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Raspberry Pi Passes EU Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the red-tape-dissolved-by-logic dept.

United Kingdom 137

A week ago, we posted news of the delay that the Raspberry Pi Foundation faced because of a requirement that their boards be tested to comply with EU regulations. Now, the word is in, and the Raspberry Pi passed those tests without needing any modifications. From their post describing the ordeal: "The Raspberry Pi had to pass radiated and conducted emissions and immunity tests in a variety of configurations (a single run can take hours), and was subjected to electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing to establish its robustness to being rubbed on a cat. It’s a long process, involving a scary padded room full of blue cones, turntables that rise and fall on demand, and a thing that looks a lot like a television aerial crossed with Cthulhu."

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Cool for cats. (5, Funny)

mr_lizard13 (882373) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603203)

Thank goodness it passed the cat rubbing test. We Europeans love rubbing electronic devices on our cats.

Re:Cool for cats. (1)

zammer990 (2225956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603223)

And perhaps now, pies on cats...

Re:Cool for cats. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603225)

And I hope the Raspberry gave the EU the ....never mind.

Re:Cool for cats. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603231)

Over here we rub cats on our electronic devices. You guys have it all backwards.

zeno's arrow (incremental progress) (1, Flamebait)

noh8rz3 (2593935) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603389)

holy shizznit another slashdot update on the raspberry pi, which is incrementally moving forward from the last update! next update - "raspberry pi recieves email status update." holy cow people, this is like xeno's arrow - with each update, we are making less and less progress towards the goal.

Re:Cool for cats. (2)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603469)

Be honest, how many cat hairs are on your main home workbench right now?

Re:Cool for cats. (3, Funny)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604587)

I have always felt that in the interests of fairness and equal opportunity toward all phenomena of physics, that every facility that has antistatic workstations should also have prostatic workstations. Such a workstation could consist of a bench with the work surface covered with cat's fur and with a full set of hand tools made of glass.

Re:Cool for cats. (2, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604743)

The good Dr. Robert J. Van de Graaff [mos.org] has your prostatic workstation needs covered.

In fact, I'm pretty sure that he is now a major factor in semiconductor production: during the later stages of their diffusion, when the punk-ass new microprocessors think they know everything, the wise old 8086s tell them: "Now kids, if you exhibit any of the undocumented errata for your model number during your rated lifespan, Dr. Van de Graaff will come for you, and with him comes the Vcore transient from which their is no waking..."

Re:Cool for cats. (2)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604481)

Mrs Slocombe [wikipedia.org] , is that you?

Re:Cool for cats. (2)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605219)

We Europeans love rubbing electronic devices on our cats.

The vibe I get is that it's a quite understandable translation error.

Re:Cool for cats. (1, Offtopic)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605245)

Thank goodness it passed the cat rubbing test. We Europeans love rubbing electronic devices on our cats.

Well my GF always wants me to rub devices on her pussy

Two turntables and a mirophone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603207)

WHERE IT'S AT

got a frosty!

Re:Two turntables and a mirophone (2)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603307)

WHERE'S THE CAT

...

*CLAP*

Re:Two turntables and a mirophone (2)

Threni (635302) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603349)

We'll send you the cat as soon as Farnell finishes v7 of their price matrix, assuming they've read any of the last 20 mins emails they've been sent about the requirement that they sell to end users.

RASPBERRY PI FOR EVER !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603211)

I can name that tune in ONE NOTE !!

Pics? (3, Funny)

walkerp1 (523460) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603213)

Am I the only one that desperately wants to see pictures of the Cthulhu antenna?

Re:Pics? (3, Funny)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603299)

The EU just want to be sure that the devices won't pick up any transmissions from the great old ones, what with the approach of may-eve and all.

Other little known tidbits: in addition to the cone shaped undulating turntables, and the chtulu antenna, the device has to withstand being in the same room with a drunken MP reading select passages from the necronomicon backwards, while rubbing on cats.

They are very thurough is the EU.

South Park did it. (3, Funny)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603289)

Bad kitty! That's my Pot Pi! No! You're a bad kitty!

Scary padded room (3, Funny)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603291)

full of blue cones, turntables that rise and fall on demand, and a thing that looks a lot like a television aerial crossed with Cthulhu.

