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U.S. Gov't To Keep Data On Non-Terrorist Citizens For 5 Years

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the innocent-until-eventually-suspected-of-something dept.

Government 186

arnott writes with this excerpt from the Washington Post: "The Obama administration has approved guidelines that allow counterterrorism officials to lengthen the period of time they retain information about U.S. residents, even if they have no known connection to terrorism. The changes allow the National Counterterrorism Center, the intelligence community's clearinghouse for terrorism data, to keep information for up to five years. Previously, the center was required to promptly destroy — generally within 180 days — any information about U.S. citizens or residents unless a connection to terrorism was evident."

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I'm surprised there is a limit (5, Insightful)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452543)

I'm surprised there is even a 5 year limit- figured they would keep that data indefinately. I'm sure they have loopholes to allow them to keep the data on anyone that they think is "interesting".

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (5, Interesting)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452565)

Don't worry, in five years the limit will be raised to ten years...

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (5, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452625)

Don't worry, in five years the limit will be raised to ten years...

A moving target ... just like extending copyrights so works don't end up in the public domain?

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452877)

What does NAACP stand for? Now Apes Are Called People.

Why are there only 2 pall bearers at black funerals? Garbage cans only have two handles.

What does the BFI logo on the side of a dumpster stand for? Black Family Inside.

Why is it cruel to give Tootsie Rolls to little black kids? They'll bite their own fingers off.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (1)

Tr3vin (1220548) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453233)

Go put on a hoodie and walk through a gated community.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (5, Interesting)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452963)

According to the Supreme Court it could be 1000 years and still be constitutional. That is why Jefferson advised Madison to include a fixed number of years in the Bill of Rights -- that no monopoly should last longer than an author's lifetime.

(And once again Jefferson demonstrated an uncanny ability to predict future events... that the monopoly for artists/media companies would be extended to insanely long terms.)

   

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (1)

zlives (2009072) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453495)

i am sorry that data was purged after 180 days, there is no reference available to said "Jefferson"

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453213)

Don't worry, in five years the limit will be raised to ten years...

A moving target ... just like extending copyrights so works don't end up in the public domain?

Whoa, now it all makes sense...Disney must keep buying Congress so that they will keep extending copyright terms because Mickey Mouse is a TERRORIST!!!

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453385)

The Zombie Bono Data Retention Act.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (5, Interesting)

mr1911 (1942298) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453197)

Or, as the OP eluded to, they just define whatever it is you are doing as a potential terror indicator and then keep your data forever.

Don't worry about being added to the list. You're probably there unless you live a very boring, very sheltered life and speak to no one.

Don't be alarmed. This is all for safety and security. Just not yours.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453613)

"antisocial behavior" is probably already on the watch list, but nice try.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (4, Insightful)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452595)

no one here can prove that data EVER gets destroyed.

that's all.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (4, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452639)

no one here can prove that data EVER gets destroyed.

So the US government is going to hire Facebook to handle data storage?

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (4, Funny)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452875)

Dont be silly. They hire Facebook to GET the data in the first place!

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453147)

After deduplication with the data FB already has, I imagine the storage costs would be extremely low!

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (4, Interesting)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452775)

I'm sure they have loopholes to allow them to keep the data on anyone that they think is "interesting".

Yeah, it's called an FBI file...

That we occasionally get a released FBI file on a long-dead political activist, or on an entertainer, or on a politician, or on a civil rights leader... draw your own conclusions.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453381)

I'm sure they have loopholes to allow them to keep the data on anyone that they think is "interesting".

Yeah, it's called an FBI file...

That we occasionally get a released FBI file on a long-dead political activist, or on an entertainer, or on a politician, or on a civil rights leader... draw your own conclusions.

Don't get your knickers in a twist. They've had an FBI file on me since the 70's. It was part of my background check for security clearance in the military. AFAIK, they still have it, though I don't know offhand when it was last updated.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (0)

jd (1658) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452799)

Given the NYPD is reportedly collecting information on anyone left-of-centre, for the crime of being leftwing, under terrorist legislation, I am not confident that any of the rules were being obeyed anyway. Since when has investigating people on the other side of the country been NYPD jurisdiction?

However, Obama is in a pickle. If he cracks down on the abuse of the rules, the Republicans will attack him for being soft on terror. If he does nothing, the Republicans will accuse him of being soft on corruption. His only option left, in an election year, is to legalize the abuses.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (5, Insightful)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452879)

Or, you know. He could do his job, and crack down on the abuses regardless of what political consequences it has for him. I, for one, don't believe in giving our representatives a free pass on not doing their job just because they don't want to hurt their chances of re-election.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (2)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453145)

Hope. Change. We are the ones that we've been waiting for. This was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (3, Insightful)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453267)

Acknowledging this is election cycle politics doesn't excuse behavior, it explains behavior.

