×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Google I/O Sells Out In 20 Minutes

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the improved-throughput-explains-all dept.

Google 221

netbuzz writes "Last year it took almost an hour, but this morning Google's enormously popular conference for developers sold out in about 20 minutes, Vic Gundotra, Google's senior vice president of engineering, told his followers on Google+. 'While we're overwhelmed with the interest and enthusiasm around Google I/O, we know it can be very disappointing and frustrating when an event sells out this quickly,' he wrote. Those who did not get tickets were not only disappointed and angry, but mystified as to why they were left out of a first-come, first-served sale despite being online and ready to buy the second the bell rang. And, of course, tickets were quickly being scalped on eBay." Of course, everyone who gets in drives away in a free Tesla.

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

221 comments

is it the content or the SWAG? (4, Insightful)

raitchison (734047) | about 2 years ago | (#39486703)

I've always wondered with I/O how much people want to go because of whatever new technology is being introduced or discussed there or because the expectation being set that all attendees will get a full featured Android device (phone or tablet or STB).

The developer of the dominant alternative recovery for MANY android devices wasn't able to get a ticket this year (though he may well get one via back-channels) due to the mobs of people who snatched up the tickets like it was a Queen concert complete with zombie Freddie Mercury.

Also as TFS pointed out I suspect there are a fair number of people who got tickets with the intention of reselling them at a profit.

Hopefully Google does the right thing (3, Interesting)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#39486789)

If Google does the right thing, they'll find and cancel the scalped tickets - and do a second round.

Re:Hopefully Google does the right thing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39486893)

WTF, this is capitalism. At its finest. Next you'll be asking them to spread around some of their money.

Besides that, Google only says that they won't do evil. Not that they will do good.

Re:Hopefully Google does the right thing (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 2 years ago | (#39487001)

Besides that, Google only says that they won't do evil.

Not even that: they say don't *be* evil, you can still do it every now and then.

Re:Hopefully Google does the right thing (1)

raitchison (734047) | about 2 years ago | (#39486963)

Sounds good (and hillarious) but I think it would be harder to pull off than one would think, even for Google.

How would Google identify which tickets were scalped? I guess they could make the tickets non-transferrable but that would affect people who bought tickets with the intention of going but later found out they couldn't and would give their tickets to someone else (or sell them at cost).

Re:Hopefully Google does the right thing (3, Insightful)

ccguy (1116865) | about 2 years ago | (#39487105)

I guess they could make the tickets non-transferrable but that would affect people who bought tickets with the intention of going but later found out they couldn't and would give their tickets to someone else (or sell them at cost).

Just make them non-transferrable but refundable and problem solved.

Google would buy them back (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | about 2 years ago | (#39487183)

If a developer couldn't go because of illness, Google could offer to buy them or at least broker them at face value to someone who could go. If the tickets were non-transferable except through the brokering service, that would be less evil than letting the scalpers get them.

Solutions to Scalping (5, Interesting)

Firethorn (177587) | about 2 years ago | (#39487209)

It's a little late, but I have two thoughts. One was a band that discovered something like 80% of their tickets had been bought by scalpers, who were demanding 10X the ticket price. Their solution? They held 3 more shows. The first, originally scheduled, show was practically empty - the other 3 were packed.

Solution type: Increase supply.

Another option is to hold a 'dutch auction' for the tickets. Easy enough for shows with one seating category, but only a touch more difficult with multiple to handle people who are willing to pay $X for 'good' seats, but $Y for 'normal' seats only if they don't get good ones. The tickets then go for the minimum price that 'just' sells all tickets. Yes, this means that only the richest and/or most dedicated fo fans get to go, but at least the money ends up in the hands of the artist's company, not scalpers. If the artists feel that the price has risen too much, add shows.

Solution type: Increase the price so that demand equals supply.

Re:Solutions to Scalping (4, Informative)

Pope (17780) | about 2 years ago | (#39487345)

There was an even better solution to Hannah Montana or one of those other Disney types a year or so back: buyer's name goes on the ticket, and only that person can get in.

The biggest problem is between bands demanding a certain amount of money per show to play, and the touring management companies who feed into it, raising ticket prices in the process. This mostly applies to older bands, but it's easy to see where it leads.