Also, cats.

Scary???? (1, Interesting)

pe1rxq (141710) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603303)

Am I the only one scared by these guys?????
They think they can design a PCB yet are scared of some simple measuring equipment. (I have been involved with and designed several products which had to go through CE testing and that stuff is NOT scary if you known what they are doing).
I really hope the summary is just joking about the antennna.... if not: stay away from Raspberry Pi: it is designed by clueless idiots.

Re:Scary???? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603361)

It was written by the PR person, not the engineers.

Re:Scary???? (4, Insightful)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603363)

I actually thought the comment was tongue-in-cheek, so, no I am not scared by them.

Re:Scary???? (4, Funny)

chispito (1870390) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603369)

The PR person is a food blogger who does this for free in her spare time because she is married to one of the foundation Trustees. Cut her a little slack.

Re:Scary???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605135)

Why is this modded "funny"?

Re:Scary???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605211)

That would explain why she is so arrogant and clueless,and why the raspberry pi foundation keeps her around although she is so detrimental to the project.

Nepotism: now with more condescending attitude

Re:Scary???? (1, Troll)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603433)

I'm terrified by people who use multiple punctuation marks. Mostly because it indicates that they're probably a 13-year-old girl, an incredibly dangerous group of people to be talking to on the internet.

Re:Scary???? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603443)

Yeah, but they had already built 10000 of the things and their distributors were refusing to sell them until they passed CE. So if there was _one_ mistake that required hardware modification then the entire batch of 10000 had to be repaired (again, since they already had to replace the ethernet port) or scrapped. Not to mention the angry community members who have *already* paid for their pi.

So maybe you dont need to be a "clueless idiot" to feel a little nervous.

Re:Scary???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603541)

if not: stay away from Raspberry Pi: it is designed by clueless idiots.

That's just lame...

Re:Scary???? (2)

Zapotek (1032314) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603573)

Irrispective of who wrote it I think that it was meant as a joke, which I personally found funny and lol'ed a bit. My my so touchy....

Re:Scary???? (2)

KreAture (105311) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603965)

The interesting thing is they were forced to do this at all.
Farnell in Norway does NOT sell to end users, only companys and developers, and as such the boards are not supposed to be forced to adhere to this testing.
It smells like some competitors have gotten their will here, and it's nice to see that they didn't win. Now the sales will be even better from the get-go.
I already know of several projects that may use the pi as a base-platform now that it passed the tests.

Re:Scary???? (1)

makomk (752139) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605295)

Farnell in Norway does not sell devices other than the Raspberry Pi [raspberrypi.org] to end users. There was a big PR campaign by the Raspberry Pi Foundation to market the device to ordinary end users, then a big backlash when they changed their distribution plan and only businesses would be able to order it in many countries, so they managed to convince Farnell and RS Electronics to start selling to ordinary consumers in countries where they normally don't.

Re:Scary???? (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605337)

Farnell in Norway does NOT sell to end users, only companys and developers

They are making an exception for the Pi. Anyway just because farnell refuse to sell to end users in your country doesn't mean they do that everywhere.

It smells like some competitors have gotten their will here

I find it far more likely that someone in legal simply got worried when the saw the massive volumes stacking up and realised that the vast majority of those sales were almost certainly going to people who were not going to use it as a development board.

Congratulations (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603311)

I may even get one when there isn't a several months long delay between ordering and shipping anymore. Perhaps I'll just wait until heaps of these toys show up on eBay when their owners find out that RaPis are much slower than even first generation netbooks.

Oh good! They did some testing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603317)

Now I'm SURE it's not vaporware!!!

Re:Oh good! They did some testing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603401)

You are an idiot.

Re:Oh good! They did some testing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603543)

I smell a pre-orderer....

Re:Oh good! They did some testing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604831)

It's really not that complex of a device, if any Dick and Jane manufacturer can whip out Arduino clones making this isn't too much harder. It's a populated PCB for crying out loud, not a OpenPandora. It's not that hard. This is like saying that woodchips are vaporware...

