Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Stolen iPad's Reported Location Not Enough To Warrant Search, Say Dutch Police

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the oh-that's-hardly-specific-enough dept.

Crime 619

lbalbalba writes "A location message sent from a stolen iPad by an anti-theft application turns out to be insufficient evidence to issue a search warrant for the Dutch authorities. A Dutch man reported his iPad as stolen to the Dutch authorities last month. Despite the fact that the rightful owner was able to locate his iPad within hours of the theft, thanks to the anti-theft application he had installed, the Dutch authorities did not issue a warrant to perform a search. According to the prosecutors, a search warrant is 'a very heavy measure,' that should only be used when there is 'sufficient suspicion.' The theft report by the owner was viewed as 'no objective evidence' in the case."

cancel ×

619 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Plan B. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364685)

That is when you grab the pistol out of the nightstand, take a cab over to the criminals house, break down the door and take justice into your own hands. At least you tried the legal way first.

Re:Plan B. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364745)

Over a fucking iPad. Please faggot.

Re:Plan B. (1, Flamebait)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364873)

Over a fucking iPad. Please faggot.

Real nice...your comments here were almost as offensive as the OP suggesting to use a gun to recover an iPad.

Re:Plan B. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365007)

According to the prosecutors, a search warrant is 'a very heavy measure,' that should only be used when there is 'sufficient suspicion.'

Of course if there was anonymous tip of some gardening [youtube.com] , that would be sufficient for an armed raid...

Re:Plan B. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364749)

Yep, took the words right out of my mouth. Bring the vigilantes!

Re:Plan B. (1, Insightful)

ubergeek65536 (862868) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364793)

In Holland, like in most of the civilized world, people don't have pistols in their nightstand.

Re:Plan B. (5, Funny)

stms (1132653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364881)

In Holland, like in most of the civilized world, people don't have pistols in their nightstand.

And then you wonder why you get your iPads stolen.

Re:Plan B. (5, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365019)

Statistics for burglaries per 100,000 people, using the most recent figures I could find (2006):
  • USA: 714.4
  • Holland: 427.5

Looks like those guns are doing a great job of protecting you. It's almost as if a culture that regards force as a valid solution to disputes encourages crime...

Re:Plan B. (2, Informative)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365123)

No, it's almost as if a culture with a huge population of poor people encourages crime. It's cute to compare tiny little Holland to the US though.

Re:Plan B. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365191)

'Tiny little Holland' is one of the densest populated countries in the world, what's your point?

Re:Plan B. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365193)

It's almost as if you don't know how statistics work. ("burglaries per 100,000 people").

If you want to keep chanting "we're #1", then please stop justifying gun ownership on the basis that you have lots of poor people.

Re:Plan B. (5, Insightful)

AlecC (512609) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365235)

Since the figures are per 100,000 people, I see no reason not to compare them. Holland has a much greater population density giving greater opportunities for burglary. The two countries have very similar average incomes, though spread differently.I think the comparison is as reasonable as any country-to-country comparison.

Re:Plan B. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365127)

Imagine how many thefts and assults there would be if people did not have guns?

We have cities that imposed weapons bans within city limits, it did not reduce crime at all. In fact some of those cities have HIGHER rates of crimes and higher rates of murder and crimes committed with guns. The thiefs know that there is a very strong chance the potential victim will not have a gun.

Re:Plan B. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365185)

The problem is the distribution of firearms is un-even.

Crime statistics are heavily skewed towards urban centers where firearms ownership is heavily controlled or outright prohibited. Arguably, it's more of a societal thing where crimes occur where there's higher un-employment, more broken families, and fewer positive male role models, but saying that un-wed mothers on welfare contribute to crime is not politically correct.

Kennesaw, Georgia, which mandates firearms ownership, has distinctly lower crime rates than the balance of Cobb County.

Re:Plan B. (4, Insightful)

Entropius (188861) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365205)

Now look at education statistics in the US vs. Holland. We have so much crime here for reasons that have nothing at all to do with firearms. If we'd adopt something more like Dutch drug laws, or address inner-city education and culture issues, we'd have less crime. There are a whole lot more differences between the Americans and the Dutch that have nothing to do with guns.

Washington DC is one of the most crime-ridden cities in the US. It's also nearly impossible to legally own a firearm there. Same with Chicago.