It's hardly a free pass. Almost everything that happens in politics is due to re-election. The deficit limit shenanigans that resulted in a lower credit rating, and higher borrowing costs, were an election gambit to appease the tea party and fiscal responsibility types. The entire 1980's and more were one big "I'm tougher on crime" pissing match to get votes.

Understanding how laws are passed is the first step in preventing bad laws being passed. The next step is a true institutional memory where abuses are archived, and included in SuperPAC funded advertisements right before the next election.

Your actions will not be forgotten, is the message.

The next step, is to get the people who actually care out to vote.

After that, we need honest people to get pissed off enough that they run for office just so the establishment doesn't keep reinforcing itself. Without the earlier steps, this guy won't stand a chance.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453629)

Given how long current political elections when aren't we in one?

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453133)

Since when has investigating people on the other side of the country been NYPD jurisdiction

"Other side of the country"? Try "other side of the world.

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/spy-talk/2010/11/nypds_foreign_cops_play_outsid.html [washingtonpost.com] “The NYPD has an assistant commissioner who is responsible specifically for the supervision of overseas officers" who are posted in London, Paris, Madrid, etc.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452829)

I suspect this is being mis-interpreted, it really should read "retain the last 5 years of data on citizens having no links to terrorists".

That would be a lot more believable. The limit would be extended as cheaper data storage becomes available.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452965)

"Previously, the center was required to promptly destroy â" generally within 180 days â" any information about U.S. citizens or residents unless a connection to terrorism was evident."

Considering the broad definition of terrorism they can hold just about any data they feel like holding.

Cost (1)

currently_awake (1248758) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453053)

Hosting all that data costs money. From a law enforcement point of view it's probably worthless after 5 years anyway.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453077)

If you cycle data through "independent contractors" (civilians outside of government regulation) you can easily bypass these rules privately. Obviously, the problem was dealing with the quantity of data, so they were forced to extend the limit publicly.

Re:I'm surprised there is a limit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453955)

Don't worry, within the next 5 years they will extend it more.

Fuck yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452549)

America...

Hope and Change (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452561)

I Hope we Change our President this year

Re:Hope and Change (4, Insightful)

mhajicek (1582795) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452691)

You mean for yet another one that's just the same?

Re:Hope and Change (2)

frodo from middle ea (602941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452723)

And replace him with an even more draconian one ?

Re:Hope and Change (3, Informative)

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452913)

And replace him with what....Romney? Gingrich?! Santorum??!!

Let's face it. Whomever wins the next presidential election, the citizens will lose.

Re:Hope and Change (1, Insightful)

Xenkar (580240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453281)

Ron Paul

Re:Hope and Change (4, Insightful)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453517)

The problem with Ron Paul is that while he's on the mark about 30-40% of things, he's bat shit crazy about another 50% or so. The remaining 10-20% falls into the "meh" category.

Re:Hope and Change (4, Insightful)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453861)

While I agree he has his wacky side (a rather large one at that) it seems he would be much more constitutionally minded than any of the others running. The president's power is in the ability to sign or veto legislation, as commander and chief of the armed services, and who he appoints as judges. If Congressman Paul were elected as president what would be the worst that would happen. We probably wouldn't be starting any wars unless we were attacked. We would stand a better chance of bring all of our troops home. The federal government might shut down like it did in the 90s because congress can't get its shit together and produce a balanced budget because I highly doubt a President Paul would sign one that wasn't balanced. The biggest issue might be anyone who he would appoint to the US Supreme Court, and even there I think I would be willing to pick people who would support individual freedoms and liberties. Problem he comes with a lot of baggage as a large number of established Republicans would rather he didn't run as a R because they are rather embarrassed by his libertarian and dovish sides and the rest of the population is well aware of his more wacky beliefs (note there is probably a fair amount of overlap between these 2 groups). This is why he doesn't stand a snowball's chance in hell of getting the republican nomination let alone winning the presidency.

Re:Hope and Change (2)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453523)

And replace him with what....Romney? Gingrich?! Santorum??!!

Let's face it. Whomever wins the next presidential election, the citizens will lose.

That's been the problem for the last several election cycles. I haven't seen a real candidate since, well, hell, I don't think I've ever seen a real candidate, and I'm pushing 60!