Re:Solutions to Scalping (1)

EvanED (569694) | about 2 years ago | (#39487727)

I've thought about this. The first solution, of course, is the best, and has the schadenfreude benefit of screwing the scalpers a bit.

But I don't like the second one because of the drawback you mention. I'd prefer an approach like what Roger Waters used for his presale tickets for his recent tour of The Wall. Have a lottery to allocate tickets, but make the tickets non-transferable and check IDs at the will-call booth. (This is like what the other reply said.)

It means that the prices remain in reach (still very expensive in the case of The Wall, but almost certainly still far less than what they'd otherwise have been), and I suspect goes a long way to reducing scalping. (Technically it could still have occurred as long as the scalper can travel to the venue to pick up tickets. You could even check IDs at the door if you wanted to eliminate that possibility.) Waters's lottery could have been better, but IMO the fundamentals were pretty sound.

Re:Solutions to Scalping (2)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#39487791)

Bands time is finite, so they can't increase supply forever. And many of those popular bands feel some responsibility to their fans who've supported them for years. That means they don't want to charge limit their audience to the rich. In this case, neither of your solutions are workable.

Fortunately, the Grateful Dead came up with a solution. Ticket lotteries. One entry per person, a small maximum number of tickets per entry. This way, at least you have a fair chance of getting a ticket, instead of it being stacked towards the rich or well connected.

Re:Hopefully Google does the right thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487359)

"scalpel" tickets are easy to identify, they are sharper than regular tickets.

Re:is it the content or the SWAG? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39486939)

Between hotel, airfare and the $900 ticket price, you're not going to come close to breaking even unless you can avoid them because you live in the Bay Area. I think the vast majority of registrations are legitimate developers who are interested in participating in the conference, and not there just for the swag.

Whether or not google should prequalify registrations is really a different issue. Is the developer you mention more worthy than an independent developer with an app or two on Google Play? I think that's a hard sell, and for those few cases the backchannel technique is a good option.

Better way to give out tickets (3, Informative)

LostCluster (625375) | about 2 years ago | (#39486799)

Maybe instead of an online first-come first-serve process Google should hold a ticket lottery for those who want to attend, That will help get the tickets into the hand of pre-qualified developers instead of eBay ticket scalpers.

Not really... (1)

KingSkippus (799657) | about 2 years ago | (#39486955)

Not really. The scalpers would just get hundreds (thousands?) of people to register to be in the lottery to ensure that they get the tickets. Hell, they could probably even get more that way.

Honestly, I would think that the best way is to have some kind of lottery system combined with some process to vet people who are actually developers or industry folks who should be there. Maybe a really basic question about development that only developers would readily know the answer to. Once you've "passed," you don't have to do it again next year, you're automatically in the drawing (if you want to go, of course) for five years or such.

I'd love to see the same thing for popular concerts and sporting events.

Re:Not really... (0)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39487187)

It's possible to scam the Ebay scalpers by simply saying, "Ticket not received." (Or if the ticket is tracked, then return an empty envelope and then ask for a refund.) Google could do this very easily to recover tickets from scalpers while depriving those scam scalpers of profit.

And yes I think scammers deserve to be reverse-scammed. I've done it to many of them -- especially those who claim a game or video is "new" or "like new" but then deliver scratched-up junk that is really USED not new. i.e. Lying scumbags. I keep the game but get back the money (minus $2 for shipping). Teach the scammer that lying is costly.

Re:Not really... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487993)

So a scalper "lying" is bad, but you stealing property that he/she paid for is ok? How old are you?

Re:Not really... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488385)

Are you expecting applause for being a scammer, or admitting to it?

Re:Not really... (1)

LostCluster (625375) | about 2 years ago | (#39488063)

Google could reward actual developers only by requiring they have an app registered to them/their company in the official app store.

Re:Not really... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488299)

Except this conference is much more than an Android conference. Half the stuff is about ChromeOS, Google+, GWT, etc.

Re:Better way to give out tickets (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39486997)

I think they should have some kind of Google programming question as a prerequisite for registration.
It needs to be something that would eliminate the PHB's.

