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This American Life Retracts Episode On Apple Factories In China

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the this-means-we-can-ignore-it-now-right dept.

Businesses 326

New submitter Hartree writes "This American Life aired an episode in January about visiting Foxconn's factory in Shenzhen China that supplies Apple with iPhones and iPads. It was the most downloaded of all of its episodes. That show helped prompt Apple to release, for the first time, a list of its suppliers and allow outside audits of working conditions at its suppliers. This American Life has now retracted the episode after finding out that Mike Daisey, whose visit to the factory the show was based on, fabricated portions of the story. This included a number of minor items, but also major ones such as his saying that he personally met underage workers and those poisoned by hexane exposure. To set the record straight, this weekend's episode of This American Life will present how they were mislead into airing a flawed story (PDF)."

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326 comments

This American Lie (5, Funny)

schlachter (862210) | more than 2 years ago | (#39381935)

...is how I read the headline...how appropriate

Re:This American Lie (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39381967)

"We believed our reporter, so it wasn't our fault that we didn't edit out the false stuff. You can still believe everything else we say."

Re:This American Lie (4, Insightful)

dynamo52 (890601) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382099)

To be fair, at least the show's producers acknowledge the mistake, are willing to present a full retraction, and are doing so in the same forum and with equal prominence as the original story. If the same had happened on Fox News, the likely reaction would have been a coordinated attack on whoever brought the truth to light.

Re:This American Lie (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382125)

LOL. NPR gets caught publishing a massive lie by an anti-corporation hipster, and you respond by attacking Fox News?

Re:This American Lie (5, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382221)

Yes. He did exactly what he said that FOX News would have done. Ironic, not to mention hypocritical.

Re:This American Lie (3, Insightful)

evilRhino (638506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382425)

It's also not fair to compare Fox News to this type of situation. Fox News was created to present the conservative angle of the news without the need for fact checking. For them to acknowledge mistakes is antithetical to their core mission to "present the other side".

Re:This American Lie (4, Insightful)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382433)

Yes. He did exactly what he said that FOX News would have done. Ironic, not to mention hypocritical.

How exactly did he do that?

Did dynamo52 make some other, invalid comment, only to be exposed by FOX News, so now he's attacking them?

He contrasted what happened here with what he expected to happen had it been FOX News instead. He might be wrong (or not. I make no claim to know), but he's not hypocritical.

Re:This American Lie (1)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382613)

Yes. He did exactly what he said that FOX News would have done. Ironic, not to mention hypocritical.

But Fox News didn't uncover the story. He said that Fox News would have had a coordinated attack to smear who ever brought it to light, and he didn't smear American Public Media's Marketplace... he smeared someone completely unrelated.

So, no. Not hypocritical.

Re:This American Lie (4, Insightful)

dynamo52 (890601) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382323)

It's a fair criticism. NPR, when faced with evidence that they presented misleading information immediately took appropriate steps to remedy the mistake. Fox News on the other hand has been repeatedly caught with their hands in the cookie jar and the response is always the same: first try to brush it under the rug and hope nobody notices and should that fail, make every attempt possible to discredit the whistleblower.

Re:This American Lie (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382461)

You mean, they fessed up after they got caught red-handed and probably didn't want to get sued. It's truly bizarre how Slashdot groupthink decides whether everything the government and/or media does is a fascist money-making plot or a principled exercise of wisdom on a case by case basis.

Re:This American Lie (5, Insightful)

dynamo52 (890601) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382605)

They could have absolved themselves of liability by simply issuing a correction in a much more low profile fashion. By doing so in the manner they are, they are making a point of journalistic integrity.

Not NPR (4, Informative)

MushMouth (5650) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382343)

NPR (National Public Radio) doesn't have anything to do with the production or distribution of This American Life. It is produced independently by WBEZ and distributed by PRI (Public Radio International, a direct competitor to NPR)

Re:Not NPR (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382607)

LOL, yeah, except that the show is produced by Chicago Public Radio, which is an NPR affiliate. Are you a paid NPR shill or something?

Re:Not NPR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382627)

What's really amusing, is that AC likely doesn't get the irony of his post.

coordinated attack... (1, Flamebait)

schlachter (862210) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382213)

I think you mean that FOX would launch a coordinated attack on Obama and the Democrats....regardless of who brought the truth to light. :)

Re:This American Lie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382447)

They follow 'Car Talk' in my area so I hear the show on a regular basis.
Lots of well crafted, well told stories.
Some with absolutely amazing convenient coincidences and or omissions that would make dan rather blush. If he knew how..
Nevertheless I am pleased they chose to be up front about one of their enhanced stories.

