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Nokia Applies For Vibrating Tattoo Patent

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the everything-has-been-invented dept.

Idle 97

New submitter CanHasDIY writes "Tired of waiting for the Pip-Boy or Omni-Tool to be invented? Never fear! Nokia is developing the basic technology needed to make your dreams a reality: haptic-feedback tattoos. According to the patent application, Nokia is proposing 'a material attachable to skin, the material capable of detecting a magnetic field and transferring a perceivable stimulus to the skin, wherein the perceivable stimulus relates to the magnetic field.' Basically, the process is the same as for normal tattooing; the difference is in the ferromagnetic ink. Kind of brings new meaning to the term 'embedded device,' doesn't it?"

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I wonder what a MRI would feel like (5, Insightful)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428073)

Subject says it all.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (1)

Rakshasa-sensei (533725) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428387)

I was like... wow... I want that.

Then I read your comment and realized I'd rather not have my skin ripped off every year.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (1)

DragonTHC (208439) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428753)

why do you need an MRI every year?

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (2)

Rakshasa-sensei (533725) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429095)

Well, more like every second year... When the brain is involved it's better to be on the safe side.

And it is one of the benefits of free universal healthcare; when it is necessary with regular checkups, even if expensive, there's no health insurance company there to complain.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (-1, Offtopic)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 2 years ago | (#39431883)

And it is one of the benefits of free universal healthcare; when it is necessary with regular checkups, even if expensive, there's no health insurance company there to complain.

The downside, of course, is that you pay for it in higher taxes. And for another one for each member of the out-of-work family down the street.

Then when it gets too expansive for the government to afford, they try to patch it by reducing services. Like with cancer surgery waiting list time longer than the time it takes the cancer to become inoperable. Or decision-making committees deciding who is old and sick enough that it makes financial sense to let them die and use the resources for people still young and productive.

Of course once the healthcare is single-payer there's no alternative to go to. If the "death panel" says you die, you die.

(Yes, the original Obamacare legislation didn't have "death panels". They were in a companion bill passed around the same time.)

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (-1, Troll)

Rakshasa-sensei (533725) | more than 2 years ago | (#39432249)

You're a retard. (And it didn't cost me nor society shit to diagnose you, lol)

One of the most expensive countries in the world to live in (for the middle class), yet we spend per capita close to half on health care compare to the US. Explain that... You can't, cause your system sucks balls in ways that defies imagination.

Thanks for being so stupid, it improves my self-image to realize there can be so many fucking stupid people in one place.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39433395)

And after the usual libertarian bullshit, someone talks sense.

An MRI in a public healthcare system is cheaper than in a private one, because the lucre isn't present. And a preventive system is proven to be cheaper, too. you know, one day off for a MRI is much, much cheaper than the two months medical license and surgeries and more surgeries to take multiple tumors from someone.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39439559)

""Of course once the healthcare is single-payer there's no alternative to go to. If the "death panel" says you die, you die.""

You realize of course that even in the countries like the UK with a sane health system where your life isn't dependent on the comercial whims of an insurance company there _is_ still a private health system too right? So _if_ you can afford it you can seek care elsewhere, just like in the US, only if you _can't_ afford it you have a decent if imperfect 'free' healthcare system.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429117)

Lots of reasons. My wife has MS and to detect new lesions and determine the effectiveness of her treatments they submit her to a 3T MRI once or twice a year.

I can imagine quite a few other neurological or autoimmune disorders, not to mention cancer etc., that would have similar diagnostic requirements.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39429061)

Ignoring the MRI problems, it'd be fantastic to be able to detect A/C fields with your tattooed fingers!! Seeya multimeter, my fingers tell me if that cable is live now!

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (1)

nomorecwrd (1193329) | more than 2 years ago | (#39430353)

Your fingers can tell you if the cable is live now even without the tattoos....
It may hurt a little bit, but you will end up with a nice curly hair ;-)

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 2 years ago | (#39431925)

Also, the tatroos detect magnetic, not electric, fields. So you might be able to tell if the line was VERY heavily loaded. But just being hot won't affect the tattoo.

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (1)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429515)

Might work as an effective but expensive tattoo remover think Magneto from the X-men movie with hemoglobin :-)

Re:I wonder what a MRI would feel like (1)

elsurexiste (1758620) | more than 2 years ago | (#39432069)

The part in which the magnet rips your skin apart must be a downer, I guess...

