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Nokia Lumia 900 Reviews

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the n950-was-way-cooler dept.

Cellphones 195

MrSeb, zachareye, and others wrote in with several reviews of the Nokia Lumia 900. Starting things off, Extreme Tech asks if the Lumia redefines the smartphone; BGR chimes in declaring the phone "terrific". Ars Technica, on the other hand, isn't quite so enthusiastic, especially about the camera optics. Anandtech joins Ars in not being particularly enthused. It looks like most reviewers are happy with the UI, but not so enthused about the hardware (low display resolution for one). Signs point to an OK handset, but nothing spectacular.

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195 comments

Duh (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572149)

So they come up with a device that doesn't meet the hype they're pushing it with which will drive down Nokia's share price making them easier for Microsoft to one day acquire. It's gonna happen, they'll sell off all the parts except the patent portfolio and the Brand.

Re:Duh (5, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572367)

You expected any other reason for ex-Microsoftie Stephen Elop to suddenly show up as CEO of Nokia?

Not sure what Microsoft would do with it beyond the patent portfolio, though. the brand is a perishable item, and by the time the company well and truly dies, it may well have about the same reputation as the AOL or Tandy brand. :/

As for the patents, I'm not really sure what they expect to get from those, other than income off the Android OEMs.

Re:Duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572527)

As for the patents, I'm not really sure what they expect to get from those, other than income off the Android OEMs.

Sue every major company involved with Android/ChromeOS/Google in the mobile space and offer safe harbor on Windows Phone?

Re:Duh (0)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574073)

More like, make another attempt at imitating Apple by building their own phones to go with the mobile OS

Re:Duh (3, Funny)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573311)

Not sure what Microsoft would do with it beyond the patent portfolio

Give us all a good laugh when they release the Zunegage?

Re:Duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39574197)

And a social networking oriented model to complement the media-centric Zunegage - Kingage.

Re:Duh (5, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572429)

Look. They're late to the game, they're trying to mimic the apple hype and simultaneously deliver while not putting enough effort into making a competitive device to actually deliver. They're praying that being able to be around long enough off android revenue (before B&N/antitrust cut that to zero) will be enough for people to consider it a competitive device.

Microsoft is just following standard protocol with Nokia. What makes you think the business model has *ever* changed? Why? Well look no further than:

Embrace, Extend, Extinguish. where are we at with Nokia again? What always comes first?

Re:Duh (2)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572749)

The ITC rejected [arstechnica.com] B&N's antitrust complainst against Microsoft.

Re:Duh (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572863)

OMG larry bagina replied to my thread. I feel so accomplished and it's only 12:30!

Re:Duh (5, Informative)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572591)

Actually if you look, the summary is wrong, it's only the ars review of the ones listed that doesn't have a generally very positive set of things to say about the phone, and the ars review is comparing it to a galaxy nexus and iphone 4s (which are 200 dollars more expensive, but much better hardware phones).

They're building up hype because they've made a pretty good mid range product, whether or not it gets any traction with consumers or AT&T retail monkeys (who then convince consumers to buy it ) who knows. They're not aiming for the 600 dollar phone market, stupidly, there should be a flagship device positioned there. But for what it is price wise, it's pretty good overall.

Re:Duh (4, Insightful)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574135)

Nokia's problem with all their Windows phones (and MSFT's problem with Windows Phone in general) is that they can't get retailers to push the phones.

Nobody comes into a store wanting to look at a Windows phone, so immediately the hurdle is that you've got to change their minds about what they want. Some articles posted here have even said that salespeople are not willing to push it because the return rate on Windows Phones had been high, and they lose their time for zero commission, when they could be across the room selling someone an iPhone and being safe with their commission.

Re:Duh (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39573119)

What seems funny is that when Intel came up with a cellphone prototype with better performance, everyone came asking for battery life. Now Nokia came with product that apparently has a great battery life, and nobody seems to care.

So I ask, where are the battery life comparison/benchmarks from these sites that don't seem to be "enthusiastic" about the phone's performance?

Re:Duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39573759)

Wow, calm down. It is just a phone and a pretty nice looking one at that.

I am not sure how you made a logical leap from a simple product release to "OMG Microsoft is purposely driving down Nokia's share price". Whatever happens, happens. If Microsoft does acquire Nokia, so what? It's a part of doing business. If you can't handle that, perhaps you should crawl back into your parent's basement and let us adults run the world.

Goodbye iphone and android! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572169)

I can't wait to get a hold of this! I'm going to be trading in my iPhone as soon as I can. Windows Phone 7 is sleeker and easier to use than iOS and way more polished than Android in every respect, plus you aren't stuck walking around with a crappy phone from a company like HTC or Samsung. Nokia have been making great phones for years and now I can get the best of the best running my new favorite mobile operating system!

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (0, Troll)

Theophany (2519296) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572189)

I think you were in cryogenic stasis since ~2007, which is ironically the last time Nokia made a phone worth owning. Everything since has been a slow and steady erosion of what was once an invaluable brand and that is now worthless beyond it's name.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (4, Informative)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572251)

I think you were in cryogenic stasis since ~2007, which is ironically the last time Nokia made a phone worth owning.