Re:Better way to give out tickets (4, Interesting)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | about 2 years ago | (#39487233)

Excellent idea. Google could put out an open ended problem. Those with the best solution get in for free, the worse your solution, the higher your cost. If you invent a one-of-a-kind, genius solution, Google hires you.

Re:Better way to give out tickets (1)

curunir (98273) | about 2 years ago | (#39487019)

I think there was actually a way for developers to game the registration process. For example, the registration page was doing client-side validation on date, so setting the system clock on your machine forward to past 7am would let you agree to the terms and move on to the next phase before the 7am live time.

Unfortunately for me, I only thought to do that about 6:45am, so I wasn't able to figure out how to game the second step in time. Did anyone else navigate the whole path this way?

Re:Better way to give out tickets (2)

mycroft16 (848585) | about 2 years ago | (#39487045)

The simplest method is to register a ticket to a name. Show your ID and the name must match that on the ticket. If you're buying 10 tickets for the group you are taking, enter all 10 names.

Re:Better way to give out tickets (2, Interesting)

ccguy (1116865) | about 2 years ago | (#39487053)

Maybe instead of an online first-come first-serve

I'm not so sure this was the case. I applied, and after the first "Sign up" button there was a page that said something like

"We're looking for a ticket for you. Please don't refresh this page or you will have to start over"

It lasted about 3 minutes before going to the next page where you could select your T-Shirt size, food preference and a few more things.
I don't believe those 3 minutes were overload. Maybe when google said "We're looking for a ticket" they meant "we're looking you up, looking for android, linux and java in your gmail / google + and so on".

Of course it's a theory I just made up. But if you have a better explanation for a 3 minutes delay (different to each user) other than some kind of priorization, go ahead :-)

Re:Better way to give out tickets (1)

magarity (164372) | about 2 years ago | (#39487093)

Maybe instead of an online first-come first-serve process Google should hold a ticket lottery for those who want to attend, That will help get the tickets into the hand of pre-qualified developers instead of eBay ticket scalpers.

No, Google should just auction them off on Ebay in the first place. It's hard to make a profit at scalping if the scalper has to pay more in the first place than the next highest bidder.

Re:Better way to give out tickets (2)

Ichijo (607641) | about 2 years ago | (#39488119)

But if the tickets were sold on eBay, the bids would go up so much that nobody could afford them!

Re:Better way to give out tickets (1)

oddjob1244 (1179491) | about 2 years ago | (#39487203)

Maybe instead of an online first-come first-serve process Google should hold a ticket lottery for those who want to attend, That will help get the tickets into the hand of pre-qualified developers instead of eBay ticket scalpers.

That won't help. They need to print your name on the ticket. If your ID doesn't match the name on the ticket, you don't get in.

First raspberry pi not goog IO (-1, Flamebait)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39486809)

First it was raspberry pi now its goog i/o. With all the shortages (not to mention other issues), USA in 2012 is sounding more and more like Russia in 1980.
We even have a centrally controlled failing economy.
All we need is some teenage german kid to fly his cessna halfway across the country under the radar, and land in our equivalent of red square, I guess that'd be some place in D.C. And some crappy Rambo movies where we're friends with the Taliban again.

Re:First raspberry pi not goog IO (4, Insightful)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | about 2 years ago | (#39486973)

The Raspberry Pi organization and its distributors are based in the UK and manufacturing is done in China. But don't let facts get in the way of paranoid rants.

Re:First raspberry pi not goog IO (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487127)

Shortage of tickets to google I/O and shortage of raspberry pi boards now equals food/clothing/housing shortages?

A Tesla? (1)

KingSkippus (799657) | about 2 years ago | (#39486815)

Of course, everyone who gets in drives away in a free Tesla.

What reference am I missing here?

Re:A Tesla? (4, Informative)

raitchison (734047) | about 2 years ago | (#39486903)

The ever increasing "stuff" that attendees get, a few years ago everyone got a Nexus One, a couple years ago I forget but last year people got a XOOM tablet and some other multi-hundred-dollar gizmo.

Re:A Tesla? (1)

KingSkippus (799657) | about 2 years ago | (#39487005)

Ah, thanks! Maaaan... In that case, I do wish I could go. I love new gizmos, especially the multi-hundred-dollar variety.

