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Dell To Acquire Wyse

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the oh-is-that-what-they're-calling-it-these-days? dept.

Businesses 95

New submitter alancronin writes "Computer and IT giant Dell said today it will acquire privately held Wyse Technology, a company that specializes in what it calls 'cloud client computing.'"

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Dumb (5, Funny)

generationxyu (630468) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559773)

What an idea to acquire such a terminally dumb company.

Re:Dumb (4, Funny)

Sique (173459) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559893)

You don't think this was a wyse decision?

Re:Dumb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560127)

What's dumb is "cloud client computing". No, you make terminals goddammit.

Sorry, no puns here.

Re:Dumb (5, Funny)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560339)

Oh, a Wyse guy, huh?!

Re:Dumb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560829)

Hahahahaha. Fun-ny.

Re:Dumb (0)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561933)

Wonder what the Wyse guys think about this?

Why(se)? (3, Funny)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561831)

You don't think this was a wyse decision?

Dell me about it!

How unfortunate: Wyse and not Wang (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39559777)

Just think of all the Slashdot jokes that could have been...

Re:How unfortunate: Wyse and not Wang (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561041)

Wang is nothing to joke about. Once a profitable company, many investors ignored the warning signs of its decline...
A lot of people lost their ass to Wang!

I know, it was a long way to go for the punchline...

Re:How unfortunate: Wyse and not Wang (4, Funny)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561211)

Just think of all the Slashdot jokes that could have been...

That doesn't mean we can't still make Wang jokes.

Q: Who was the first female computer programmer?

A: Eve - she had an Apple in one hand, and a Wang in the other.

Re:How unfortunate: Wyse and not Wang (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39561467)

A: Eve - she had an Apple in one hand, and a Wang in the other.

She showed him her Apple, he showed her his Wang,
When he plugged in his hardware, his battery drained.
His battery's dead, he heeds one that's live.
He's got a floppy disk but she wants a hard drive.
High tech sex, Computer Love [dmdb.org] .
(It ain't no joke when your Wang is broke.)

Found it on Demento database. Can anyone find an MP3 of this track? Band was "Strapped" (of "Edna" fame), from 1986.

Re:How unfortunate: Wyse and not Wang (2)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563399)

An old friend of mine used to work at Wang. He was emphatic about that. "I do not work for Wang. I work at Wang!"

Re:How unfortunate: Wyse and not Wang (1)

Forever Wondering (2506940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39565363)

An old friend of mine used to work at Wang. He was emphatic about that. "I do not work for Wang. I work at Wang!"

An old friend of mine used to for (er... at) Wang. Everybody had Wang word processors in their cubicles. So, people used to walk around and say "Show me your Wang" ...

Re:How unfortunate: Wyse and not Wang (1)

matuscak (523184) | more than 2 years ago | (#39584979)

Lo these many years ago, I worked for a company that used a Wang VS system. We were testing some voicemail thing they were trying to sell us. As I recall, the Wang system wasn't smart about detecting when someone hung up the phone and you were supposed to hit the "#" key on the keypad when you were done with it. We had a training class where one of the women in the department was going over the functions from the phone keypad and she said "Always pound off the Wang". I was snickering for the next week.

Oh god (2, Informative)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559795)

When I was in highschool my school used Wyse Terminals which was the most bad and ironic name I've ever seen. I hated those things..every one hated those things. They broke all the time and had to constantly be reflashed with a new image. They were so awful that by my Senior year they were being phased out entirely.

Re:Oh god (4, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560055)

That was the latter years. The old ones were beyond awesome. A good rule of thumb for wyse terms was if you could not flash it, it was old enough to be fantastic, and if you could, its a turd. I have an old one on my desk for embedded work... Hey I've got the space, can always use another screen, etc. Kinda sucks for cut and paste, but perfect for watching logs and boot messages scroll by...

Re:Oh god (1)

SomePgmr (2021234) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560459)

Yeah I'd say it's hit-or-miss depending on the models, even today.

I've got a lot of s30's that have run like champs for years now. I don't think I've had a single one go bad yet that didn't involve something stupid (knock on wood).

I do have some of their 9650 all-in-ones for kiosk applications and some of the old... 3125's (I think?). Those have been terrible. I just replace them with s30's and similar, and they're gtg forever.