I am the proud owner of a Nokia N900 (which is very much worth owning) since end of 2010, which is well after 2007.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (3)

rahlskog (2010302) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572337)

Yep, the N900 is still the best phone out of Nokia, I am afraid that it may one day break and I will be forced to look for an alternative.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573555)

Buy a spare N900 while you still can! That's what I'm about to do!

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572393)

Surprise surprise, slashtards think an old phone with an esoteric Linux OS is the best thing since sliced bread.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572515)

That's because it is. I wuv my N900!

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572579)

Oh, for fuck's sake, Theophany. Look, you've been here before, you KNOW the consequences of making a statement like that. Now look what you've done. You've summoned another member of the N900 Denial Squad into this thread. See? NOW do you see why we don't make statements like that? Now he'll NEVER leave! That's ANOTHER moron we'll have infesting any other Slashdot story that has to do with any sort of cell phone!

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (1, Interesting)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572675)

I had the N900, used it for several months, I don't consider it worth owning at all - and I can't understand why people are so enthusiastic about it.

Terrible interface, terrible screen, terrible keyboard, hardware wasnt at all resilient (the wifes one died physically after 6 months of usage).

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (-1, Flamebait)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572817)

I had the N900, used it for several months, I don't consider it worth owning at all

You must be a windows troll, or worse!

(the wifes one died physically after 6 months of usage

What did she do to that poor phone? I hope she handles your dick more carefully, or else you're in for a world of hurt!

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572837)

Inconceivable! My n900 has bounced off of numerous surfaces for the past 3 years including linoleum, concrete, steel and in once instance actually damaged the asphalt at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. No Otterbox either, because that's how I roll. It has some little scratches and a worn spot on the screen from it's gorilla-glassness rubbing up against my keys but other than that it works fine.

I'm willing to bet that she had to find another n900 to damage her own n900 with. Nothing can truly damage or destroy a Nokia except another Nokia.

Maybe your wife just broke her n900 because she'd rather have an iPhone. There is no other reasonable conclusion.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (2)

gox (1595435) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573397)

I bought three N900 phones until now (one for wife, one for a friend), two of them were second hand, none of them broke. And they've been constantly abused by my two toddlers, fell down from tables and into puddles god knows how many times. Recently I tried to smash mine against a wall (was having a rage episode), threw it directly at the wall two times with all my might. It's still working, apart from the camera function, and I'm still using it. I also constantly overclock it from 600 to 1150 MHz.

I'm not such a gadget enthusiast, but I've read some criticism against N900, which focused on screen/keyboard, but never heard about resiliency. My wife also recently bought an Asus Transformer Prime. Screen? I can read from N900 in broad daylight but it's impossible with the transformer. Keyboard? Mechanical keyboards are still better than on-screen ones as a matter of fact.

What else? I love being able to run the same programs on my desktop PC and my mobile tablet. I love being able to carry one in my back pocket. If you have a better solution for this than the N900, I'd probably be inclined to buy one.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (-1, Flamebait)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574013)

... And the N900 lovers come out of the woodwork - nice modding there guys, just because i consider your pet hardware to be shite.

I can post photos later on of the second N900 she used, with most of the keyboards plastic covering rubbed off through normal usage. She's not abusive to her phones (her phones prior to and post the N900 haven't suffered in any way) and yet she's had major issues with two of them including a broken slide action on the first device. She does use it a lot tho.

The preference between a physical and onscreen keyboard is just that, a preference, most certainly not "matter of fact" one way or the other. I don't prefer one over the other.

I just really didn't get on with the N900, despite sticking with it for ages before I switched to someone else, and I can't see what others see in it.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (1, Offtopic)

wickedskaman (1105337) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572273)

Invaluable means valuable?! What a country!

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572509)

'Invaluable means valuable?! What a country!'

invaluable/invalyoobl/
Adjective:
Extremely useful; indispensable: "an invaluable source of information".

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (1)

MadKeithV (102058) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572363)

I think you were in cryogenic stasis since ~2007, which is ironically the last time Nokia made a phone worth owning. Everything since has been a slow and steady erosion of what was once an invaluable brand and that is now worthless beyond it's name.

I'm the proud owner of a Nokia C1. So are a lot of people I know. We're not all into smartphones you know.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (4, Interesting)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572365)

That's sort of the point of the reviews. For the price (and that does count a lot) the Lumia 900 is a decent phone. It struggles to compete with dual core phones which are much more expensive, which is a problem for the windows brand, since the Galaxy Nexus and iPhone 4s are powerful flagship devices, but as a Nokia Phone that isn't going to just be sold to rich people who can afford 500+ dollar phones it's pretty good overall (where I am the Galaxy Nexus and iPhone 4s run 575 and 650 dollars respectively, where the Lumia 900 is about 450).

