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After Megaupload, MPAA Targets Other File Sharing Services

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the making-a-list-checking-it-twice dept.

The Courts 214

An anonymous reader writes "It is no secret that the MPAA was a main facilitator of the criminal investigation against Megaupload. While the movie studios have praised the actions of the U.S. Government, they are not satisfied yet. Paramount Pictures' vice president for worldwide content protection identified Fileserve, MediaFire, Wupload, Putlocker and Depositfiles as prime targets that should be shuttered next."

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Pirate Bay? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39538979)

I guess the pirate bay is still flying under the radar. Hopefully that one never goes mainstream.

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Informative)

sg_oneill (159032) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539001)

Oh its above the radar. Heck its founders even did jail for it. But they are taking a solid stance and have basically told the MPAA/RIAA to fuck off and have deployed clever lawyers to keep it afloat.

This whole thing really is pissing me off. My band uses these services to facilitate distributing our album and what not, and since a lot of our followers really dont know how to drive bit-torrent, this is the easiest way to get them the goodies.

And because we are distributed across 2 countries (Members in the US and Australia) , we use it to send mixdowns and recording stems when we do stuff.. I mean I guess we probably should move to dropbox for that sort of thing, but the point still remains. These bloody lawyers are trying to ban ALL sharing, and seriously not all, in fact probably most, sharing is piracy.

Its bullshit, these people need to be called out as enemies of the internet and free speech.

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Insightful)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539041)

As a smaller, (presumably) independent band, the RIAA wouldn't mind killing you off. The RIAA isn't there for small artists; they're there for the few giant names they can push, and any competition is bad competition in their view.

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Interesting)

sg_oneill (159032) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539819)

As a smaller, (presumably) independent band, the RIAA wouldn't mind killing you off. The RIAA isn't there for small artists; they're there for the few giant names they can push, and any competition is bad competition in their view.

Well neither the RIAA or ARIA have ever done a frigging thing for us, so I don't doubt that. Heck I even had a genine "no no" issue of piracy happen to us once where I found a site in the US selling our MP3s for about half the priace we where selling them. I dont care if you pirate-bay or whatever our songs, its not really about that for us. But don't sell our work without giving us a cut of it, is all we ask.

Well I contacted ARIA, and they said "Oh thats in the US, we cant help you". So I contacted the RIAA and they said "Your australians, we are not really interested sorry."

Well I bet if we where AC/DC or something they would be.

Frankly I'd rather kim dotcom got my money than RIAA or ARIA. At least I'm under know illusions as to who Kim represents.

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539065)

My band uses these services to facilitate distributing our album and what not

Your label is supposed to handle that for you. If you're not signed with a major label and have the temerity to try to distribute your own music, you're clearly some kind of terrorist socialist pedophile drug dealer pirate, and will be dealt with accordingly.

Re:Pirate Bay? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539135)

My band uses these services to facilitate distributing our album and what not

Your label is supposed to handle that for you. If you're not signed with a major label and have the temerity to try to distribute your own music, you're clearly some kind of terrorist socialist pedophile drug dealer pirate, and will be dealt with accordingly.

Your sense of humor sucks. Go back to watching the Daily Show where your predictably hipster jester laughs at his own contrived jokes.

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Interesting)

Xelios (822510) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539185)

Independent film makers get similar treatment [youtube.com] from the MPAA. And unlike musicians they really are forced to deal with them to have their film rated for release.

Re:Pirate Bay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539741)

That's why I laugh when people say small government is better.

Do they really think that the MPAA and other corrupt powerful organizations will go away, just because there is a small government? And who do they think will rush in to take over whatever the government no longer does?

It's quality not quantity that matters more.

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539915)

Independent film makers get similar treatment from the MPAA. And unlike musicians they really are forced to deal with them to have their film rated for release.

And if you are an indie filmmaker, you can expect very harsh treatment at the hands of MPAA for your rating.

I just heard an interview with the director of the terrific new documentary Bully and he was talking about how the MPAA wanted to give his movie an "R" even though all of the characters were real teenagers involved in real bullying and the movie is possibly the most important movie for middle and high-school kids to see. He ended up just going "Unrated" which of course will limit his distribution (but it looks like a lot of media people are getting behind him to help out).

I've made a portion of my living as a professional musician, composer and arranger for about 25 years and I won't go near a project with anything but an indie label and not only an indie label but a really small privately-held indie label. I most enjoy self-released work, which in my opinion has now reached a point of quality every bit as good as anything on a major. I only pay for music when I can buy direct from the artist, or very nearly direct. I'm hoping to get to that point with movies someday.

Re:Pirate Bay? (2)

Nrrqshrr (1879148) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539759)

Trying to get rid of the middle-man somehow became a suspicious deed, lately. It's like being an independent content creator is the new crime of the 21st century.

jail time? (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539261)

From what I understand, the founders have not done jail time but are fugitives, with a price on their head and all that.