Re:A Tesla? (3, Informative)

updog (608318) | about 2 years ago | (#39487911)

Actually last year it was a Galaxy Tab 10.1 (not a XOOM), a ChromeBook with 2 years free 3G, and a Verizon 4G hotspot with 3 months of free service for everyone; and for some attending certain sessions, an Xperia and an Adruino ADK.

Re:A Tesla? (1)

rosciol (925673) | about 2 years ago | (#39488281)

2008: Nada
2009: Google Ion
2010: Motorola Droid and HTC Evo 4G
2011: Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
2012: ?

Re:A Tesla? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39486921)

Oprah, I think.

Re:A Tesla? (2)

Andy Dodd (701) | about 2 years ago | (#39486949)

Historically, I/O attendees received giveaways that exceeded the ticket cost in value.

For example, 2011 attendees paid $350 I believe, and received, at a minimum, a tablet worth $500 (Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1).

This year, the ticket price was increased to $900, the question of course is - will the swag value increase or decrease? If it decreases or stays steady, it may not sell out so fast next year. If it increases to match the ticket price - this problem will continue because the conference becomes effectively free (with the exception of travel expenses of course.)

Re:A Tesla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487023)

And if you can convince your employer to pay for the conference, you get completely free gear.

Re:A Tesla? (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | about 2 years ago | (#39487413)

And if you can convince your employer to pay for the conference, your employer gets the gear.

Fixed that sentence for you.

Re:A Tesla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488339)

What sort of cheap-ass hell-hole sweatshop employer do you work for?

Re:A Tesla? (1)

Eponymous Hero (2090636) | about 2 years ago | (#39487107)

they give away valuable swag to attendees just for attending. and paying the exorbitant ticket price. most attendees therefore don't even care for the conference itself. imagine if buying a ticket to a tool concert got you a free fender gibson guitar or a marshall half stack. their tickets are scalped pretty bad as it is, at least the buyers are actually fans of the band.

Re:A Tesla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487149)

That was last year's give away.

this year everyone gets a blow job from a well endowed blond babe.

Re:A Tesla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487395)

But... I like small redheads. Google has failed me once again! :(

Re:A Tesla? (2)

larry bagina (561269) | about 2 years ago | (#39488049)

Not everyone. There are a few lucky attendees that get to dress up like a well-endowed blonde babe and suck off a everyone else.

Re:A Tesla? (1)

stewsters (1406737) | about 2 years ago | (#39487161)

They figured out how to clone Nikola Tesla in their 80:20 time. Everyone gets one.

Re:A Tesla? (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 2 years ago | (#39488149)

I think Apple just found their proper half insane/ half brilliant replacement for Jobs.

Re:A Tesla? (1)

Thuktun (221615) | about 2 years ago | (#39488477)

They figured out how to clone Nikola Tesla in their 80:20 time. Everyone gets one.

I think Apple just found their proper half insane/ half brilliant replacement for Jobs.

Given some of the things he was building, I think Nikola Tesla was (like the fictional Sheldon Cooper) one lab accident away from becoming a supervillain.

Damn! Missed out. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39486879)

Where will I get my attractive yet ugly Android plush dolls? And where will I go to suck dick now? First my local S&M club runs out of space for subs; now GIO sells out.

Re:Damn! Missed out. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487011)

And where will I go to suck dick now.

The after-party of the next Apple WWDC?

Re:Damn! Missed out. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488475)

And where will I go to suck dick now.

The after-party of the next Apple WWDC?

I'll leave that to Eric Raymond! Only the most wizened of hackers can handle that. Google is getting harder (pun intended!) every year, but it will take some time before its look-and-feel matches Apple's.

My school's CS club is very disappointed (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39486935)

It's a shame, because a couple of these guys are Java wizards with a strong interest in developing for Android. A simple programming challenge at the gate would've thwarted all the posers.

Oh, well. I guess I'll start learning Objective-C.

Re:My school's CS club is very disappointed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487891)

Objective-C is just for the top-level GUI stuff. You will have to use raw C for most underlying things. Keep that in mind first.

You have been warned!

