Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Wind Map of US Will Blow You Away

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the concentrate-especially-on-oklahoma dept.

Earth 104

Hugh Pickens writes writes "Talk about visualizations. Ever wondered what the wind would look like if you could see it in action from above? A new project posted online by a pair of Google computer scientists, called simply Wind Map, has to be seen to be believed. "It can be quite hypnotizing to watch the gusty trails blast across the American continent, skitter over the Sierras, get roughed up by the Rockies, and whoosh over the great plains on its way to Canada," writes Chris Taylor. Wind Map is the brainchild of Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg, the co-leaders of Google's 'Big Picture' visualization research group in Cambridge, Mass. Wind patterns are constantly changing, of course, which is why the Wind Map designers have also given us a moving-image gallery of previous blustery days."

cancel ×

104 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Just as I though (2)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533415)

Big suction holes west of Dallas and Philadelphia.

Re:Just as I though (1)

Cryacin (657549) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533431)

That and the windy city blows.

Proof positive (1, Funny)

chill (34294) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533425)

Canada sucks. Heh. I always wondered what that little nub of Minnesota sticking into Canada was caused by.

Re:Proof positive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533559)

Canada sucks. Heh. I always wondered what that little nub of Minnesota sticking into Canada was caused by.

That's where Minnesotans extract their funny accent.

Re:Proof positive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533859)

"blip on the top of Minnesota that was the result of treaties long ago".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Angle

Re:Proof positive (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534549)

I think it's fascinating that all along the Minnesota-Ontario border there's a southerly wind at the moment, but at the eastern end it's blown down from Quebec, looped around Chicago and is on it's way back up; in the middle it's come up from Texas, and to the west it's come in from Montana. That must make for some marked shifts of weather within just a few miles, and yet locally the wind would seem to be coming from the same place.

Re:Proof positive (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535257)

Do note the warm front emanating from Washington, D.C.

Re:Proof positive (1)

akboss (823334) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535649)

Do note the warm front emanating from Washington, D.C.

Warm front?? Currently the maps shows this HUGE sucking in from Columbus south. All being pulled into DC at the moment. As is normal when Congress is in session.

California (1)

m0s3m8n (1335861) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533429)

I always knew California blew.

the jokes blow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533443)

page failed with many errors for me.
also all of the jokes so far blow

No thanks. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533445)

I clicked on the link and as soon as I saw the Mashable banner, I closed the page. Fuck spam advertising for those twats.

Re:No thanks. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533601)

Then click the second link which goes right to the map. -_-

Next step: Google Maps (4, Interesting)

slasho81 (455509) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533449)

I'd love to see a Wind overlay on Google Maps all over the world. Would be great for sailing. That's why we need open data.

Re:Next step: Google Maps (3, Informative)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533591)

Wind maps + 7 day forecasts of the world's oceans are widely avalible. When you're sailing you're looking at the big picture of what's causing the wind and where it's headed, so a fine detail tool like Google Maps is sort of a moot point. Wind maps only really make sense on a scale of 1000 miles or more.
 
  7 day wind forecast of the South Atlantic [stormsurfing.com]

Re:Next step: Google Maps (1)

rHBa (976986) | about 2 years ago | (#39537403)

Not at all, if you're a glider pilot wind maps of 5-10km can be really useful. That's why we have blipmaps [drjack.info] .

Re:Next step: Google Maps (1)

LoztInSpace (593234) | about 2 years ago | (#39537523)

As a pilot you may already know of this: http://www.xcskies.com/ [xcskies.com] It's a forecast rather than observation.

Re:Next step: Google Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539775)

Wind maps + 7 day forecasts of the world's oceans are widely avalible. When you're sailing you're looking at the big picture of what's causing the wind and where it's headed, so a fine detail tool like Google Maps is sort of a moot point. Wind maps only really make sense on a scale of 1000 miles or more.