Not really a red tape delay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603345)

Since everything that wants a CE mark needs to comply with EMC I don't really see it as a problem. I don't want my rasberry pi device killing my pacemaker.

Re:Not really a red tape delay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603817)

If it does, your problem is with the manufacturer of the pacemaker.

Re:Not really a red tape delay (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603865)

Not when one of the FCC regulations is "must accept interference". No seriously, that's actually a requirement.

Re:Not really a red tape delay (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604215)

Not when one of the FCC regulations is "must accept interference". No seriously, that's actually a requirement.

I don't think that pacemakers would qualify as Part 15 devices; but Part 95 [gpo.gov] ones. Those have a much shorter list of things they aren't allowed to interfere with; but they are still required to deal with interference(that and, obviously, building life-critical systems that can't handle a little RF would be a Bad Thing even if it were legal.)

Re:Not really a red tape delay (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605011)

You're both semi-wrong here: The testing was for EU regulations, nothing to do with the FCC. Though they may want their own tests done in addition.

OMG, this is news?! (2, Insightful)

Maury Markowitz (452832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603375)

Doesn't every product, everywhere, pass this test?

So, this is worthy of the front page why?

Re:OMG, this is news?! (4, Informative)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603393)

I'm sure that not every product passes this test, otherwise the test wouldn't be necessary :p

Re:OMG, this is news?! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603595)

You sir do not understand the state.

Re:OMG, this is news?! (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603677)

You sir do not understand the state.

I most certainly DO understand the state. What I don't understand, however, is what you're talking about.

Most Consumer Products (5, Informative)

andersh (229403) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603665)

All electronics that are going to be sold, as finished products, in the European economic area (EEA) have to be tested and comply with European standards. It's the short answer, and I'm skipping a lot of details.

The problem the Raspberry-foundation faced was that it was initially not a "finished" product, more of a DIY kit. Once it became clear it was more of a "consumer" product it had to comply and be tested.

The same applies in the US where the FCC has the same role, but labs do the actual testing in both jurisdictions.

Re:Most Consumer Products (2)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604947)

It's still a bogus requirement for this devices by any means. It's an open circuit board. The emitted radiation thus depends entirely on the end use. Many electronics wouldn't pass without a metal case surrounding them. Not to mention that none of the other development platforms which are sold in a similar way (Beagle board, Arduino, STK500 etc) require this certification.

Re:Most Consumer Products (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605151)

It's still a bogus requirement for this devices by any means. It's an open circuit board. The emitted radiation thus depends entirely on the end use. Many electronics wouldn't pass without a metal case surrounding them. Not to mention that none of the other development platforms which are sold in a similar way (Beagle board, Arduino, STK500 etc) require this certification.

I guess. but they're dodging taxes by it being a finished product? at least that's what was used as one reason for skipping production in eu. something about there being import tax on components but not on finished products. you can't exactly claim it's a finished product in one form and that it's an unfinished project board in another form...

Re:OMG, this is news?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603653)

Originally the foundation didn't think the Pi needed a CE mark as other electronics boards like the Beagleboard don't (It is not a finished consumer product) but the distributors (Farnell and RS I think) thought otherwise and refused to ship until the boards had a CE mark.

Re:OMG, this is news?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604009)

Read the story, apparently the hub/switch they had the pi attached to for part of the test couldn't pass it...

Re:OMG, this is news?! (2)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604599)

This slashdot posting is part of the 'Raspberry Pi Trainwreck-Launch' series. Collect 'em all!

Re:OMG, this is news?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605057)

Oh, there are only 1,000,000+ people (http://www.guardian.co.uk/educ..intcmp=122) anxiously waiting for this. Due to the increased interest and attention this testing has been brought forward, delaying the release. And unlike originially planned, the UK BIS decided that the RPi couldn't be sold without it. So quite big news actually.

Re:OMG, this is news?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605185)

Nope, we had one product not passing the test because it was emitting high frequency radiation. It required only some extra shielding, but it didn't pass the first time.

Cat got your tongue? (something important seems to (1)

bsa3 (200) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603397)

Pictures of the cat or it didn't happen.

Serious Question... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603435)

Could someone enlighten me on why the testing would include ESD sensitivity?

