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One Sci-Fi Author Wrote 29 of the Kindle's 100 Most-Highlighted Passages

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the precise-but-not-necessarily-accurate dept.

Books 239

An anonymous reader writes "Today Amazon announced that a science fiction writer has become the Kindle's all-time best-selling author. Last June Suzanne Collins, who wrote the Hunger Games trilogy, was only the fourth author to sell one million ebooks, but this month Amazon announced she'd overtaken all her competition (and she also wrote the #1 and #2 best-selling ebooks this Christmas). In fact, 29 of the 100 most-highlighted passages on the Kindle were written by Collins, including 7 of the top 10. And on a separate list of recent highlights, Collins has written 17 of the top 20 most-highlighted passages." It's pretty interesting to go through the top-100 list and look at the passages people think are worth highlighting. Taken out of context, many of them could be patched together and re-sold as a self-help book. None are quite so eloquent as #18 in the recent highlights.

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great book! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392067)

I read book one of the series, and it was quite good. Much better than I expected. I have no idea how they are going to make the movie rated PG-13, considering all the awful stuff that happens to the kids in the book.

Re:great book! (2)

danbuter (2019760) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392079)

Crap. I wasn't logged in. My comment. Great book for those interested. Kind of like The Running Man, but in many ways, much crueler.

Re:great book! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392103)

Sure, it's a great book. If you're still in middle school.

Re:great book! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392489)

Have you read it? Good literature is good regardless of your age, and despite my initial doubts, this trilogy is actually good literature.

Re:great book! (-1, Troll)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392655)

People say the same about Harry Potter and Twilight. Those people should be smacked in their mouths with a rolled-up newspaper.

Look, if you're here, the assumption is that you are an adult or literate high-school upperclassman. You've probably been exposed to real literature and you know how to sling multisyllabic words, so shouldn't you be promoting a series that is a little less "Dick and Jane?" I've seen better books in special ed classes. Hunger Games makes L. Ron Hubbard sound like Gore Vidal.

Why go through all the trouble reading the Harry Potter or Hunger Games series when you could read Dr. Seuss's books and become three times as enriched in a fraction of the time? If you want to read something short and pithy without looking like a moron, you should try Tom Wolfe, David Sedaris, or even any magazine more than 8 bucks.

Re:great book! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392685)

Don't worry, no one here is impressed with your intellect. You're free to read something purely for enjoyment.

Re:great book! (1)

lightknight (213164) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393155)

Agreed. Read what you enjoy. That's the key to enjoying reading in general.

Re:great book! (2, Informative)

Exceptica (2022320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392773)

Don't bother (or do, if you must). These books exploit the stupidity, the covardice of the masses revelling in violence because they are afraid of a society without it. Throw some 'wisdom' into it to give the text a resemblance of an intellectual edge and 95% of the rest can be violence, latent or explicit, which is what they understand, what they think they can manage. These poor excuses for a human being are the same who love the crap of Ayn Rand, or think The art of war or The prince are the pinnacles of human wisdom. Kierkegaard noted that men die for freedom of speech but happily forgo freedom of thought. Let them suffer if they cannot stand social pressure. I think everyone can agree on the effect time has on this garbage: not quite the same as it has on Aristotle, Democrit, Schopenhauer or -to name a contemporary- Einstein. But let the poor souls have their armchair violence, anything to appease the mildly horrifying feeling of having to be alive.

Re:great book! (4, Interesting)

FrootLoops (1817694) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393165)

What an asshole you are. You make up your own cultural norms by presumably abstracting from your personal experiences and then you passionately insult anyone who doesn't follow the limited views that result.

Norm 1: people read books to be "enriched" by them as efficiently as possible ("Why go through all the trouble reading the Harry Potter or Hunger Games series when you could read Dr. Seuss's books and become three times as enriched in a fraction of the time?"). This is patently ridiculous. Books can be enriching, but they can also be guilty pleasures, pure entertainment, sleep-inducing material, or a host of other things. Moreover, books are different things to different people. Your own view of a book will probably not be very universal, and that's not a bad thing.