Re:This American Lie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382111)

Coincidentally, it was the 60 Minutes story on Steve Jobs that made me realize that journalists are just regular people who sometimes phone it in. From the couple minutes I saw of it, Steve Kroft took all of the what the author of his approved biography said and paraphrased it without bothering to do any research at all on Jobs. In particular I liked the part talking about how Jobs didn't want to be one of those people who was changed by their wealth (e.g., buying a sports car) and made a big point about how he had just a regular ol' home anyone could walk up to, when of course Jobs had a Gulfstream and spent 6 years fighting to demolish a historic mansion so he could build a new one. Just like regular people, I guess.

Jobs didn't "have" a Gulfstream (1)

unassimilatible (225662) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382421)

Jobs was awarded a Gulfstream by Apple for saving the company. “Given what he’s accomplished, we should give him five airplanes!”, Apple director Larry Ellison said at the time.

And I know plenty of middle class people who have fought their cities for building permits. Nice nitpick, though.

Re:Jobs didn't "have" a Gulfstream (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382509)

You think Jobs didn't have a say in the Gulfstream? That it was just thrust upon him? SURPRISE!

Re:This American Lie (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382541)

That's funny, because he traded in his sportscar every time the temp plates expired so he wouldn't have to get real plates.

Wrong tense in summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39381945)

The past tense of "mislead" is "misled". They were misled.

Re:Wrong tense in summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382031)

Or so they say,

Refreshing (5, Insightful)

Translation Error (1176675) | more than 2 years ago | (#39381973)

To set the record straight, this weekend's episode of This American Life will present how they were mislead into airing a flawed story

It really is nice to see that someone has journalistic integrity in this day and age. Rather than ignoring their mistake or trying to hush it up, they're saying they messed up, this is what they did wrong, and this is how it happened.

Re:Refreshing (5, Insightful)

Sir_Eptishous (873977) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382019)

Exactly. To think, that a media outlet would have the balls to admit they were wrong, then explain how they made the mistake. That is rare these days...

Re:Refreshing (0, Redundant)

dynamo52 (890601) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382187)

This in in clear contrast to organizations claiming to be journalistic enterprises, [I' looking at you Fox News] where when presented with evidence of factually incorect or misleading reporting will instead attack whoever exposes the truth.

Re:Refreshing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382615)

If you're going to make a list of organizations committing fraud with their claims of being "news organisations", maybe you should add MSNBC to it?

"Here we have a white man with a gun showing up at a polling station to intimidate black voters - yes, very much like the racist old days!".

Re:Refreshing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382345)

It is rare these days, but I don't believe this is a case of balls or integrity. The way the press release is worded, it seems to be a case of CYA. The American Life press release works hard to distance itself from Daisey and set themselves up as victims duped by a con-man. Yes, it takes some balls to admit this, but at no point are they saying "We got it wrong." They're saying "Daisey seemed like a good guy, we trusted him, and he lied to us."

Re:Refreshing (4, Interesting)

3.1415926535 (243140) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382573)

"At that point, we should've killed the story," says Ira Glass, Executive Producer and Host of This
American Life. "But other things Daisey told us about Apple's operations in China checked out, and we
saw no reason to doubt him. We didn't think that he was lying to us and to audiences about the details of his
story. That was a mistake."

That sounds like, "We got it wrong," to me.

Re:Refreshing (5, Interesting)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382641)

Exactly. To think, that a media outlet would have the balls to admit they were wrong, then explain how they made the mistake. That is rare these days...

Well, as they note on NPR, the stories checked out, and were real events... it just turns out that Daisey didn't personally witness them.

It's like getting all worked up over a story that is based on real events, and it's like "good! but remember, it's still fictionalized..." They took a theater act and turned it into a journal piece without any augmentation to ensure that viewers understood that while these events were true, they were being dramatized.

Re:Refreshing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382023)

And rather than those who only rush to apologize and correct themselves when they know they are about to be exposed anyhow.

Re:Refreshing (0)

outsider007 (115534) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382055)

Right, that's integrity at work. And not a desire to not be sued back into the stone age.