Devices that don't die when you pick them up on a non-humid day certainly are nice; but(outside of safety-critical medical and controls applications) dropping dead if handled without ESD precautions doesn't seem like a safety risk, or a greater RF emissions violation than the spark doing the killing, or otherwise troublesome in a regulatory sort of way. Likely to annoy customers, quite possibly; but not likely to do much harm in the process...

CE mark requirements (1)

andersh (229403) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603689)

To quote a source on the web:

"If a product is not susceptible to ESD and fast transients, for instance, it will not fail as readily during normal use. This is not only important from a performance standpoint, but from a safety and legal liability standpoint as well. Therefore, it is useful to use interference generators in the product design and development stage, as well as in the CE mark certification process. "

http://www.conformity.com/artman/publish/printer_166.shtml [conformity.com]

Re:Serious Question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603693)

Doesn't take too much ESD to zap a microprocessor or memory chip. It's not about harm to person, but making sure the device is slightly robust enough to be given to...consumers.

Re:Serious Question... (1)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603999)

Gee, if only there were a way for consumers to make quality- and fitness-for-purpose decisions on their own. We could call it... oh, wait, I know -- a market!

Re:Serious Question... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604145)

Some of us realize that if the society market wanted libertarian anarchy, it would have developed that way.

I guess you'll have to keep on dreaming.

Re:Serious Question... (1)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604201)

Yeah, because once the nanny state gives up and lets the free market handle aspects of product quality that don't impact anyone other than the purchaser, we might as well all pack up and move to Somalia.

Seriously. Were you people shaken as infants?

Re:Serious Question... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604369)

Free market? What a joke. Never existed and never will exist. Enjoy the mental masturbation of a fantasy world.

Re:Serious Question... (1)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604533)

(Shrug) You seem to have your own little argument going with someone only you can hear. All I'm saying is, when government sets up needless and costly bureaucratic roadblocks, the less choice we all have as consumers, and the more we pay. I don't recall any widespread consumer demand for ESD immunity standards, do you?

Here's an idea. How about if the government worries less about ESD immunity of consumer products, and more about fraud prosecution and banking oversight? Because it seems that they cannot, in fact, do all of these things at once.

Re:Serious Question... (2)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604685)

Its sort of a cabal arrangement. The big established device manufacturers collude with the regulatory bureaucrats. They do so to insure there is always a substantial barrier to entry to protect themselves from those meddlesome low budget startups with their market-disturbing innovations.

  Big companies have whole departments dedicated to "handling" the compliance/regulatory stuff. Its just good (borderline monopolistic) practice to operate that way, and defend the regulatory requirements in a bellicose tone any time the requirements are questioned.

I worked for years in the medical device field. The big companies know very well how to design and package a device with no more complexity than a simple AM/FM Radio into a product Insurance companies can be billed $800-1000 for.

Re:Serious Question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603797)

Could someone enlighten me on why the testing would include ESD sensitivity?

It's all part of the CE electromagnetic compatability regulations needed to sell electronics in Europe. It specifies that the device has to be capable of operating in conditions it's likely to be exposed to, or at the very least be able to recover from transient conditions.

It just makes sure all devices play nicely together.

Re:Serious Question... (1)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603833)

Basically some useless bureaucratic hoops that the EU, but almost no one else in the world, sees fit to make manufacturers large and small jump through.

I don't understand why this board needed certification at all, frankly. Since it's sold as a PC board, why don't they just market and sell it as a component, rather than a system? Then it would only be subject to RoHS and WEEE legislation, not EMC.

Re:Serious Question... (4, Informative)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604625)

The issue is with the distributors, not the RaspPi people.

Farnell and RS got nervous when they realized how many of the boards they would be shipping. There is not the same requirement for low volume eval boards they sell as engineering prototypes.

The Foundation always planned on obtaining the CE mark for the Raspberry Pi boards during the main launch, which will come in the future when schools have their curricula worked out and huge numbers of the finished devices (in enclosures mostly) will be going out to schoolchildren. Right now the boards are seen as a preliminary release. The Foundation had CE certification on the schedule. Just not this soon.