Now, overall, given the circumstances I don't think that makes it a great launch. Nokia, or one of the WP7.5 launch partners should have a quad core phone out the door nowish (but then I figured the playstation vita should be a phone as well), and the lumia 900 could be a mid range device. There's a big gap in the user experience between iphone and android in terms of software updates, and it's an area on the PC that MS does surprisingly well at in terms of how updates are delivered and what works/doesn't on them. But MS doesn't seem to have delivered very well, and that's not good for anyone, least of all nokia employees and shareholders.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (2)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572483)

I still don't trust Microsoft in the mobile world. They've shown too many times that they're willing to shut down projects (Kin anybody?). Like Apple in the datacenter, I question how much effort they're willing to expend to stay in an already saturated market.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (4, Insightful)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572521)

Billions? They've been at this a while. Kin was dead out the door, they knew it, you knew it, I knew it. Everyone knew it. But contracts must be honoured.

That doesn't mean they'll ever make any money however, it could be billions invested for nothing. The windows 8 strategy of unifying all the device OS's is actually a good idea. A decent phone these days is basically a half speed laptop (with a dual core 1.x GHz processor and a gig or so of ram that's like half a laptop), which means you really can run the same OS on everything. If you try out the windows 8 preview it seems more like it's for phones than desktops, so this might be shooting themselves in the foot with a rocket launcher overall, but we'll see. They certainly seem to be all in on this plan.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (2)

Rob Y. (110975) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573547)

They certainly seem to be all in on this plan

Indeed they do. Too soon to know whether it works or not. But it's all upside for Microsoft. They don't need for people to like it on the desktop. As we've seen with Vista - people get (and pay for) it whether they like it or not. And if they put up a big enough stink, they can pay extra not to get it. In the meantime, Microsoft gets a fully funded project to develop a tablet OS that might possibly be able to leverage MSOffice compatibility into a winning formula. Nice what a monopoly or two can do...

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39574395)

Trouble with the hype was that it gave me the impression that the Lumina 900 was a high-end device. So telling me it was, and then on launch saying it is a good medium-end (oxymoron!) device seems a little odd. Perhaps I had a misunderstanding.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (3, Funny)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572217)

Goodbye iphone and android!

What? You dual wield two phones at once? Go-go phone ninja!

Curious: do you plan to dual wield 2 Win-Phones now?

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (5, Funny)

MadKeithV (102058) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572383)

Curious: do you plan to dual wield 2 Win-Phones now?

That's obviously a win-win situation.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572543)

I hope you die an utterly painful death for that HORRENDOUS pun. I had a little vomit in my mouth after reading that one.

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572233)

Gawd, the astroturfers have become so obviously these times...

Re:Goodbye iphone and android! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572315)

You mean trolls. Not astroturfers. It's a blatantly obvious troll. And unsurprisingly right now it has more replies than any other post in this thread.

Out of the way (-1, Troll)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572179)

Just so we can get to other stuff: It runs Windows 7.

Re:Out of the way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572227)

Windows 7 != Window Phone 7. Get informed before opening your mouth.

Re:Out of the way (1)

caywen (942955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572453)

Source please.

Re:Out of the way (2)

Relayman (1068986) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572531)

It runs Windows Phone 7.5 (Mango). A step up from 7.

Nice phone, wrong OS (0)

Jack Malmostoso (899729) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572193)

If you like the shape of the phone, just get an N9 :)

And yes, it runs Linux!

Re:Nice phone, wrong OS (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572279)

If you like the shape of the phone, just get an N9

I might if I could try it before buying it.

Re:Nice phone, wrong OS (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572405)

Yep and with vibrate it works as a much better anal dildo than an iPhone. All the guys down at my local gay bar can't wait to try it out on themselves!

Why Nokia hate android? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572247)

Every OEM is using it expect Nokia and Apple

Re:Why Nokia hate android? (2)

rahlskog (2010302) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572385)

I believe it was because they did not want to become just another Android maker having to compete with Samsung, LG, Huawei, ZTE and other brands with nothing but hardware to set them apart. So instead they chose WP7 and ended up competing with Samsung, LG, Huawei, ZTE and other brands...

Re:Why Nokia hate android? (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573587)

While I agree in this point, how is becoming a windows phone manufacturer any different?

Re:Why Nokia hate android? (4, Insightful)

Relayman (1068986) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572563)

Every OEM is using it expect Nokia and Apple

And the Android phones are having trouble standing out in a crowded market.

There are a lot of people out there waiting for new Windows phones.

Re:Why Nokia hate android? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39574245)

Because most android manufacturers are losing money [asymco.com] .

Hope MS does well with this phone (4, Insightful)

MoronGames (632186) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572327)

We need more competition in the mobile phone market. BlackBerry is pretty much dead, WebOS is dead, Symbian is dead. It would be really nice to see Microsoft grab a significant portion of the market away from Android, which will push Google into making their OS better.

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (4, Insightful)

Zouden (232738) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572519)

I would think Google are trying their hardest to improve Android to compete with iOS. Another smartphone maker doesn't really change that does it?

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (1)

danbob999 (2490674) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572559)

Wait, someone who wishes that Microsoft succeed against a Linux-based OS just got modded +5. Someone must have spoofed slashdot.org

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (4, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572577)

The problem is that Microsoft seems to have no idea why people should use their phones. Apple claims better screen, face time, etc. Google claims open system, low cost app development and a wide range of hardware options. Microsoft claims you can get to the camera app real fast. Its just not a convincing argument.