Norm 2: an "adult or literate high-school upperclassman" should not promote a children's or young adult's ("Dick and Jane") series. Screw you; I'll recommend The Hobbit or Harry Potter or whatever I think is appropriate for whatever reason I feel like to whomever I wish. You're in no position to pre-judge the quality of my reasons in such a hypothetical case you judgmental prick. You're similarly in no position to judge the value of everyone's reasons for reading a particular book.

You do have some good points--calling Twilight "good literature" is pretty silly using the usual definition of "literature"; most people on /. are literate adults; and Dr. Seuss' books are remarkably enriching, especially to the young. Your good points are buried in crap and shrouded in assholery today, though.

Re:great book! (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393315)

One of my favorite books to this day is Gemini Game, which is all about virtual reality games and a minor criminal conspiracy. It's set in a dystopian sort of future where nothing is really pointed out as bad but a smart kid will realize the implications (such as police being able to open any door by putting their badge against the lock).

Re:great book! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392897)

Sure, it's a great book. If you're still in middle school.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hobbit [wikipedia.org]

Re:great book! (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392107)

Crap. I wasn't logged in. My comment. Great book for those interested. Kind of like The Running Man, but in many ways, much crueler.

And a complete rip-off of Battle Royale. Skip it and just watch that instead.

Re:great book! (2)

Ambvai (1106941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392241)

That was my first reaction, though I've seen plenty of entertaining books inspired by others. Has anybody that's read both Battle Royale [novel] and Hunger Games care to comment?

Re:great book! (2, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393325)

That was my first reaction, though I've seen plenty of entertaining books inspired by others. Has anybody that's read both Battle Royale [novel] and Hunger Games care to comment?

I doubt there is a great overlap of audiences. The Hunger Games readers are, in my judgment, going to be Potterheads, not weaboos.
Some of them might be old enough to have seen Schwarzenegger in The Running Man, but fewer will have read the book or have seen Series 7: The Contenders. And like with any fad, the majority will think it's new and groundbreaking.
As long as it gets kids to read, I won't complain. Perhaps they'll pick up some other books later, and one day develop critical thinking.

Re:great book! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392693)

Which was a rip-off of some Star Trek episode or Asimov story.

No new ideas in the hopper.

Re:great book! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392785)

They were probably all inspired by "The Lottery," a short story from 1948 that most all of us read in high school.

Re:great book! (1)

lightknight (213164) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393203)

Indeed. One of the original horror stories, so far as I'm concerned.

Why? Because when you're in high-school, you believe that it's just a story. Later on, you find out it's a commentary on communities in general -> everyone goes along with a tradition / way of thought, because it's how they've always done things. The only people who call for change are those who find themselves the odd-man out, and typically only after they've been selected as a sacrifice; the people throwing stones are just happy it isn't them.

To that end, Brave New World and 1984 are nightmares in their own right. Change = death, usually to the heretic. Just once in my lifetime, I'd like to see the gods say "No" to the status quo (and someone please protect me from the consequences of that wish, as someone who has read the HHGTTG might say (Arthur Dent and the Seer comes to mind)). A tale comes to mind, of the Babylonian king selecting another to be king for the day, only for said person to be sacrificed at the end of the day -> instead, the real king died, and left the other guy on the throne; apparently he ruled well. But I'd prefer a stronger, lasting dose; perhaps my own life is filled with too much bitterness.

Re:great book! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392713)

Battle Royale was nothing like this, except "a bunch of kids are confined in an area and forced to kill each other". Why are they there? Who are they? How did they get there?

Both books were completely different.

Re:great book! (2, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393349)

Both books were completely different.

As opposed to only one of them being completely different? Yes, I can believe you're a Hunger Games fan with that feat of logic.

The two are as similar as "Ca Plane Pour Moi" and "Jet Boy, Jet Girl". That is, they're indistinguishable for an outsider, but different for those who are fans. But when you boil away the fat, the exact same riff or plot remains.