Re:Serious Question... (1)

s-gen (890660) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604207)

The sensitive device will annoy customers of the emitting device too though. So a highly *successful* sensitive device could impose a de facto RF emissions limit in its market that was lower than the regulatory one.

Re:Serious Question... (1)

Fred Ferrigno (122319) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605075)

Is it not a worthwhile effort to save consumers from losing money on devices that drop dead under normal use? I can see the argument about whether the Raspberry Pi counts as a "finished product", but if we were talking about, say, a television remote, it would be unacceptable to have to take ESD precautions just to change the channel.

2 months after official launch (-1, Flamebait)

citizenr (871508) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603495)

2 months after official launch, and Rasppi foundation sold exactly TEN (10) boards, each at ~$1000 on Ebay auctions.
  No other Raspberry Pi board exchanged hands, NOT A SINGLE ONE.

Re:2 months after official launch (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603655)

The curve for early adoption of this gizmo is steeeep!

Changing hands... (1)

andersh (229403) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603707)

They do have about 2000 in their hands now.

http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/945 [raspberrypi.org]

Re:Changing hands... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603799)

Ok. When do they get them to Element14's hands?

Re:Changing hands... (0, Troll)

citizenr (871508) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604055)

They do have about 2000 in their hands now.

http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/945 [raspberrypi.org]

So they "have" 2000 boards 2 months after "official launch", during which they claimed they already gave 10000 boards to distributors? Nice.

Re:Changing hands... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605265)

"they claimed they already gave 10000 boards to distributors"

Errr.... NO.

The first batch of 10000 was produced. When these arrived in the UK, the Foundation performed full functional testing on samples from the batch (as compared to electrical tests carried out at the factory) and discovered that the manufacturers had substituted a certain component between the first manufacturing samples and batch production. All the production was returned to the manufacturer for rework, which has taken some time. Reworked stock is now in the UK and going into distribution. Delivery is now contingent on RS and Farnell receiving copies of the test results so they are satisfied in their own minds that the Raspberry Pi can be sent out. Neither RS Components or Farnell have had "a 10k batch" to hand. Ever.

Its all on the Raspberry Pi forum you know. Whats "nice" is your complete lack of knowledge and comprehension. :-)

Re:2 months after official launch (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603749)

This is a charity and this is the first time they have gone through this process. There are bigger companies still have this issue. With pi they are just being more transparent about it.

Re:2 months after official launch (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605421)

Then why did they keep pretending that they have people who are experienced in these things? This "charity" keeps telling the story differently every time. They know what they're doing, it's the first time. The official shop will be on their home page, you can't order from them at all. They'll ship worldwide from day one, their distributors refuse to sell to private individuals until the waiting queues are already months long. The distributors have 5000 boards each, the first 2000 boards have just arrived from the factory. The official distribution will probably be Ubuntu, Ubuntu doesn't support the CPU at all. Being a charity isn't an excuse for leading people on.

Re:2 months after official launch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603917)

Certification avoids stories like "It was discovered today that Raspberry Pi computers interfere with insulin pumps..."
[captcha: breaks]

Re:2 months after official launch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604245)

2 months after official launch, and Rasppi foundation sold exactly TEN (10) boards, each at ~$1000 on Ebay auctions.
    No other Raspberry Pi board exchanged hands, NOT A SINGLE ONE.

To paraphrase Wernher von Braun*:

We can sell a Raspberry Pi in Europe, but sometimes the paperwork is overwhelming.

----

*"We can lick gravity, but sometimes the paperwork is overwhelming."

2 months after official launch???? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604919)

6th April is nowhere NEAR 2 months after 29th February. 36 days to be exact.

So its true about the declining ability of Americans to do math.

No wonder you're becoming a third-world country.

Test chambers (3, Funny)

cookd (72933) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603625)

After the testing you will be baked and then there will be cake.

Re:Test chambers (2)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603971)

After the testing, you will be baked...

Is that from huffing the kittens?

CE certifications..... (4, Interesting)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39603681)

From TFA:

A cute story. Radiated immunity testing involves hitting the Raspberry Pi hard with narrow-band EM radiation, while checking (amongst many other things) that the device is still able to send Ethernet frames to a hub. The first time the team did this, the light on the hub stopped blinking: no frames were making it through. They did it again: still nothing. Finally, they discovered that the hub (which, I should point out, gave every appearance of being CE marked, so it should have been able to get through these tests itself) was being knocked out every time somebody pressed the button. Jimmy used a longer cable, put the hub outside the field, and found that the Raspberry Pi got through its immunity tests with no problems at all.