Re:Hope and Change (2)

x0d (2506794) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453349)

there's your politics http://i.imgur.com/mSTMD.jpg [imgur.com]

Good. (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452577)

We need to take down these terrorists, and if that means ignoring the Bill of Rights and throwing Americans into concentration camps, like we did in WW2, then so be it. As Santorum said, "We must be united in this war. We cannot allow any criticism."

/end sarcasm

Re:Good. (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452739)

As Santorum said, "We must be united in this war. We cannot allow any criticism."

When did he say that? I would in no way be surprised if he did say that, but a google search didn't return anything.

Re:Good. (3, Informative)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452871)

an early 2007 debate. He was telling Congressman Paul that he should be quiet (Paul is pro-defense but against preemptive wars of aggression).

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453519)

Care to cite instead of just letting us take your word on it? Or would that be too much for you to swallow?
 
Sounds like spin and FUD to me.

Re:Good. (2)

Threni (635302) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453657)

"(Paul is pro-defense but against preemptive wars of aggression)."

"but"?

Re:Good. (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452929)

Santorum is President? I must have missed something.

Re:Good. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453125)

Ate you intentionally being dense or just stupid?

Re:Good. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453271)

You did. You missed the part where nobody said anything about Santorum being president.

Re:Good. (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452941)

Older folks in Russia always like to say how they felt safer in the old Soviet Union. They didn't get the opinion of the people who went to the gulags though.

Re:Good. (4, Informative)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453215)

We need to take down these terrorists, and if that means ignoring the Bill of Rights and throwing Americans into concentration camps, like we did in WW2, then so be it.

That's a great idea, and I know just where to start! There's a guy who organized the illegal killing of several Americans in Yemen with a large explosion. He currently resides at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington DC. He has many of accomplices working elsewhere in Washington as well as nearby Arlington, VA.

Re:Good. (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453619)

We need to take down these terrorists, and if that means ignoring the Bill of Rights and throwing Americans into concentration camps, like we did in WW2, then so be it.

That's a great idea, and I know just where to start! There's a guy who organized the illegal killing of several Americans in Yemen with a large explosion. He currently resides at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, Washington DC. He has many of accomplices working elsewhere in Washington as well as nearby Arlington, VA.

Don't forget their running buddies over in Langley. And don't forget that the former resident of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave is just as guilty. Grab him and his running buddies too.

Re:Good. (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453509)

My former sig seems appropriate here:

Only through obedience and faith can we preserve our way of life against authoritarian fanaticism"

And I Promise You... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452603)

None of the Republican candidates (with the exception of Ron Paul, who everyone ignores anyway) will choose this particular subject to thrash Obama on.

Look at what happened in Toulouse (2)

Jack Malmostoso (899729) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452611)

I really fail to understand how this data is used and if anyone actually checks it or if it is kept in order to incriminate you later. See what happened in Toulouse last week: a man who went in and out Afghanistan and Pakistan, was known to the police, went in and out of jail a couple of times, was known to frequent an extremist group, still managed to kill children in a school and keep the police busy for two days under siege.
Shouldn't he have been stopped before?

I don't understand, really.

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (4, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452659)

Stopped for doing what? Traveling? Is that now illegal too? (Oh yes of course it is; you can't fly domestically without the SA's permission.)

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (1)

Niedi (1335165) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452697)

still managed to kill children in a school

Just a couple of days after he went out to kill a soldier.
Twice.

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452717)

The NSA claims to have some super-secret data-mining operation going on... but a lot of people are doubtful about how effective such a thing could be.

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452763)

The NSA claims to have some super-secret data-mining operation going on... but a lot of people are doubtful about how effective such a thing could be.

Don't worry, the NSA knows who these doubters are and they will use it against them at sometime in the future.

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (4, Insightful)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452807)

Keep in mind that it's security theater, not real security. They do these things to increase their budget and power, and justify the increase in budget and power itself and future increases, not to actually do anything to increase safety.

It would be a liability were the public to actually care. The government had good indications that this guy was bad apples, had all these increased powers and ability to suspend our rights, and obviously it failed. But rather than say "Okay, then this isn't working, you guys utterly failed in your stated mission, you guys are fired and we're throwing out all these suspensions of our rights and increased government powers," the public says "TAKE MORE OF OUR RIGHTS! SPEND MORE OF OUR TAXES!!! HAVE MORE POWER!!! JUST PROTECT US FROM ALL THESE BAD GUYS!!!"

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452823)

Simple. This is just a means to legalize what is already being done. Terrorism isn't what it's about.

You're not looking closely enough.

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453241)

It's quite simple, really.