Re:Plan B. (2)

thelexx (237096) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365253)

Right, it's a direct and meaningful comparison because those two countries are equal in every other way. The Netherlands being more homogenous culturally and ethnically, combined with 7th in the world per capita net worth and a tiny population, have absolutely nothing to do with it.

Re:Plan B. (1)

stms (1132653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365263)

I was being sarcastic. I knew I should have posted annonymously.

Mod parent up (1)

michelcolman (1208008) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365199)

Come on, that comment was funny, definitely not flamebait. Someone here has no sense of irony.

Re:Plan B. (5, Funny)

trongey (21550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364901)

In Holland, like in most of the civilized world, people don't have pistols in their nightstand.

Really? I never realized that nightstands were so scarce.

Re:Plan B. (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364921)

No, the cops can find them easily, there.

Re:Plan B. (2)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365035)

In Holland, like in most of the civilized world, people don't have pistols in their nightstand.

That's great, but when the authorities cannot help citizens with their grievances, eventually this will lead to vigilantism. On the surface, it looks like the police are being quite noble by protecting the rights of the accused. However, this leaves the victim two choices: eat the $500 or bypass the authorities.

Personally I would put an ad on Craigslist saying that I'll give $500 to the person who does the cops' job for them and fetches my iPad.

Re:Plan B. (2)

madison_hotel (2466834) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365267)

While I can understand a person's desire for the thief who took his precious iPad to leave this world, the application finds the iPad, not necessarily the person who took it. If I where to take my mother's iPad with me and forget it at some place I visited, I don't think a search warrant would be the way to go. If I took somebody else's iPad and dropped it inside someone's car, I also don't think a search warrant would be the way to go.

Re:Plan B. (1)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365101)

In 1930's Italy, the trains ran on time like much of the civilized world.

Re:Plan B. (2)

SirWhoopass (108232) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365225)

The majority of Americans don't have pistols in their nightstands. The majority of Americans don't own a firearm of any type.

Re:Plan B. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364831)

A man notices that burglars are trying to break into his garage. He calls the police who tells him that they don't have any police officers available at the moment.

A few minutes later he calls the police and says that they don't need to bother because he just shot the burglars. The telephone operator is horrified and several police cars quickly arrive at the man's home and they catch the unharmed burglars red handed.

"Didn't you say that you shot the burglars?" one police officer asked.

"Didn't you say that you didn't have any police officers available?" the man retorted...

Re:Plan B. (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364959)

Good one. :-)

Of course the next thing that would happen is the police arrest the homeowner for filing a false report, or abusing 911 resources, or wasting police officers' time on a crime of low priority. Or maybe just "disturbing the peace" which is the standard catch-all to arrest someone who did nothing wrong (like Professor Gates).

Re:Plan B. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365067)

Of course the next thing that would happen is the police arrest the homeowner for filing a false report

What false report? I 'shot' them with my camera. You know, to help identify them later.

or abusing 911 resources

??

or wasting police officers' time on a crime of low priority

I tried to tell your dispatcher that I had taken a picture of the thieves, so they didn't need to worry about coming out at all. I had ::snicker:: no idea that it would make you show up faster.

Re:Plan B. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365147)

Good one. :-)

Of course the next thing that would happen is the police arrest the homeowner for filing a false report, or abusing 911 resources, or wasting police officers' time on a crime of low priority. Or maybe just "disturbing the peace" which is the standard catch-all to arrest someone who did nothing wrong (like Professor Gates).

interestingness - disturbing the peace is NOT an arrestable offence (in the UK) once the act is over with unless the disturbance is 1) on going, or 2) likely to reoccur.

The police officer that tried to arrest me for such didn't like it when I pointed this out to him, but he checked and found that I was correct.

Re:Plan B. (2)

Glarimore (1795666) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365037)

This is a really old joke. It was very funny to me at first, but in reality by making that false 911 call you're buying yourself a free ticket to be arrested and jailed for the night. And for good reason.

(The only reason I brought this up is this joke supposedly originates from a Newspaper clipping, and the above statement makes that very unlikely to be true)

Re:Plan B. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365107)

This is a really old joke. It was very funny to me at first, but in reality by making that false 911 call you're buying yourself a free ticket to be arrested and jailed for the night. And for good reason.

Why is that a good reason? If cops would actually do what they're "supposed" to do and catch a robber, that wouldn't have been necessary. Instead they were probably more concerned with sitting on the side of the road raising revenue or harassing some pot smokers.

Re:Plan B. (3, Insightful)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365249)

I'd gladly take the false 911 charges over being robbed and possibly killed.

