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OLPC Project Disappoints In Peru

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the will-the-right-people-get-blamed-though? dept.

Education 274

00_NOP writes "The One Laptop Per Child project has disappointed in Peru, reports the Economist, apparently because in general teachers did not make creative use of the technology. As in other cases the computers seem to have been regarded as ends in themselves rather than tools to help change the ways kids are taught. Quite disappointing for those of us looking for Linux-Global-Domination but not really much of a surprise given the experience in richer countries either."

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Ha, here's problem. (5, Insightful)

sunking2 (521698) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606073)

In some circles the project seems to be more about pushing Linux-Global-Domination as opposed to helping educate people.

"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606101)

Give up Penguins: U've tried it & failed 4 decades since "the year of Linux" is never going to happen on PC's + Servers combined @ both home user & corporate environs levels. U FAILED. Amazing the lengths of political crap they'll try, only to fail as usual. Disguising it as "for the children" is a new LOW though.

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (1, Redundant)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606115)

Next time they should install a proprietry and closed OS on these laptops, thereby increasing their price and enforcing minimum hardware requirements.

Works 4 MS & kids too (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606151)

Since once they're out in the working world, they'll find what they're used to already: Windows!

(Which is, face it, in the gigantic majority by far, vs. some other OS, worldwide on PC's & Servers usage from the home end user into corporate production environments).

Thus, it makes them pre-trained employees and more employeable on 'surface area' coverage by Windows alone (which is by far much larger on PC's & Servers combined than any other OS) as well as attendant softwares used that ride ontop of Windows that most people already use.

Good point. After all, there's what's in my subject above, and any "naysayers" can "argue with the numbers" & logic (good luck - you'll need it).

Re:Works 4 MS & kids too (4, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606231)

Since once they're out in the working world, they'll find what they're used to already: Windows!

By the time any of them are out in the working world, Microsoft will have gone through several generations of Ribbons and Metro and whatnot other changes. What kids need is to learn to write and structure documents, not the finer points of style and formatting. They need to be able to use their math in spreadsheets, making formulas and chaining them together, not making pretty management reports. That's not to say it won't be important in the future, but that's it's mostly pointless to learn it now to know how it'll be in Word and Excel 2022.

Re:Works 4 MS & kids too (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606265)

Microsoft'll still be there as it's been 4 decades: Ur point's what? The kids'll grow w\ changes as we all did on MS or anyone's wares. Change is a fact of life in the field of computing, get used to it.

U fail to note that there are radically differing versions of *NIX desktops too, ala KDE vs. GNOME (& others like xfce & more and changes in them as well over time), plus the changes that occur on its attendant softwares that ride on it too (that aren't used 1/100th as much as Windows & its wares are).

Thus, Your very argument is defeated on its very basis, albeit, turned around on Linux, ala "reverse-psychology" and the numbers prove the rest for me in terms of usership/mindshare (as well as marketshare).

SURPRISE SURPRISE SURPRISE!!! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606373)

Another STUPID project perpetuated by the Bono types of the world. Another COMPLETE waste of time. Give these kids textbooks and be done with it. You don't need to CRANK a textbook to read it. You aren't going to crack a textbook when you drop it. Textbooks are cheap to replace. Textbooks aren't distracting. A shipment of textbooks isn't going to be stolen, reprogrammed, and sold as something else on the black market.

Re:SURPRISE SURPRISE SURPRISE!!! (1, Insightful)

Locutus (9039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606537)

it appears you never read about the goals of the project. paper products do not last in the rural humid environments the OLPC devices are designed for. I didn't agree with the idea that teachers will learn with the students how to best make use of the devices but that's has nothing to do with the device design. As a replacement for books which can't be constantly replaced, the XO is very nice and as a platform for learning exercises it too is a very nice platform.

But you can't just drop it out of an airplane and expect it to be used even close to its intended purposes. "The Gods Must Be Crazy" comes to mind.

LoB

Re:SURPRISE SURPRISE SURPRISE!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606641)

Sorry, moron, but ever heard of fiber engineering? You know, that stuff that they can do with paper to make it work for arbitrary applications?
 