Lunatics like that guy in France are not the target. It's you and me, and everyone else who questions authority. There is a group of people who dominate the annals of power in the world, and a free-thinking populace who desire liberty and free exchange of ideas is an impediment to their vision of the future they want. They believe they are justified by whatever god or philosophy they subscribe to, and know they are righteous. Commoners just don't understand what's best for them.

Re:Look at what happened in Toulouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453493)

Lunatics like that guy in France are not the target. It's you and me, and everyone else who questions authority. There is a group of people who dominate the annals of power in the world, and a free-thinking populace who desire liberty and free exchange of ideas is an impediment to their vision of the future they want.

And to the present they have.

* Posting AC because I've already moderated.

Pick a name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452619)

Obama, Santorum, Romney, etc.. etc.., You only get to choose the one that's gonna stab you ...

Re:Pick a name... (2)

mhajicek (1582795) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452725)

Would Misuer prefer to be hanged with a red rope, or a blue rope?

Re:Pick a name... (1)

geckipede (1261408) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453043)

Was that an attempt to spell "monsieur" ?

DRM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452681)

Let's see them get by my DRM...

More proof... (2)

MitchDev (2526834) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452707)

...that the biggest Terrorist organization and biggest threat to American's rights is the US government...

Re:More proof... (-1, Flamebait)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453671)

Oh, please. Parroting the rantings of paranoid, right-wing nut-jobs is not helpful discourse. We agree that "the government" is over-stepping here, and has been since this bullshit started over ten years ago, but calling them "terrorists" is just stupid. What's next? Calling for armed insurrection? Or will you just retreat to your "compound" in Texas or northern Idaho? How about, instead, we talk about things that we can do that will actually make a difference?

Excellent! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452735)

I admit, I used to think any data retention, let alone as long as for 180 days was bad.

But about 3 years ago, I realized that this line of thinking was wrong, perhaps even racist. Now keeping data on everyone for 5 years is good.

My attitude on war has undergone the same growth.

That's growth? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452769)

It's ok, everyone goes senile eventually.

Thank god for Obama! (4, Funny)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452773)

If it were Bush it would be 10 years!

Re:Thank god for Obama! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452869)

Only because Bush uses both hands to count.

Re:Thank god for Obama! (1)

RussR42 (779993) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453413)

You fool! This was somehow the Bush administration's fault. At least it will be by next week.

Re:Thank god for Obama! (3, Funny)

zlives (2009072) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453571)

well at lest Guantanamo is closed, o wait

Re:Thank god for Obama! (1)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453821)

So - eight minutes of fear, hate and war mongering have no bearing on what's happening now?

Absolutely Obama hasn't done enough to change things. No doubt about that.

But with that said, Bush and Friends not only set the wheels in motion, but they did everything to ensure that the switches on the tracks were broken and locked into place and that the brake mechanisms were removed.

Re:Thank god for Obama! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453757)

Obama allows this to happen, how is this a 'Bush' thing..

But, but, but .. BUSH!

What terrorism? (1)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452793)

Didn't terrorism end after they killed Bin Laden?

Re:What terrorism? (2)

JeanCroix (99825) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453083)

We have always been at war with terrorism. And drugs. And poverty.

Re:What terrorism? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453275)

I thought poverty was our ally and always had been. Freedom is slavery. Riches make you poor. I'll be rich so that you don't have to deal with the burden.

Double plus good! (1)

isotope23 (210590) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452797)

"Oh say does that start spangled banner yet wave....
  o'er the land of the free, or the home of the slave?"

How Bizarre. (1)

fullback (968784) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452863)

What a strange country the U.S. is turning into. It's as if the old Soviet Union and eastern bloc transposed with the west in some bad science fiction movie. The old East German secret police, the Stasi, must be green with envy.

Americans seem perfectly happy with it all. That's fine, though. Americans should do as they wish in their own country. It's their business and theirs alone.

I just wish the U.S. showed other countries the same consideration and let people in other countries do as they wish.

Re:How Bizarre. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453401)

It's not like there's no precedent for this. All of the world's super powers have tried to fight their inevitable decline by imposing strict rules on their people to try and prevent the inevitable revolution, be it ancient Rome, most European countries throughout the middle ages right up to the Soviet bloc in recent years. The USA is no different, it's had the glory days of its economy and is now entering its winter of discontent and the government is repeating the cycle by gearing up to fight a public backlash.

All hail! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452925)

We love you, Dear Leader, President For Life Obama! Can this go on my permanent record?

bogus rationale (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452931)

According to the linked article this is due to not catching the underwear bomber in 2008.

Except he was a Nigerian. Not a us citizen. Afaik there were never any citizens associated with that incident.

Re:bogus rationale (1)

benjamindees (441808) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453513)

That's code for "fuck you, citizens, we'll do whatever we want."