LOL - ever sailed a regatta? The pros use detailed vector data (grib) forecasts to plan the fastest course for their boat. Free grib data is available e.g. here [grib.us]

Re:Next step: Google Maps (1)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 2 years ago | (#39540135)

You'd be shocked to hear my actual regatta resume. Generally a basic wind forecast is all we need to pick our sails (light, heavy) because local wind is so specific to the area, and most lakes are smaller than the data you can get. When wind is light, I've regularly seen the wind clock 180 degrees, then back again on a particular lake here in Dallas. Generally you're looking for fronts that will blow through, and if the front is going to come through during your regatta. Again, this requires looking at 1000 miles of data, as fronts are generally 200-300 miles wide at their smallest.

Re:Next step: Google Maps (4, Informative)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533631)

Have a look at Windfinder [windfinder.com] . Quite useful for planning your trips.

Alergies (2)

lahvak (69490) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534999)

Forget sailing. It looks like it could be a great tool for figuring out movement of allergens such as pollen through the air, for studying allergy outbreaks.

Re:Next step: Google Maps (1)

CBravo (35450) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535339)

There is open data, I download it every day. Rasp operators use it for soaring forecasts: http://www.drjack.info/RASP/index.html [drjack.info] . Rasp is a pot of glue: It downloads data, data is processed by WRF and visualized by NCL.

The slight problem is that I need a fast dedicated core i7 machine for it (work in CUDA is in progress). It takes about an hour to do a forecast.

Last problem: there is NO good installation and configuration method (all knowledge is shared though via a forum / wiki). You get there in the end, after a while and some extra.

Re:Next step: Google Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39535467)

See also http://nowcoast.noaa.gov/

Re:Next step: Google Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39536329)

Actually you can download grib files (updated 4 times a day) from NOAA. Just get a free grib reader from grib.us. These can be animated to show patterns all over the world.
The thing is this project from hint.fm is an even better visualization tool. I'd love to see a world wide, selectable by area, version. This is a good start. Hope someboady runs with it.

Canada sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39538039)

We all knew Canada sucked, but now we know exactly where and how much.

Freakin' awesome! (5, Interesting)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533453)

This is incredible technology. Wouldn't you love to have some checkboxes to turn on/off: state borders, topography, jet stream, hi/lo pressure systems, time display...

Re:Freakin' awesome! (4, Insightful)

MrKaos (858439) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533547)

This is incredible technology. Wouldn't you love to have some checkboxes to turn on/off: state borders, topography, jet stream, hi/lo pressure systems, time display...

Mountain ranges might be an interesting one, perhaps different wind layers as well

Google Earth (2)

MDMurphy (208495) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533841)

I was thinking I'd love to see it as a layer in Google Earth, being able to see the wind flowing over and around the topography would be very interesting. I see a few null areas with little wind showing so I plan to check them out in GE to see if some local hills or mountains that I don't remember are creating them.

Re:Google Earth (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 2 years ago | (#39536163)

I checked the one weird calm spot in Idaho southeast of Boise. It is a low area surrounded by hills, with a lot of irrigated fields. Now i'm trying to figure out how that causes a still spot in the wind. Something to do with extra humidity from the irrigation making the air in the low area denser and causing a bubble perhaps?

Re:Google Earth (2)

rHBa (976986) | about 2 years ago | (#39537487)

Depends on the albedo value of the farm land, freshly ploughed fields are usually great for thermal development though. The darker the surface the more heat it absorbs.

However, damp soil releases its heat much more slowly and won't be so good for strong thermals although they might last a little longer into the evening.

Re:Freakin' awesome! (4, Insightful)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533823)

That's why people have focussed on making very fast Javascript engines over the last couple of years -- to enable stuff like this.

Re:Freakin' awesome! (1)

ScytheBlade1 (772156) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533985)

I'd also like to see large bodies of water. Right next to Salt Lake City is... the Great Salt Lake, and right there is a massive area where the wind just dies. It makes sense (moisture rising, disrupting the existing airflow), but seeing that defined would be awesome.

Re:Freakin' awesome! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39534273)

>> checkboxes to turn on/off: state borders, topography, jet stream, hi/lo pressure systems, time display...
 
...red state/blue state

Re:Freakin' awesome! (1)

CBravo (35450) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535359)

maybe not exactly what your are looking for (e.g. a limited area): http://map.weatherme.eu/ [weatherme.eu] What do you think?