Re:Oh god (4, Interesting)

zipn00b (868192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560929)

Yeah I did a LOT of installs from the Mid '80s on using mostly Wyse 50 or 60 terminals hanging off SCO boxes ( back when SCO was a real company not a lawsuit factory) And I was supporting software running on old SCO boxes 20 years later that still only ran nicely with Wyse 60 emulation instead of the default VT100 that so much terminal software assumed everything liked. I think it was in the mid-90's that I started replacing the WY60 terminals with emulators as it ended up being cheaper to run that over TCP/IP instead of hanging a terminal off a multi-port serial card. But for a long time one of my disaster backup plans had a couple locations stocked with the old terminals in case a hurricane took out our main office. Never used any of the newer line of terminals so can't say how good or bad they were but the old Wyse terminals worked great for a LONG time....

Re:Oh god (2)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563499)

Eventually the onboard nicad config batteries fail and leak... gotta pull them and replace with a little 2-cell AA battery holder from radio shack.

nicad juice will rot the traces if not caught in time.

Its a storage issue. Left plugged in forever, the battery never discharges so it never corrodes.

Re:Oh god (1)

Forever Wondering (2506940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39566305)

Yeah I did a LOT of installs from the Mid '80s on using mostly Wyse 50 or 60 terminals hanging off SCO boxes ( back when SCO was a real company not a lawsuit factory) And I was supporting software running on old SCO boxes 20 years later

When I was an engineer at Altos Computer Systems, the engineers were asked to evaluate an early model Wyse terminal. This was because Don Valentine [Sequoia Capital] was an Altos investor and on the board and he was interested in investing in Wyse. The model we got was a bit boxy/clunky (it predated the later WY-30/55/60's that sold like hotcakes) but we felt it had potential. Eventually, a Wyse terminal was usually paired with an Altos system. In particular, the Altos ACS 586.

SCO didn't manufacture hardware. They did ports of Xenix (Microsoft's version of Unix--in those days, this was a hedge against MS/DOS not being as successful as it was) to various microsystems. Altos did its own port of Xenix to the 586 [but may have used SCO later on???].

Just curious ... What was the hardware vendor for the systems you were using?

Re:Oh god (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563975)

Agreed. I really liked those terminals.

Re:Oh god (1)

LinuxIsGarbage (1658307) | more than 2 years ago | (#39566667)

My only experience with Wyse terminals was my local public library. In the early 90's they migrated from a manual card catalog / checkout system to a computer based one. Wyse terminals were located through the library, and at the checkout. It was revolutionary! You could modem (and eventually telnet) into the system to look up or renew books! They also had a couple Wyse terminals in the back connected to the local Freenet for public internet access.

They built a new branch 10 years ago that had brand new Wyse dumb terminals. Eventually they migrated to a web based system.

Meanwhile at my current job we use VT220 terminals and DECwriters connected to 1980's PDP-11's.

Before we replace those we have to get rid of the 1970's computers.

Re:Oh god (2)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560057)

When I was in highschool my school used Wyse Terminals which was the most bad and ironic name I've ever seen. I hated those things..every one hated those things. They broke all the time and had to constantly be reflashed with a new image. They were so awful that by my Senior year they were being phased out entirely.

YMMV. I had an admin job back in the late 90s that involved entering information into a dumb green-screen terminal. It was as tedious as hell, but at least the dumb Wyse terminal I was using- some of the time- had arguably the best mechanical key action (*) of any keyboard I've used, marginally beating the late-era Model B BBC Micros. Crappily, they later got some beige box PCs running a terminal emulator under NT that came with some mediocre generic membrane crap. To be fair, I'm not anti-membrane, as some modern ones can be quite good, but those were pretty "meh".

I got a mechanical Cherry keyboard a few years later on that was supposed to have a similar action- it was okay, but had just a bit too much resistance on the keys to have that satisfyingly effortless typing I was after.

(*) The type that goes "tap" when it hits the bottom of its travel, not the tediously-fetishised "clicky pressure point halfway down" action of the IBM Model M, whose obsessive fans seem to love it but anyone not already used to it would likely find strange- and noisy. (I didn't like it, even though I'd used plenty of mechanical keyboards previously).