Re:great book! (1)

danbuter (2019760) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392931)

And Battle Royale was a complete rip-off of Stephen King. Yet it's still very different from his story. Same with this.

Robert Scheckley (3, Interesting)

js_sebastian (946118) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393265)

Crap. I wasn't logged in. My comment. Great book for those interested. Kind of like The Running Man, but in many ways, much crueler.

And a complete rip-off of Battle Royale. Skip it and just watch that instead.

And all of the above got the idea from Robert Scheckley's 1958 short story "The Prize of Peril", which is not only the first depiction of this type of game, but also of any form of reality television in fiction, decades before it materialized in the real world. I have not read the hunger games, but I wonder how much all of these add to the original concept...

Re:great book! (3, Interesting)

MBCook (132727) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392213)

I agree. I needed something to read early last summer. Based on hearing about it from a friend or two and all the promotion, I decided to give it a try. I was quite pleasantly surprised by the three books.

I'm interested in seeing the movie. Some of the bits in the trailers look great to me, although I imagined District 12's town to be less rural and the fence more imposing. I agree that PG-13 is going to be an interesting challenge. Given it's a book in which, just based on the jacket, you know 23 kids should die means they're going to have to deal with violence issues. Of course there is no way they could make it R, it would cut out the movie's target audience.

The movie has a big enough budget that they certainly should be able to do a good job. I hope it at least turns out decent.

Re:great book! (5, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392311)

Violence is OK. They just have to keep sex out of it.

'The Gun is good. The penis is evil'

(Anybody remember Zardoz? You do? I'm very sorry.)

Re:great book! (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392485)

As long as you don't start projectile vomiting piles of guns (pun not intended, but appreciated), I think you can survive exposure to Zardoz.

Re:great book! (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392537)

Oh, I survived it, but I think it permanently scarred me.

Sean Connery in a pink diaper with suspenders - one of those horrid images that pop into my consciousness at inappropriate moments.

Re:great book! (2)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392587)

Sean Connery in a pink diaper with suspenders - one of those horrid images that pop into my consciousness at inappropriate moments.

Legend has it that Connery was concerned that he would be forever shoehorned in the "suave spy" role of his James Bond movies and used Zardoz to shatter that stereotype utterly. I also imagine it was a lot more fun to be in the movie than to watch it.

Re:great book! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392915)

Wait, Zardoz wasn't a Bond film?

Re:great book! (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392951)

If it was, then Bond shot Q twice (not that that's a bad thing). And there is an HMS Zardoz floating head roaming around the English countryside forever vigilant against the forces of evil, particularly that of sexual promiscuity.

Re:great book! (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392963)

Yeah, he got to get up close and personal with Charlotte Rampling and a few other attractive actresses. Such sacrifices....

Re:great book! (1)

oldmac31310 (1845668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393143)

Ah come on! Zardoz is crap bit it's great fun. Really funny!

Re:great book! (5, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392371)

I have no idea how they are going to make the movie rated PG-13, considering all the awful stuff that happens to the kids in the book.

As the relieved father of a young woman who has finally made it into her twenties, I am keen to read some books where awful stuff happens to teenagers.

Especially goths. Does anyone know if these books have awful stuff happening to goths? Oh, and horny teenage boys who are always hanging around. I could do with a book about awful stuff happening to horny teenage boys with adams apples and their parents' cars who are always hanging around trying to get daughters to go to parties at the homes of absent parents. That could be very entertaining. Dismemberment, maybe brutal beatings with baseball bats, like that. I may have to check out these books.

Hey, they're making a movie of this Hunger Games stuff, right?