Re:Freakin' awesome! (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535665)

> Wouldn't you love to have some checkboxes to turn on/off: state borders, topography, jet stream, hi/lo pressure
> systems, time display... ...Zoom out...stop scrolling to the mouse pointer when no buttons zoom in.

Why doesn't this work like google maps?

...animation speed scaled to map size/zoom? (1)

swb (14022) | more than 2 years ago | (#39536201)

I'd also like to see the animation speed scaled or scalable to match the map scale/zoom level.

It sure looks cool, but the animation speed is misleading relative to the actual wind speed.

Almost awesome (1)

subreality (157447) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533473)

Very cool. If someone mashes it up with a topo map it'll be awesome.

firefox is now bloatware (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533475)

Don't bother trying to watch this in firefox, chrome works much better. FF is falling way behind in the lead up to HTML5, indeed, it kind of feels like IE6 did about 5 years ago.

Re:firefox is now bloatware (1)

slider2800 (1058930) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533765)

Ahem... Firefox 11.0 here and it works like a charm, thankyouverymuch.

Re:firefox is now bloatware (1)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533959)

Firefox 12b3 here, no problems.

Re:firefox is now bloatware (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534363)

Wait, you're saying that a Google-made page works best in a Google-made browser?

Will the days of IE-only web pages return, only with IE replaced by Chrome?

Yeah, but... (-1, Flamebait)

echusarcana (832151) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533477)

Its a pretty cool app, too bad wind is a stupid way to make electricity.

Re:Yeah, but... (5, Insightful)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533529)

Yeah, stupid. It just averages out to a predictable level over the whole grid, effects minimal pollution and, well, just works. Greetings from Europe - with apologies to all decent people in the US, we kinda find it amusing to see you sliding back into your personal version of the dark ages.

Re:Yeah, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533885)

Ah, another "superior" European. Meanwhile, in the real world, the US ranks #1 in wind power generation, #1 in biomass generation, and #2 in solar generation in the world.

Re:Yeah, but... (2)

beaviz (314065) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533983)

Ah, another "superior" European. Meanwhile, in the real world, the US ranks #1 in wind power generation, #1 in biomass generation, and #2 in solar generation in the world.

Per what?

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534329)

Ah, another "superior" European. Meanwhile, in the real world, the US ranks #1 in wind power generation, #1 in biomass generation, and #2 in solar generation in the world.

Per what?

Per Library of Congress, what else?

Re:Yeah, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39535111)

Per what?

Per your mother.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39534121)

Excuse my neighbor, he's been brainwashed into thinking dedication and loyalty to the U.S. is a really really good thing. Logic eludes him.

Re:Yeah, but... (1, Flamebait)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534393)

Actually, even your useless metric of comparing a country the size of the US to much smaller European states is wrong. Germany beats the pants off of the US in solar generation as does Italy, wind power per square mile or per capita is pityful compared to the rest of the world, and biomass statistics include wood burning, which can be a very bad idea.

Conservatives: where facts are created from the gut.

Re:Yeah, but... (0)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534585)

The relevant metrics here are based in the fact that my hometown with over a million inhabitants will be off fossil fuels by 2025. The conversion is going as planned and I have yet to see the blackouts the conservatard FUD-mongers are predicting. Salutations from the 3rd millenium, friend! ;)

Re:Yeah, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39537455)

Suddenly comparing statistics based on country sizes is useless, but for every broadband article the "superior" Europeans claim it doesn't matter. The US is #1 in the total amount of renewable energy production in the world. Sorry those are the facts.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 2 years ago | (#39537591)

Because, dear AC, bandwidth is measured at the house, not in total capacity. Therefore, the bandwidth per square mile is a completely useless statistic. And even then, the US fails.

At least compare the US to the EU, which has a comparable size and population. But since that doesn't work in your favor, you ignore it. You do realize that reality doesn't care about your mental gymnastics, right?

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39538537)

In every broadband article, "superior Europeans" (and non-brainwashed Americans) suggest taking a particular metropolitan area of US that is similar in size and population density to some European country - say, Los Angeles or New York - and comparing that. And such comparisons always result in US still lagging behind.