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (5, Interesting)

cornjones (33009) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572729)

Microsoft claims you can get to the camera app real fast.

Its just not a convincing argument.

The new crop of android phones are android phones are in a serious pissing match over this very stat. I will say that i will be weighing this in my decision. my phone is my primary camera and I have missed several camera worthy moment by phone lag of getting to the camera (yes I have set the camera to be able to launch from lock )

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573005)

The new crop of android phones are android phones are in a serious pissing match over this very stat. I will say that i will be weighing this in my decision. my phone is my primary camera and I have missed several camera worthy moment by phone lag of getting to the camera (yes I have set the camera to be able to launch from lock )

Hell, the iPhone is also in on it, back when Jobs was alive it was something he remarked upon in iOS - getting to the camera and snapping a photo was to be much quicker. (Leading to the joke of one particular Motorola handset taking a good long 5+ seconds to snap a photo and lagging in subsequent ones after that).

Good to know that people are stepping up to the plate on the Android side as well

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (0)

ninjacut (1938862) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573109)

Metro is the reason, very unique and well throught UI. The satisfaction rate of folks who actually use it is better than iOS or Android. I am using it for over a year now, and see no reason to even think of moving to iOS or Android.. perfect smartphone experience

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (2)

caywen (942955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573161)

It was for me. The dedicated camera button is actually very useful. As I'm taking my phone out of my pocket, it's easy to hold the camera button down and have it ready to take pictures by the time it comes out. That's actually a fair bit faster than turning on and pressing a button on the lock screen. I've used both, and the camera button is simply better.

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (4, Insightful)

Artraze (600366) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573433)

I rather disagree.

Apple phones pretty much define the high end, and so even if they're very shiny you have to pay for that. Also, they lock you into the Apple experience, which isn't necessarily the best one.

Android is an open system, with low cost phones available, but at the same time it's plagued by bloatware and inconsistent user experience. Honestly, I don't know how people put up with it... Well, without installing Cyanogenmod like I did. I know someone with a Galaxy S II (IIRC) and the thing has ~30 apps on it that cannot be uninstalled (and are useless, of course). They'll always be there, with permissions you didn't approve, potentially running in the background wasting your resources and causing problems. (On that note, I know a different someone who's phone is actually rendered unstable due to a preinstalled app.) Sure, you can kind of hide them, but they'll be there when you look through the app drawer or add a shortcut or do a general action (e.g. "Share photo" via Picasa, Facebook, Twitter, arg where's MMS?)

If Microsoft can actually deliver a streamlined no-nonsense interface and solidly hit the midrange price point I think they'll find buyers. It's true that people don't care _that_ much, but at the same time I think there's a lot of frustration building up over Apple's walled garden and Android's bloatware/platform issues. They may not be all 'wow I can shave 100ms of my time-to-pic', but when they go to buy their next phone they'll remember Microsoft advertising a snappy simple interface and their problems with their old phone and be willing to give it a try.

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (1)

Relayman (1068986) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572587)

BlackBerry needs to drop hardware and develop an app that runs on any phone. Good luck getting that through their thick skulls!

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (1)

cornjones (33009) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572823)

seconded... but part of their value prop is that they give strong security to corp IT. if this was just an app on another os, they may not be able to engender the same level of trust. (yes they could just encrypt the damn contents and offer short term keys over the network)

the other problem bb has is that they had a long time to 'perfect' their phones. before the smart phone explosion, bb came out w/ a new phone every 9 mths or so that was a bit better than the last. with no competition they had time to slowly address usability issues and come out w/ a really good mobile email device. (my old bb bold is still far better than any smartphone for this). when the competition (iphone) came out, bb was not able to respond quickly. the 'quick' responses they did were crap. their only strength is as a work tool but we all want toys that can do work too. i don't see any hope for them at this point, really.

Re:Hope MS does well with this phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39573275)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/story/2012/04/03/rim-opens-network.html

Good or Great is not enough (2)

Wattos (2268108) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572351)

From experience: "good"/"great" even "better than the competition" is not enough.

It must be better by a huge margin (or have a "killer app") for the phone to be adopted at this late of a stage. Android had the edge of being "free", so it was "easy" to ship with. I am curious how successful the platform will be (and will be watching from the sidelines), but at this point I do not think it will change the mobile market.

Re:Good or Great is not enough (2)

ItsIllak (95786) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572449)

It's killer app is fully integrated contacts and social media. It's a hard one to understand though it's great when you've set it up and use it.

Takeaway from the Ars review... (1, Informative)

theurge14 (820596) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572409)

The brand new Lumia 900 comes out somewhat comparable to the two year old iPhone 4.

Pass.

Re:Takeaway from the Ars review... (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574465)

...well, when you consider that it's about the same price as the two year old iPhone 4 ($99 w/a 2 year contract), it's not so bad.

WP7's two biggest problems... (5, Informative)

ItsIllak (95786) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572419)

First.