Re:great book! (4, Informative)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392591)

It's much better to see kids die horrible deaths than to hear the F word a few times. (see the controversy over the R rating for "Bully")

Re:great book! (2)

danbuter (2019760) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392975)

There's a very well-made (10 mins) fan movie of the Hunger Games that happened 24 years earlier than the one in the book (and the upcoming movie). No spoilers are included for the book and it will give you a great idea of what to expect. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mUjssn86h4 [youtube.com]

How did they collect this data?! (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392087)

What is going on here? Amazon is collecting data on what passages we highlight?
What other data are they collecting?
I am going to re-read their end user agreement again before I buy any more books from them.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (-1, Troll)

lexsird (1208192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392129)

Seriously, WTF? Nice slip up there Amazon, you shouldn't let people know you are spying on us.

We need a Constitutional Amendment regarding digital and privacy rights. Of course we will have to have ragging mobs in the streets running down big brother to lynch him before they consider it. Of course they are prepared for this and it will end in shit for us as well. So get used to having your privacy farmed by these cocksuckers.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392151)

How else did you think they let you see passages that other people have highlighted?

Re:How did they collect this data?! (4, Informative)

MBCook (132727) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392177)

Are you trolling?

If you have a Kindle, it's dead obvious they do this.

As soon as I started reading on my Kindle, I noticed underlines on things. Amazon shows you the most popular things to highlight in the books you read, and tells you that. It's one of the features of the Kindle (I turned it off, as I found it distracting).

Re:How did they collect this data?! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392249)

unless you purchased a used kindle, registered to god knows who, never connected it to a network and downloaded 40,000 books. once again piracy FTW

Re:How did they collect this data?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392283)

That's good you can turn it off. Amongst people who choose not doing anything beyond reading, highlighting, xor taking notes, highlighting is the only warning sign I might not like their personality. It's like the lazy but ostentatious (and, physically, destructive) way of pretending you're reading intently, without the actual benefits of taking notes (which improve knowledge retention just by making them).

Re:How did they collect this data?! (2)

MBCook (132727) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392651)

Yeah, I'm not generally a highlighting person. It has it's place, and if I was reading some reference book it might be nice. But when I'm reading fiction I'm not interested in finding out what sentences 8500 other people think are poignant.

Amazon did a good job with it. And having turned off other people's highlights, I can still put my own in (even though I don't).

Re:How did they collect this data?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392423)

Agreed. Obvious trolling and / or retard. Kindle makes it pretty clear this is what is going on.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392629)

...and that it's optional. I don't see what the kerfuffle is about.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (2)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392967)

Hmm, haven't noticed that on the books I have on my Kindle. Of course, I have books on Iraq, Afghanistan, and scholarly books like the sinking of the Biskmarck and the Wehrmacht on the Western Front. So, guess the books I read just arent all that popular.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (4, Insightful)

Salgak1 (20136) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392337)

Uh, since you apparently found the Constitution to be TL:DR, allow me to point out something: the Constitution limits the actions of the Federal Government. Amazon may be near-omnipresent, but they're NOT the Feds. The operative document is your Kindle User Agreement, which, no doubt, you clicked through because it, too, was TL:DR. Lesson is, read the agreement, for that which the Large Print giveth, the Small Print usually taketh away....

Re:How did they collect this data?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39393083)

Who enforces breach of contract? Seems to me that would be the government? How can they enforce any clauses in a contract that violate the constitution? Their actions would be limited in that regard aren't they?

Re:How did they collect this data?! (1)

Grimbleton (1034446) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393191)

How does a private entity violate the constitution, which is a document that has to do with the government and not private entities?

Do you think a no talking rule in the theatre equates to a violation of your First Amendment rights?

Re:How did they collect this data?! (2)

milkmage (795746) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392459)

spying? please.
you VOLUNTARILY gave them your name and billing address when you ordered the damn thing.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (1)

lexsird (1208192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393259)

Ha ha! Let me address my loving readers all at once here.

I always say, "Say what you want on the Internet, if you are wrong, you will be corrected with great enthusiasm." I liken it to being married.