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Informative)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539307)

Heck its founders even did jail for it.

Actually none of them have. They have been sentenced but only one is actually living in Sweden and his will be served in the community rather than behind bars. The others left ages ago and the authorities have been unable to recover a single penny of assets from them to pay the millions of Euros in fines, and as they are now in countries that won't extradite to the EU there is pretty much no chance of them doing any time. Plus there are still appeals in the pipeline.

Meanwhile the Pirate Bay continues, benefiting from free publicity paid for by the media companies trying to take them down.

Re:Pirate Bay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539455)

The other ones do not have any money

Re:Pirate Bay? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539371)

Oh its above the radar. Heck its founders even did jail for it.

No they didn't. Don't be part of the propaganda machine. It's still not over and they haven't done any time yet. But if/when they do, they will do it with their head held high. Why are pirates called pirates? Because they Arrrrrrrr.

Re:Pirate Bay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539461)

Just a question: Why don't you use sites designed for distribution of music instead?
If you don't mind giving away your music for free, try one of the sites listed here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_music#Record_labels_and_websites_distributing_free_music
Also, make video clips and upload them to YouTube!

Re:Pirate Bay? (5, Insightful)

TFAFalcon (1839122) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539675)

MPAA will contact Youtube and get your video removed. They own all music after all.

Re:Pirate Bay? (1)

Skal Tura (595728) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539933)

You mean RIAA owns all music ;)
Anything having the slightest resemblance to music has a chance of to be taken down on youtube.

vice president for worldwide content protection (5, Informative)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#39538989)

That Paramount actually has a "vice president for worldwide content protection" says plenty.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539003)

All it says is that they have lots of rich people on hand to schmooze other rich people. This is not extraordinary for a large corporation, much less unique. Hence why tech companies like MS and Google are finally trying to learn how to play ball and pay off... I mean lobby politicians, so that they're not completely railroaded by media and other old boys' companies when the two conflict.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539107)

"Finally learning"? Microsoft exists as it does today because it already knew all about that more than a decade ago.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539171)

No, that mostly came from good vs. incompetent lawyering. Proper political connections would have avoided that mess getting as big as it did before it went away. Compared with the RIAA or MPAA, Microsoft has been in the minor leagues politically. Hence why it's okay to villify them or Google, but god forbid we should ever question a group of companies convicted of collusion when they say something that takes away people's rights is absolutely necessary to get them proper compensation (e.g., never-ending copyrights).

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (4, Funny)

PatPending (953482) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539049)

Heh. Reminds me of a story from the sixties about General Motors. A customer called GM to complain about his car.

The phone operator asked what was wrong and the guy said a mirror was defective.

"Which mirror?" she asked.

"The side mirror" he replied.

"Which side?"

"The passenger side."

"I'll connect you to the Vice President for Passenger Side Mirrors."

Dunno if it's true or not. My grandfather worked in the US auto industry for 30 years and had lots of interesting stories to tell...

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (4, Funny)

game kid (805301) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539129)

Do you not realize how tough it is to be promoted to that office? The Executive Vice President of Employee Titles (who's also the Creative Director of Padded Résumés and Acting Senior Human Resources Strategist) does not just bandy these things around willy-nilly.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539161)

Why wouldn't they? They sell a product which is pirated around the world. Are the movie companies not even allowed to try to prevent this? They're not a charity. They make a product for the masses with an expectation of a returned profit. Even if they did have a stupid executive, why should it matter to Slashdot? Would you care if they have a "vice president in charge of video game soundtracks"?

Slashdot loves to rationalize piracy, no matter how little logic is applied. Even "They try to prevent piracy!" is used as some sort of argument against the MPAA.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539247)

It's better that 100 guilty walk free than one innocent wrongly convicted or something along those lines is the way the quote goes.

But because 90%* of people use a legal service to perpetrate illegal acts, the 10%* must suffer? A lot of people use cars in the commission of a crime. Should we start banning cars? Don't even get me started on guns...

*made-up figures for illustration purposes only

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (3, Insightful)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539699)

Cars / guns aren't really the best analogy.. It'd be more like a shipping service that ships 10% legal goods and 90% illegal goods. If they took action to cut out the illegal stuff there wouldn't be a problem.

They also took it a step further in how they paid people who got the most downloads and got people to subscribe. Even TPB keeps a degree of separation between themselves, the illegal content, and the way they make money, but megaupload was pretty much making money directly off people uploading illegal content and getting subscribers to pay to download it quickly.

Also no-one needs TPB to distribute their personally created music.. Even if your band can't afford the miniscule hosting fees you can just host the torrent file; the whole point of bittorrent is it doesn't need sites like TPB.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (1)

Skal Tura (595728) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539939)

MU was doing heck of a lot more to curb piracy than Pirate Bay has ever done ... Just saying.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539527)

Piracy is only illegal because the law says copying and distributing music is illegal.

