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Waterboarding Whistleblower Indicted Under Espionage Act

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the long-hoped-for-bullet-arrives dept.

Government 338

wiredmikey writes "A former CIA officer was indicted on Thursday for allegedly disclosing classified information to journalists. The restricted disclosure included the name of a covert officer and information related to the role a CIA employee played in classified operations. The indictment charges John Kiriakou with one count of violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act for allegedly illegally disclosing the identity of a covert officer and with three counts of violating the Espionage Act for allegedly illegally disclosing national defense information to individuals not authorized to receive it. The count charging violation of the Intelligence Identities Protection Act, as well as each count of violating the Espionage Act, carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, and making false statements carries a maximum prison term of five years. Each count carries a maximum fine of $250,000."

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Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (5, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598131)

Until you men realize that the U.S. does not, and cannot, commit any war crimes--then you will be suitably punished. For those of you patriots who accept that all U.S. action is lawful, by virtue of it being U.S. action, then prosperity and salvation await. For all others, who would engage with the socialist press and outside agitators in conspiring to disparage this flawless nation, only purgatory and a jail cell await you.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (5, Funny)

toetagger (642315) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598171)

I didn't know Romney had a /. account

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1, Informative)

Iceykitsune (1059892) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598211)

WOOOOOOSH http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Poe's_Law [rationalwiki.org]

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (5, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598271)

Double-whoosh. The second poster caught the original poster's drift, and merely expanded upon it. Apparently you missed that.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598541)

Sarcasm travels as well across the internet as a fish does in the mail.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

Kneo24 (688412) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598653)

While this is true, if you couldn't tell that what toetagger said was a joke, there's little hope for you. The obviousness of it should smack you in the face.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598917)

The obviousness of it should smack you in the face.

Well, normally it would--but the last time it happened he got a restraining order. Now obviousness can't come within 50 yards of him.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (2)

jc42 (318812) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599097)

Nah; I think what you mean is that we should hope that the original post was a joke, but it's not logically possible to determine that from the words alone. So you may decide that the writer was serious or joking, but you stand a good chance of being wrong whichever you pick. That's what Poe's Law is all about. Written English leaves out a lot of tonal information that's in spoken English, and there's not much we can do about it.

Except use smileys. ;-)

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598797)

I'll see your Poe and raise you a Godwin. Well almost. That concept of patriotism, anti-socialism, duty to accept what the state decides, promise of prosperity and invocation of salvation all combined make me think of an essay/speech from Mussolini defining what Fascism is.

He basically said , in my poorly paraphrased, possibly somewhat misremembered rendering:

Democracy is a failed experiment.
Fascism isn't socialism because it doesn't really care about economic theories.
What matters is the state. The state is a living, aware entity, and all people are subservient to it.
War, expansionism and imperialism are the signs of a thriving state. Anything that goes against these is a sign of a state in decline.

Captcha: sanguine

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (4, Informative)

Jerry (6400) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599033)

I see your Poe and Godwin and raise you Alinsky's 5th rule -- attack through humorous ridicule. As Saul said, it is almost impossible to counter with facts because the truth usually isn't as simple as a lie.

Take the ridicule against Palin. In an interview she said "There are places in Alaska from which one can see Russia." A TRUE statement. The Left "quoted" her as saying "I can see Russia from my house."., Being good researchers, some on the Left consulted maps and noticed that one can not see Russia from Palin's house. So the mockery began and was repeated endlessly and recycled in the forums and blogs on the Left. Repeat a lie often enough, Right or Left, and the faithful believe it as fact, even to the point of self-righteousness, quoting the lie as proof of their intelligence. It really gets interesting when psychological terms are thrown at "unbelievers". Terms like "denier", etc...

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (3, Interesting)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599199)

There was one like that for the first Bush. The story was that he was in a supermarket and was amazed at the bar code scanners (which had been around for a while) and so he was out of touch. Turns out he was at a demo of a new scanner at a convention that could read really mangled bar codes. If anyone cares, snopes has the details.