Ok, here's my perspective. I got a Kindle. I just want it so I can read. My eyes aren't so well these days, and I can make the print big enough I don't need my reading glasses. Honestly though, for me it's still backwards. I spend most of my time on the computer and not reading a book. I haven't read fiction, (other than the news) for a long time, and most of what I am interested in, I can read off of web pages as I want it ala carte*.

So, I have read ONE book on it. So far, it's the most expensive copy of Fear and Loathing in Vegas, that I an think of. I am sure I glossed over the "highlight" stuff, but only on my way to reading the damn book. I'm sure there is plenty of bells and whistles I have skipped over, and or don't know about. But I didn't marry the damn thing, and it's here for me, not the other way around. Right.....? (Holy Shit, I didn't marry it. Did I? FUCK!!! I need to read those TOS papers after all.)

Part of my brain when I read this article was happy about the advances in tech that would help give authors feedback. But it wasn't louder than the part of my brain screaming WTF? Because that did a rabbit hole into data bases and just how much lovely data could be mined off my innocent looking Kindle, just laying there in it's cool black leather jacket, just whistling to it's self.

I then switch channels to "Who's Looking At My Data" starring Facebook, and all the rumors of everyone from the FBI to the Israelis sniffing through it from company side. Which quickly cycles through the Conspiracy De Jour that is peculating in my brain. All the while, my fingers have ran off without brain editing some post of "WTF??". And by posting early on in the tread, so there is nobody else to tank the first idiot "WTF" for me, so I can sagely stroke my beard and toss in some smart ass remark.

I set myself up for it.

Then I write a TLDR explanation of it. Sweet Jesus, this means you will read it, and have wasted almost an equal amount of time. Damn, there isn't any winning is there? It's like the Kobayashi Maru of /..

Don't shoot, I surrender!

Re:How did they collect this data?! (2, Informative)

NicknameAvailable (2581237) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392155)

What is going on here? Amazon is collecting data on what passages we highlight? What other data are they collecting? I am going to re-read their end user agreement again before I buy any more books from them.

It's stored on their cloud you dumb shit, of course their collecting it.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392293)

Speaking of dumb shit: it's `they're,' not `their'

Re:How did they collect this data?! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39393001)

Speaking of dumb shit: it's `they're,' not `their'

Really? "It's stored on they are cloud"...

I'll let you decide who the dumb shit is here.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39393061)

Since you wrongly chose which one of the two occurrences of the word 'their' my comment applied to, you are truly a dumb shit.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392167)

Home -> Settings -> Popular Highlights -> Turn Off

Re:How did they collect this data?! (3, Interesting)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392243)

When you highlight a passage, you have the option to share it. When you're reading, you'll see highlights that other people shared as dotted line underlines, along with a number indicating how many people shared that bit. You can turn off the display of shared highlights in the menu. Anyone who owns a Kindle would know that, so I suspect you're lying when you insinuate that you're a Kindle owner. Most likely a shill/fanboi for some other company.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (5, Interesting)

thejynxed (831517) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392333)

The Kindle Reader app does not make the ability to disable this visible or obvious.

It's also not visible or obvious on all versions of the Kindle.

I think you need to go take a better look at the software on the different Kindle models.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392361)

When you highlight a passage, you have the option to share it. When you're reading, you'll see highlights that other people shared as dotted line underlines, along with a number indicating how many people shared that bit. You can turn off the display of shared highlights in the menu. Anyone who owns a Kindle would know that, so I suspect you're lying when you insinuate that you're a Kindle owner. Most likely a shill/fanboi for some other company.

Typical rude, offensive comment.
I am using Kindle software on an iPad 2.
The setting descriptions are very vague.
I had popular highlights turned off but not annotations backup. I have sinced turned that off.
Please, let's keep a civil discussion.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (5, Interesting)

sdnoob (917382) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392393)

Anyone who owns a Kindle would know that

anyone? doubtful. most? also doubtful.

amazon tracking and collecting this sort of data is not any different than tivo and cable companies doing the same with dvr's (and not any less spooky), what programs are recorded and watched, when they're watched, what parts get replayed, skipped-over or paused on. and like tivo, amazon defaults to opt-in instead of opt-out (which is not exactly convenient to do with tivo.. and near or completely impossible with cable company boxes). tivo took a lot of heat after that most unfortunate of superbowl half-time performances -- amazon should here as well.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392377)

This is why you hack the living shit out of a kindle 5min after taking it out of the box. The "kindle" sucks. A hacked kindle on the other hand, is a marvelous device and what Amazon should be selling in the first place.