Re:Oh god (1)

archen (447353) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561303)

Totally agree with you about the keyboard. I really wish I could use it on a PC. I have the feeling that it would be nearly impossible to replicate today, just by the nature of materials and quality that were probably involved in making them. The closest I've found that I've liked is the overly expensive Das Keyboard.

Re:Oh god (1)

Misagon (1135) | more than 2 years ago | (#39566507)

Some of the Wyse PCE keyboards (with IBM PC like layout) talk the PS/2 protocol and can be connected directly to a modern PC with or without a simple adapter. Look for model numbers 900840 and 900866.

The key switches in the Wyse keyboards are "Cherry MX Black". There are now loads of new keyboards with the different variations of the Cherry MX (black, red, blue, brown...) -- because they have become popular for computer gaming. One of the first, and now most inexpensive models with blacks, was Steelseries 6GV2 and Steelseries 7G. Look also for Filco, Rosewill, Leopold, Deck, CM Storm Quickfire and TT eSports Meka [G1], but note that some of them can come with different Cherry MX switches.

Vintage Wyse keyboards are quite popular among keyboard enthusiasts (collectors) these days. However ... they are mainly not after the key action but for the key caps to put on their modern keyboards. The key caps on the keyboards for the Wyse 50 terminals (without cursor keys) were made of thick plastic, but the others are quite good too. Both were double-shot injection molded, so that the legends never wear off. People also like the vintage colour scheme of dark blue (not black) on grey/dark grey. In fact, some groups of enthusiasts have made replica key sets. There is a project right now for making an adapter kit [geekhack.org] with a few missing keys in the vintage style to make them all fit modern keyboard layouts and have the same style.
A while ago, a group of Korean collectors got a full replica set made ... but they botched the colour code for the blue legends when the ordered it so they got light blue instead ... and now there are other enthusiasts who are making a replica of that set, even, hehe.

Re:Oh god (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39561523)

We used to use the Cherry keyboards with the card swipe for POS. They were nice, and sturdy, but I couldn't afford to replace each one that had a pepsi spilled on it, at like $300/ea.

Re:Oh god (1)

gmarsh (839707) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561753)

100% agreement on what constitutes a good keyboard.

I'm rockin' a Das Keyboard "Model S Professional Silent" on my work PC, and I'm pretty happy with it.

I won't call it silent by any stretch; the switches don't click at the tactile point like an IBM Model M keyboard, but there's a pretty loud clack when you bottom out a key. The tactile "give" is still there - but it's a lot "softer" than the M. When you push down on a M key, there's an increasing resistance until BANG, the bottom pretty much falls out of the key. With the Das Silent, it's more of a 'buttery' tactile feel at lack of a better description - it feels like you "push through" the tactile point instead of "breaking" the tactile point. The Das Silent also requires a fair bit less force to type on than a M.

I've gone back and forth between the Das Silent and the M a few times for the sake of comparison, and I've concluded that I prefer the Das Silent.

The Das Silent uses "Cherry Brown MX" keyswitches - keep an eye open for a deal on a keyboard using the same switches, I think you'll like it.

Re:Oh god (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560425)

I worked at a pizza joint in the late 90s early 2000s, they used Wyse terminals for their order entry system. I'd say about once a month we had to reboot the "server" (a 386 desktop in the office/closet) but other than that it ran smoothly and did what we needed. When they upgraded to Windows based systems it was a total nightmare.

Re:Oh god (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560773)

Really because I would have thought it would have been Wang.

Re:Oh god (2)

CAIMLAS (41445) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560927)

I administered on a network where we used the Wyse terminals as dumb clients to talk to our in-house time (accounting) server. We had about 200 of them, of two different vintages.

We had old Wyse and new Wyse. The old ones ran an in-house rolled BSD, but the new ones were WinCE 4.x or 3.x and we weren't able to flash them with a newer BSD ROM due to the hardware being incompatible.

We ended up buying replacements for the newer model with the old models on Ebay.

I have no idea how their products have performed in the last 7 years, though. With a marketing name like 'cloud client computing', I'd sooner not use them.

Re:Oh god (1)

hairyfish (1653411) | more than 2 years ago | (#39568317)

Not sure how old you are, but we run 99% of our 2500 machine fleet on Wyse with Vmware View and Windows and they work very well. Maybe your implementation wasn't so good? (although I can't see how you could screw up a simple thin client roll out).

Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (4, Insightful)

sheehaje (240093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559825)

Maybe Dell can finally offer an affordable thinclient. I am a big fan of their FX100, but it is priced out of range. By the time you license it and plug it in, it costs as much as a small form factor desktop. Not exactly the value customers are looking at with thin clients.

Lately we've been using PanoLogic Zero Clients. They are basically glorified network cards in a cube. No RAM, Processor, or other overhead that is prevalent in traditional ThinCleints. They are inexpensive and have a good management tool. Its inevitable that someone buys them out at some point.

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (1)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560071)

Lately we've been using PanoLogic Zero Clients. They are basically glorified network cards in a cube.

Would a Raspberry Pi work as a thin client? You could just attach it to the back of the monitor with sticky tape, plug in monitor, keyboard, mouse, and Ethernet, and then arrange for it to boot over the network.

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (1)

sheehaje (240093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560205)

Yes, a Raspberry PI would work great as a thin client, just have to have the specific agent for whatever system you are running on the backend. I imagine there would be some tweaking involved to get audio/video streams that sync well. As for booting over the network, wouldn't really need to if you can have a small image on the device. The screen is delivered from the backend servers/clusters anyway. I guess upgrading the image would be easier with booting over the network, but not neccessary. This is what I liked about the PanoLogic solution --- there is no OS on the device itself. It takes one piece out of the equation, which is nice when dealing with cloud type of architecture.

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (1)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560317)

Yeah, that's the reason I suggested network boot, for ease of management - but provided it can be updated remotely by the administrator, booting a local image would also work well.

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (1)

CAIMLAS (41445) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560965)

Dell offered a thinclient a couple years ago, IIRC. It was fairly affordable for the time.

You can find thinclients in the ~$350 ballpark, but that's a bit expensive compared to what's capable with ARM devices now. I imagine you could get them down to $200 and run Android without much problem at all and still have decent quality - their specifications don't need to be that steep, and a Beagleboard spec'd device would more than do the job.

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (1)

datavirtue (1104259) | more than 2 years ago | (#39562027)

It isn't about the purchase price, that is not the point. Thin clients should be plug and play--no administration. That is the real savings.

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563233)

It isn't about the purchase price, that is not the point. Thin clients should be plug and play--no administration. That is the real savings.

Exactly right. This is why Wyse thin-clients are popular at places like banks. You don't need to have an IT guy driving all over hell's half acre to the 100 branches fixing them. They just work. And as for the endpoint cost, you also need to factor in the server costs.

OpenThinClient.Org and $45 diskless from Geeks.com (2)

charnov (183495) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561005)

I use OpenThinClient.Org and $45 diskless workstations from Geeks.com. Works better than the $250 HP's we have.

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (3, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561175)

Maybe Dell can finally offer an affordable thinclient. I am a big fan of their FX100, but it is priced out of range. By the time you license it and plug it in, it costs as much as a small form factor desktop. Not exactly the value customers are looking at with thin clients.

The point was I think that the savings would come from not having to replace it ever unless it broke - so it would last 10+ years or three or four generations of desktops. The other savings was on the IT side - less management (these things boot up, there's nothing to break, nothing the user can download and infect it, etc) and just having to upgrade the server when necessary.

Of course, most businesses got sticker shock since they had to make huge IT investments, which they were loathe to do - big powerful servers/blades had to be bought, and terminals that cost the same as a desktop. From an initial investment, it didn't make sense since few businesses plan for such timespans...

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (2)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561995)

The FX100 is generally used for keeping the admins out of the dino-pen. If they're in the same building they can't complain about lag or latency since there's dedicated hardware on the other end to squeeze bits over ethernet.

A hardware solution to a people-problem.

Re:PCoIP will still be owned by Teradici (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39562143)

I have root on all of your Teradici management consoles.

LOL

Re:Can't wait to see the rebranded offerings (1)

Kiaradune (222032) | more than 2 years ago | (#39564207)

I suggest you check out evga.com's PD02 client. I have bought dozens of them, and they are sleek, cheap ($300) and identically technically to the FX100/P20.