Re:Plan B. (0)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365209)

LOL nice XD I'll have to remember that.

Re:Plan B. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364861)

And what do you do if the item you went there for was maybe bought by the unsuspecting victims from the actual thief ...

Re:Plan B. (2)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365053)

That's still illegal: possession of stolen property. Watch out who you buy from.

Re:Plan B. (2)

ewanm89 (1052822) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365277)

1) Dealing in stolen goods both buying and selling is illegal in itself, 2) The police have a possible lead back to who it was bought from, 3) the stolen item can be recovered and returned to the rightful owner.

Re:Plan B. (1)

phrostie (121428) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365023)

I know the feeling, but if he is a thief to begin with, don't you think he's probably using someone else's internet access?
the IP address is most likely that of a neighbor.

still it's no excuse for the cops to do nothing.

Lessons learnt. (5, Informative)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364711)

Whatever you do,
whatever happens:
Don't call the police.

Re:Lessons learnt. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364863)

Don't call the police.

Unless you're a cop or family member of one. If this was a cop's personal iPad, and not John Q Publics, the story would of read something like:

"Dutch police and SWAT team raided an apartment early Wednesday morning over stolen goods. The thief was shot multiple times after an iPad with a 'gun-sounds' app installed, was mistaken for a real weapon. As a routine measure, all cops have been placed on paid leave, pending an investigation. No other stolen items were recovered."

Re:Lessons learnt. (2)

MacTO (1161105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365285)

There's cynicism, and then there's paranoid delusions. I'll let you figure out what impression your comment gives.

Re:Lessons learnt. (5, Interesting)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365289)

Whatever you do, whatever happens: Don't call the police.

That's incredibly bad advice. My bank called me at work last April asking if I was missing some checks, that someone had tried to cash an obviously forged one. When I got home I found my back door broken open and a lot of stuff gone -- including an almost ful box of checks. I called the cops, who took the report, went to the bank and viewed the video, and arrested the guy half an hour later.

However, he had accomplices. Over the next year (it's still going on) I would get notices from merchants that I'd cashed checks on a closed account. Of course I cloised if after the theft! I sent all of them copies of the police report, and the fraudulent bastards, every single one, turned them into the county's State's Attorney anyway.

Had I not reported the burglary I could have wound up in prison for those damned stolen checks.

If you get in an automobile accident you had damned well better call the cops, because if you don't you're jailhouse-bound. If there is an injury you've committed a felony, and the cops are pretty damned serious about folks leaving the scene of an accident.

Now, someone attcks you in a bar? Don't call the cops, they're as likely to arrest you as your attacker.

Happened to a friend of mine. (5, Interesting)

mhajicek (1582795) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364729)

A friend of mine in California had his house broken into. His iPad and a shotgun were stolen. He tracked the phone to the trunk of a car, told the police, and they did nothing.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (5, Informative)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364771)

He tracked the phone to the trunk of a car, told the police, and they did nothing.

Consequently, if anything happens to the vehicle he tracked the phone to or the person who owns it, your friend will become suspect #1, all because he made the mistake of talking to the police.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (5, Insightful)

ClintJCL (264898) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364773)

Police are just there to "stop" drugs, "stop" prostitution, and beat protesters. They don't actually care about crime that affects the average person. I've had a gun pointed at my head for trying to ask directions, but when I get robbed, they won't even take a report because "the phone system is down and you have to drive 40 minutes to make the report in person". But oh, you'll make me turn my marijuana-legalization-themed shirt inside out at my sister's public high school graduation under threat of arrest. It's good that we have our fucking priorities straight.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (5, Insightful)

wjhoffman1983 (1145155) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364835)

This is the way it should be. Any Joe Programmer can make an app that makes it look like stolen goods are behind that closed door. Taking evidence from theft prevention and tracking apps is the exact same as taking the victim's word for it.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364893)

We have warrants and rules of evidence for preventing that type of abuse. In theory anyway :p

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (4, Interesting)

Skater (41976) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364927)

This could be the most insightful comment so far. The police supposedly use and believe Lojack; what would it take for them to rely on Apple's Find My Phone (or whatever it is) and equivalent similar options for electronic devices?

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364989)

money

lojack makes enough money that it can contribute to the right political campaigns so that the police take them seriously

LoJack is also under complete police control... (1)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365229)

unlike the "Find my iPad" type apps.

The LoJack system only starts transmitting when the cops tell it to (perhaps whether or not the car has actually been reported stolen?).