Re:My school's CS club is very disappointed (1)

larry bagina (561269) | about 2 years ago | (#39488351)

Objective C is a superset of C, so if you know Objective C, you know C.

And it's hardly GUI only -- consider the Foundation Kit (NSString, NSArray, NSData, NSDictionary, etc).

no scalping (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about 2 years ago | (#39486943)

All Google has to do is ban scalping of the tickets. You buy a ticket, YOU get in, not the holder of the ticket.

Re:no scalping (1)

pohl (872) | about 2 years ago | (#39487103)

All Google has to do is ban scalping of the tickets. You buy a ticket, YOU get in, not the holder of the ticket.

How would one implement that while maintaining the ability for a business to decouple purchasing a ticket from the decision of which member of a development team gets to go?

Re:no scalping (3, Interesting)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about 2 years ago | (#39487253)

All Google has to do is ban scalping of the tickets. You buy a ticket, YOU get in, not the holder of the ticket.

How would one implement that while maintaining the ability for a business to decouple purchasing a ticket from the decision of which member of a development team gets to go?

So a business can buy a ticket for a to-be-named-later employee, but you gotta prove you're an employee of the company to use the ticket. You can get your money back up to a certain point in time, and that spot goes to the next person on a wait list. It's not that fucking hard to ban ticket scalping for these kinds of events.

Re:no scalping (1)

mattiaza (2567891) | about 2 years ago | (#39487307)

By having the business decide who gets to go before buying the ticket. It's only 3 months away, the "most appropriate team member" is unlikely to change.

Re:no scalping (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#39487309)

Link the ticket to the company and have the employee provide credentials to show they are a current employee. How was that hard to come up with?

Re:no scalping (4, Insightful)

psmears (629712) | about 2 years ago | (#39488065)

Link the ticket to the company and have the employee provide credentials to show they are a current employee. How was that hard to come up with?

"Yes, I do work for ScamScum Ticketing Inc. It says so right here in this letter - on their company letterhead! - which they conveniently sent me along with my overpriced ticket".

Re:no scalping (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#39488211)

No, that's not how it's done. Tons of conferences have employees come based on an employer purchasing them tickets. The company tells the conference runners who they are sending and the person's identity is checked based on an agreed upon Form of ID. This is a long solved problem.

Re:no scalping (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 years ago | (#39487435)

dunno.

ask how 3gsm does it.

hint: it's pricing the tickets accordingly so that they don't run out but you get a loooot of people to come, some of them sponsored by some company xyz some of them not.

if there's scalping going on then the PRICE WAS NOT RIGHT.

Re:no scalping (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#39487601)

Company name on ticket, company ID required to get in.

Re:no scalping (1)

Roger Lindsjo (727951) | about 2 years ago | (#39488183)

How many companies actually have company ID? I have only seen it for companies with thousands or more employees.

Re:no scalping (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#39488273)

I work for one with 100 employees and we have one.

If your business is sending 10 people at $900 a pop to Google i/o you can spend $49.00 on getting some ID's made.

Re:no scalping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488489)

Likewise, if you're scalping tickets for $2k an extra few bucks for nice looking company IDs isn't much of an issue.

Re:no scalping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487123)

How do you propose to enforce this magic?

Re:no scalping (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#39487275)

What is magic about checking a valid form of ID to verify that they are the purchaser? This may come as a shock but this 'magic' is currently used millions of times daily already.

Re:no scalping (2)

oddjob1244 (1179491) | about 2 years ago | (#39487301)

How do you propose to enforce this magic?

Really? The same way they do at the airport.

Re:no scalping (1)

sconeu (64226) | about 2 years ago | (#39487899)

Google I/O will be using Perv Scanners?

Re:no scalping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487975)

Yep and they'll laugh at all the tiny penises of Android developers. Everyone knows that iOS developers have the longest, thickest cocks.

Re:no scalping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488305)

s/have/are/

Re:no scalping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488045)

Google I/O will be using Perv Scanners?

Yep. They've got their I on your O.

Re:no scalping (1)

gparent (1242548) | about 2 years ago | (#39488069)

What magic? Is this year 1? You look at the ID, and then you check if it matches what is written on the ticket. People can be fucking stupid sometimes...