The iPhone revolutionised the mobile phone market, essentially turning smartphones that had limited use and poor experience into things that are quick and reliable. Now we're tweaking and improving, it's hard for anyone to carve a niche. WP7's niche is that it totally integrates your contacts. If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are. That's it's killer app. The problem is that it takes more than a one-day test to really see this benefit so reviews are never going to "get it".

Second.

MS are keen not to make the mistake Android is making (or that they made in the PCmarket). They want to standardise the platform. This is easy for Apple/iPhone, they're the only ones making one. Not so easy keeping HTC, Samsung, Nokia and others to stick to one design. There's nothing for them to distinguish themselves in the market.

Roll on Windows 8 and tablets - then iPhone will be under serious threat. For most consumers, the tablet - if properly conceived and integrated - is a far better computer experience than the PC/Laptop.

(disclosure: I'm a devoted Lumia 800 and previously Samsung Omnia 7 owner)

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (5, Informative)

Nursie (632944) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572631)

If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are.

My N900 has been doing that for some time now, as well as integrating skype messages and calls into the normal call and SMS systems.

You mean other phones can't/don't do this?

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572881)

If Android can do that, why the hell can't we do that on a desktop?!?

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39573069)

N900 aint' Android. It's Maemo.

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (5, Insightful)

randallman (605329) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573593)

Ditto. Another N900 owner here. I'm amazed when new phones don't do this when my relatively old N900 has always had really good contact account integration. Also, Skype and SIP are well integrated into the phone app and all messaging including SMS is integrated. Without looking at an indicator icon, you may not know whether you're using SMS or an IM protocol. Or you may now know if you're receiving a cell call or a Skype call.

It's funny that MS is advertising features from the platform they're trying to kill.

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (1)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572707)

WP7's niche is that it totally integrates your contacts. If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are. That's it's killer app. The problem is that it takes more than a one-day test to really see this benefit so reviews are never going to "get it"."

I'm trying to figure out what the advantage of this is. I already have a tool that integrates multiple modes of communication into one one view of a person, it's called my brain. I know that the joe375@hotmail that i email with is the same WittyNickname that i have on my twitter feed and the same as the OlderNickname that i have in my LJ friends. How does Microsoft "seamlessly integrating" them make things better?

Although perhaps the fact that i have two distinct twitter accounts and two LJ accounts and three G+ accounts, all of which get variously used depending on how public i want to be and who i'm trying to communicate with, and know several other people who handle things the same way means that i'm not really the target audience.

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (0)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572765)

The integration has a dual edge to it. It handles some things well like replying to a FB message in tiles but to create a new FB message you need the FB app. Newer updates have promised to incorporate more functionality though. This is going to be a tricky balance as these apps add functionality, will MS be able to integrate that functionality in updates?

Standardization is important but HTC, LG, or Samsung all make WP7 phones as far as I know so I'm not sure the advantage Nokia has when it comes to standardization.

As for Windows 8, I think the biggest mistake that MS is making is not differentiating the different versions enough for consumers. Their insistence that everything must be "Windows" is only likely to cause bad PR. There is a reason Apple separates iOS from OS X and Google separates Android from Linux.

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39573263)

That's not true. To FB chat/message, chose your contact that's got a linked FB account. Hit the left/right arrow icon at the bottom to switch to fb mode and send a message. Same for all messaging services it supports...

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572873)

MS are keen not to make the mistake Android is making (or that they made in the PCmarket). They want to standardise the platform. This is easy for Apple/iPhone, they're the only ones making one. Not so easy keeping HTC, Samsung, Nokia and others to stick to one design. There's nothing for them to distinguish themselves in the market.

Wait, what? Windows running on a wide variety of hardware not bound to a single distributer is a major reason they utterly dominated personal computing for a decade and a half. Apple's control-freak-like nature, on the other hand, is pretty directly why they nearly died as a company back in the 90s. And that was Microsoft's mistake? Sort of like how Android, despite the fanboys chanting "fragmentation" every day as if it meant something to the common user, is running equal-or-better in sales to the iPhone, depending on who you ask? Is that Google's "mistake", too?

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (4, Insightful)

c.r.o.c.o (123083) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573115)

The iPhone revolutionised the mobile phone market, essentially turning smartphones that had limited use and poor experience into things that are quick and reliable. Now we're tweaking and improving, it's hard for anyone to carve a niche. WP7's niche is that it totally integrates your contacts. If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are. That's it's killer app. The problem is that it takes more than a one-day test to really see this benefit so reviews are never going to "get it".

The Nokia N9 and the Nokia N900 had this integration feature for years. It's nice to have, but it was not and will never be a killer app. Otherwise you'd see the Maemo/Meego being the third ecosystem as MS likes to brand itself.

There are no killer apps anymore. Apple has amazing, yet closed hardware that is closely tied into their App Store with millions of apps and into iTunes with millions of songs and movies. So they appeal to fashionistas and people who just want something that works even if overpriced.

Google has shitty or amazing, but open hardware that is tied into their Google Play with hundreds of thousands of apps, and is an open development platform where anyone can cook a ROM, tweak it, etc. So they appeal to poor people, regular people, geeks and everybody else. At the same time Google Play seems to be making a run for iTunes.