My only question is WTF happened to that scanner? My state of the art supermarket's scanners still crap out with even slight crumples in the code.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598663)

No, it's clearly not Mitt Romney: If it were, you'd see a post a bit further down with an impassioned defense of human rights and the value of questioning government in a democracy.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598761)

No, it's clearly not Mitt Romney: If it were, you'd see a post a bit further down with an impassioned defense of human rights and the value of questioning government in a democracy.

So when do we inundate aspects of Romney's campaign tour with flipflops, like what happened to John Kerry?

Or are we just admitting that Democrats actually have the slightest scrap of dignity over Republicans?

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (3, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598851)

>>>I didn't know Romney had a /. account

Which one is Romney? The current sitting president or the candidate for president? They all look alike to me.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598989)

The one that has an ungodly mountain of money. It's the only way to tell them apart by measuring money pile size.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

PIBM (588930) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599099)

I though we could not measure infinity ?

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598983)

Couldn't be him the words are too big..

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598205)

Trolling, you are doing it right.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598249)

You are kind of covering all bases there arent yeah crazyjj.... oooohhhh *wink wink*

Thats' what THEY said (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598343)

That's exactly what the Nazis said!

OK, what happens when you use Godwin Law in a Poe's Law comment?

Did the Universe just end?

Re:Thats' what THEY said (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598557)

That's exactly what the Nazis said!

OK, what happens when you use Godwin Law in a Poe's Law comment?

Did the Universe just end?

That's when we assume you were an original Usenet user and that your neck beard is graying.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

godless dave (844089) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598429)

Sadly, there are many politicians and regular people in this country who would say that with a straight face, and mean it.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598507)

We are a Christian nation, it is all part of God's plan. Now stop complaining and get back to working for your billionaire masters.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (-1, Troll)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598661)

the U.S. does not, and cannot, commit any war crimes

A long list of war crimes [wikipedia.org] would like to tell you to stop drinking the koolaid.

For those of you patriots who accept that all U.S. action is lawful, by virtue of it being U.S. action, then prosperity and salvation await.

Some restrictions [wikipedia.org] apply. See your local government office for full details. Offer not valid outside of US. Void where prohibited by law.

For all others, who would engage with the socialist press and outside agitators in conspiring to disparage this flawless nation, only purgatory and a jail cell await you.

There are a lot of agitators [wikipedia.org] in this country. More than any other country even. But you're right, I'm sure they have nothing [amnestyusa.org] to complain about.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (-1)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598945)

I'm actually kind of in favor of this. Disclosing classified information should be something that carries consequences, even done for a good reason. It keeps them from being whistleblowers about things that aren't important.

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (2)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599047)

It keeps them from being whistleblowers about things that aren't important.

What if we want whistleblowers for the things that *are* important? Like this one.

Or maybe you think torture works and is a perfectly acceptable way to get information?

Re:Let this be a message to the unpatriotic (1)

no-body (127863) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599095)

Yah - right! Being an US citizen is not just a plain citizenship as in most other countries, one needs to have a religious believe system fully embodied to become really part of it and get the full benefit of feeling outrageously great - most of the time...

I'm sick of my country (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598217)

This is the crap that makes me sick of being an american. I'd go somewhere else if I thought anywhere else was truly different AND better.

Hope and change (4, Interesting)

HBI (604924) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598233)

Well, not for John Kiriakou, at least. It is interesting how the policies of the USG - let's confine this to defense and intelligence, shall we? - have essentially changed only in rhetorical ways since the 2008 election. Gitmo remains open. People are still being prosecuted over talking to journalists about waterboarding and rendition.
We're still assassinating people. It would almost make you think that the politicians that were essentially calling GWB a war criminal might have been a bit less than wholly honest.

Re:Hope and change (2, Informative)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598287)

It would almost make you think that the politicians that were essentially calling GWB a war criminal might have been a bit less than wholly honest.

Well, sure. Congress gave him the power to do what he did: they could have reined him in, but they chose to go along for the ride.

Re:Hope and change (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598353)

It's okay if you're the president, though. Remember when Bush outed Valery Plame? I guess it's okay for a president to put an agent in danger. Just not anyone else doing it for any real meaningful purpose.

Re:Hope and change (0, Troll)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598509)

Remember when Bush outed Valery Plame?