A system that the property owner can activate independently of the cops just makes work for the police, without the possibility of being able to be used by the cops to track you without your knowledge or consent.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364953)

So if a victim gives a sworn statement that they witnessed a neighbor breaking into their car that shouldn't be grounds for a warrant either?

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (4, Informative)

kikito (971480) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365223)

Not the same thing.

The sworn statement means "if later it is discovered that I was lying, then I'm committing a crime".

If an app says that my iPad is in a house, and that turns to be false, then I'm not commiting a crime - I'm not "responsible" for what the app says.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (3, Informative)

MobyDisk (75490) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364981)

Taking evidence from theft prevention and tracking apps is the exact same as taking the victim's word for it.

Agreed. And that word has been good enough in the past.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (2)

wjhoffman1983 (1145155) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365121)

Hardly. Are you saying that if I walk into a police station, grab an officer, take him outside to a random car and tell him that my phone is in the trunk then that would be good enough to get him to crack it open? That essentially what I would be doing if I was using a tracking app. That tracking app evidence has the same weight as my words because for all the officer knows I could have written that app to track anything to any destination I want.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (1)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365265)

This whole argument is one giant strawman.

If you believe that GPS and signals from a phone to another device work, then there is strong reason to believe the victim when he claims he knows where his property is.

If you think that cell phones and their related technologies are actually magic devices that only work under certain conditions, then maybe not so much.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (1)

kikito (971480) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365243)

Nope.

If the victim has lied, she goes to jail. If the app lies, the victim goes free.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (1)

ConfusedVorlon (657247) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365173)

That's manageable. Get the person reporting the crime to sign a witness statement that they have got the data honestly and in good faith.

If you wind up with someone abusing the system to get raids on their enemies - then you can prosecute them for giving the police a false statement, wasting police time, etc.

Policing is frequently (mostly?) done on the basis of what someone says.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364995)

They miss finding 380 lbs of Meth

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (5, Funny)

guttentag (313541) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365071)

A friend of mine in California had his house broken into. His iPad and a shotgun were stolen. He tracked the phone to the trunk of a car, told the police, and they did nothing.

Perhaps they were skeptical because he seemed to believe that either his iPad or his shotgun was a phone.

Re:Happened to a friend of mine. (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365309)

I always wondered if these tracking solutions were worth anything, I should have known it was too good to be true...that was my idea for securing a valuable car as well, crap...

Bias (5, Insightful)

DEFFENDER (469046) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364751)

And once again we find that it's only true to a government if their own agencies or personnel tell them it's so. A private citizen should be able to produce evidence and have it considered with the same weight as something produced by a policing force. Providing obtaining that evidence didn't violate the law in any way.

You can bet that if it had been the police that can up with that GPS location they would have a warrant in hand tight now.

Not Bias (5, Insightful)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364897)

That's not what this is about at all. The Netherlands is a country that takes its fundamental privacy-from-the-police assurances more seriously than the US does.

Re:Not Bias (1)

Elisanre (1108341) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365031)

But police still managed to bust torrent-sites and that 15 year old anon..

Re:Bias (2)

Oo.et.oO (6530) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365131)

I have evidence that DEFFENDER produces and distributes meth.

how's that feel?

in the article case the evidence in question DOES violate the law. laws for unreasonable search and seizure.
if only the US were more strict about issuing search warrants, and more restricted when they do...

in my above example, my statement may fall under freedom of speech. it may also fall under libel. either way it's certainly inadmissible. but that won't matter much if they get a broad warrant and find a gimp tied up in your basement, will it?

(IANAL, and i have no evidence against this upstanding citizen)

Different in the States (2, Funny)

mholve (1101) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364765)

Here they walk in and take all your meth, instead.

Re:Different in the States (1)

mholve (1101) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364787)

Link would help... http://www.mercurynews.com/crime-courts/ci_20096845

Re:Different in the States (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365003)

Interesting aside to that story: according to the cops who "made the bust" (read: accidentally stumbled onto the operation like the Keystone Kops they are):

The officers didn't have a search warrant, so they knocked on the door of the apartment and asked the occupants for permission to come in. They consented, Tomkins said.

"They probably thought if they didn't, we'd suspect something," Tomkins said. "Or they thought, 'I'll let them in -- they probably won't find anything.'"