What does MS bring to the table? They have sub par, closed hardware (sorry, but the beautiful design of the Lumia 900 does not compensate for the crappy specs), and they have few apps. Given the fiascos that were every single MS foray into digital media distribution, an iTunes style store is pretty much dead in the water.

Maybe future revisions of Windows Mobile will address some of the issues. But do you think Apple, Google and even RIM are sitting around twiddling thumbs? How long did it take MS to implement copypasta? Nokia learned this lesson the hard way. Maemo 5 on the N900 was MILES ahead of Android or iOS. But they sat on it for a couple of years, and by the time Maemo 6 came out, it was outdated. I should know this, because I have both Maemo 6 and ICS in front of me.

MS are keen not to make the mistake Android is making (or that they made in the PCmarket). They want to standardise the platform. This is easy for Apple/iPhone, they're the only ones making one. Not so easy keeping HTC, Samsung, Nokia and others to stick to one design. There's nothing for them to distinguish themselves in the market.

This approach only ever worked for Apple, since they are a vertically integrated company. They differentiate based on hardware specs, design and OS all at once. But if you take away the OS and hardware specs as you propose with a standard Windows platform, that means design is the only thing left. Samsung, Nokia, HTC, LG, etc will become little more than custom case designers.

Nokia took the bait, but it will be a cold day in hell before Samsung drops even their struggling Bada platform in favour of Windows.

Really, tell me how will the hardware manufacturers differentiate themselves when they ALL have to have the exact same OS and hardware specs, and they ALL have access to the same apps, etc.

Roll on Windows 8 and tablets - then iPhone will be under serious threat. For most consumers, the tablet - if properly conceived and integrated - is a far better computer experience than the PC/Laptop.

Define properly conceived and integrated. That's such a platitude, I have a feeling you threw it in there because you were itching to click Submit. Tablets DEFINITELY have a place, but it's a niche. I tried iOS, Android and Windows 7 slate PCs. Yes, the most useful by far was the Samsung Series 7. But you know what? Even though it was a full fledged PC, with decent touch input, it was still limited. No keyboard meant I had to bring an external one. No means of propping it upright meant I either had to hold it in my hand, lean it on my knee or carry a stand for it. The point is that tablets will not replace laptops or desktops for a long while, if ever. You simply cannot do any amount of serious work (writing research papers as I'm doing right now, to app development) without bringing enough crap with you that you may as well use your laptop.

To use the obligatory car analogy, there's a good reason you can buy 2 door sports cars, compact, mid and full size family sedans, cross-overs, SUVs and pickup trucks. One form factor does not fit all, but this is what MS is trying to do with Windows 8 and Windows Mobile 8. Force the interface that may work well on phones onto tablets and PCs. It won't work.

Re:WP7's two biggest problems... (1)

horza (87255) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574397)

There is a lot of rewriting history here. There were plenty of quick and reliable phones before the iPhone, which is no quicker or more reliable than any of its predecessors. The way it revolutionised the mobile phone market was to turn something as mundane as a phone into an expensive must-have fashion icon. The only original feature was the "Visual Voicemail". The contact integration (email/fb/phone/etc) is not some new killer app of WP7, Blackberry has been doing it for years.

MS is similar to Android in that it has to work with all the handset manufacturers. This does not stop them from differentiating themselves. No.1 is by hardware, a nicer camera or bigger screen. No.2 is by initial touch/feel, which is where Android scores over MS with the ability to customise as much as needed. No.3 is exclusive content coming bundled. I can see no reason why any manufacturer would want to offer Microsoft Windows instead of Android though.

Phillip.

New Class? BS! (4, Insightful)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572435)

Thatâ(TM)s the key point here: The Lumia 900 isnâ(TM)t targeting iPhone or Galaxy users; itâ(TM)s targeting the 41% of the US public who still own a feature phone. If youâ(TM)re already firmly set on getting an iPhone, the Lumia wonâ(TM)t stop you â" but for walk-in customers, the $200 price difference is really quite significant.

A quick glance on Amazon shows new android phones at less than $300 without a contract. T-Mobile has lots of Android phones available at $0 + plus a contract. Those current feature phone owners will find that more attractive than $450 for the Lumia 900, or about the same as $0 to $99 with a contract. It's not a new class.

Re:New Class? BS! (1)

ItsIllak (95786) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572491)

Nokia have also released the Lumia 710 which is in (or close to) that price range I believe.

Re:New Class? BS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39573273)

How much is your phone after you pay for a voice and data plan? The AVERAGE customer pays $80-$100/month. So your "free" phones end up costing you up to $2400 (or more, especially on AT&T!) over the 2 year period that most customers will be locked into. Most US customers simply dont buy unlocked phones off contract.

What we have here is Nokia and Microsoft wanting to have it both ways. Yes, its their "Flagship" device...but it's also a cheap, inexpensive phone for the entry level customer! Which is it? Well, the specs and reviews pretty much show that for a "flagship", it's underwhelming...so PLAN B! Sell them for free! Or for $100! Surely SOMEONE will want it at that price, right?

The fact that this phone is being GIVEN AWAY shows you how much desperation they are feeling right now. If it were TRULY a "Flagship" device, and could go toe to toe with the iPhone 4s and the latest Android phones, you would not see them giving them away!