People who support piracy are fighting to have the law changed. These people believe that since music can be copied indefinitely and at no cost (even though there is an initial cost of producing the music), the music industry should change to a business model that makes music free.
There are also people who are just fed up with the music industry's abusive behavior. They can sue people who upload music to others for all I care, but many of us are sick of seeing sharing services get shut down - these services have useful, legal purposes. We're m also sick of all the fake DMCA take-downs, the "pay-up or else" letters that target innocent people, the attempts to make wifi network owners liable for how other people use their network, the extradition of young students to the USA for doing something that is legal in their own country, the SLAPP lawsuits, the constantly increasing copyright terms that lock away history from the public (yes, some songs and movies can be considered of historical value), etc.

You can disagree with this, but the fact is, people are not saying the music industry should stop using the protections that the law gives it: they're saying these protections should be taken away. They want to change the law, arguing "but it's the law" is beside the point.
And you won't convince anyone that the music industry should get protections from the law when the music industry behaves the way it does, just like if Hitler were alive you would not succeed at convincing anyone that he should have the right to own a gas chamber.

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (4, Insightful)

rotorbudd (1242864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539965)

Ah, you had me there till Godwin's Law struck.
Gas Chamber = Ripped song?

Re:vice president for worldwide content protection (4, Insightful)

Skal Tura (595728) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539987)

No, they should update their business plan to make most revenue from:
  - Legitimate download sites (where artist gets more than 0.01% of revenue)
  - Performances, ie. concerts bringing in the dough, and maybe some new innovative live performance formats for more revenue per gig
  - Merchandise/fan products
  - Physical media as a shelf decoration. pretty much like it is now, but saner pricing, and emphasis on showcasing it, that's why many people buy CDs/DVDs/BluRays, but also give access to digital, online copy which allows more convenient watching than putting the physical media in.
  - Direct monetary gifts from fans -> who just want to support the artist, but does not necessarily need more crap etc.
  - For some bands, "custom tailored" music, ie. for companies, movies etc. This is already happening but more direct and bigger scale adoption, ie. hourly rates or something like that.

Generally by increasing accessibility they should be able to monetize better.
If i want to buy an album today, i have very few choices: Physical store for media i cannot use since i don't own even a SINGLE "just a cd player", iTunes for devices which i don't own (i don't own iPhone, iPad, iPod or any other apple devices), Spotify for computer only listening (nothing to play in my car).

I need non-DRM'd MP3, FLAC or OGG format so i can play it on any of the devices i have, ie. car, phone, computer, ps3

As it stands now, i would need to change to iPhone and purchase via iTunes (at a non-sensible per track price), and change my car audio system to accept iPhone for convenient access to most of my devices. Ofc, for iTunes to work properly i need to change to Mac OSX as well which means buying a mac. This still leaves my PS3, and other DLNA devices out (or has iTunes gained DLNA capability?). No i don't want new expensive devices.

On car i only radio, usb and bluetooth.
On computers i don't even bother installing a DVD drive anymore for longer than OS installation.
I use a Nokia phone (E7, got to love the QWERTY and casing it has!)

So my options are extremely limited! In practice i listen to radio only anymore because access is so ridiculously limited.

I guess there is probably SOME option, but i really can't be arsed to search for such a solution, if i need to put in time to try and find such a solution it's not accessible enough. There is plenty of radio channels to choose from even just from FM, which is easy and convenient :)
Downside is none of the artists i really like gets no monetary gain from me directly in any fashion anymore, only thing they get is from the radio royalties get from me. I wouldn't mind buying a few albums if it meant i could listen on any device of my preference, anywhere, anytime, with or without access to internet.

Countersue (5, Interesting)

sixtyeight (844265) | more than 2 years ago | (#39538993)

When do the various file-sharing services get together and collectively countersue the MPAA for obstruction of commerce, racketeering, and whatever else comes to mind when one industry gets together to choke another?

For that matter, when does the internet start to crowdfund a bounty in the form of attorneys' fees to go after these guys? [coinconnect.org] Perhaps we were waiting until the ISPs implement "6 Strikes", at which point all the open public WiFi hotspots will necessarily be taken offline or passworded outside common public use.

Re:Countersue (5, Insightful)

Trogre (513942) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539029)

The best way to get these guys is to cut off their revenue stream. Stop buying [1] their crap.

[1] By "buying" I also mean downloading, for by doing so you are endorsing it, giving it further mindshare.

Re:Countersue (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539043)

But the drop in revenue will only be attributed to more pirating.

Re:Countersue (5, Informative)

ThePeices (635180) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539485)

"But the drop in revenue will only be attributed to more pirating."

The movie industry has been doing quite well indeed.

Just look at their profits the past ten years. They are breaking profit records year after year. The movie industry has never made so much money in its history.