Anyone who's ever met a meth dealer/cook (and here in the Meth Capital of the World, I've met more than my fair share) can tell you, something about the officer's story doesn't add up; drug dealers don't just let cops into their homes, especially when they're sitting on enough poison to ensure a long, long prison sentence. I could almost believe it if the dealers were geeking their balls off and thus fairly unaware of their surroundings; but again, based on my experience, anyone with $35 million worth of drugs around the house probably aren't users, and sure as hell aren't knowingly letting the fuzz through the door without a fight.

Hardly a surprise... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364803)

The Dutch police doesn't even enter an house when there are two of them and they literally hear someone get tortured to death. I'm not making this up; this actually happened. The officers in front of the house could hear screams and moans and did absolutely nothing.

Want more? Neighbors heard a woman cry and scream for help and it sounded so distressful that they called the police. The police came, rang the doorbell an after a small talk they left, never to bother with his again. 3 months later it turned out that the woman in question was being held by her will, prostituted, treated in extreme inhumane ways and well... "The police thinks they may have made a mistake by not entering the premices".

And the list goes on and on.

On the positive side. If you manage to speed a little on the Dutch highways (you know, reckless driving where you dare to drive 85 - 86 km/hr instead of the allowed 80 km/hr) then chances are very high that you will get a speeding ticket. That's where the Dutch police truly excels.

So quite frankly, within this context this can hardly come as a surprise.

Re:Hardly a surprise... (1)

jwijnands (2313022) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364991)

Dutch police make mistakes, just like everywhere else. And when a police officer makes a mistake that can have dire consequences. However in this case our police forces wanted to do something, they requested a search warrant. Actually doing something about a minor theft is rare enough that that in itself is almost worth a headline. However for some strange reasons they were not granted a search warrant which is bizarre.

Re:Hardly a surprise... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365075)

Dutch police make mistakes, just like everywhere else.

Bullshit rationalization.

Re:Hardly a surprise... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365207)

I'd rather for them to err on the side of "Stay the fuck out" than "kick the fucking door down at the slightest provocation" like they do here in the states.

Re:Hardly a surprise... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365281)

To be fair that same thing could have happened in the US.

If the person who talked to the cops at the front door had his act together he could easily have given a reasonable explanation, acted surprised at the accusation, and politely denied them permission to enter.

Common sense says "if you hear hooves think horses not zebras", and in this case which is more likely: he was watching a horror movie with the volume up too high, and is willing to turn it down at the police's request, or he has a woman held captive in his house?

Re:Hardly a surprise... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365295)

Dutch police is also completely uninterested if ppl from new EU states are mobbed/robbed/discriminated.
As a matter of fact in this formerly tollerant state any Muslim from Iran (not willing to learn Dutch and local customs, living on Dutch welfare still gets better treatment than Poles, Romanians, Bulgarians (learning language, making decent living with legit job .... "stealing jobs from Dutch ppl").
Somehow in the past 40 years other immigrants did not steal jobs.

What happened to this country that suddenly nationalist sentiments become so popular?

Where do I go? (2)

subreality (157447) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365301)

Somewhere between the growing totalitarian hell of the US and UK and the apparently overly-respectful approach of the Dutch... Somewhere, is there a sane country where I can live?

In the United States... (-1, Troll)

xyourfacekillerx (939258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364827)

when someone steals our shit and we KNOW they stole it, we confront them ourselves without police involvement. If they don't give it back we smash their teeth in with a baseball bat. That's how I got my bicycle back,.. as the dude was in the middle of painting it over ... I walked up, bat in hand, and dude gave it right back claiming someone sold it to him (yea? then why paint it over?)

So if I could pinpoint the location of my iPad... i wouldn't need the police to recover it...

Re:In the United States... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364913)

Baseball bat. In America. Yeah. That must work great when you know in advance that the criminal is definitely not carrying a gun.

Re:In the United States... (1)

xyourfacekillerx (939258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365273)

If I lived in an area where people carried guns around while stealing *bicycles* ... well I would probably be in a different line of work, I doubt I'd be a slashdot reader or programmer; and those kinds of people wouldn't be stealing bicycles, they'd be stealing cars and mugging people. Also, mods, I wasn't trolling. To state as a fact how some people reclaim property is not trolling, grow up.

Re:In the United States... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364915)

This only works a few times before you get a cap in your ass.

Re:In the United States... (1)

Zeromous (668365) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364933)

This also applies in Canada and the UK. Recovered my bicycle by intimidating everyone until I traced it to the person who stole it. Worked pretty well surprisingly.