Re:New Class? BS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39573999)

Though a quick glance around Amazon will also show the top rated phones are mostly windows phones [amazon.com] and not those low end Android phones, so maybe this is a new level of value for customers.

Re:New Class? BS! (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574149)

How many new Android phones for $300 come with a non-PenTile AMOLED screen?

Can I hear you now? (1)

pjpII (191291) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572473)

So, are any of these reviews going to give us any idea, at all, of call or sound quality on these phones? Or have we just completely given up on the "phone" part of the functionality?

Re:Can I hear you now? (1)

jader3rd (2222716) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572545)

So, are any of these reviews going to give us any idea, at all, of call or sound quality on these phones? Or have we just completely given up on the "phone" part of the functionality?

From what I can tell about reading non proffesional online reviews/comments, all many techincal people care about are the number of cores on the device. Doesn't matter if they're turned on or off, or are even fast. They apparently only buy phones for the cores in them.

Re:Can I hear you now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572869)

Phone-spectrum audio has been 'solved' for a number of years. Unless you read a review complaining about substandard quality, it can play evertything that gets sent over the phone call, and can record everything that can be sent to the other end. If you want to know the capabilities of the microphone and speaker, look for a portion about music/movie playback. I only skimmed a few of the links, but I didn't notice a section on the speaker quality, so I do not know if anyone asked.

And since the summary mentioned one of the reviews being unimpressed with the camera, I had read about this a few weeks ago. The initial run of Nokia 900s is only going through ATT, but in a few months a version with an upgraded camera will hit the market, and at least a few other carriers. I only remember that Verizon is expected to have the 900b (for lack of an exact product name) in mid-summer, but some other names were mentioned as well.

Autonomy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572475)

Not even ONE DAY of autonomy ... When will we able to buy PHONES ?

Flip phone + Galaxy Player (2)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572561)

Yes, it's a pity that Microsoft killed the Pocket PC in the Windows Mobile 6 era. So if you want more battery life for the phone, you'll probably have to do without Windows Phone. Buy and carry both a cheap flip phone and an Android-powered PDA such as a Samsung Galaxy Player. The PDA gets service wherever there's Wi-Fi, and in this car culture, if you don't have Wi-Fi, you're probably already busy driving a vehicle.

Nokia N9 Linux Swipe FTW! (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572477)

Nokia's Linux N9 has a front facing camera and an option for 64 (not 16) gigabytes. Plus the swipe keyboard is the bomb. Check out the video, 2nd thumbnail from the left, on the bottom of this page:

http://swipe.nokia.com/ [nokia.com]

It is a breeze for me to SSH to it, when I need a real keyboard, like to enter serious passwords, (hopefully rarely).

Those are the main advantages the Linux N9 has over the Lumia 900, its WP7 polycarbonite twin.

I read the Anantech review (3, Informative)

anss123 (985305) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572539)

Quick summary:

It looks okay. Wifi and 3g battery life is poor, but 4g is good. Java script performance is unimpressive. Camera is good, but white balance is poor and a faster CPU would help post processing. There wasn't nothing to complain about on the display. No 5Ghz wifi, but bandwidth and such is good. Speaker quality is good. And that's about it.

Their biggest complaint seems to be that the phone lacks a dual core CPU. They are apparently coming and will let the phone record video at 1024p, over 720p, and perhaps take better photos.

Other than that, it's a normal Windows 7.5 phone.

Nice phone, but Nokia needed more for Microsoft (1)

caywen (942955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572557)

First off, I like Windows Phone 7.5. I have an HTC Titan, and it works quite well. I would definitely say it's almost competitive in most aspects, and does exceed in a few important areas. That said, Microsoft's really not doing Nokia many favors. Lumia 900 really needed an updated WP OS. This was a perfect opportunity for Microsoft to release, say, WP7.6, with support for a higher resolution screen, and maybe some much needed UI tweaks and facelifts. Instead, consumers may well walk into AT&T and realize that phones like the Focus Flash run exactly the same OS and are free. Fine for MS, but not so good for Nokia.

Microsoft really needs to have Apollo ready, like, yesterday. There is already a good amount of mystique about it, but that mystique will dissipate quickly once iOS 6 and Android 5.0 hits the market.

I can't see if going anywhere (1)

maroberts (15852) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572629)

Most phones in UKia are sold on contract and if people are told they can have this or an iPhone4s if they agree a few more months on their contract I know which way they're gonna go.

The main reason to buy a Nokia seems to be if you want a camera which just happens to have a phone on it, such as an N-900 or even their forthcoming Nokia-808 PureView when it comes out

Missing Features (1)

Amtrak (2430376) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572677)

The phone looks nice, but I have always felt that Microsoft has made a calculated mistake in trying to be "Me too" Apple. They will never have the blind, "This device is hot!" following that apple has. M$ should get back to there roots, business. WP is a good piece of software, and has the opportunity to make itself secure and business friendly, but by crippling the platform with single core processors and no removable memory it will never interest power users. But if they go business centric they may have a chance to catch Apple where they are weak, and with RIM imploding they actually have a chance.