And all of this in the face of rampant piracy for many years.

What does that tell you?

Re:Countersue (2)

TheTurtlesMoves (1442727) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539513)

People still like going to the theaters.

Re:Countersue (5, Interesting)

WCLPeter (202497) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539647)

They are breaking profit revenue records year after year.

Sorry, had to fix that for you. No movie ever made has ever turned a profit, none. [wikipedia.org] In fact, some world famous movies are such colossal failures they weren't even able to pay the actors [slashfilm.com] who starred in them.

Re:Countersue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539849)

Willing to share some of that kool-aid with us?

Re:Countersue (1)

infurnus (1897136) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539051)

The best way to get these guys is to cut off their revenue stream. Stop buying [1] their crap.

[1] By "buying" I also mean downloading, for by doing so you are endorsing it, giving it further mindshare.

But the drop in revenue will only be attributed to more pirating.

Yeah. Kindly fuck off with your "stop buying/downloading" and actually get off your ass and give a shit like the rest of us.
I've contacted the EFF about issues like this, what have YOU done, mister "sit around and do jack shit"?

Re:Countersue (5, Interesting)

Maow (620678) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539335)

The best way to get these guys is to cut off their revenue stream. Stop buying [1] their crap.

[1] By "buying" I also mean downloading, for by doing so you are endorsing it, giving it further mindshare.

But the drop in revenue will only be attributed to more pirating.

Yeah. Kindly fuck off with your "stop buying/downloading" and actually get off your ass and give a shit like the rest of us.

I've contacted the EFF about issues like this, what have YOU done, mister "sit around and do jack shit"?

Sorry for cursing, I'm just really peeved about stuff like this.
I'm an indie musician

The ills of the entertainment industry are merely symptoms of a greater problem.

Boycotting in all forms is an excellent plan, while considering options to deal with the real issues (bribery, corruption, crippled economy, laws by the 1% for the 1%, etc.)

When facing civilization-challenging crises, entertainment is something that's rather easy to ignore / boycott.

We're likely on the same side, but I see entertainment as the circuses part of "bread & circuses" and seek farther-ranging solutions, which ought to trickle down into the content industries, copyright, and patents.

Of course, I myself am not exactly sure what to do, and expect any effective solution to be ... messy as hell, probably devastating to many, and entirely unpalatable. At some point, our status quo will be describable in those same terms, and by then maybe some ideas will be on the table with a critical mass of support behind them. Not there yet...

Re:Countersue (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539343)

The best way to get these guys is to cut off their revenue stream. Stop buying [1] their crap.

[1] By "buying" I also mean downloading, for by doing so you are endorsing it, giving it further mindshare.

But the drop in revenue will only be attributed to more pirating.

Yeah. Kindly fuck off with your "stop buying/downloading" and actually get off your ass and give a shit like the rest of us.

I've contacted the EFF about issues like this, what have YOU done, mister "sit around and do jack shit"?

Wow, you've actually written an e-mail complaining about the MPAA? They must be panicking right now, and in a day or two they will dismantle their organization out of fear of you sending even more e-mails. You, sir, deserve a medal. In fact I have just contacted the Queen of England and Her Majesty says your Knighthood is well underway. Slashdot is truly blessed to have someone like you on our userbase.

Re:Countersue (1)

infurnus (1897136) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539373)

Wasn't really about the MPAA, but nice strawman anyways

Re:Countersue (1)

infurnus (1897136) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539063)

Sorry for cursing, I'm just really peeved about stuff like this.
I'm an indie musician

Re:Countersue (1)

javascriptjunkie (2591449) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539141)

Dude, this is Slashdot. It's okay to let one rip occasionally.

Re:Countersue (4, Insightful)

Trogre (513942) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539407)

So am I, on both counts.

And to answer your earlier question about what I am doing about these abusive organizations: I have stopped giving them money. On the rare occasion I buy music, I buy indie. If everyone did that, then we wouldn't have this problem.

Re:Countersue (1)

sixtyeight (844265) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539095)

The best way to get these guys is to cut off their revenue stream.

While I agree that it's productive, I have to disagree with that statement as written.

Boycotting can be very effective, but it's unlikely to happen significantly with the mainstream media. I more or less boycott the industry just because I don't find it entertainment but insult; however, most people aren't there yet. Either way, taking action in law to stop organized criminal behavior that's plainly detrimenting society is also not only necessary, but an implied duty in a society of laws.

(I know, our society hasn't looked like that recently. And I posit that the lack of public involvement is a large part of why.)

Re:Countersue (3, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539115)

Doesn't work, and here is why: PPT math. You see they simply go into whatever legislature they intend to corrupt with a PPT and give a spiel like this 'As you can see here our focus group says people like X and people like Y, so by this chart here you can see that we SHOULD have made X PLUS Y but since we didn't? it must be those ebil pirates argh!" and then they will simply take your money in the form of a tax, while getting any draconian law passed, after they hand out the bribes of course. See the extra price added to CDs to cover piracy in many places for example.