Re:Refreshing (5, Informative)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382145)

I disagree. This American Life is a good show. I've listened to them for years. They are clearly very left-winged journalists (most are I guess) but this show in particular does a very good job of trying to present the other side of topic. In particular I recommend the 2 pieces they did on the financial crisis and how it happened. Their conclusions are startling and some of the best work on the topic I've heard. In fact, it's probably the ONLY journalistic effort I've seen to actually explain the subject in any depth what-so-ever.

Re:Refreshing (1)

Optic7 (688717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382673)

Exactly. Great show, and those episodes about the crisis are amazing. It's incredible how people say all kinds of crap about the crisis without acknowledging (or perhaps realizing) what was really happening at various levels around the time the crisis hit.

They also did another interesting episode later on talking to Wall Street people to see if they had any regrets over causing the crisis or receiving the bailouts.

Re:Refreshing (2)

Stormy Dragon (800799) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382691)

They also did a piece a week or so ago about Grover Norquist that frankly did a much better job of making his views look like a good idea than he normally does himself.

Theater (4, Insightful)

rabenja (919226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39381991)

"My mistake, the mistake I truly regret, is that I had it on your show as journalism, and it's not journalism. It's theater."

...as opposed to what we see in the media every day...(?)

Re:Theater (3, Insightful)

shmlco (594907) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382599)

It's the Rush Limbaugh defense. "I just make absurd comments in order to illustrate my points."

Never happened before..nope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382007)

http://www.teslamotors.com/teslavstopgear

Seriously, TV is full of examples of "reality" shows making things up to help sell through sensationalism. I'd be more surprised to find out, at this point, that ANY of that crap was accurate.

Re:Never happened before..nope (2)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382127)

There is a large difference between This American Life (a news program, i.e. it presents factual information) and Top Gear (a comedy program, occasionally involving cars, which presents absolutely anything for a laugh). Here's a hint: One of the two killed one of the presenters by drowning at sea.

Neither one is a "reality" show - which are, as you say, not factual.

Not to worry (0, Flamebait)

RyoShin (610051) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382017)

It's okay, This American Life. Slashdot has been lacking in fact checking, posting sensationalist stories, and using untrusted sources for years. You'll be fine, don't cry.

Re:Not to worry (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382137)

Slashdot has been lacking in fact checking

What are you talking about? Slashdot is one huge hive of fact checkers - we get Karma if we can debunk the original post ffs!

My cynical nature (0, Flamebait)

dmomo (256005) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382041)

Wants me to believe that the story is true as originally aired and that this is some sort of PR clean-up strong-armed by Apple.

If that's not the case, good for NPR for admitting to and taking responsibility for their mistakes.

Re:My cynical nature (0)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382095)

Lies covered by Truths, covered by Lies. In the end, no one knows what to believe, so we all ignore it.

Re:My cynical nature (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382121)

That's not your cynical nature, that's your Apple-hating nature. A pretty common defect among Slashdotters.

Re:My cynical nature (0)

alen (225700) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382205)

the people working in the factories never had an education and the only other job is work on a farm for a lot less pay

china is not like the US or Europe where almost everyone has an email address at work

TAL has nothing to do with NPR (1)

MushMouth (5650) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382393)

It is produced by WBEZ (which itself broadcasts NPR distributed shows, such as Car Talk, but has to pay NPR for their broadcast), and distributed by PRI (Public Radio International, a direct competitor to NPR).

A perfect story for them (5, Funny)

icensnow (932196) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382059)

This kind of story, where they can go seriously meta about how they fact-check their stories and how they were misled, set to mournful music, is an almost perfect This American Life setup. They will probably want to goof like this every year now. OK, I'm being very snarky, but Ira Glass is just way too sincere for my taste.

Re:A perfect story for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382437)

"too sincere for my taste."

That's an interesting objection.

This may seem trivial but: By Thirds in China (1)

aoeu (532208) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382061)

One is World Class One is normal, and One is crap. Same as anywhere else except that the range seems broader.

Cool! (1)

PessimysticRaven (1864010) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382089)

Not only can I -- thanks to Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl -- say anything I want by following it up with the "not a factual statement" disclaimer...

I can now slander companies AND get a cushy advertisement by NPR by saying "the tools of theater are not the same as the tools of journalism." Thanks, Mike Daisey!

No, I didn't put links. Google the names, lazy-folk!