Re:Yeah, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39534133)

it's called usatosisitis. you have it too. the blanket keeps you warm.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

echusarcana (832151) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535701)

This is Europe where countries like Germany are shutting down your carbon free nuclear and letting your less fluent neighbors burn coal on your behalf? Hypocrites.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39536121)

Greetings from Europe - with apologies to all decent people in the US, we kinda find it amusing to see you sliding back into your personal version of the dark ages.

You mean, like in Germany where they are saying goodbye to nuclear [consumerenergyreport.com] and cutting solar power subsidies? [renewablesbiz.com]

Re:Yeah, but... (3, Insightful)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 2 years ago | (#39536177)

Yeah, cutting solar subsidies, because it is becoming self-sustaining by now and cutting nuclear because it was never sustainable without unloading a shitload of externalities on everyone. We did not like that, and, unlike some other western nations, we have a functioning democracy.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 2 years ago | (#39537167)

So now instead of nuclear, Germany's switched to coal and buying electricity from France, and you've got a promise to switch to renewable long after the politicians who made that promise will be out of office. Sounds like a real functioning democracy to me.

Keep throwing those insults, though.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 2 years ago | (#39536197)

As someone who lives in the US near some of the HUGE wind farms that have been installed over the past 10 years, i have to point out that the reason we don't use more wind is because we are STILL not ready for it. These massive wind farms are situated in ideal locations, and yet, they sit there, standing still. Why? because the grid is just not capable of handling the load that these huge farms produce. We can make loads of electricity, we just have not built up the infrastructure to get that electricity to where we need it. And of course, part of that is because 'wah wah wah big oil subsidy takes the money' and whatnot, and part of it is because these things take time when the distances you have to cover are larger than most European countries.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 2 years ago | (#39536251)

Yes, I am aware of that problem. I was a bit snarky up there, I do wonder, though, why no one can get his shit together to invest in infrastructure anymore.

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 2 years ago | (#39537871)

i suppose because despite its national scope, literally hundreds of companies all have to get their shit together, at approximately the same time, all with enough budget to upgrade/replace *their* portion of the grid. And we all know how good humans are at working together when money is involved.

Hurricanes (5, Interesting)

sehryan (412731) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533507)

Personally, I am looking forward to checking out this map during hurricane season. This map is the number one thing I am going back to when a hurricane strikes land here in the US.

Re:Hurricanes (1)

DriverDude (213749) | more than 2 years ago | (#39540577)

I'll use it for hurricanes also. This visualization is AWESOME. Excellent work. Thanks for the link - I'll be passing it around.

What are they eating? (3, Funny)

Eudial (590661) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533515)

What are they eating in San Jose to produce all that wind?! Seriously. Something is seriously wrong. Seek medical attention.

Re:What are they eating? (1)

eugene ts wong (231154) | more than 2 years ago | (#39538387)

That's what you thought of when you looked at the map??

When I looked at it, I thought, "Eastern US looks like a hairy chest...Western US looks like a long haired woman.".

A few days behind google plus... (-1, Flamebait)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533549)

This was posted on there on Wednesday or so. Usually slashdot is desperately trying to copy facebook, but this time slashdot is a few days behind google plus.

mod dowVn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533561)

Training and Visualization (5, Interesting)

AtomicSnarl (549626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533611)

As a retired weather guy with over 25 years working with and training weathermen, this is one of the best tools I've seen. Applause!

Understanding fluid flow and visualizing it is not easy, but it crucial to meteorology because that dynamic drives and reveals the mechanisms that create the weather systems we track, such as fronts, storms, and so on. Given the tools seen are usually something like this (from ADDS) [aviationweather.gov] or this (from CoolWx) [coolwx.com] , the WindMap does a much more intuitive job of showing the strength and patterns in merging flow.

So, well done! The only improvement I can think of for better use operationally would be an hourly looper of, say, the past six hours with a 3-4 second pause for each hour. This would let you track specific features as the day goes on.

Re:Training and Visualization (1)

siride (974284) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533969)

The Unisys site has had a wind streamlines map for ages: http://weather.unisys.com/surface/sfc_con.php?image=st&inv=0&t=cur&expanddiv=hide_bar [unisys.com]

vortex.plymouth.edu lets you make maps with streamlines as well.

Granted, none of these are animated, but the point is that streamlines are hardly new in the online weather visualization field.