You see just like the banks these multinationals have a great "heads i win tails you lose' sort of thing going and there is pretty much not a damned thing you can do to stop it. After all it doesn't matter what the people say or do, the elected officials simply ignore them if it comes down to them or a multinational. throw them out, you just replace shill A with shill B, no change at all. Hell I don't know a single person that has bought one of their CDs at retail in years, we all buy indie artists or pick them up at a used CD shop, see it make ANY difference?

Re:Countersue (1)

sixtyeight (844265) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539157)

After all it doesn't matter what the people say or do, the elected officials simply ignore them if it comes down to them or a multinational. throw them out, you just replace shill A with shill B, no change at all.

"Well there's yer problem, buddy!"

We're encountering the symptoms of a lack of political accountability to the law, and to the People.

See my above link for a [darn good] patch for that.

Re:Countersue (2)

Trogre (513942) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539447)

That's not my point. My point is this - if they're not making any more money, they won't be able to afford to keep crooked senators and buy horrible legislation.

I'm not trying to make a point to the RIAA/MPAA by not giving them money - I'm trying to gut them completely.

Re:Countersue (1)

thejynxed (831517) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539917)

Yes, and good luck, with all of the millions upon millions throwing their wallets to the content industry via iTunes alone, let alone via concert tickets (Ticketmaster and LiveNation, both fully controlled by the RIAA and account for almost all concert ticket sales in the USA and its territories, simply by owning the contracts with the venues).

This will never stop as long as anyone wants their music, wants it now, and is willing to pay for it.

Re:Countersue (1)

gsgriffin (1195771) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539563)

Now that is a creative twist...crowd source to get enough money to pay lawyers.not sure if that sis well in my stomach.

Thats great news. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39538995)

Breaking the law is breaking the law.. I can't wait for the coming DNS blocks. Finally a software developer or musician wont have to worry about starting a business and getting ripped off by people who want to enjoy his work for free.

Re:Thats great news. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539011)

Breaking the law is breaking the law! Turn in anyone on your block hiding filthy Jews today!

Re:Thats great news. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539277)

Infringing copyright to consume and enjoy material someone else has produced is equivalent to "saving jews"? Dude.. you are fucked up in the head.

Why don't you hire an artist to produce content for you? Then you own it, you can do whatever with it, including sharing it with others for free.

Re:Thats great news. (4, Insightful)

rohan972 (880586) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539327)

Infringing copyright to consume and enjoy material someone else has produced is equivalent to "saving jews"? Dude.. you are fucked up in the head.

The statement being replied to did not express the wrongness of copyright infringement, but of breaking the law. If the law is the basis on which you decide morality then it would seem you would have to conclude that saving Jews from Nazi persecution when they were in government was an immoral action since it was illegal. If you can't abide by that conclusion then you need a more thorough justification to claim that copyright infringement is wrong.

An average high school student could be expected to understand that point without having it explained. I pity you, since either your intellect is insufficient to understand the point or your character is insufficient to require you to make an honest argument. Both are serious deficiencies.

Why don't you hire an artist to produce content for you? Then you own it, you can do whatever with it, including sharing it with others for free.

My wife is a musician and we are quite ok without locking the internet down. Recording artists from major labels now put their songs on youtube for free and still sell copies. Why they are still getting bent out of shape over file sharing is beyond me.

Re:Thats great news. (2)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539021)

Yeah, that's what musicians do. Start businesses.

Ozzy Osborne soda is the best.

Re:Thats great news. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539215)

Breaking the law is breaking the law... unless you work for the government or a large corporation.

Re:Thats great news. (1)

hawkinspeter (831501) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539531)

Breaking the law is only breaking the law if you get caught. Otherwise, you're innocent.

Re:Thats great news. (2, Insightful)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539597)

Breaking the law is breaking the law.. I can't wait for the coming DNS blocks. Finally a software developer or musician wont have to worry about starting a business and getting ripped off by people who want to enjoy his work for free.

MPAA may be full of shit, but at the same time it's annoying how anti-piracy comments always get robotically modded down in Slashdot. I just think it's good to look objectively at both sides of the coin.

The Founding Fathers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539009)

The Founding Fathers are rolling in their graves. Technology has changed. The laws have only gotten more complex and far-reaching...

This is why America needs the Affordable Care Act (5, Funny)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539031)

The Affordable Care Act failing to pass muster in the Supreme Court would imperil the planned 2013 Legislative Lobby agenda by the RIAA and MPAA to introduce that Affordable Media Act (AMA) which would provide Government Subsidies to help keep Blu-Ray and Access to Media Streaming Services at existing Prices in exchange for the requirement for all American Tax Payers to show proof of the purchase of at least $500 per year in Digital Media from any one of a number of participants in a Government run Media Marketplace (member including Walmart, iTunes Music Store, Amazon and others) or pay a tax penalty of $100,000.00 or 10 years imprisonment since it can be assumed that by not buying media from an authorized Marketplace Member, you are engaged in Copyright Infringement.