Shed the guilt, fast! (-1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382093)

Oddly enough I never heard of the original story or any of the fabricated details, yet news that it was a fake is all over the web. Apple fans too eager to believe that it may all be a hoax?

Re:Shed the guilt, fast! (2)

dmt0 (1295725) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382279)

Oddly enough I never heard of the original story or any of the fabricated details, yet news that it was a fake is all over the web. Apple fans too eager to believe that it may all be a hoax?

Yes, Apple fans, including the 206 hedge funds (and various other institutions, including even governments of some countries now) that own Apple stock. Considering that Apple now is bigger than the entire US retail sector, it can not be allowed to lose. Or at least not yet.

Re:Shed the guilt, fast! (5, Insightful)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382341)

More like he admitted he took quite a bit of license in his retelling of events. I may be an Apple lover, but I'm a nerd first, and facts matter in the world of nerds, regardless of who they favor.

The monologue he engages in contains the following:

...and all these people have been exposed [to N-hexane]...Their hands shake uncontrollably. Most of them...can't even pick up a glass.

But then to quote from another interview with him in the last few days [marketplace.org] after he was confronted with his interpreter's contrary testimony:

Rob Schmitz: Cathy says you did not talk to workers who were poisoned with hexane.

Mike Daisey: That’s correct.

RS: So you lied about that? That wasn’t what you saw?

MD: I wouldn’t express it that way.

RS: How would you express it?

MD: I would say that I wanted to tell a story that captured the totality of my trip.

Ira Glass: Did you meet workers like that? Or did you just read about the issue?

MD: I met workers in, um, Hong Kong, going to Apple protests who had not been poisoned by hexane but had known people who had been, and it was a constant conversation among those workers.

IG: So you didn’t meet an actual worker who’d been poisoned by hexane.

MD: That’s correct.

Getting the facts out should be in every nerd's interest, regardless of who they favor. This guy is clearly a liar and is being slimy in all of his responses. He could've lied about any major manufacturer. I'm glad he's being discredited. Even he admits it wasn't the truth now:

My mistake, the mistake I truly regret, is that I had [my monologue] on your show as journalism. And it’s not journalism. It’s theater.

Re:Shed the guilt, fast! (2)

Pumpkin Tuna (1033058) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382371)

"may be a hoax?"

There's no "may be." Dude made stuff up. He admits it. He did it because it makes great theatre!

Integrity in Journalism (5, Insightful)

minderaser (28934) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382131)

Ira Glass is a man of honour. Would we EVER see another news agency do this?

Re:Integrity in Journalism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382235)

But how honorable is his? Is he willing to fall on his sword for dishonoring NPR?

Truth... (2, Interesting)

InfiniteZero (587028) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382155)

China bashing is all in vogue these days, since they are supposed to be the next superpower, which doesn't bode well with the current superpower that is the U.S. But realistically, neither side is pure evil, or for that matter, completely innocent. The Chinese are people like you and me, capable of things both good and bad.

Moral of the story: when deciphering all the spin in the media, truth is always somewhere in the middle.

Re:Truth... (1)

MobyDisk (75490) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382349)

Moral of the story: when deciphering all the spin in the media, truth is always somewhere in the middle.

I used to espouse this as well, but I'm beginning to realize even this caveat is too simple.

After following some war coverage, I realized that the truth is not always somewhere in the middle. There are cases where story A says something like "10 Taliban fighters were killed, and 2 American's were wounded" and story B says "20 unarmed women and children were killed" and the truth is probably not in the middle. One of the two sides is completely lying.

But the story is essentially true (3, Interesting)

_xeno_ (155264) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382177)

It's important to note that the details that were false all involve Daisey personally witnessing events. He didn't, he just learned about them. So some of the specific examples are dramatizations, but all the basic facts of the horrendous working conditions are true. He just didn't personally talk with the effected workers.

So, yes, This American Life should clarify the story and should admit that they screwed up in claiming that a dramatization was pure fact. But they did, in fact, check out all the basic facts about the working conditions, and everything claimed is based on things that really happened.

Don't try and take this as evidence that the troubles at Foxconn were fabricated or that Apple was unfairly targeted based on fake stories. They were not.

Re:But the story is essentially true (5, Interesting)

samkass (174571) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382303)

It's important to note that the details that were false all involve Daisey personally witnessing events. He didn't, he just learned about them. So some of the specific examples are dramatizations, but all the basic facts of the horrendous working conditions are true. He just didn't personally talk with the effected workers.