Re:How did they collect this data?! (1)

milkmage (795746) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392449)

don't your highlights get sync'd to all copies on your devices?

some would consider that a feature.. and how else are they going to do that if they're not watching?

Required reading (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392135)

It's a recent publication that is required reading in a lot of schools. Of course a lot of it is highlighted, those are the answers to the tests.

Hmm. What a co-incki-dinck! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392143)

Gee, how shocking. A book which is getting a lot of advertising push in the run-up to a movie release just happens to be getting highlighted in an Amazon bookstore function designed to let you see what's popular. Gosh, I guess it must just be practically scientifically, objectively the most read book right now. You should probably buy it and check it out!

+/-1 Snarky? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392251)

Agree with the sentiment. Disagree with the tone.

Which #18? (4, Interesting)

Ambvai (1106941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392205)

Which #18 is the summary referring to?

"Press and hold, then drag your finger across text to select it. A dialog box will appear that lets you highlight the text, add a note, and so on. If several other Kindle users have highlighted a particular passage in the book you are reading, you will see that passage underlined. You can turn off these Popular Highlights in Settings. Notes appear as superscripted numbers within the text. To view a note the next time you visit that page, simply tap on the number."

or

"“Panem et Circenses translates into ‘Bread and Circuses.’ The writer was saying that in return for full bellies and entertainment, his people had given up their political responsibilities and therefore their power.”"?

They're both oddly appropriate for self-help...

Re:Which #18? (2)

Soulskill (1459) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392597)

The former, definitely.

What Else Could be Found? (1)

Walt Sellers (1741378) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392255)

Its nice for an author to be recognized.

It would also be nice to see success for eBooks that can't succeed as paper.

Re:What Else Could be Found? (3, Informative)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392317)

Interestingly, the Hunger Games series is one of the few on Amazon that is significantly cheaper on the Kindle (and apps) then the paper version. And for some bizarre reason, they're the only Kindle books that I've seen that aren't plastered with typos.

Re:What Else Could be Found? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392375)

For the typo issue:

Low-paid interns and temporary workers employed solely to rapidly copy the text from the dead-tree version into .pdf files, etc. English as your primary language, optional.

Re:What Else Could be Found? (2)

Exceptica (2022320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393013)

And here I was thinking my collection of pirated books had typos because of sloppy idiots not loving them enough but someday... someday I'd find a torrent with Kindle or B&N editions, perfectly formatted and proofread like the paper ones I've had the audacity to become used to.

Then you shatter my bubble and Google quickly confirms that editions people pay money for have more than a fair share of errors, formatting extravaganzas and strange ASCII combinations whenever an accent or, say, finnish letter were.

At least I was right in what I do: if the author is alive I buy a real book, have it cut, scan it at 300 dpi, 1 bit depth, every page is about 2-3 KB and perfect. If the author is dead, I do the same but torrent it afterwards. I am astonished that people would pay for mistakes. Why do they do it?

Who? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392279)

When I saw the title of the article you guys swiped for publication here, I thought sure it would be about Terry Pratchett. He has far more "notable and quotable" than most other authors (regardless of genre).

Re:Who? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392323)

Not relevant to the topic at hand, but I notice my submission is listed as being authored (yes, Slashdot news crew, I wrote the content myself - you should try it, it's liberating) by "Anonymous Coward."