American's want online media -- let's provide it to them in a lawful and controlled manner.

Re:This is why America needs the Affordable Care A (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539073)

Ha ha! You can't fool me! It's April Fools! Oh, wait...

Re:This is why America needs the Affordable Care A (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539127)

Troll much?

Re:This is why America needs the Affordable Care A (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539249)

Troll much?

Fucking moron. You are truly a fucking idiot. Asshat.

Re:This is why America needs the Affordable Care A (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539145)

The radio and web sites all are controlled by angels who talk to me personally. It would be way more expensive than copyright issues. Ba ha. I don't watch TV or listen to music except the angel songs I get from God. I'm spoiled.

God says...
C:\LoseThos\www.losethos.com\text\words\AUGUST.TXT

t merciful
Lord, pardoned and remitted this sin also, with my other most horrible
and deadly sins, in the holy water?

Verecundus was worn down with care about this our blessedness, for
that being held back by bonds, whereby he was most straitly bound,
he saw that he should be severed from us. For himself was not yet a
Christian, his wife one of the faithful; and yet hereby, more
rigidly than by any other chain, was he let and hindered from the
journey which we had now essayed. For he would not,

Doesn't really matter (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539033)

http://icefilms.info has been operating for 5 years and still remains untouched even when Ninja got busted. I use XBMC with the Icefilms.info plugin installed which is sweet on my home television. I haven't had cable tv in over 8 years since I got tired of Spam TV.

We have spam blockers for our email, spam blockers for our web browsers and I felt 8 years ago it was time for spam blocking my television. So I went straight torrent/newsgroups/icefilms/xbmc route.

For the torrent lovers
http://kat.ph
http://thepiratebay.org
http://demonoid.me (registrations open or get an invite)

For the direct download sources
http://icefilms.info

My ISP offers free newsgroup access since they were a dialup ISP in the 90's, Now I have 20mb vDSL with them and still have the same newsgroup access, Cable companies stopped giving free access to newsgroups but many many DSL isp's at least in the south still offer free newsgroup access with an account. Which is very nice.

Course it does help that I work for my ISP and we have our own private torrent tracker and employee FTP server hosted in our network operation center in house as well when we wanna get our "YARR" on :P

Re:Doesn't really matter (1)

Cito (1725214) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539053)

100% spot on! I did the same about 6 years ago, I cut cable and never looked back I also run XBMC with icefilms plugin and have 12mb dsl with newsgroup access and I have a demonoid account and instead of a DVR I use a feature in uTorrent called RSS Downloader. I give utorrent a list of movies and tv shows I want and it automatically downloads them weekly for me, stores them on an shared external usb hard drive which my XBMC box can see so with so many shows saved in my uTorrent RSS Downloader I get new tv shows daily all commercial free zero spam! spam free tv is the only way to watch anymore!

Re:Doesn't really matter (1)

Siridar (85255) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539385)

If you're going to all this effort, and already have usenet - ditch torrents completely. I can highly recommend the sickbeard/couchpotato/headphones/sabnzbd setup.

For once the MAFIAA may be right.... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539037)

Americans should not longer tolerate those damn corporations who are (to quote from the MPAA 'fact sheet' mentioned in the article) "All About the Money". Those sorts of corporations should be put out of business immediately, their assets seized, and all their executives and board members rounded up and thrown in jail, with their personal assets confiscated or frozen as well for good measure. I believe Fortune magazine has a convenient list that would make a good starting point...

April Fools Day? (1)

kelarius (947816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539071)

WTF? It's 4/1, it's not allowed to have real news on 4/1!

DMCA safe harbor status (4, Interesting)

billcopc (196330) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539079)

I don't know all of these services, but doesn't the DMCA's safe harbor provision exempt them from this sort of witch hunt prosecution, as long as DMCA reports are handled in a timely manner ? You could receive a thousand such reports a day, as long as you promptly take down the content (or challenge false claims), you're supposed to be in the clear, as far as the law is concerned.

I've received such complaints in the past, when one of my hosting clients had their site compromised and was used as a warez drop. I fixed the problem, nuked the offending files and never heard of it again. Given that I'm currently in the process of setting up such a file host (no payments though), I'm a bit concerned about this legal abuse. Youtube allows user uploads, and honors DMCA takedowns, and they seem to be doing just fine. Both sites are hosting user-created content. Both have the potential to carry copyrighted material. Both generate ad revenue from their traffic. What makes a filehost any different ?