So, yes, This American Life should clarify the story and should admit that they screwed up in claiming that a dramatization was pure fact. But they did, in fact, check out all the basic facts about the working conditions, and everything claimed is based on things that really happened.

Don't try and take this as evidence that the troubles at Foxconn were fabricated or that Apple was unfairly targeted based on fake stories. They were not.

Actually, according to the article, some were. No one ever saw armed guards, for example, yet that was a prominent part of his story. Underage workers were also only rumors. And of the facts that were true, they were not nearly so commonplace that a casual trip would find them-- he had to pull together anecdotes across space and time to make it seem like all this stuff was happening casually and consistently. It wasn't.

Re:But the story is essentially true (5, Informative)

_xeno_ (155264) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382489)

No one ever saw armed guards, for example, yet that was a prominent part of his story.

The article just says that the translator never saw any armed guards, it never says they weren't there. Again, This American Life claims they did fact check parts like this, and found that they were true. But I can't find anything else that corroborates "armed guards at the gate" without referencing Daisey so I'll concede that point.

Underage workers were also only rumors.

And if you read the article, This American Life addressed that in their original story. The found that there were, in fact, underage workers at Foxconn - but they were rare.

They forgot about the children (1)

mveloso (325617) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382557)

The program forgot to mention that each iPad and iPhone is dipped in blood extracted from Chinese infants then wiped clean with the spittle from Foxconn executives before shipment.

Besides that, the program was totally accurate in all respects.

Re:But the story is essentially true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382309)

You can't just say something is true. It has to be supported by objective facts. Since these facts are missing you can't say the claims are true.

Re:But the story is essentially true (0)

Pumpkin Tuna (1033058) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382405)

Except Apple seems to be the only one being targeted. Why? Are conditions magically better in other factories in China? I doubt it.

Re:But the story is essentially true (4, Informative)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382497)

Except Apple seems to be the only one being targeted. Why? Are conditions magically better in other factories in China? I doubt it.

Not only that, but Foxconn doesn't just make Apple products - it makes stuff for Dell, HP, etc.

From the way these stories have been reported, you'd think there was this awful, rundown, slum-like section of the Foxconn factory making the Apple products, while a shiny state-of-the-art part of the factory, staffed by smiling suit-wearing adult Chinese workers, was putting together all the other companies' products.

Re:But the story is essentially true (1)

crmarvin42 (652893) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382537)

It's even more rediculous than that. Those same factories make other companies products. It's not a 1 company/factory set up. It's different assembly lines, yes, but not separate sites. Therefore it's as though only Apple's assembly lines are bad, which is just ludicrous.

If you want to change the labor laws in China do so, but Apple is hardly the only company working with Foxconn, and by all accounts they do a much better job of verifying that overseas suppliers comply with their rules regarding worker treatment, compensation, etc. than others.

Re:But the story is essentially true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382439)

No. They are not true. Nobody has evidence that the horrendous working conditions are true and there's nothing but mountains of actual evidence directly refuting those claims. If they were true, there would be mountains of evidence but there isn't. Sorry.

Re:But the story is essentially true (1)

shmlco (594907) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382643)

Reducing a story to a single individual is a time-honored journalistic tradition. It puts a face on the issue to which your audience can relate.

Creating a hypothetical individual in order to demonstrate the problem is also a time-honored journalistic tradition, and fine just as long as you say you're doing it. "Take Joe, a typical, hypothetical worker..."

Creating a fictional individual and pretending he's real is also a journalistic tradition... that tends to get one fired. Especially when you do a whole segment on your "interview" with Joe, who trembled when he held an iPad, which he'd never seen before...

Link to the retracted episode (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382181)

The page [thisamericanlife.org] about the retracted episode on the site is not linking to the audio of the show like they do for every other episode.

However, the well-documented trick still works, so if you want to listen to it you can do so here [thisamericanlife.org] .

I think the URL is supposed to be NPR's way of letting you know they're on to you.

Re:Link to the retracted episode (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382389)

How did you find that?

Re:Link to the retracted episode (1)

tiago.bonetti (1995614) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382455)

Still a Great show... I would preffer they just added a msg on the begin explaining that not all of it is the truth.