How can we remember what did not happen? If you're going to do some trollish BS-ing, at least try to be more creative. That one is so simply not true that you're just making it obvious you're a twelve year old trying to sound cool. Really, come up with another one. Involve Eeeeevil Corporations, Dick Cheney's heart transplant, the Greek debt and German taxpayers, CO2 emissions, gold currency standards, AIDS as a CIA plot, and then you'll be getting somewhere.

Re:Hope and change (-1, Troll)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598611)

Bush/Cheney outed Plame to interfere with her husband's denial of Bush/Cheney's faked Niger uranium "evidence" lying us into war with Iraq.

Everyone knows this is true. Even you. Why do you Republican bother to lie about this stuff? Don't you have lies about birth certificates to peddle?

Re:Hope and change (-1, Troll)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598715)

Everyone knows this is true.

Other than the details. You know, where it wasn't who you said it was, and it had nothing to do with the reasons you're saying. And of course the part where you're leaving out her role in the high volumes of BS surrounding the situation, her husband's rampant lying and misrepresentation, and your own deliberate (indirect) characterization of the info mentioned by the UK, etc.

We were in a conflict with Iraq from the day they invaded Kuwait. They never stopped shooting at planes, never honored a single condition of their agreement during their withdrawl, and continued everything from long range missle import/construction, mass murder, terror funding, UN cash redirection-to-military-use, obstructing inspectors, and the rest - non stop - until the day that regime was finally taken down. Pretending that unclear British intel about (real!) uranium trafficking/shopping-around, or any other single event, sealed the deal to have Saddam finally held to account is the big lie, here. So why are you pushing it?

Re:Hope and change (1)

ElmoGonzo (627753) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598379)

Sounds like you don't know how Washington works. As Steve Earle remarked on stage a few weeks ago, when you become President, it's like being Harry Potter. They tell you all sorts of secret stuff that you didn't know before and then they put all sorts of obstacles in your path just to make things interesting.

Re:Hope and change (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598585)

I didn't see that speech, but I always kindof assumed this was the case.

We saw harsh 180's on a lot of things Obama promised repeatedly, in very clear language. Domestic spying was going to stop. Guantanamo was going to stop operating the way it does. The list goes on.

Then he got in office, pulled an about-face on all of it, and signed an EO allowing snatch & grab detention of US citizens without a warrant or trial, if someone, somewhere, thinks that citizen might be somehow connected with terrorism-like activities.

He learned something when he took office. Something scary. Because otherwise he just burned a ton of political capital (with every intention of running for a second turn) for no reason. That doesn't make sense for a capable, career politician.

Re:Hope and change (2)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598909)

He learned something when he took office. Something scary. Because otherwise he just burned a ton of political capital (with every intention of running for a second turn) for no reason. That doesn't make sense for a capable, career politician.

No doubt, but that doesn't mean that these policies are necessarily in the interests of American citizens in general. It merely means that Obama had some kind of incentive to pass them.

Re:Hope and change (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39599007)

Yeah. Sadly, I've noticed this too. People I've followed prior to election who had clear consistent policies suddenly change the day they take office.

I'm not talking about the normal broken promises. It's clear something happens. It's like Men In Black, where suddenly they're show the aliens and can't tell anyone. Instantly those three letter agencies are doing a great job and don't need changing.

I've seen it with Senators a couple of times. Once from someone so maverick it shocked me into recognition. Clearly someone is telling these people a story when they get elected. A story which changes everything.

Personally, I think it's wrong and evil this story is being kept from the American people. It's not very democratic if I can't understand what's happening and vote accordingly. I also suspect the story contains lies designed to protect the power of these spooks, but I doubt I'll ever learn the truth.

This is a really big deal and I'm glad to hear a few other people have noticed, outside conspiracy nuts.

Re:Hope and change (2)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599041)

It is one of two things.

1 - Obama lied through his teeth about all of it.
2 - a shadow government in control that when he got there they held guns to his family's head and laid it all out on how things will work, and if he plays along he get's to have two terms as president.

Add to that the fact that every president after they leave office has a team of security with them 24 7 for the rest of their life, and of their family's life..... Things start looking plausable on the kooky conspiracy side.