Cloud? Why don't we... (3, Informative)

PixetaledPikachu (1007305) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559841)

...call it what it is: Thin Client. Wyse offers pretty good range of thin clients, from Windows embedded to Linux with built in ICA client. We ended up going with HP, since Wyse's equivalent was pricier

Re:Cloud? Why don't we... (2)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563597)

Because managers seems to like new buzzwords for old things, and seem to like reinventing the wheel. This, however, is a first in that it's not reinventing the wheel so much as it's repackaging it and calling it something else.

Wyse? Wow. (1)

beaverdownunder (1822050) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559849)

I had a Wyse 286 back in the day. Now I know what happened to them...

Re:Wyse? Wow. (1)

Camaro (13996) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560001)

I had one, too. It was my first "real" computer and I bought it at an auction for a farm equipment dealership that was going out of business in 1991. It was a cool machine with the CPU on a card plugged into a daughterboard. It aso has a 70MB hard drive which was pretty big for those days. I had to pull a tape drive to install a 3.5" floppy drive. I still miss the keyboard.

Re:Wyse? Wow. (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#39567597)

They continued their terminal biz for another 20 years and got into thin clients in the 2000's. They were smart enough to get out of the "me too" IBM clone market, right as everyone and their mother was bleeding out cash to stay up to date and fail (386 maybe 486 era, never saw a wyse 486 myself, but we still have a wyse 386 controlling an even older robotic line at work which I get to fix now and then as I am apparently the only one around dumb enough to say "heh I was a computer tech back when those things were new")

Dell is really scraping the bottom of the barrel.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39559887)

...next they will buy RIM...lol.

RIM would actually be a good plan... (1)

johnjones (14274) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560351)

great international client list

lots of gov contracts

absurdly great patents

dell I don't think could afford them

have fun

John

Dell will become none the Wyser for doing this. (1)

trudyscousin (258684) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559909)

That is all.

Exec responsible will soon be (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39562563)

Exec responsible will soon be sitting at home drinking BudWyser all day!

Re:Exec responsible will soon be (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39565343)

Exec responsible will soon be sitting at home drinking BudWyser all day!

KNOCK, KNOCK!
(Who's there?>
BUD!
(Bud who?)
BUD! Wyse are gettin' bought out by Dell!

Dell has lost its way (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39559933)

Michael Dell should shut down the company and give the money back to the shareholders

Re:Dell has lost its way (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39568487)

No, the shareholders are getting what they deserve. Shareholders demand 10% growth every year. When PCs are in decline (laptops and handhelds are taking off), you buy Alienware to try to keep your 10% growth. Then, when you need more things to sell, you buy Sonicwall, to add to the other networking companies you've already acquired. Looks like thin clients are making a comeback? Wyse it is. They'll acquire their way to greatness or bankruptcy, all to fit the demands of the shareholders, not in spite of them.

Relics (1)

Dynamoo (527749) | more than 2 years ago | (#39559997)

Wyse is a bit of a relic. What next? Zenith Data Systems? Kaypro?

Re:Relics (3, Funny)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560097)

Wyse is a bit of a relic. What next? Zenith Data Systems? Kaypro?

I'd like Altair to make a tablet. No more of this glass sheet crap, give me about 50 toggle switches and blinking lights.

Re:Relics (2)

berashith (222128) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560243)

I have been waiting for the HeathKit tablet.

Re:Relics (1)

zipn00b (868192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561215)

I miss the old HeathKit stuff. Used to drool over catalogs and magazines with that stuff in there wishing $3 an hour or so would let me afford that stuff.

The Touch (2)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560297)

No more of this glass sheet crap, give me about 50 toggle switches and blinking lights.

Touch doesn't get much better than manually flipping a toggle switch. Ahh.

Re:Relics (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560635)

64 toggle switches, 64 blinking lights, and a run button.

Re:Relics (3, Funny)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 2 years ago | (#39562525)

Because 64 bits ought to be enough for anybody!

Re:Relics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39562053)

I loved my Kaypro keyboard! Best I have ever used.

Re:Relics (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560617)

They've been around a long time, but they seem to have a decent presence in the thin client and virtualization market. They make a pretty good Remote Desktop + VMware View client for iPhone and iPad (I think there's an Android version, but I'm not sure how it compares).