Ah, right, well go read up on that. Don't assume that I didn't read the project's goals, douche imbiber.

Re:SURPRISE SURPRISE SURPRISE!!! (1)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606665)

The kind of teachers and administrators who can't adapt their polices to get good use out of an OLPC are also the kind who make up bizarre and illogical polices for textbooks, such as requiring every child to run with a 35 pound load of them between classes, or cutting out the world maps and text that refers favorably to a rival country from the geography books. Before you just say "It didn't work!", ask yourself, "Would anything else have worked any better with these people in charge?"

U point out Penguin fails & FUD? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606535)

U get insta-moddown on /.: See how moderation works on /. everyone?

Another "insta-downmod"? LMAO! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606941)

Thanks 4 proving a point: U post facts penguins can't handle = insta-downmod.

Re:Works 4 MS & kids too (2)

Locutus (9039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606507)

yes, Apple and Google should just shut down shop and go home because Microsoft has the answer today and into the future. FAIL!

Did you ever hear that the reason companies hire college grads is not so much because of what the learned in school be the fact that they could be taught something new? And if kids are being taught what pictures to click on and not the concepts of word processing, spreadsheets... oh wait, you were talking about the user interface(UI)... I guess by default all Windows users know Microsoft's Metro UI?

In other words, your comment is a big FAIL. It's about learning to learn, not what the tool's UI or apps look like.

LoB

Learning's possible on any computing platform (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606559)

What's ur point? A "Line Of Bullshit"?? QUESTION: If Linux is "so great", how come it's in last place in terms of marketshare & user mindshare on PC's + Servers combined then??? It's free, that alone should have guaranteed a "win" over MS, & yet, we see the results... explain them & answer the question please. We'd like to see yet another Line Of Bullshit", lol!

Re:Learning's possible on any computing platform (2)

knuthin (2255242) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606589)

For the same reason Justin Beiber has the most viewed video to his name on youtube.

What reason's THAT, "CaPTaiN-PaRaNoiD"? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606837)

This we must hear: Get ready 4 the "phantasiez-spin" usual b.s. everyone - Yes, that[s right kids! It's time for the "CaPTaiN-PaRaNoiD" show (w/ it's daily rant & failing 'spin' attempts @ how evil MS is etc. (coming soon on knuthin's response)), lol!

Re:Works 4 MS & kids too (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606917)

The age where Windows is the default interface people learn is rapidly coming to a close.

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (1, Insightful)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606239)

Give up Penguins: U've tried it & failed 4 decades since "the year of Linux" is never going to happen on PC's + Servers combined @ both home user & corporate environs levels. U FAILED.

May I remind you Android is Linux?

May I remind what u quoted? PC's & Servers (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606303)

Android's a Linux that's being "torn up" 4 security. See subject-line & what you quoted also: What you quote specifically notes PC's & Servers combined - not smartphones & afaik that's what ANDROID runs on. NOT servers & pc's!

(Since ANDROID is the most used OS on smartphones it is attacked as rampantly, if not MORE so on that computing platform in smartphones, as much as Windows is or more on PC's & Servers - thanks for helping me make that point here as well).

Catch a "penguin" in a screwup? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606517)

U caught his misquote fail, u got insta-moddown: See how /. works?

Re:May I remind what u quoted? PC's & Servers (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606849)

Android's a Linux that's being "torn up" 4 security. See subject-line & what you quoted also: What you quote specifically notes PC's & Servers combined

You mean the already irrelevant niche for the home user - in which the mobile devices outnumbers the PC-es?

Also, I think you shouldn't shout that loud about the failure of Linux on the server, you may cause a market crash if some of the following decide to enter voluntary administration when they hear you qualifying as failures the followings: Google internal infrastructure [wikipedia.org] , NASA and the other major users of OpenStack [wikipedia.org] , IBM [wikipedia.org] and other [wikipedia.org] modern supercomputer [wikipedia.org] builders, VMWare baremetal virtualization products [wikipedia.org] , NYSE [informationweek.com] and London Stock Exchange [computerworlduk.com] ...