Re:Hope and change (2)

flaming error (1041742) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599151)

> He learned something when he took office.
> Something scary

What scary thing could he possibly have learned?

That there were dangerous terrorists loose? That they've obtained the Red Substance or the All-Spark or the Ark of the Covenant?

Re:Hope and change (0)

CubicleZombie (2590497) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598733)

Obama called Gitmo a "Sad chapter in American history" and promised to close it in 2009. People voted for him because of that statement (I recall McCain saying at the same time that it'd be nice, but it's not that simple).

The president had the entire executive and legislative branches of the government but couldn't find a way to close a prison with 200 inmates, yet we are to trust those very same people with running our health insurance? I'm not trolling - if Obama's solution to every problem is more government, then there is NO excuse for Gitmo remaining open.

Re:Hope and change (2)

Boronx (228853) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599057)

You can't rely upon a president to curtail presidential powers. Even if such a thing did happen, it couldn't possibly be permanent. We need a Congress that' s willing to do it.

Re:Hope and change (1, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598411)

I am still amazed that people think they see a difference between the parties...

Re:Hope and change (5, Informative)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598891)

There are lots of differences between the parties—just no significant ones. All of the differences are with respect to issues that neither party can significantly affect without getting smacked down by the courts—abortion, for example—or differences that in theory make a difference but in practice do not—techniques for redistribution of wealth, for example. (Tax and spend versus borrow and spend both have the same net effect, but one causes inflation that reduces your paycheck's buying power, while the other causes your paycheck to look smaller numerically, thus reducing buying power without inflation.)

Re:Hope and change (0)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599091)

"There are lots of differences between the parties—just no significant ones."

For example...

Republicans hate gays, women, the poor, and damn dirty immigrants.
Democrats hate the rich, republicans, and damn dirty people making their own decisions.

All their points are useless drivel that only server to rile up their supporters. They know they have no chance in hell doing anything they promise and will instead just do what their biggest financial supporters tell them to do.

Re:Hope and change (5, Insightful)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598449)

Someone is a war criminal.

Bush? maybe. Cheney? definitely.

But yes, Obama isn't much better.

I don't have anyone I can vote for any more.

Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians, Greens, Reform. All are putrid vulgar fools. There isn't a single party that offers rational solutions to any of the problems we face and respects the principals that were supposed to make America a shining beacon of liberty. No matter what happens, this country is doomed.

Re:Hope and change (1)

Grog6 (85859) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599003)

I'd love to argue with you, but as you're right, that's hard to do.

Hey, hopefully an asteroid strike will make this all seem silly.

Yes you do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39599075)

I don't have anyone I can vote for any more.

Ron Paul.

Re:Hope and change (1)

Boronx (228853) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599111)

Bush, definitely. It's a war crime to invade another country. He also violated Congress's authorization of force since it required him to find Iraq an imminent threat or had ties to Sept 11 '01 attacks, neither of which Bush had evidence for, though he falsely submitted a statement that he did.

Re:Hope and change (2)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598555)

A lot has changed other than just rhetoric. A lot has gotten a lot better. For one, few if any whole new categories of abuse are being opened, even if not enough old ones are being closed.

But as we see here, in the military/intel realm, practically nothing has changed. And with the passage of time it's gotten worse: institutionalized, unchallenged, accepted, upgraded.

In general executive privilege, whether the US Chief Executive (president or their whole branch), or a military commander, or even a troop commander (or a lone soldier making "executive decisions"), or corporate executives - all executives have privileges that exempt them from paying the costs of their decisions.

Yes, Obama has destroyed hope for changing that from what Bush established as our offensive national priority. Though it's not quite that bad outside that essential scope, it's bad enough to hate it.

Re:Hope and change (1)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598965)

Not only did he destroy hope (and change), but he expanded on many of the policies started after 9/11 by the Bush Administration. Drone attacks have skyrocketed (and Obama has the dubious honor of blowing up an American citizen with a drone attack... good resume fodder I guess), the PATRIOT Act was renewed (and Obama even called for its renewal, even though he campaigned against it and executive branch power grabs...)