Re:Training and Visualization (1)

SumterLiving (994634) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534145)

Yep, and 30,000 years ago there were people telling stories by drawing on cave walls. Today those cave wall drawing are animated to such a point that people pay $10 to watch them. My point is graphic novels and movies have been around for a long time so why get excited?

Re:Training and Visualization (1)

fhage (596871) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534757)

Intuitive feel is not really worth much. The ADDS plot shows wind direction, speed to the nearest 2.5kts, gust speeds, pressure, temperature, and local flight rules. Quantitative things a pilot needs to know. Watch the nice animation, but learn to read the plot symbols.

[rant]As one of the originators of the ADDS web site, and someone with 25+ years writing scientific data visualisation software, I can report that most meteorologists and forecasters are disinterested in this type of presentation. I produced a display which could produce these types of wind plots for NCAR in the early '90s and I never saw anyone but software people look at them. I thought it looked great, but I was mocked for suggesting it might be useful. My tool provides maps overlays, topography, and multi parametric, false colour and contour plots, with all the fancy animation controls. One can select arbitrary multi way-point cross sections of the volumetric data to visualise the atmosphere along a flight path or interesting weather features. Most meteorologists look at a few, low resolution, static 500mb and surface plots from several models, a sounding or two and make their forecast. No fancy tools needed, only plots produced on the supercomputer. In my experience, it was mainly people responsible for producing live watches and warnings or weather enthusiasts that made use of new, modern visualisation tools. It was a joy to produce something for people (GA pilots) who actually appreciated the effort and creativity we put into the site. We got awards (plaques and a tiny cash bonus) and lots of attention for ADDS, but I was still laid off a few years later after 18+ years of service with NCAR. [/rant]

April Fools. (-1)

Zaldarr (2469168) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533619)

Cats. There are cats in my adblocker... Also wind and stuff. (for those Offtopic mods...)

Google Tax? (3, Funny)

popo (107611) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533687)

Oh... I thought the East-coast was a visualization of tax-dollars.

Maybe if it was accurate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533713)

The map shows a west wind over Boston. But anyone can look at the current radar, and see it's an East wind. Looks useless so far.

Re:Maybe if it was accurate... (3, Informative)

bobbutts (927504) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533931)

This seems to visualize surface winds. Radar (precipitation aloft) is moved by winds higher in the atmosphere. There's often a disconnect in the direction of surface and elevated winds. Check out a Skew-T Sounding and you can see the larger vertical wind profile.

Re:Maybe if it was accurate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39534221)

I am looking at my anemometer. It is 30 feet off the ground - that's surface wind.

Sure would like to know why my comment was modded to zero. Windmap fanbois?

Are you here looking at my instruments? No. You aren't.

The map is wrong.

Re:Maybe if it was accurate... (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534653)

I am looking at my anemometer. It is 30 feet off the ground - that's surface wind.

Sure would like to know why my comment was modded to zero. Windmap fanbois?

Are you here looking at my instruments? No. You aren't.

The map is wrong.

You posted as anonymous coward, which always starts out with a moderation of 0. No, we're not looking at your instruments. Are you looking at the same windmap?

Re:Maybe if it was accurate... (2)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535327)

At 30 feet off the ground, your anemometer is measuring a very localized wind direction, which, depending upon terrain, vegetation, etc., can be very different from your neighbor's wind direction 100 yards away. I have stood in my yard during wind storms and watched the trees on either side of my house blowing in different directions, due to wind being funneled in ravines near my house.

They didn't say in the wind map page (of if they did, I didn't see it), but I suspect they are taking an average wind speed and direction from a number of points. YMMV.

Re:Maybe if it was accurate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39533947)

Agreed, it shows the wind in my area constantly blowing southwest when in fact it almost always blows (and usually quite heavily) northeast

Re:Maybe if it was accurate... (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534643)

At the moment it's showing an easterly wind over Boston, not a westerly. You do know that wind directions are named for the direction the wind is coming from, not the direction it's going to, don't you?

Re:Maybe if it was accurate... (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534691)

Looking at a weather page for Boston [wunderground.com] it agrees with the windmap. Are you sure you know which way a westerly wind blows?