Re:no scalping (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 2 years ago | (#39487171)

Agreed. For all the technology and data store that Google has, they're probably be able to barcode the tickets to your DNA. It should be a no-transfer ticket, but you can turn your ticket back in and allow them to send them to wait-listed people if you decide you can't make it. Sort of an enforced don't-be-evil requirement for attendees!

Re:no scalping (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487913)

Or just charge a price equivalent to what the resellers are charging.

Look, if the resellers are selling tickets at a much higher price than Google then that is the market speaking; someone finds it to be a fair price for the event.

From what I saw... (4, Informative)

Necroman (61604) | about 2 years ago | (#39487075)

I ended up getting a ticket, though I'm giving it to a co-worker (who work is paying to send).

From what I saw, it wasn't actually a first-come first-serve setup. One of my co-workers who got in "queue" before me didn't get a ticket. I started about 5 minutes after they were posted and I got a ticket. So it seems that once you were in their queue, it may have been random who they gave the tickets to.

I can't speak for others, but I attended Google I/O for their GWT (Google Web Toolkit) and related talks. The GWT sessions were actually rather popular, even though Android is the hip tech that everyone is interested in. I'm guessing people also wanted to attend the Android talks in hopes of getting free phones (some of the talks last year gave phones to people who went to that specific session).

If I was a student in the Bay area, I would definitely fork over the money (only $300 for students) to get the free swag. But for a regular priced ticket ($900), plus hotel and travel, I figured it would have cost me around $2600. I couldn't justify that cost, especially since all the talks are posted to Youtube within a few days of the conference.

Re:From what I saw... (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 2 years ago | (#39487433)

If I was a student in the Bay area, I would definitely fork over the money (only $300 for students) to get the free swag.

If you're forking over $300 - then the swag isn't free. It cost $300.

Re:From what I saw... (1)

Necroman (61604) | about 2 years ago | (#39487787)

point taken. :-D But last year at a minimum, everyone got a Galaxy Tab 10.1 and a Chromebook. If I would have ebay both of them, I would have made around $1200 (and tickets were $500 last year for full-price).

But I guess I could argue the $300 is covering food and drinks. They feed you breakfast and lunch for the 3 days of the conference. As well there is 1 night of partying (with free alcohol, and live music (last year it was Jane's Addiction)).

Re:From what I saw... (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 2 years ago | (#39488497)

Unless they're particularly inefficient, or you're a particularly heavy drinker/eater... they're making a profit of about $200-250 if you just look at applying it to the food.

Re:From what I saw... (1)

gparent (1242548) | about 2 years ago | (#39488091)

If you're going to correct people on basic economics, consider that the swag they get greatly exceeds the cost of the conference. It literally costs nothing. Now if you want to include hotel, airfare, that's another story, but it doesn't apply to every attendee.

Buy a Tesla, give a Tesla (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487083)

Perhaps they should increase the ticket price to enough to buy two Teslas, one given to the attendee, one given to a deserving Google engineer.

Never buy Google I/O (4, Funny)

Lucas123 (935744) | about 2 years ago | (#39487249)

Personally, I like PCIe for internal and fiber optics for external. I don't think Google is even a hardware or network service provider. It's no wonder it sold out so quickly.

A Better Way (1, Interesting)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | about 2 years ago | (#39487269)

Google should post an open-ended problem. Those with the best solution get in for free, the worse your solution, the higher your cost. If you invent a one-of-a-kind, genius solution, Google hires you.

Re:A Better Way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487447)

they did post that stupid ball programming game a few weeks back and required g+ to play with it. if you did well, they probably gave you a ticket.

Re:A Better Way (1)

updog (608318) | about 2 years ago | (#39487863)

I created a machine that was featured on the Google Developer's Google+ stream, and I did not get a ticket (nor even an early invitation code).

Obligatory hipster comment (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487281)

Those who did not get tickets were not only disappointed and angry, but mystified as to why they were left out of a first-come, first-served sale despite being online and ready to buy the second the bell rang.

Oh, please. BlizzCon was doing this to people long before Google made it cool.