So, what we've learned, (or if you watch FOX or MSNBC, haven't learned) is that it doesn't matter what party you elect... they both want to take your liberty away bit by bit. Donkey or elephant, it doesn't matter. What matters is we're still stupid enough (in the aggregate) to believe that there are differences between the parties.... I don't know how bad it has to get before people realize it.. but I hope it's not too far gone when we finally do wake up.

Re:Hope and change (3, Insightful)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598605)

Come on, most people agree that Obama is a much better Republican President than GWB.
Actually the best since Clinton.

Re:Hope and change (1)

Daniel_Staal (609844) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598775)

You obviously don't talk to people near where I live. To most of them, GWB should have had a third term, and Obama is dragging this country to hell.

Re:Hope and change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39599139)

You obviously don't talk to people near where I live. To most of them, GWB should have had a third term, and Obama is dragging this country to hell.

True. I try not to talk to dilholes.

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598713)

Lets see... Guy was a CIA officer from 1999-2004. This all stems from events in 2002, and from a NY Times article in 2008. The guys indictment, that happened yesterday, comes about from a 'classified defense filing' from January 2009. What happened about that time again? Changing of the guards... ? Doesn't ring a bell .. ?

As much as you can hate the continued policies that the current Administration retains, enacted by the previous Administration, this is just more crap leftover from it. Accept it, and hate it, and denounce it as usual. Are you really that surprised?

The real irony here is that this is more about some guys name who got released, and NOT about water-boarding. Water-boarding was/is, US Foreign Policy. An individual CIA operative releasing a name of a covert op. to a reporter is a rather individual act. Perhaps if he was a better spy, he wouldn't have gotten caught?

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598929)

Please stop using the word waterboarding as if it lend the pratice an aura of legitimacy.
Call it by what it is : torture. The US has institutionalised the use of torture. Plain and simple.

You're no better than those third world countries the US continually criticises for lack of democracy.
Its like the pot calling the kettle black. Think about it, the US has abdicated the rule of law and replaced it by a police state in all but name. What a shame, but I guess this is what happens when an empire goes down the drain. It takes time for the seeds of corruption to infect all levels of government and civil society. And then collapse.

Re:Hope and change (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598931)

>>>We're still assassinating people

Bush assasinated americans? I know he's an ass, but I don't recall that one.

Hmmm... (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598235)

Whatever happened to this? [wikipedia.org]
Interesting....

Re:Hmmm... (0)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598559)

Whatever happened to this?

What do you mean? The guy in the State Department who mentioned her name to a reporter got in a bit of trouble, and the scapegoat the Dem's special prosecuter tried (and failed, of course) to pin it on, got strung up for a completely unrelated matter. That was that. Were you hoping for something absurd, like it mattering more, given the actual circumstances?

Where's the whistleblower immunity? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598289)

Exposing crimes against humanity and they charge him with treason?
I for one applaud his decision, it was and will forever be, the correct choice.
I also hope that we as Americans will stand up for him and against his persecutors.

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598523)

I also hope that we as Americans will stand up for him and against his persecutors.

Oh please!

The media - all the media - will get caught up in the patriotic furor and label this guy as a traitor - we all know it'll be those loud mouth liars on Fox News.

Then the Fox News fans will parrot what they hear and get all pissed off that this traitor isn't being executed.

You see, they've all watched '24' and know that you got to be hard on those terrorists and sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do! They saw how it works out on TV and the "good guys" who torture are doing for ...for ....the good!

Because if we don't, we'll loose our way of life! You know, Truth, Justice and the American way. Because if the terrorists win, we'll become a Islamo-fascist empire and we'd be subject to torture, oppression, and other crimes.

So, they have to commit torture so that people won't be subject to torture if we lose our American Way of Life!

Get it?

One day, I'll explain why we have to give up our Freedoms in order to be Free in America. It's pretty complicated and it took hours and hours of watching Fox News.

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598565)

And who will we side with?

Is there any valid alternative?

Gary Johnson of the libertarian party supports slavery VIA private for profit prison labor plus retarded economic beliefs.

Republicans have a far worse track record on civil liberties than the democrats, plus retarded economic beliefs.