Too bad their CE certified ethernet hub failed the CE testing.... remember kids, this is what you get when you buy cheap stuff from cheap manufacturing countries.... oh wait!

Re:CE certifications..... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604413)

CE stands for China Export doesn't it?

Re:CE certifications..... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604535)

Just for curiosity's sake, I have to wonder if the hub itself was flawed and fraudulently labelled(also, was it a real, live, hub? those must be getting hard to come by...) or if it was one of the 'qualification tests with a decent wall-wart adapter, ship with the cheapest piece of shit that doesn't catch fire when plugged in' jobs that could be compliant with the right swapping...

Re:CE certifications..... (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#39604663)

sometimes the CE is fake and its thought to be, instead, 'china export'.

Re:CE certifications..... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605191)

Placing a CE mark on something that doesn't pass CE tests can be done, but it makes you liable for any damage it might cause. With the CE mark you say "I swear it passes CE tests", if it doesn't, and people find out, you can get into serious trouble.

yo0 Insensitive clod! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39603891)

you go7 there. Or [samag.com] in the from now on or a losing baatle;

Thank goodness it passed the test (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604259)

I'm going to use these to make internet connected disposable pirate radio base stations. :D

Re:Thank goodness it passed the test (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605023)

I have wondered... if you could set up, say, ten of these in a dispersed area, and switch from one to the next every tenth of a second or so... time it right and the recievers shouldn't notice, but it'll really screw with anyone trying to use a tracker.

Raspberry Pi passes ALL tests. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39604875)

Not just the CE, but the FCC, the Aussie one and the Canadian one. Others too? Probably as they'll have much the same requirements as the leading ones.

D'you think the Foundation would spend time and money reserving a registered test chamber to perform just the CE tests when there's worldwide demand to service? Now the production lines can leap into full spew mode and deluge the planet with Raspberry pi!

R-Pi question (1)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605167)

When you build an ARM device like the Raspberry Pi, PandaBoard, does it include a BIOS or similar low level firmware?

Re:R-Pi question (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605227)

It contains a bootloader. Usually "u-boot".

Re:R-Pi question (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605385)

U-boot is the typical bootloader found on many ARM devices and the code that is first executed when the CPU starts up from power-up. However, in the case of the Raspberry Pi, the GPU contains proprietary code that loads the Linux kernel into memory from a FAT partition on the SD card and boots the ARM device. U-boot could be made a secondary bootloader, but the RPi is capable of booting Linux up from a properly configured SD card without a bootloader running on the ARM device first.

Re:R-Pi question (2)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605393)

The details vary but ultimately there does have to be some firmware located in a place that is non-volatile and directly accessible to kick off the boot process.

Older devices used paralell flash directly on the data bus. The bootloader was then executed directly from this flash and went on to load the kernel.

Most recent arm devices have a very small boot program on the chip itself. This chip then reads a bootloader from somewhere (usually NAND flash or SD card) which in turn loads the kernel.

The Pi is a bit unusual in that the GPU starts first. The GPU starts from a small peice of code on the chip itself, reads it's firmware from the SD card (in several stages) and then loads the kernel, resets the SD card device and starts up the arm core.

Re:R-Pi question (4, Informative)

spatular (2474044) | more than 2 years ago | (#39605435)

Generally there is a small ROM embedded in CPU that loads another bootloader from NAND, SD card, SPI Flash, etc. On Atmel ARM chips that bootloader must be small enough to fit into embedded SRAM. Than bootloader initializes SDRAM and fetches U-Boot into it. U-Boot in turn may initialize wider range of devices and then load Linux kernel.

All boot process is very SoC- and board-specific. Bootloaders must be compiled for selected CPU and board components, and Linux kernel should also have board description down to what types of chips are installed as autodetection is usually very limited.

who? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39605331)

cares? wft is up with all these 'Raspberry Pi' stories?

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