Re:Relics (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563527)

[...] Zenith Data Systems [...]

Hey! I still have my ZDS T-Shirt [inkfrog.com] from when they were supplying the various federal service academies with PCs.

Okay, the PCs sucked. But the T-Shirt was cool.

TIL: Dell is still in business! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560005)

And apparently has enough money to buy other companies I didn't know were still in business!

ZeroClient (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560009)

PCoIP and Zero Clients have become very usable in the last few years. My current company is using the WYSE P20 zero clients for our contractors. The Wyse nowadays is just a network-KVM for a VM

Curious... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560099)

Does Wyse have some sort of secret management-sauce that I've not dealt with in my own relatively small deployments?

I can easily see that thin clients are something that Dell would be interested in selling; but buying out a company to move into a market is usually something you do if the product is in some what specialized.

Thin clients are basically the most boring single-board computers available(with specs somewhere between embedded desktops-level and weedy ARM SoC, depending on how 'thin' the customer actually wants) running either Windows Desktop OS Embedded Edition, WinCE, or a cut down linux. Surely this isn't the most difficult market for an existing whitebox slinger to break into?

Re:Curious... (2)

berashith (222128) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560275)

not tough to break in to, but now Dell has an existing installed base, some internal knowledge and relationships to support that base, and one less competitor to deal with. Buying this is probably cheaper than spending a year or two building it up.

Re:Curious... (2)

Caratted (806506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560623)

I deployed three Dell PCoIP thin clients for some public kiosks in a hotel. 16 months ago.

They had the best pricing and the integration with VMView was seamless. What's that about an existing installed base? This is about patents.

Um...patents? (4, Informative)

robla (4860) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560293)

From TFA: "The company has more than 180 patents, both issued and pending, covering its solutions, software and differentiated intellectual property."

Re:Um...patents? (2)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561145)

Basically same thing nVidia did to 3Dfx. Purchase the company for its IP.

Re:Um...patents? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39562091)

Thank you. I was just wondering that. Would there be any way to know what companies (including Dell) license patents from Wyse?

Companies must run a 'wish list' of acquisitions, based on what they license, and what the full portfolio is worth in fees. This'll be referenced to current uses, and to projected uses.

Dead obvious for patent food-fights, but also for technical projects. It's kinda interesting where Dell may be going with this.

Re:Curious... (1)

CuriousGeorge113 (47122) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560557)

You also buy a company if it's a good bargain. The fact that everyone is now selling thin clients really takes away Wyse's competitive edge, so they were probably looking for a buyer. Throw in some nice IP and a distribution network, and an acquisition like this makes a lot of sense, if the price was right.

Re:Curious... (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560673)

Dell's been growing quite a bit in the server market lately. I could see them wanting to preen the client side components in order to offer a more complete and integrated virtualization stack.

Re:Curious... (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563425)

Dell wants to sell the SERVERS that all these thin-client Wyse terminals hook up to. Racks and racks of servers...

ah yes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560179)

cloud client computing... that's what they call it nowadays :D

Why is slashdot so behind (2)

gubers33 (1302099) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560191)

This was announced yesterday and I actually saw it in the firehouse yesterday. Yet it isn't posted on Slashdot til today.

Re:Why is slashdot so behind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560967)

So what? You were not harmed, since you did know it yesterday (even on /. firehose), I was not harmed because I know it now and knowing it yesterday wouldn't make a difference. Only a shareholder of one of both companies would care, but they don't need /. for their information.

Tactical facepalm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560239)

I work in Government IT and we are just NOW phasing out those horrible Wyse thin clients with some crappy Dell 160s low-profile PCs. And I come on Slashdot this morning to find this awful bit of news. The powers that be are STILL listening to the consultants and salesmen that tell them that virtual desktops are the best thing since sliced bread despite the fact that our prior experience running virtual desktops on Wyse devices was so horrible (from both a performance and compatibility standpoint).

Now my Dell sales rep will be pushing thin clients to my boss. Oy vey.

Re:Tactical facepalm (3, Informative)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561907)

Thin clients are not for the end user they are for the administrators and the people who spend the money.
You will almost always be better off if you have a full speed desktop at your beck and call vs. a Thin Client... However those clients can stay current much longer and at the cost of a beefy server so Admins don't have to do desktop fixes and you don't need to upgrade every system every 3 years.