Seriously, give me one person who respects civil liberties, has integrity, and is neither a theocrat or Ayn Rand free market worshiping retard.

And before you accuse me of being a communist, they suck too.

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598837)

Russ Feingold

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (2)

Boronx (228853) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599147)

Bernie Sanders

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598597)

There is no immunity provided for the disclosure of classified information. It comes down to whether the authorities choose to prosecute and, note, he is not being charged with that. I guess the explicit charge of revealing the identity of a covert operative was enough?

Unlike killing another human being, U.S. law seems not to provide for an affirmative defense in crimes against the state. I could be wrong, but I can't think of any at the moment, anyway.

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598697)

How is something that is illegal classified? It's a fucking war-crime - it's illegal to classify those actions.

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (2)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598749)

Unlike killing another human being, U.S. law seems not to provide for an affirmative defense in crimes against the state. I could be wrong, but I can't think of any at the moment, anyway.

Jury Nullification is still legal, although you can be thrown in jail for saying so. http://reason.com/blog/2011/02/25/is-advocacy-of-jury-nullificat [reason.com]

Re:Where's the whistleblower immunity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598923)

Criminal governments have never allowed themselves to be prosecuted. They make the act of revealing a crime a crime itself.

when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598299)

remember when dick cheney exposed that cia agent when her husband opposed the iraq invasion? i guess they forgot to charge him with espionage...oh well maybe next time.

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (4, Funny)

sneakyimp (1161443) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598359)

Oh c'mon silly! Everyone knows he just did that because he didn't have a heart. Now they got him one! Everything is going to be fine now -- or at least for the next five years til they have to murder another young athlete to get him a new heart.

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598495)

Back where I come from, there are men who do nothing all day but good deeds.
They are called phila-- eh, phil-- um, yes, uh-- good-deed-doers.
And their hearts are no bigger than Cheney's.
But -- they don't have one thing Cheney's got: billionare patrons and political clout.

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599109)

They still feed him the hearts of Cuban children? I though that stopped when he left office.

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (-1, Troll)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598573)

remember when dick cheney exposed that cia agent when her husband opposed the iraq invasion?

It's difficult to remember stuff that didn't actually happen. Seems to work for you, though. Have fun with that.

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598767)

Is that why my no one believes me when I have PTSD flashbacks to the French and Indian war?

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (1)

scot4875 (542869) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599113)

IOW: I reject your reality and substitute my own spin.

--Jeremy

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (0)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599155)

Yeah, keep your brainwashing going. IF you think that Scooter Libbiy did ANYTHING without the direction of Dicky then you are a complete moron. Cheney ran his officer with an iron fist, you could not crap without his approval.

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598753)

It wouldn't matter - Bush II would have just pardoned him like he did Scooter Libby.

Re:when dick cheney did it he wasn't charged (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598841)

Yeah, it was right after Clinton raped a whole busload of children, and right before Obama chained the doors to a daycare and burned it down.

I mean, if we're going to just make shit up, let's go all-out.

this is how fascism works (5, Insightful)

Dan667 (564390) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598317)

make what is illegal legal and legally prosecute anyone that exposes it.

Re:this is how fascism works (1)

donscarletti (569232) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598667)

If it was legal why would they need to punish someone who exposed it? Since it was not legal, why is there anything to be exposed?

Don't worry, this is made up slander and is nothing a good waterboarding won't fix.

Did I say waterboarding? I mean, um... shit

What can I do? (4, Interesting)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598383)

This, to me, might well be the final straw. What can I do to reverse this? I'm not apathetic, I'm willing to work to change this, but thanks to the majority of the voting public, I feel the simplest solutions will not work. What can I do to stop this?

Re:What can I do? (0)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598617)

What can I do to reverse this?

Reverse what? Reverse it being a crime to blab classified stuff? If you think he shouldn't be in trouble for identifying covert agents, just lobby to have him pardoned by the executive branch, who have that authority.

Re:What can I do? (1)

parlancex (1322105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598879)

That's starting to sound an awful lot like terrorist talk. Please remember do your civic duty and vote for one of our 2 Political Parties at the next scheduled Democratic Election.

Nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598947)

There is nothing the entire world can do to stop the continuous expansion of government, let alone a single man. How do I know this? Tens of thousands of years of organized coercion, all with the same result: oppression of the common man, and enrichment of the elite few.

If you call me a pessimist you'd be wrong. I'm what you call a realist, because my conclusions are based on simple observations of reality, rather than hope, fear, and idealogy.

Re:What can I do? (5, Informative)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599001)

Become an active member of Amnesty International. They do some awesome work and have saved hundreds of people from torture or "disappearing." Their reports are impartial and so well-researched that they serve as a standard that even governments cannot ignore them.

Not happy with this country anymore. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598433)

I feel ashamed to be an American.

Ha fucking ha (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598517)

Sucked in cockhead. Hope he gets the needle.

Well, it appears we have no choice (1)

Lucas123 (935744) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598551)

John Kiriakou refused to be trained in torture tactics and he was the first CIA officer to call waterboarding "torture" Waterboard him.

That's why we need Wikileaks (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598645)

n/t

You know they talk about risking lives by leaking? (1, Interesting)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598741)

This, not Wikileaks, is a great example of that. In fact, if Wikileaks supporters are smart they will support throwing this man under the bus because he specifically named people who terrorist groups would have motive to find and murder.

I'm not a big fan of Manning and believe he deserves time in Leavenworth. However, Manning doesn't have a thing on this guy in terms of putting people at risk. I'd rather see Manning walk with an honorable discharge and VA benefits than see this man not do at least 10 years.

Re:You know they talk about risking lives by leaki (0)

Assmasher (456699) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599117)

How much time do you think Cheney and Rove should get?

Re:You know they talk about risking lives by leaki (2)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599175)

Still no charges for the agents who actually committed acts of torture. Waterboarding is just as wrong whether it's committed by us, or whether it's done to us [politifact.com] . In either case, the torturer deserves the same fate.

so we're faced with two choices. (2)

nimbius (983462) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598835)

an administration that recognizes waterboarding is not in fact torture or one that secretly admits it is a form of turture.

if in fact waterboarding is not torture, then no espionage has been commited as waterboarding by its definition under the bush administration is a widely accepted enhanced interrogation technique that can be reasonably expected in any interrogation scenario in the world, as outlined by the geneva convention.

if however waterboarding is torture, then we have ourselves a case of espionage in that a secret employment of torture was authorized under the bush administration despite our acceptance of the geneva convention and adherence to a protocol that would in turn ensure our soldiers and foreign citizens will not be subjected to such harsh treatment.

Boxes of Liberty (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39598941)

there's one left.
Spring isn't a strictly Arabic phenomenon.

I wish he did 1 thing differently (4, Interesting)

s.petry (762400) | more than 2 years ago | (#39598977)

If he had not disclosed names which does put people at risk, I would have no problem with what he did. That one thing makes a huge difference, and for that reason it's difficult to defend him.

Exposing the activity alone should have been enough to open an investigation. Let the courts find the names relevant. He could have waited until a Grand Jury was opened, and exposed all the names he thought important to the courts.

I'm not trying to imply that the right people would have been prosecuted under those circumstances. Just that since he put people at risk by giving names to media the whole things gets a big question mark.

Presidential Medal of Freedom (4, Informative)

Phoenix666 (184391) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599063)

That's what this guy should get.

Exposing crimes against humanity is every human's duty. Systematic torture is a war crime and covering it up makes you equally culpable. That's what the whole deal was with the Nuremburg Trials, remember?

The Nazis claimed they were just following orders, but that didn't spare them from the gallows. Every member of the American government who helped perpetrate this atrocity or who looked away should be locked up or face capital punishment according to their proximity and complicity.

It does look like at this point that the greater part of the American government was complicit, including almost all of Congress, the entirety of the Executive Branch, and the Judiciary, so we'd have to expunge nearly all of Washington DC with extreme prejudice.

And you know what? I'm really OK with that.

How many dead whistle blowers does it take to.... (1)

3seas (184403) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599187)

... finally shut down all the corruption of the so called intelligence industry?

I don't know about you all, but those no-nonsense (1)

spads (1095039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39599193)

covert operators give me wood.
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