I'm part British, so I do see the humour in it (along with the humour in pulling someone's pants down in public, placing a live mouse in a freshly-prepared meat pie, kicking someone who has just fallen into the horse trough, and other displays of hilarity taken straight out of the 15th century. However... I wish to point out that at no time during the process of submitting my previous comment was I invited to create an account on your site. So which of us does that show as being cowardly?

Regardless, thank you for the site. I occasionally find mentions of articles here that I find worthy of reading. And, after I click on the link to go to the page on the site where the article actually is, I often do read the article. And leave comments where both the author(s) and the people the article is directed to are likely to have a chance of seeing them.

Have a nice day.

Nice passages (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392327)

Astro-turf. Pop culture feel good quotes, coming to a theater near you, and and mindless platitudes. The Harry Potter star-maker machinery is at work again, I see.

'bloomers' for the win. Ben Franklin would have loved that, the ol' whore monger.

Depressing (5, Insightful)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392341)

Seeing what statistically significant humans think is highlight-worthy is incredibly depressing. Is it any wonder the One Percent can manage to stay in control? Humans have opposable thumbs and can manage language, but wise they aren't. They can't discern platitudes and doublespeak from actual wisdom.

Re:Depressing (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392391)

Thanks for posting that and saving me the trouble. When I saw the link to the 100 most highlighted passages, I thought great--a few new gems for my personal collection. Wow, was I wrong. Almost none of the passages were insightful or even interesting. For some real insightful and interesting quotes & passages, check out Robert Heinlein's "Notebooks of Lazarus Long". (FWIW, IMHO, YMMV and other standard disclaimers apply)

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392877)

As a fan of Heinlein , what I find depressing is that its 2012 and Rick Santorum is a possible nominee for prewsident. See the similarites to Nehemiah Scudder?

Re:Depressing (2, Insightful)

tomhath (637240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392411)

You know what else is depressing? There will always be a Top One Percent. No matter what. There will always One Percent that has more than the other Ninety Nine Percent. Deal with it.

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392499)

Agreed.

And to the parent: even in former/current socialist/Marxist/fascist/etc "utopias," is not the 'ruling elite' in China; Cuba; the former USSR; N. Korea; etc. the Top One Percent?

Re:Depressing (2)

Sooner Boomer (96864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392551)

You know what else is depressing? There will always be a Top One Percent.

Yeah. And half of you are below average. THAT'S depressing!

Re:Depressing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392625)

You mean half are below the median (and that's a tautology). The average can be higher than 99% of the population. For example, take 99 ordinary people and 1 Bill Gates. His fortune alone makes everyone else's below average.

Re:Depressing (1)

voidphoenix (710468) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392749)

The mean can be higher than 99% of the population. For example, take 99 ordinary people and 1 Bill Gates. His fortune alone makes everyone else's below the mean.

FTFY. Both mean and median are averages. Mode as well.

Re:Depressing (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392797)

Yeah. And half of you are below average. THAT'S depressing!

When you know what the average is, yes. It's not exactly below average genius, if you get my drift...

Re:Depressing (2)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392585)

That's not depressing at all. There are 100 different 1 percents. Let's make sure that each of them gets to be the 1 percent that matters, over the course of human history.

Re:Depressing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392715)

Let's not. Most of you haven't done a thing to earn it. Despite current popular thinking, "being born" doesn't cut it.

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392763)

Yeah, 'cause only the One Percenters deserve to be born rich!

Re:Depressing (4, Interesting)

MBCook (132727) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392657)

Wait, you mean the most highlighted things come from the books the most people have? Say it isn't so!

Hunger Games isn't a bad series. Would you prefer the top highlights be from Twilight? Or some terrible self help book by the latest fad guru? Or the newest diet sensation?

Don't forget that not only have the Hunger Games book sold incredibly well, they were one of the promoted books for the "one free book a month for Prime subscribers" program.

Re:Depressing (2)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392677)

Seeing what statistically significant humans think is highlight-worthy is incredibly depressing.

But it's at least least warned me not to bother reading The Hunger Games -- the quotes all seem trite and badly written to me, so it seems that the books are not for me.