Re:In the United States... (1)

Glarimore (1795666) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365085)

This sounds like a great way to get the shit beaten out of you (unless it's one of your "friends" who stole the bike).

Re:In the United States... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364935)

And if I am sitting on the jury after you are through, you are going in for assault with a deadly weapon. The guy you beat will probably do less time.

Despite what you read in comic books, vigilante justice is an oxymoron, tough guy,

Re:In the United States... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365143)

Not if I'm sitting on the same jury, prick. It takes 12 morons together in a jury to successfully screw someone the way you suggest. One juror with an ounce of sense stops the 11 other morons cold.

Business as usual (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365017)

While the maturity level of the above post leaves something to be desired, he does have a point in that government (including their police) do not exist to benefit you. They exist to benefit the business of government, the largest and most financially successful business in human history.

Re:In the United States... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365213)

almost exactly what happened to me! some guy stole my bike when i was a kid and my grandfather drove around town until he spotted a guy in his backyard in the process of spray painting it.

i live in a smaaaaall town and the even cops here don't give a shit about stolen property, there's simply nothing in it for them. they're glad to take a report and stick in a cabinet somewhere, but otherwise they won't do anything.

Re:In the United States... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365221)

Please just ignore this troll.
They stole his bicycle. He was probably 10 at the time and the bat was a plastic whiffle ball bat. In the US we just call the police like everyone else once we start wearing long pants and shaving.

Victim is too privileged. (-1, Troll)

mc6809e (214243) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364887)

This appears to me to be a class issue. Anyone that can afford an IPad isn't seen as needing the protection or help of the state. Maybe the authorities don't view the victim sympathetically.

If it was Government Property Stolen (0)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364889)

They would be busting down doors, strip searching, interrogating and harassing people. They wouldn’t care about warrants!

Re:If it was Government Property Stolen (2)

jwijnands (2313022) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364961)

No... not in the Netherlands.

Re:If it was Government Property Stolen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365151)

If you replace Government with corporate and Netherlands with USA then you are back on track.

Re:If it was Government Property Stolen (1)

fnj (64210) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365169)

Yeah, riiiiight.

Funny... (3, Insightful)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | more than 2 years ago | (#39364907)

...they seemed to think it was enough when the iPhone 4 prototype was stolen.

Re:Funny... (4, Insightful)

lxs (131946) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365057)

No Dutch police thought that the iPhone theft was none of their business because that happened on an entirely different continent.

No problem! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364917)

Just tell the police the thief also used bit torrent sometime in the last 10 years, and the FBI will be there with a battering ram to bust down the door in seconds! SECONDS, I TELL YOU!

What happens? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39364955)

What happens if the police refuse to take action, and the rightful owner steals it back via burglary, walking in through an unlocked door, or simply snatching it out of the thief's hands? Can the thief really file a police report?

Re:What happens? (1)

headLITE (171240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365021)

He could file for trespassing at least (more if the door is not unlocked). But not for theft. And he would of course have to explain how the stolen iPad ended up in his house. So he probably wouldn't do it.

It might be worth to try and just walk up to the door and knock, then offer the person a chance to give the device back without involving the police.

bitCh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365009)

Solution --- live where the sheriff is elected (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365055)

next election, loudly support his opponent, making un-recovered property / un-acted upon information a major plank.

So do the dutch have a problem with vigilantism? (1)

orphiuchus (1146483) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365065)

Because I know for damn sure if I was in the same situation I would go recover the stolen property myself.

This is why vigilantism will never completely die (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365117)

As evil as it is, this is why vigilantism exists.

Not Suprising, or even Negative (1)

bv728 (943505) | more than 2 years ago | (#39365133)

All he has is a location his device was at, not who brought it there, or why it was brought there. He also only has his statement the device was there. Not a lot of evidence, all told.

No service, no tax (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365135)

So said Dutch man should deduct the price of the device from this year's taxes then.

The rest of the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39365183)

Only part of this story has been covered, apparently by someone seeking attention. The most important bit of the story was left out:

- The owner of the ipad knew the person he accused of stealing.
- The accused was known to the police.

The police didn't do anything, because they could not confirm that the owner really had his ipad stolen. The owner was suspected of framing the "thief", which would have had severe consequences for the accused. The owner might have had an argument with the accused, somehow got his ipad in the hands of the accused and then tried to use the police to get it back. I'd rather have the police bother with real crimes, this guy should probably talk to the accused first.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>