It's all nice and fine (4, Insightful)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428079)

until you have to take an MRI.

Re:It's all nice and fine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428201)

yeah... could you imagine the pain from the magnetic ink being ripped out of your skin....

Re:It's all nice and fine (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428701)

I've had MRIs (two of them, one after another), and among the checklist items beyond no metal was tattoos. Apparently they can heat up during an MRI, I was informed, when I asked why they had tattoos on the checklist form.

Now, I don't have any tattoos, but the experience was interesting enough. For those who have not been in an MRI chamber, here is my take on that: I got the head MRI done, so the rest of me was outside the chamber. Still, the main issue was that I felt I was not able to breathe in there after about three minutes. They told me the air flow was at maximum, then gave me supplemental oxygen when I told them it still wasn't enough airflow, and I was good after that. (Otherwise, they told me, I would need to get a sedative from my doctor and then return.)

Everything else wasn't even a factor, except for me mentioning it for others who have not had an MRI. The bed part isn't too hard, nor is it absolutely pillow soft, and they provide something to elevate the feet. The face shield isn't too bad it's like a football helmet mask. They offered me eye pads, but I said I wanted to be able to open and close my eyes at will, they didn't see any problems if I did open my eyes during the MRI. For me, it wasn't even the enclosed circular chamber with small diameter and no other visibility unless I would have moved my head to look at my feet (and moving the head is not allowed or it will blur the result). It wasn't even loud buzzing and grinding sounds despite having earplugs and earpads. It was just the airflow issue, and the oxygen fixed that.

Re:It's all nice and fine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428803)

I find your prose very interesting, and wish to subscribe to your newsletter...

Re:It's all nice and fine (1)

Rakshasa-sensei (533725) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429271)

Having had about a dozen or so MRI's, I would say it's not very likely that the airflow was an issue. If your mind starts wandering the wrong way it can cause issues, the 'airflow' is one I can easily imagine coming up.

Similar to the emergency button/pump you receive, as long as you hold it in your hand you're ok. But if it slips out of your hand then many fill freak out cause their state of mind ends up in an irretrievable place.

So to sum it up; yes, it was the restrictive head position, yes, it was the closeness making it hard to focus on anything except for the small mirror, yes, it was the stress of trying to stay so very still while your heart is pumping and you need to swallow, and most definitely, yes, it was the loud clack clack clak drrrr sound that the boring music couldn't keep out.

Just relax, it's not the airflow, you just need to relax and let your mind wander.

Re:It's all nice and fine (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 2 years ago | (#39430339)

I'd hate to have a choking/sneezing fit while stuck in there.

Re:It's all nice and fine (1)

deroby (568773) | more than 2 years ago | (#39431251)

Having gone through 'the procedure' too (only once admittedly), I tend to agree that objectively all those annoyances are just that : annoying. But subjectively it's a different story. When you're laying there just waiting for the experience to be over it's hard not to get stressed by the combination of LOUD noise, the inability to change position even a little bit (both by the fact your head is restrained and because you know you don't want to ruin the session by causing blurred 'pictures' and having to do it all over again).
I'm a (very) laid back type, but I too had to restrain myself from going some thought-paths, the mind indeed tends to wander to strange places when given too much time.

Re:It's all nice and fine (1)

guruevi (827432) | more than 2 years ago | (#39431363)

The no tattoos is because old tattoos and certain types of tattoos (if you got them in jail) are made with ferromagnetic ink (thus invalidating this patent). They can heat up and cause discomfort, even slight burns because of the currents induced by the magnetic field.

The breathing problem is simple claustrophobia maybe you also had vertigo (I get vertigo after about 15 minutes in a 3T MRI) causing you to panic. There are no real "airflow" problems in an MRI, usually it's fanned which they can control.

The "face shield" or as we call it "head coil" is the part that makes it actually work. Depending on the type of scans you do and the local setup there are a wide range of possibilities as far as making you comfortable, everyone has to offer adequate ear protection, most venues will offer at least music, masks etc. Some older people actually fall asleep in them. There are also places that offer video or personalized media and much more.

Re:It's all nice and fine (1)

s.petry (762400) | more than 2 years ago | (#39432257)

The breathing problem is simple claustrophobia maybe you also had vertigo (I get vertigo after about 15 minutes in a 3T MRI) causing you to panic. There are no real "airflow" problems in an MRI, usually it's fanned which they can control.