The underwear bombing was basically a verified government false flag.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WU7_L1bVBLo [youtube.com]

Damn that evil Dick Cheney! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39452949)

...Oh, wait.

Re:Damn that evil Dick Cheney! (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453067)

Hey! Not all evil dicks are as bad as Cheney....

foreigners (2)

anonieuweling (536832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39452993)

That info is about USA citizens.
So the situation for foreigners must be much worse...

Re:foreigners (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453317)

Absolutely. Basically US agencies have the cart blanche for spying on any non-US citizens in any way they like. I wouldn't be surprised if they already have built a giant database with all information about any non-US person they can gather just because they can.

Re:foreigners (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453647)

I'd be curious about how long they store those fingerprints they collect at border crossings, actually (God, what a hassle!). Also, what they do to them if the person crossed becomes a citizen later on.

I hate stories like this because.. (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453019)

aside from the obvious reasons, my end users will read it and expect me to be able to archive 5 years of their data and email. We just don't have the storage capacity or funds to buy more for that kind of archival, the state is in a world of financial hurt. Must be nice to be the Fed.

Re:I hate stories like this because.. (1)

benjamindees (441808) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453535)

You sound like a Windows admin...

Re:I hate stories like this because.. (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453727)

Um..not particularly; I admin Linux and NetWare mostly. Why?

Don't Worry! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453055)

They stored the data on MegaUpload!

We need Mulder and Scully (2)

rjejr (921275) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453137)

Thanks to the US govt people can stop worrying about the trilateral commission and smoking old men in dark back rooms. Who needs conspiracy theories are theorists when the govt. can do anything it wants right out in the open. We're all criminals and pirates. Well except for white collar criminals, their just good capitalists.

and if you wonder why (4, Insightful)

nimbius (983462) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453315)

the united states government is pursuing terrorists so voraciously, it is not because they have your safety as a primary concern. Natural disasters are easily shrugged off, for example little effort was put into katrina and many lives lost due to government neglegence but no real repercussions arose from the incident, just a smooth shuffling of deck chairs so to speak.

the occupy protests, while they included violent police crackdowns on citizens and journalists alike, also received no real repercussions that couldnt be easily dismissed by the government as the rantings of kids and slackers with "no clear message" and "subversive" tendencies.

terrorism on the other hand brings results. it undermines a government in ways that are unchallengeable as it is an amorphous concept. theres no real enemy, despite how badly america wanted it to be osama, or sadam, or al-awlaki. Terrorism is an ideology, and every troop from the legions of rome to the english military officer who stood guard against the irish menace during the troubles understands that no weapon will ever purge it from the earth. terrorism is determination with absolutely nothing to lose; the last resort of a broken people.

you dont disarm terrorists by spying on everyone, because anyone can be a terrorist at any time it simply is not efficient. the only way to stop terrorism is to recognize the demands of the terrorist and try to understand what it is thats driven them to it. so long as we continue to fight, we will meet the immovable object to our unstoppable force each time with no ground gained or lost on either side.

Re:and if you wonder why (1)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453767)

+1 Insightful
Now, cue the retards who will try to skewer you for being "soft" on terrorists. Never mind the fact that more people die in auto accidents every few weeks than died at the hands of terrorists on 9/11/2001. A healthy perspective is not something that fearful people usually have. That's why it is doubly shameful for our leaders to still fanning the flames of that fear, rather than helping us to collectively regain our perspective.

Money, not power (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453791)

The dirty little secret is that political power is merely a stepping stone to riches. The Hitlers and Stalins of the world -- those who are motivated by power more than money -- are extremly rare.

We know that all governments only expand in power and revenue throughout their lifetimes. Modern times have seen governments all over the world swell to unprecedented levels. But it wasn't for power or glory. Nearly ALL of that expansion was done in the name of money, not power. Again, political power is merely a stepping stone to riches.

Politicians lie every day, but the balance sheet ALWAYS speaks the truth.

He is so different from Bush... (0)

Higgins_Boson (2569429) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453325)

...that he does many of the same types of things.

Vote Obamoppression 2012!

Job applications in jeopardy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453347)

So what's going to happen when this data is inevitably shared and, years from now, you're applying for that dream job that you're absolutely perfect for and, at the last minute, the HR department trots out all the pr0n sites you visited five years ago?

Airline industry, brace yourself (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39453623)

Please prepare for the extended dry season as more and more of your customers are deemed unsafe for the Pentagon building.
--
Sincerely, Your administration

Gosh (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | more than 2 years ago | (#39453687)

I feel SO much safer now, this is the change he was hoping to provide.
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