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539099)

What makes them different is the amount of bribes that they have or have not funneled into the coffers of the various Congresscritters, judges, lawyers, and others in the interconnected web of privilege that runs America.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (5, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539179)

It's vague enough for lawyers to argue over. The problem is that DMCA takedowns are of limited effectiveness in such a dynamic environment: Take one down, someone will upload a new one in a few seconds. The legal case against Megaupload hinged on a technicality: They took the files down on request, but didn't also take down duplicates of the same file uploaded by someone else, even though they could (as they used file-level dedupe) have done so trivially. It isn't entirely clear what the responsibilities of a service provider are any more: The DMCA doesn't get into the technical implications of hashlists, de-duplication, fingerprinting, the countermeasures against them or the countermeasures against the countermeasures. It was written on the assumption that publishing content would be a difficult and expensive task, so if you can get it pulled down you've seriously inconvenienced pirates. The whole model breaks when publishing a file is just a matter of uploading, which it really always was.

The only way to actually stop piracy would be by passing new laws so draconian that I'd rather just see the entire copyright-driven industry destroyed than sacrifice that much freedom or hand so much power to those who can afford lawyers.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (2)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539673)

The legal case against Megaupload hinged on a technicality: They took the files down on request, but didn't also take down duplicates of the same file uploaded by someone else, even though they could (as they used file-level dedupe) have done so trivially.

If you take MegaUpload's definition I simply have to have a dynamic link generator, oh I took down the last link but you can push "generate download link" and get a different URL to the same file and that's legal until we get a DMCA takedown for that. Everybody understands that's not how it's supposed to work and the law isn't that into the details as URLs. It simply says "(ii) Identification of the copyrighted work claimed to have been infringed". "The file accessible at URL: $foo" is identification, but it's not the literal URL that is infringing but the file it points to. I think the prosecution will argue pretty hard that after that you're aware of the file and fail the "(i) does not have actual knowledge that the material or an activity using the material on the system or network is infringing;" condition, meaning you're no longer protected from liability.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (1, Troll)

kamapuaa (555446) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539209)

"The "red flag" test stems from the language in the statute that requires that an OSP not be “aware of facts or circumstances from which infringing activity is apparent.” The "red flag" test contains both a subjective and an objective element. Objectively, the OSP must have knowledge that the material resides on its system. Subjectively, the "infringing activity would have been apparent to a reasonable person operating under the same or similar circumstances.""

These services exist for no other reason than to facilitate piracy, and any reasonable person knows this. Therefore, no, the DMCA provision doesn't apply.

I know, I know. "I don't know this! What makes you the judge!" Well fuck you. Yes you do know that these sites exist entirely to facilitate piracy.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539483)

Youtube only exists for pirating music videos ..

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539289)

Youtube has a very effective proactive tool for automatically finding and removing copyrighted content before any DMCA take down request is even made. It works for audio on streaming videos but its really not a practical approach for these sites that can host encrypted / compressed content that can't be analyzed by such a tool.

As far as I understand it this kind of proactive analysis is not currently required by law but I'm sure it doesn't hurt when it comes to defending themselves. Besides that google has an army of lawyers and deeper pockets than any other file sharing site. That alone should be enough to put them low on the list of targets for the mpaa/riaa

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539321)

Many people, including myself, have been subject to false positive results from their copyright-screener. It's an inprecise process, and youtube's policy is to pull anything suspicious. There is a nominal appeal process, but even after many attempts I never recieved a reply or even acknowledgement.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (1)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539665)

I hear this all the time. In YouTube, when you hit an incorrect copyright infringement claim or your video gets flagged for no good reason, it's very hard to actually reach a person who can fix it.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (1)

reub2000 (705806) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539495)

Considering that I can simply do a search with the song title and artist name, and find a song on youtube, how effective has this tool been?

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (3, Interesting)

Raenex (947668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539579)

Probably more effective than you think. One of the things YouTube did was to give copyright holders the option to profit from advertisements on the video, so it's quite possible that they are up there with after-the-fact permission. Some of the songs on YouTube are actually official videos from the holders, in particular Vevo [wikipedia.org] . I'm guessing the rest just don't care enough to have the videos taken down, as I've seen some of them up for years.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539315)

Most of them are not based in the US so the DMCA does not apply. Megaupload's mistake was to have servers in the US. Everyone else learned from that and is now making sure they don't have any assets under US law at all.

Re:DMCA safe harbor status (1)

Raenex (947668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539615)

DMCA provided fair harbor, and many other countries don't provide an equivalent, so it's not like moving to a country without it would necessarily benefit. You can look at the ongoing saga of Pirate Bay to see proof of that.

April Fools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539109)

Come on, Slashdot. I know it's early and all, but I expected better than this for an April Fools Day joke.

I understand most of these... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539159)

Not that I agree with the stupidity, but MEDIAFIRE? Really? That's the most legitimate filehost I've ever used, I was recommending it post MU shutter. This is just well out of hand if MediaFire can be a target.