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392747)

Because the only reason to highlight is to get words of wisdom...not to make it easy to track with the plot/story or anything...

Re:Depressing (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392923)

If that's the primary reason that people are doing this, then I might retract my rant... or at least the motivation for it. Humans are still stupid by and large. ;-)

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392989)

Have you actually looked at these highlights? People are obviously marking them because they think they're particularly good or meaningful quotes (they aren't). They have very little to do with following the plot.

Re:Depressing (2)

wanzeo (1800058) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392959)

They can't discern platitudes and doublespeak from actual wisdom.

How do you think the bible got so popular? Now excuse me while I duck.

Re:Depressing (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392981)

At least you said it before I did. I get to keep eating for once.

Re:Depressing (1)

KaimaraZatar (1267396) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393009)

Seeing what statistically significant humans think is highlight-worthy is incredibly depressing.

Yes, it is depressing to see what a "statistically significant quantity" of humans think. However, I don't believe this has taught us anything about what "statistically significant humans" think.

obligatory snark (4, Interesting)

mako1138 (837520) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392381)

From my own highlight list:

How much of old material goes to make up the freshest novelty of human life.
  --Nathaniel Hawthorne, House of the Seven Gables (1851)

And everything new is good forgotten old (2)

siddesu (698447) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392639)

One can find the origin of these rather shallow "deep thoughts" in much older literature. The requirement is just a little knowledge. E.g. the first on the "recent list" is a seriously dumbed-down Faust:

When I say to the Moment flying;
'Linger a while -- thou art so fair!'

And so on.

Re:And everything new is good forgotten old (4, Funny)

Ambvai (1106941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393051)

Bah. That's clearly just repackaged from:

"Hello, my friend! Stay awhile and listen..."

history repeating (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392807)

When it was Battle Royale it was garbage, but some white lady "writes it",and its a literary masterpiece.], with a multi-million dollar movie & advertising campaign.

wtf?

What?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39392863)

Amazon knows what I highlight in my eBooks?! Scary......

Why highlight anyway? (1)

bulletman (254401) | more than 2 years ago | (#39392935)

I highlight to come back to a passage. I don't choose the most poignant prose to highlight, but the most descriptive for where I am in the book. It seems like a lot of the highlighting that is going on is just piling on -- people highlight passages because other people do.

Oxford American Dictionary #124 (2)

kscheetz (86026) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393015)

The highlighted text:
The New Oxford American Dictionary Contents About this book

Truly inspiring

The sample size seems way too small (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39393163)

Does anyone else find this list to be a bit sparse. There's only a handful of books represented, which makes me wonder how many people are actually using this feature. Most people aren't even familiar with "The Picture of Dorian Gray," yet it has a half dozen quotes selected from it.

Am I the only one then...? (4, Interesting)

Lord of the Fries (132154) | more than 2 years ago | (#39393297)

That read the first book and thought "Really?? This is what all the excitement is about?" I didn't care for Hunger Games at all. It was an engaging read admittedly. I kept turning the pages. But the foreshadowing of where things were headed seemed pretty shallow to me (no, I did not cheat and peek at the ending). My closing thoughts were "well, someone's hoping to cash in on a screenplay here" and a sort of dirty feeling. I felt like one feels when you slow down at the sight of a roadside accident to see if there's anything gory.

I read the next two books just to see if it would get any good.

I have this vague sense of irony about the whole thing. As I listen to people tell me why they just like this book so much, some times I feel like a big part of the reason they liked it was because everyone else seems to as well. It's cool, because if you're read it, you're in the club. And the club says it's good. Given that a major theme of the book is humanity's ability as a collective to ignore stuff that is wrong, this seems hugely ironic to me.

If you enjoyed it, no offense meant. I respect that. To each his own. I liked the Mistborn series and Terry Pratchett novels far better than this among recent reads, and maybe you don't care for those.

Am I the only person that didn't care for Hunger Games at all?

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