Re:Missing Features (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 2 years ago | (#39572913)

The original strategy of business centric was back in the day when most smart phones were for businesses as they were the only ones to put with the hassles of a smart phone. Most manufacturers released consumer versions that were just slightly modified versions of the business class as some enterprise users wanted the same functionality in a personal phone. The business segment was vastly larger than the consumer side. Apple and Google focused on phones that were designed for consumers and the consumer market has exploded eclipsing the business segment.

Better than N9? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39572737)

That's all I want to know.

Physical keyboard? (2)

alexo (9335) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573117)

Are there any good phones with a real physical 5-row QWERTY slider keyboard anymore?

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39574221)

Dual core 3g
milestone 3.
droid 3

dual core 4g
droid 4

No current options for sprint or tmo, though, unless you can deal with the milestone 3 on edge only.
If you can deal with 4-row, the optimus q/slider is pretty tits too, for a crapgadget class phone.

Cell Phone Luddite Input (1)

eepok (545733) | more than 2 years ago | (#39573691)

I'm still a cell phone Luddite. I don't like most "smart" functions because of the drain battery power while giving me a ton of stuff I don't want.

Things I don't want:
"Seamless integration of phone and social networking contacts" -- I have different spheres of life for a reason. I don't want any corporation being able to draw a perfect picture of my habits, hobbies, peers, or family.

"Blazing fast web access" -- I don't want to shell out more than I'm paying right now ($50/month) for a cell phone. That means I don't want a "data plan". The lack of web access decreases time/money/effort spent on phone development and prevents unexpected accidental charges.

"Touch screen keyboard" -- Buttons work better. They just do.

----

Don't get me wrong, I'm as super nerd as anyone else, but I also have a very real preference to not be "leashed" by technology. I refuse to become "tech dependent" which most people admit to becoming after getting a smart phone. ("I never thought I would need it, but now I can't live without it.")

I just want the following functions to work *flawlessly* on a feature phone:
*Great speakerphone, sound, and mic
*Hardware QWERTY for text messaging
*Customizable UI color schemes
*MicroSD card Slot
*Good quality snapshot camera (no flash necessary)
*Great MP3/OGG/etc. player and interface
*3.5mm headphone jack
*All other weight saved should go to increased battery size/life and reduced weight

Re:Cell Phone Luddite Input (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574201)

"Seamless integration of phone and social networking contacts" -- I have different spheres of life for a reason. I don't want any corporation being able to draw a perfect picture of my habits, hobbies, peers, or family.

You misunderstand what "integration" means in this case. Simply put, if you add a Facebook account, your friends from there will appear in your contact list ("People hub"). Which I personally find rather inconvenient, but it doesn't mean that Facebook gets to see your regular phone contact list. And, of course, if you don't add Facebook account at all, it's a non-issue.

"Blazing fast web access" -- I don't want to shell out more than I'm paying right now ($50/month) for a cell phone. That means I don't want a "data plan". The lack of web access decreases time/money/effort spent on phone development and prevents unexpected accidental charges.

"Touch screen keyboard" -- Buttons work better. They just do.

Sounds like you don't want a smartphone, then.

Most reviews lob softballs, Not TheVerge. (2, Interesting)

guidryp (702488) | more than 2 years ago | (#39574393)

http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/3/2921472/lumia-900-review [theverge.com]

It seems reviewers are anxious for a third ecosystem to emerge so the keep making light of the shortcomings. This is ~2010 era HW power, with an OS that was aimed at the original iOS and hasn't caught up to the competition. People need to stop making excuses for the Weak HW, and weak SW. Microsoft/Nokia, need to seriously revamp the OS and release a real flagship if they want to be anything but irrelevant.

Verge Excerpt(on the software itself):
Let me just put this bluntly: I think it's time to stop giving Windows Phone a pass. I think it's time to stop talking about how beautifully designed it is, and what a departure it's been for Microsoft, and how hard the company is working to add features. I am very aware of the hard work and dedication Microsoft has put into this platform, but at the end of the day, Windows Phone is just not as competitive with iOS and Android as it should be right now.

The problems with Windows Phone are myriad, many small. But it's a death by a thousand cuts. And all those little problems were once again immediately apparent to me the moment I started using the Lumia 900.

The most glaring issues also happen to be some of the oldest issues — things you think at this point would have been dealt with. Scrolling in third party apps, for instance, is still completely erratic. I would blame this on developers, but given that this platform has been around for nearly two years, I think that's a cop out. In new Twitter apps like Carbon, lists of messages will sometimes disappear or skip weirdly when scrolling. I first complained about this in version 1 of Windows Phone, and I thought it had been squashed — it has not.

Elsewhere there are missteps. Though Microsoft has added some form of multitasking to the OS, there is nearly never a feeling that apps in the "background" are actually still waiting for you. In fact, many apps still deliver a splash screen to you when you reenter them — if this is a developer issue, then I guess most of the hardworking coders on this platform never got the memo. In short, it kind of sucks to use. Where iOS and Android at least feel responsive in packing and unpacking background apps, Windows Phone often comes across as broken and limp. ....

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