Re:Tactical facepalm (3, Insightful)

datavirtue (1104259) | more than 2 years ago | (#39562349)

Suzie in Records doesn't need performance, and she doesn't need a USB pot to plug her iPod into, or a hard drive on which to install Weatherbug, or an Application Data folder in which to foothold a rootkit. She needs a fucking terminal. Why run around in circles supporting PCs with Windows and all the necessary infrastructure needed to dick with things that have nothing to do with the business. Use an application server, a terminal (thin-client), and walk away.

Re:Tactical facepalm (1)

clarkn0va (807617) | more than 2 years ago | (#39562515)

Just because Dell sucks and Wyse sucks doesn't necessarily mean that virtual desktops have to suck. Our government funded institution has Dell hardware and Wyse hardware and the sooner it all disappears the happier I'll be. Meanwhile, we recently deployed around 80 thin clients and the experience for both IT and the client has been unilaterally positive (obviously we didn't use Dell or Wyse in this venture).

If your'e a government office then you must have an RFP process in place. Use it to define a properly-spec'ed solution and enjoy the benefits.

Re:Tactical facepalm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39562869)

Okay, I'm curious, if you didn't use Dell or Wyse, what did you use?
(Yes, this is a 100% serious question)

Re:Tactical facepalm (1)

clarkn0va (807617) | more than 2 years ago | (#39563063)

We use LTSP with its built-in RDP functionality. Our thin clients are in-house built using an Intel D525MW board, PicoPSU and 2G of RAM in a mini-box.com m350 case. The whole thing mounts with a bracket to the back of a VESA-compliant monitor. Next year we will be testing new boards, including the latest AMD low-power alternatives, ie, Brazos.

A dual-core Atom is actually pretty beefy for a thin client, and we pay for it in that our hardware is a little bigger and uses a little more power than your typical Wyse, but this is by design, as ours are used for a variety of more demanding applications, including flash video and other animations. The thin client hardware costs us less than CAD300 per unit including mounting hardware, kb and mouse, and the excellent LTSP software is free.

Re:Tactical facepalm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39563115)

Apricot :)

So, what happens... (2)

The-Forge (84105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39560245)

So does this mean a wyse60 emulation now becomes a dell60 emulation. Oh the poor termcap databases, how will it ever deal. :)

Silly name for a silly company (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39560567)

I see Wyse logos all the time here in Silicon Valley, and I swear, I could never figure out what their
company did from just reading their logo. I always thought it had something to do with
computer recycling.

Some great promotional ideas coming out of this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39561329)

Get a new Dell smartphone with Windows Phone 7 for just $25 when you agree to buy a 1 lb bag of Wyse potato chips every week for the next two years. (Early termination penalties apply).

Incomplete summary (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39561861)

The summary is incomplete. It contains only facts from which readers might ask questions, spur conversation and draw conclusions.

Where's the unfounded speculation?
Where's the flamebait anti-[COMPANY/PRODUCT] FUD?
Where's the troll-tastic open-ended question?

Get with it /. editors, we won't stand for this kind of sloppy workmanship!

wow (1)

peas_n_carrots (1025360) | more than 2 years ago | (#39561899)

What hubris Dell has to think it can turn around a relic like Wyse. This will magically put them at the forefront of cloud computing, the next iCloud!

This will be fun to watch. Any wagers on how long before they sell this off on their way down the death spiral?

Re:wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39562997)

HP bought Neoware in 2007. The rankings at the time were 1. Wyse, 2. Neoware, 3. HP. When HP bought out Neoware, they became #2. I'm surprised it took Dell so long to buy out Wyse, TBH.

Re:wow (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39564023)

they just need couple of fat patents from them and bam it's lawsuit time for onlive&etc.

Dell to acquire Wyse (2)

ChrisMaple (607946) | more than 2 years ago | (#39562271)

But not wisdom.

Wyse keyboards (1)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 2 years ago | (#39582499)

This seems like a good place to ask if anyone has experience with the Wyse 901867-01 terminal keyboards? There are some for sale on Ebay UK at the moment and they look good (Cherry MX black switches, apparently) but the connector is nonstandard. Can it be converted to USB or PS/2?
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