Have a look at their other projects (NSFW) (5, Interesting)

nbritton (823086) | more than 2 years ago | (#39533777)

If you think that's interesting, check out their other project http://hint.fm/projects/touch/ [hint.fm] (description) and http://www.fleshmap.com/touch/index.html [fleshmap.com] (direct link) on their site as well. Please note both links are NSFW.

Slashdotters are like lab mice that always seek out cocaine, but instead of cocaine, they're focused on little fluffy clouds.

Re:Have a look at their other projects (NSFW) (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534359)

Man, that's obvious. Guys like to get touched in one place. Hint: Foot massages are out.

Art more intelligent than tech (0)

nightcats (1114677) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534017)

Big deal -- Van Gogh saw this stuff with his ordinary human equipment and then painted it. This tech stuff is merely pale imitation of what that superior intelligence saw and recorded to canvas long ago.

Re:Art more intelligent than tech (1)

sayfawa (1099071) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534415)

If you haven't seen it already, you might be interested in this:
Interactive Starry Night [vimeo.com]

Jet Stream and other altitudes? (1)

nefus (952656) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534035)

Looks cool but what altitude is this? Do they have a map for different altitudes? What layer has the jet stream?

Re:Jet Stream and other altitudes? (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535349)

It's a little hard to find, but they mention it is surface level winds on the map.

Quantity, but what about quality? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39534113)

It's neat to see average winds on a visual like this. But because of gusts and such, it's possible to have high averages in locations where if you were to look at the windspeed profile over the course of the day - it would be of very limited use. (Lots of wind at certain times of day, but going flat otherwise.) Other areas that have seemingly low winds (around 10-15 MPH or so) would actually be a lot better for power extraction because it's nearly constant over the course of a day.

It would be neat if they could have extra overlays that would allow one to compare how variable the winds are in comparison to the average speed. Such data would also be more useful when it comes to showing where use of wind power would be most effective.

Next: Winds at higher altitudes (1)

RNLockwood (224353) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534167)

I assume that the winds are "surface" winds. It would be interesting to see the wind field at higher altitudes, too. AFAIK a surface low pressure area will have winds blowing into it and above it will be a high altitude high pressure with winds blowing out of it. At least that's how it's been explained to me.

Title humor... (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534371)

The joke in the title blows.

Pun alert (0)

Apothem (1921856) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534379)

This wind map really swept up my interest. It's really cool to see wind wind up on a map like this. I wonder if this will end up getting jet streamed over to an app of some kind? It would be quite the windward sight.

mod 3o3n (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39534465)

coomun#ity at [goat.cx]

Linux beard? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#39534747)

This is what it looks like when you don't trim your beard.

Eastern Oregon here I come! (1)

F34nor (321515) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535163)

What I want is to get a law passed that you can put your solar panels up anywhere in state and get paid back in terms of tax credits and local rates as if they were on your house. The idea of putting panels up west of the Cascades seems insane to me. There are transmission lines that pass through the SE of Oregon, the highest solar index and now I see the highest wind speed.

But it is all bullshit compared to the jet stream. Check out http://www.skywindpower.com/ww/index.htm [skywindpower.com] The only problem with it is that it totally fucking awesome so no one will use it.

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39535165)

Wind Map of US Will Blow You Away

That's what she said.

Bluzugh (1)

Cazekiel (1417893) | more than 2 years ago | (#39535425)

I caught this the other night after taking my Ambien. Ohhh...

Do you know why Kansas is so windy? (1)

iamzack (830561) | more than 2 years ago | (#39538617)

Because Oklahoma sucks and Nebraska blows. NyuckNyuckNyuckNyuckNyuck

April fools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539229)

Move along anonymous cowards

Proof that Chicago sucks... (1)

ColdBoot (89397) | more than 2 years ago | (#39540027)

what more needs to be said?

the eastern USA is fyucked (1)

noshellswill (598066) | more than 2 years ago | (#39540095)

But, then who wants to live in hell-whole Baltimore , Jersey City or NY? All violent, overpopulated pR0nfests. Toss in Boston and Jacksonville. They can suck sulfur or freeze in their electric blankets ... beings they are not NEEDED or wanted.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?