Sorry, but you are not correct. Having been through the process about two dozen times (different issues/times) it really depends on the machine and site. I have been in MRIs that have good airflow, but others where there was little to no airflow. As a certified deep sea diver, I can promise that it's not purely claustrophobia.

Re:It's all nice and fine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39438697)

There's a list of stuff you can't take into an MRI? I had a kidney stone last July, and had to have an MRI to determine how big it was, and where exactly it was, and the nurse, radiologist, whatever you call them, didn't even ask me to empty my pockets. As I have a basic understanding of how these things work, but didn't want to appear foolish if my info was outdated, I asked if it would fry my cell phone, or kill my credit cards. Didn't mention my keys, or the change in my pocket, or the metal buttons and zipper on my pants, or my pocketknife, or my nipple rings. She said, no, it would have no effect on my phone or cards, but I did need to lower my pants to mid thigh to avoid the zipper blocking the image. Sure enough, no machines (or myself) were destroyed in the process. Nothing in my pockets moved even the slightest bit. Not sure how that works, but maybe they just called it an MRI because that's what most laymen understand and it was actually something else, like a PET, or even a good ol' fashioned x-ray. I don't know, but I thought a magnetic field was a magnetic field, and if it is powerful enough to flip your cells, it should be powerful enough to at least jingle my keys. Or at least demag my credit card.

rule 34 (5, Funny)

godrik (1287354) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428115)

Am I the only one to immediately think of how to apply rule 34 to it?

Re:rule 34 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428203)

You could have an animated image of a girl taking it from behind as the tramp stamp of a girl taking it from behind.

Re:rule 34 (5, Insightful)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428213)

I can see some applications in wireless teledildonics. Installation would suck though...

Re:rule 34 (2)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428251)

Man oh man, I'm going back to school, I want to major in teledildonics installations.

Re:rule 34 (1)

Ol Biscuitbarrel (1859702) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428555)

You should be making productive use of your time and hang out at Slashdong [slashdong.org] , then.

Well, actually it's just some blog. Rather unfortunate name, too.

Re:rule 34 (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429049)

I'm thinking teledildonics lubrication technician would be more juicy...

Re:rule 34 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428439)

Yes. Now please feel ashamed.

Re:rule 34 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428643)

"Welcome Aboard!"

Re:rule 34 (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428953)

Nope, Terry Pratchett did it in Pyramids.

Re:rule 34 (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429163)

Am I the only one to immediately think of how to apply rule 34 to it?

No. But don't forget that getting such a tattoo would require the repeated and numerous insertion of a needle into your genitals.

Re:rule 34 (1)

tsotha (720379) | more than 2 years ago | (#39430079)

It's not like people don't do that already with regular tattoo ink.

My worry would be getting exposed to random magnetic fields from motors and such, then having to endure the smirks of people around me "Oh, is it Spring already? Hahaha." It would be like going through a second adolescence - "No, I will not go to the board and work out this math problem. I'm staying right here at my desk. Sitting. With my legs crossed."

Magneto (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428133)

You would also no longer be admitted to visit Magneto in his glass prison.

Why didn't Elop kill this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428151)

This really does sounds like the next Big Thing! Thank goodness Nokia killed off the N9/MeeGo to make room for this...

Can I get one (0)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428161)

Can I get one on my dick?

Re:Can I get one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428249)

It's for clits, not dicks. You fag!

Re:Can I get one (1)

JosKarith (757063) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428485)

I believe there's a minimum size for it to work properly... ;->

Re:Can I get one (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 2 years ago | (#39430065)

I believe there's a minimum size for it to work properly... ;->

No problem! Wanna see?

I got this sick tribal that vibrates (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428163)

every time there is a groupon for tattoos.

My tramp stamp vibrates when my STD results comeback clean from the clinic.

Great idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428225)

Forget the mundane issues people already have with regular tattoos: Ferromagnetic ink, embedded. What can possibly go wrong?

Re:Great idea (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428983)

I'm waiting for the House episode where they put someone with one of these in the MRI machine and antics ensue.

Re:Great idea (1)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429239)

Already happened on House, although the tattoo wasn't functional, they did MRI a patient with prison tattoos [usanetwork.com] and cause him lots of pain.