This deserves a rash... (4, Insightful)

Kamiza Ikioi (893310) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382197)

You know, Foxconn does some shitty things with their employees. But it's stuff like this that takes all the legitimate complaints and paints it over with, "See, it's all a lie." I hope Mike Daisey gets a horrible rash on his balls for this snow job.

Re:This deserves a rash... (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382521)

You know, Foxconn does some shitty things with their employees. But it's stuff like this that takes all the legitimate complaints and paints it over with, "See, it's all a lie."

Exactly. It's just provided ammunition for the people who want to preemptively dismiss all the legitimate complaints regarding third-world working conditions.

It's similar to how people have used Al Gore's over-the-top claims about hurricanes to poo-poo all global warming data.

Apple Applying Pressure (3, Informative)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382219)

"...workers who were poisoned on an iPhone assembly line by a chemical called n-hexane. Apple's audits of its suppliers show that an incident like this occurred in a factory in China, but the factory wasn’t located in Shenzhen, where Daisey visited. Apple's audits of its suppliers show that an incident like this occurred in a factory in China, but the factory wasn’t located in Shenzhen, where Daisey visited."

So the event happened - workers poisoned by n-hexane - he just didn't visit that factor and that's the big lie? Seriously.

Read the series of New York Times articles or are those fabricated too.

Yeah kill the messenger....

Re:Apple Applying Pressure (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382401)

According "an incident like this". Two important things here: singular as in one incident documented and like as in the one person may have been gotten a rash from a hole in protective gear. The thing is I don't know and neither do you, but the lie may be much more than location.

Theater (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382249)

Daisey says, according to the press release. "My mistake, the mistake I truly regret, is that I had it on your show as journalism, and it's not journalism. It's theater."

Sounds like the Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl excuse when he was caught in a bald faced lie on the floor of the Senate: his remark “was not intended to be a factual statement.” Just another bald faced liar who thinks lies are OK.

Pl0s 4, Troll) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382269)

the bootoms butt again. There are

Truth *actually isn't relevant* to this guy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382275)

"My mistake, the mistake I truly regret, is that I had it on your show as journalism, and it's not journalism. It's theater."

Daisey says *that* after he gets caught fabricating a story? Trying to portray blatant dishonesty as artistic license? Does he *actually not see the difference*?

In another context, physicist Richard Feynman issued a warning, "mother nature cannot be fooled." I can only assume that Daisey is in the other camp, where the truth just doesn't matter.

How did he even get this far?

Daisey is Apple shill (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382403)

The best way of permanently tainting the "Apple uses slave labour" allegation is to do a story about Apple using slave labour, but mixing various lies in with the truth. Wait a while for it to become popular than announce that some of it was fabricated. The average human will then recall "that story which was shown to be full of lies!" every time someone gives evidence of abuse.

Caricaturing your opponents as deceitful fools is such an old propaganda (being the original term for "PR" before somone invented the term "PR") trick.

Here's a quick self-test (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39382441)

Are you so passionate about a cause (that involves other people than yourself) that you could see yourself do pretty much anything to win through or get your result?

If so then you should leave it to others and find other things to do.

Its' about time. (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382487)

It's been a while since we've seen a Foxconn story around here. No, I'm not being sarcastic. Since the focus is on Apple, the story died down, just waiting for a story like this to come along. Dead story == Workers not getting relief.

So can we finally start raking the numerous other companies that are using Foxconn over the coals already?

Not sure how to feel. (1)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382555)

The overall idea presented in the story, that you should care about what's going on in the new global economy, is correct. It seems that the stories he got from actually interviewing workers were not, in his mind, compelling enough to move people to action. Most of the real stories are things that happen here: people working overtime, people who are underpaid, repetitive stress injury, worker accidents and the like.

So he made up some plausable sounding stories to make his point. It's not false in spirit, but he had to present it as literal truth for people to take it seriously. And the reality is that most of the news we read has been similarly embellished. The same way most pictures of models have been photoshopped.

So the real problem is that most people, when presented with objective facts and figures, are not able to put that information in context and connect it to the underlying human story.

More! (1)

pbjones (315127) | more than 2 years ago | (#39382581)

I'd like to hear from the hundreds of slack journalists that passed on the original story as truth. I know that things are not great in many countries, cheap labor is the reason that they build stuff there and not anywhere else, maybe they should look at some of the sweat shops in the US and other countries too.

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