Slashdot starts April 1st by bring the room down (1)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539167)

Wow. We've gone from "OMG Ponies!" to "Turn off the lights the internet is over"

The MPAA and RIAA have shit all over April Fool's day.

Re:Slashdot starts April 1st by bring the room dow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539267)

Wow. We've gone from "OMG Ponies!" to "Turn off the lights the internet is over" The MPAA and RIAA have shit all over April Fool's day.

This one's an important story, and it wasn't April 1st on the West Coast at the time of publication.

Don't worry. Whether from the MPAE [youtube.com] or the RIAE [youtube.com] , or even Aperture Science [youtube.com] , if you take a look at the queue, I think you'll find there's a pony for that. [youtube.com]

Re:Slashdot starts April 1st by bring the room dow (1)

pntkl (2187764) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539279)

Follis.

Re:Slashdot starts April 1st by bring the room dow (1)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539695)

Anyone missing the pony pink, can invert the colors of Slashdot. There's a Compiz plugin for that.

legit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539169)

I thought this was April Fool's day... article is too legit to be a joke

What (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539203)

All media is for me personally, so you must be saying something.

I'm flattered if you're impressed by LoseThos or the songs.

God says...
C:\LoseThos\www.losethos.com\text\DARWIN.TXT

  limbs of vertebrate animals are
articulated.

PETALS.--The leaves of the corolla, or second circle of organs in a flower.
They are usually of delicate texture and brightly coloured.

PHYLLODINEOUS.--Having flattened, leaf-like twigs or leafstalks instead of
true leaves.

PIGMENT.--The colouring material produced generally in the superficial
parts of animals. The cells secreting it are called PIGMENT-CELLS.

PINNATE.--Bearing leaflets on each side of a central stalk.

PISTILS.--The female o

Proposed solution: Content addressible networking. (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539251)

We have magnet links: A convenient, standard way of addressing a file by hash and size. If that were combined with some form of decentralised distribution-and-caching system, there'd be no need for lockers.

I'm not talking about piracy, but anything that needs to distribute lots of data without spending a fortune on a CDN. Linux package repos, patches, freely-distributable content, that sort of thing. Storage is cheap now. Something like freenet, but without the need for performance-hurting paranoia in every aspect. Ideally something so simple for clients that it could be built into browsers to get HTML5 video or downloads without the user needing to even be aware of what's going on.

I keep posting these half-formed ideas, hoping that if I get enough people thinking it over then someone with more skill than me will be able to work on the details and impliment it.

I pirate most of my music from Youtube (2)

Eightbitgnosis (1571875) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539399)

MegaUpload can't provide me that, but that's fine when Google does it

Re:I pirate most of my music from Youtube (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539663)

I see you enjoy double-encoded 128/192 kbps mp3s.

Correction: JEWS target file sharing services... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539411)

...because we can't have Jews doing manual labour, can we...

Jews don't own farms, don't dig roads up, don't build houses, hospitals or schools, don't work in car factories, or any other factories, doing manual labour...

No, Jews just create money from nothing, loan it to us, their 'goyim' (which means 'cattle'), and then we have to perform REAL labour to pay it back, or give them our REAL, physical assets.

Jews run your government, your media, and your banks, and yet you idiots rush to their defence, the moment you hear the word 'Jew'. Why is that?

Brainwashed much?

Can we sue the MAFIAA? (0)

Mistakill (965922) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539467)

Please? anyone?

I'd like to thank the MPAA (2)

unkiereamus (1061340) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539533)

Speaking as a casual infringer...I don't infringe by habit. But living in a third world country, sometimes I literally cannot pay for the content I want. So in those cases, I will infringe...

Anyhow, I don't count myself as a diehard pirate, but I didn't even know about 4/5 sites listed, so I thank the MPAA for improving my options.

M.P.A.A. just keeps going...??? (1)

YankDownUnder (872956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539627)

Oy - MPAA, why don't you get with the evolution of how the media should flow - rather than dictate how you WANT it to flow...BTW, MPAA, STFU and LEARN.

thanks (1)

isaracoglu (2608195) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539629)

Thank You.. ibrahim saraçolu [slashdot.org]

Reasonable access (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39539671)

There will never be an equilibrium between whats fair to pay for products and what those greedy sons of bitches want for their crappy products. Greed is greed, and when you have the greedy paying good money to lobbyists to make laws happen. Fairness for consumers will never happen, unless another revolution happens. its time to rise up against the Lord and Kinds again. and retake what the people are owed.

MediaFire/PDFs/Facebook (0)

michaelmalak (91262) | more than 2 years ago | (#39539981)

Hey, I've used MediaFire's free "hosting" to "post" PDFs of my original creation to Facebook because Facebook has no built-in way to do that.

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