Resolution (1)

lorinc (2470890) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428245)

The real question is what would be the resolution of such device. Can it be so precise that a reasonable area of skin could be used to read message? Or to restore sight to blind people or to make a non visual augmented reality?

If this is more than a binary variable (vibrate or not), then it opens the doors to much more creative applications.

Tactile feedback! (1)

deciduousness (755695) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428325)

I assume this could be used for alerting you for various things. Cell phone on vibrate. Or it could be used for feedback in video games. How about invisible fences for humans? Hikers could use this to be warned of dangerous areas or conditions. Could also be quite the distraction when you are driving.

Re:Tactile feedback! (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428883)

Hikers could use this to be warned of dangerous areas or conditions.

You mean the grizzly claw marks on your ass wasn't enough to give you the hint?

Re:Tactile feedback! (1)

Eponymous Hero (2090636) | more than 2 years ago | (#39430977)

you must be from provincetown, ct

Re:Tactile feedback! (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 2 years ago | (#39430159)

Could also be quite the distraction when you are driving.

Especially when you receive erotic messages from your girlfriend, or your wife, whichever calls first.

How is this novel? (1, Insightful)

Nemesisghost (1720424) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428349)

Unless I'm totally off my rocker(which is possible) wouldn't prior art come into play here? It's one of the "techs" of at least Mass Effect. And I don't think the writers from ME made it up out of thin air.

Re:How is this novel? (1)

Epimer (1337967) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428451)

"Prior art" doesn't mean "somebody once came up with this idea in the abstract so you can't have a patent on it".

For a piece of prior art to be novelty destroying it has to provide enough information for the ordinary skilled person to implement the teachings of the patent in their entirety. Seeing it in a video game doesn't provide you with the technical information to implement a ferromagnetic tattoo which displays different information based off data received from a mobile device.

Re:How is this novel? (2)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429105)

There is plenty of prior art for the tech of implantable magnetics :

A Sixth Sense for a Wired World [wired.com]

Haptic feedback is probably a candidate for the Next Big Thing in human interface devices, the other being wearable displays.

I can"t Wait! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428391)

My new catch phrase - "Excuse me, my butt is tingling, I have to take this"

Re:I can"t Wait! (1)

Ol Biscuitbarrel (1859702) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428661)

That's what she said.

Re:I can"t Wait! (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429175)

That's what she said.

After visiting the free clinic.

other applications (1)

CosaNostra Pizza Inc (1299163) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428429)

Okay, pleasure has already been covered in some posts as a possible application for this. What about intense pain?...Does Nokia have Orwellian aspirations for this patent?

Re:other applications (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428789)

Once you get to the point where you are installing ferromagnetic ink under a person's skin, there are much, much easier ways to inflict pain. Even if you want a permanent, can trigger remotely system.

Now hackers, on the other hand, they could have a sadistic field day with this. Really, the embedded ink sound like a really really bad idea from a practical standpoint (MRI machines as others have mentioned, but there are tons of sources of magnetic fields that could be extremely painful, dangerous, or inconvenient). The wearable material, on the other hand, has extreme potential.

Re:other applications (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 2 years ago | (#39430521)

Once you get to the point where you are installing ferromagnetic ink under a person's skin, there are much, much easier ways to inflict pain

One should also realize that modern medical technology can keep people alive long after they would rather be dead. At least back in the old days there was a significant chance you would die during torture.

The mind can shut out pain, but shutting out horror and despair might be harder.

BTW for a similar reason being one of those "highlander" immortals would be terrible in some scenarios since you cannot die. Imagine if one day you were trapped by a sadist who finds out that you can't die...

Re:other applications (1, Funny)

Pope (17780) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429283)

What about intense pain?...Does Nokia have Orwellian aspirations for this patent?

Well, they've already gone to Windows Phone 7...

There's too much iron in your blood.. (1)

Hillview (1113491) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428443)

Takes on a whole new meaning here.

Even more TSA hassles (1)

jandrese (485) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428455)

I wonder if you would set of metal detectors too? Normally small amounts of metal are alright, but this has to be acting as an antenna of some sort to get enough energy to vibrate enough to be felt.