I guess I'm not one of the lucky ones... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39487299)

Man. I sure wish I could have gotten a ticket. :(

For such a smart company, Google is STUPID (0)

tekrat (242117) | about 2 years ago | (#39487781)

Google seems to have lost it. They are quickly turning into a company that, mark my words, will be as easily hated as Microsoft.

And this latest idiocy seems to be *exactly* the kind of stupid, not thinking about the problem, problem that Google now has.

Clearly, over 75% of the "attendees" of this conference are not even going for the conference, they are going to get free shit.

So, what's the point? How can you have a developers conference, when a large majority of the people there are not even going to be developers?

I'm in agreement with the posters who have stated that there needs to be a little programming test to get in, that would seperate the developers from the posers.

As their "system" stands now, scalpers rule the day, most of the people that *want* to develop don't get in, and most of the people that do get in have no actual interest in attending.

I'm reminded of "TED", certainly in the early days of TED, where it was enormously expensive to get in, and Negroponte wrote an editorial in "New Media" magazine complaining "There are no new ideas here". -- Duh. "New Ideas" come from small studios, not giant corporations, who were the only ones who could afford to attend.

Google is a big company now. And big companies only like to play with other big companies. It's unfortunate that they have lost sight so quickly, of what it was that brought them to where they are now.

6K QPS (2)

updog (608318) | about 2 years ago | (#39487827)

WIth 6,250 queries *per* *second* when registration opened at 7AM, it's not the least bit surprising not everyone who wanted a ticket got one: https://plus.google.com/107117483540235115863/posts/iyc4arLjidR [google.com]

i.e., the few thousand tickets available could have theoretically been sold out in seconds. The Moscone Center West would not even have the capacity for 25K+ Google employees, let alone the 10's of thousands of developers/students who would like to attend. My only point here is that there's a lot of demand and very little supply, so there's going to be a lot of disappointed people. I don't think a better registration system, programming challenges, doubling capacity, a lottery, etc will do much to placate everyone who wants a ticket. Perhaps the only sensible way to reduce demand would to be double, triple, or quadruple the price.

FWIW, I've been in 2009 and 2011 - in my experience, it's mostly engineers, developers and others interested in and actively working on Google technology - not people there for just for the freebies (although they are certainly welcomed).

rationing high-demand slots (3, Interesting)

davidwr (791652) | about 2 years ago | (#39488097)

Any of the following is probably better than "first come first served" when "first come" is hard to determine or unfair to large numbers of potential attendees

1) Auction to the highest bidder. Takes scalping (mostly) out of the equation but locks out those of limited means. If you pride yourself on being non-greedy, donate the "over the face value" profits to charity.
2) Limit "1 per organization" and prohibit transfers outside of a pre-files small list of alternate users. Limits scalping.
3) Invitation-only event.
4) Require participation to attend, e.g. submit a paper, if it's accepted, you get in but you also have to / get to present your paper.
5) Require you submit a portfolio showing your presence is desirable for others who are there and/or that you are likely to benefit from attending more than someone else in line.
6) Lottery.
7) "Diversity" factors, e.g. we want 40%-50% of the attendees to be experts in the topic of the conference, 10%-20% to be newbies, and 30%-50% to be somewhat knowledgeable in the topic. Or, we don't want any more than 10% of attendees from the same company or more than 25% from the same industry segment.

There are other ways to "shake things up a bit" as well.

You can do this with just about any "over-subscribed" event from concert tickets to elementary-school transfer requests.

"First come first served" has its place, but when people start standing in line early for the sole purpose of making a buck on eBay, then either they are denying others who really should be there but can't pay $$$ a slot or they are denying you or your charity the $$$ you could've made with an auction.

Hey Vic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488237)

I'm still waiting for you to apologize to all the users that your moronic names policy alienated, like Skud and GrrlScientist. You are a hypocrite and an asshole.

--
Protect your privacy. Say NO to the products and services from the Google creeps!

Easy Solution to the end of ticket scalpers! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488359)

Make tickets non transferable/non refundable with a system that would allow you to resell your ticket at cost if you cant attend. If ticket sells you get refund minus a processing fee, if it doesn't you own it.

The need for fairness (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39488407)

Why does everything have to be fair? It's google's show, they want ppl to show up. Boom done. Move on with your lives and stop whining.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...