Windows & Servers (Fortune 100 + more) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606887)

367++ TOP FORTUNE 100/500 (or best 100 to work for per CNN Money) COMPANIES, EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, &/or GOVERNMENT AGENCIES USING WINDOWS (over other solutions like Linux) both in HIGH TPM ENVIRONS, & FROM "TOP 100 COMPANIES TO WORK FOR" (per CNN Money 2011):

---

38 HIGH TPM & 99.999% "uptime" examples:

---

XEROX: Managing 7++ million transactions a day for office devices for its customers using Windows Server 2003 + SQLServer 2005 64-bit with 99.999% uptime!

NASDAQ: The U.S.' LARGEST STOCK EXCHANGE, Since 2005 has had Windows Server 2003 + SQLServer 2005 in failover clusters running the "official trade data dissemination system" for them in 24x7 fabled "5-9's" 99.999% uptime, doing 64,000 transactions PER SECOND (compare London Stock Exchange using Linux @ 3,000 per second)

FUJIFILM GROUP: Tracks data for its imaging, information, & documentation for its products & services using Windows Server 2003 w/ a custom SAP solution on SQLServer 2005, achieving 99.999% uptime.

HILTON HOTELS: Manages 1.4 Billion records a day for customers in 1000's of their hotels worldwide - for 370,000 rooms & catering services forecasts (switching from 6 *NIX systems to 1 Windows Server 2003 + SQLServer 2005 clustered failover system using a data warehouse with 7 million rows & 99.998% uptime).

MEDITERRANEAN SHIPPING COMPANY: Manages & Tracks 7 million containers out of 116 countries daily using Windows Server 2003 + SQLServer 2005 in failover clusters with 99.999% uptime.

SWISS INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES: Serves 70 airport destinations worldwide, with 6,500 employees + 110 branch offices via Windows Server 2003 & Active Directory with 99.95% uptime (all while growing their business 30% per year). THEIR PREVIOUS LINUX SYSTEM COULD ONLY HANDLE 250 concurrent users - the Windows one handles over 500++ users concurrently/simultaneously!

UNILEVER: Global consumer good leader, migrated to mySAP on SQLServer 2005 + Windows Server 2003 & scaled UP their operations by over 200% & yet saved money + have 99.999% uptime!

MOTOROLA: Using System Management Server, Windows Server 2003 & SQLServer 2005 to conduct inventory of 65,000 desktops from a single location (e.g. for system updates corporate & worldwide).

NISSAN: Uses Windows Server 2003 to manage 50,000 employees' email & calendaring (w/ out VPN, & using Exchange Server 2003) for local AND remote + mobile users.

TOYOTA MOTOR SALES: Reduced the # of techs needed per dealership (1,000's worldwide) from 7, to 1 using Windows Server 2003.

SIEMENS: 420,000++ people, 130 business units over 190 countries managed in Windows Active Directory

REUTERS: Managing 3,000 servers worldwide @ customer sites internationally (using only 4 managers to do so, remotely).

DELL COMPUTER: Managing 130,000 servers & 100,000 PC's worldside using Windows Server 2003 + 40 million customers' data worldwide.

LEXIS NEXIS: Searches BILLIONS of documents each second delivering news, legal, & business information.

HSBC: Deploys System Center solutions to 15,000 Servers worldwide & 300,000 desktops using Windows Server 2003.

RAYOVAC: Chose Windows Server 2003 over Linux to manage their infrastructure - saving 1 million dollars estimated in software, staffing, & support costs.

JETTAINER/LUFTHANSA/U.S. AIRWAYS: managing shipping to 3,000 flights to 400 airports every day.

CONTINENTAL AIRLINES: Manages crew communication systems, log on/log off, schedules, & shifts using Windows Server 2008 worldwide.

JET BLUE AIRWAYS: Managing 12 million flights & their data annually + ticketing, finance, & personnel too.

TIMEX: Using Windows + Exchange Server for remote personnel & executives (for their ENTIRE workforce)

7 ELEVEN STORES: Chose Windows Server 2003 over Linux with a 20% TCO (total cost of ownership savings not only ESTIMATED, but actually REALIZED!), managing 1,000's of in-store servers via AD worldwide.