Not all that novel... (3, Informative)

grnbrg (140964) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428459)

People have been implanting magnetic stuff for a while...

http://www.wired.com/gadgets/mods/news/2006/06/71087 [wired.com]

Re:Not all that novel... (1)

Epimer (1337967) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428619)

Right, but reading on to claim 4 of the patent: "An apparatus... wherein the magnetic field originates from an electronic device and relates to digital content stored in the electronic device."

That's nowhere near the same thing as a simple subdermal ferromagnetic implant.

Claim 1 in the published application is probably broad enough that the stuff in the linked article would be novelty-destroying, but published patent applications aren't the same as granted patents, and in fact will have deliberately have been drafted broadly as a starting point for examination. Something with claim 4 incorporated into claim 1 is nowhere near anticipated by subdermal ferromagnetic implants alone.

Prior art (1, Informative)

RenHoek (101570) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428465)

Don't tell me this concept has never been used in SciFi before.

I'm pretty tired of companies taking all of the cool ideas people already had and stamping a patent on it. I'M LOOKING AT YOU IPAD!

Re:Prior art (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428541)

Don't tell me this concept has never been used in SciFi before.

I'm pretty tired of companies taking all of the cool ideas people already had and stamping a patent on it. I'M LOOKING AT YOU IPAD!

There is a difference between a sci-fi writer just dreaming up stuff and some company actually reasearching and describing a realistic workable implementation of it. If the patent system foster the latter, that would be a good thing (which we seldom can say about the patent system these days).

Re:Prior art (2)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428863)

Patents* don't cover ideas. Patents cover inventions. Call me up when having the idea for a warp drive means you know how to build one.

*Real, valid, how-they-are-meant-to-be-used patents. Software and design patents (such as the iPad/Galaxy Tablet thing) are just stupid.

Re:Prior art (1)

RenHoek (101570) | more than 2 years ago | (#39431811)

Yes, but patents aren't 'how-they-are-meant-to-be-used' anymore are they? Sure, you can say that's how it _should_ be, but in the end, that's not how it is. When 99% of all patents nowadays are crap, I think it's safe to go out and generalize.

Nowadays it's hard to really invent anything anyway. It's all evolutionary (computers are getting small enough to fit in my pocket, omg PocketComputer!) or discovery (Ah so when I run electricity through graphene, that's what happens).

And you made the point yourself. Apple isn't suing Samsung because Apple had a smart idea for the innards of the iPad, but suing instead because it also looked like a rectangle that somehow was reminiscent of the movie 2001).

Re:Prior art (1)

AlecC (512609) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429115)

No, to stamp a patent on it they have to explain how it is done. Which, it appears, they have done in this case. I cannot patent the idea of a time machine, but if I can explain how how one can be built, I can sure as hell patent that, despite many hundreds of SF stories describing time travel.

Re:Prior art (1)

dpilot (134227) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429253)

Well of course it has. Which begs the question...

Can it be weaponized, like the O.C. tattoos in the "Pandora's Star" series of books, by Peter F Hamilton?

No thanks ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428531)

I like tattoos. I have several of them.

But a vibrating tattoo patented by Nokia? Not so much.

I can kind of see why I'd want this as a wearable patch, but actually doing it as a tattoo? Well, that's right up there with getting a Zune tattoo -- it just sounds stupid. :-P

I'll take my actual tattoos as non-magnetic, non vibrating thanks.

Re:No thanks ... (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428881)

You missed part of it. The design doesn't matter. You can choose the design, it gets tattoo'd on you, you magentise it, then you use your phone and have sensors in the phone scan the magentic field. To make it vibrate the phone produces amodified magnetic field tbat when it interacts with your tattoo vibrates slightly, and in different patterns.

You choose design and vibration patterns. Like picking out a tattoo, or ring tone.

Re:No thanks ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429133)

You missed part of it.

No, I got that. They claim it goes in just like normal ink and then you re-magnetize later. Choose your own design and everything.

It doesn't make me any more interested. I have surprisingly little desire to have my tattoo vibrate because my phone is doing something. I simply don't care to have something like this ... I'm not that attached to my phone.

If sure someone could make a blue-tooth enabled butt-plug which would do the exact same thing -- I'm not buying one of those either.

I have no doubt there are some people who will decide they need a vibrating tattoo, but I can't see it becoming really widespread for a lot of years.

Re:No thanks ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39430735)

You missed part of it. The design doesn't matter. You can choose the design, it gets tattoo'd on you, you magentise it

But what if I don't want a hot pink tattoo?

I've seen a few people... (0)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428627)

I've seen a few people who seem hell bent on getting a full-body massage out of the idea.

No tatts here, but I admire the art work.

Santorum campaign robocalls (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428729)

would cause a tingling in my anus?

perceivable? (1)

DarthVain (724186) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428751)

"perceivable stimulus"

As opposed to patenting something that has impreceivable...

Does stimulus that no one can observe really happen?

Re:perceivable? (1)

Epimer (1337967) | more than 2 years ago | (#39428781)

You could have a stimulus which was applied at below the threshold level to be detectable by a person, but is still having an effect on the system in question. That would qualify as an imperceptible stimulus.

Re:perceivable? (1)

WillgasM (1646719) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429185)

If a tree falls in the woods...yada yada yada.

Re:perceivable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39432287)

I guess we could ask Obama in retrospect. ;)

Early April 1? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39428771)

Did somebody accidentally release an April Fools story ahead of schedule?

Remember the custom vibrating-ring-tones?

Why the hell would I want that? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429069)

You've never been prank called? Or called by a stalker? Or by some (may $deity smite them in a not-too-merciful way) telemarkedroids? Preferably while you tried desperately to sleep? Or while trying to have sex? Or while trying to do ANYTHING remotely requiring your cell NOT to interrupt?

If you thought that damn thing ringing would be a nuisance, be prepared for a really new level thereof.

I'm effin' glad if I can hurl that damn thing into some corner of my flat where I don't need to find it until next time I want to make a phone call. Why the hell would I want it to get even more under my skin than it already does?

Spidey Sense (2)

WillgasM (1646719) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429077)

We're a step closer to making one of the lamer superpowers a reality.

I'm wondering about ... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429119)

... the possibility of 'reading' a ferromagnetic tattoo with a magnetic or r.f. field. The end effect could be similar to having an RFID chip planted in my body, making me trackable wherever I go.

No thanks. I can leave my cell phone behind when I want to go off the grid.

Does the transducer work both ways? (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429215)

Can I implant one of these tattoos in my arm and a permanent magnet on my waist and then generate current when I swing my arms?

Interesting possibilities...

I might of missed it (1)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429613)

But both links talk about a "material attachable to the skin" this seems to be a patch not a tattoo. Think nicotine patches all over your arms, sexy. Why do people come up with complicated solutions to things that already exist? They aren't replacing the phone so you still have to have the phone with you. Why not put the damn vibrate setting on rather than a magnetic field generator AND a patch on your arm, have to figure out how to make it so only your phone can make your patch vibrate etc. ? A really complicated solution to have the same effect (vibration on the skin telling you something is happening).

welcome to slave-collars (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39429655)

Need I say more....

Tattoo here for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39429951)

girlfriend. Tattoo there for X-wife. Tattoo here for boss. Tattoo there for IRS...

Exploit Potential (1)

Translation Error (1176675) | more than 2 years ago | (#39429967)

"Welcome to Nokia tech support, this is Rick speaking. How may I help you?"
"Thank God I finally reached a person! My tattoo has been buzzing out 'Never Gonna Give You Up' for the past 16 hours and I can't make it stop--please, you've got to help me!"

mark of the beast: storm clouds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39430109)

the rise of popularity in different types of new tattoos, some under the illusion of health benefits, push us closer to the mark of the beast.

OK but gosh (1)

rinoid (451982) | more than 2 years ago | (#39431321)

I've already got my phone on vibrate for you baby!

Am I the only one who thought... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39431787)

"Dark marks vibrating again. Must be another text from Voldemort."

This is NOT patentable! (1)

s.petry (762400) | more than 2 years ago | (#39432697)

They are attempting to patent this as a process, without a material invented to actually work with the patent. Yet another example of blatant patent abuse that the media is trying to hype as a great thing. /sigh

At long last...I can get my Dark Mark! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39433807)

Too bad Jobs died. This would be just the just the thing for him to summon flash mobs of apple fan-boys (and girls).

No Need. (1)

FilthCatcher (531259) | more than 2 years ago | (#39437837)

I've already got an embedded device that vibrates.

Pandora's Star anyone? (1)

alexandre_ganso (1227152) | more than 2 years ago | (#39445127)

and its OCTatoos?

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