STATE OF ILLINOIS GOVERNMENT: Chose Windows Server 2003 over Linux to manage its ENTIRE infrastructure, state-wide, in 1,000's of offices remotely, back to central.

SWITZERLAND'S DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS: Managing 666 servers in 156 nations internationally.

REGAL ENTERTAINMENT GROUP: Used to run its POS concession & tickets systems @ 1,000's of theaters worldwide on Linux - Switching to Windows Server 2003 + Windows "Embedded" lowered their total cost of ownership (TCO), substantially as well as giving them better uptime.

CARNIVAL CRUISE LINES: Manages 1,000 shipboard & land based servers using Windows Server 2003 & Server Center.

QUALCOMM INCORPORATED: A wireless technology leader using Windows Server 2003 for managing 6,000 employees via an Active Directory Network in a Secured Network & Communications Infrastructure via Group Policies on AD, resulting in 33% less IT costs.

STARBUCKS: Managing 1,000's of store locations servers worldwide to HQ via Windows Server 2003 Active Directory.

RADIOSHACK: Upgrading from UNIX servers to Windows Server 2003 saved several millions in hardware, software, systems mgt., & support costs (chosen over LINUX in fact) - consolidated in-store servers by 50% from 10,200 to 5,100.

TOMMY HILFIGER: Using Windows Server 2003 they reduced their IT costs by 30%.

VIRGIN ENTERTAINMENT GROUP: Processes 400,000++ SKU's & 7.5 MILLION transactions per second analyzed in REAL TIME!

INFORMATION RESOURCES INC.: Manages over 123 terabytes of data providing consumer behaviour insights, advanced analytics, & decision analysis tools for consumer package goods, healthcare, retail, & financial sectors.

NcSOFT: Korean international gaming software company manages 400,000 users connecting to its game service SIMULTANEOUSLY using Windows Server 2003.

PING: Manages 400 end + servers & desktops for users via Windows Server 2003 Active Directory (& saved 40% less time vs. their old setup on Linux) from a single location.

TDC: Communications leader that is in 12 nations, using Windows Server 2003 to analyze data from 70 disparate (different) systems worldwide centralizing the data + analysis in SQLServer 2005.

GAMEWORKS: A high-tech gaming & restaurant chain, reduced helpdesk costs by 50% using Windows Server 2003 & AD Networks + Group Policies.

SHOP DIRECT: Shop Direct, operating under a number of brands including Littlewoods, Very, Woolworths, Marshall Ward, Kays and Great Universal, employs no less than 10,000 workers, 10% of whom work remotely. In addition, the Group also intends to migrate no less than 350 servers from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2008 R2. The combination of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 facilitates scenarios in which remote workers are no longer relying on Virtual Private Networks, but instead use the evolved DirectAccess technology. Another advantage of using Windows 7 Enterprise and ultimate is that the operating systems include BitLocker and BitLocker To Go encryption by default, which serves to protect the sensitive data of employees working remotely.

KBR/Kellogg Brown & Root: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.KBR.com [netcraft.com]

MICROSOFT THEMSELVES: The "shoe maker wears his own shoes" a sure mark of quality -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=microsoft.com [netcraft.com]

---

37++ MORE FORTUNE 100 COMPANIES RUNNING WINDOWS (OVER OTHER SOLUTIONS LIKE LINUX-UNIX etc./et al), from -> http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune500/2010/full_list/ [cnn.com]

---

TRAVELERS INSURANCE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.travelers.com [netcraft.com]

PHILIPP MORRIS: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.pmi.com [netcraft.com]

ENTERPRISE HOLDINGS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.enterpriseholdings.com [netcraft.com]

TYSON FOODS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.tyson.com [netcraft.com]

HESS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.hess.com [netcraft.com]

SUNOCO: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.sunocoinc.com [netcraft.com]

HONEYWELL: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=honeywell.com [netcraft.com]

HUMANA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.humana.com [netcraft.com]

GENERAL DYNAMICS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=generaldynamics.com [netcraft.com]

STATE FARM INSURANCE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.statefarm.com [netcraft.com]

COMCAST: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.comcast.com [netcraft.com]

DISNEY: Runs their domain on IIS -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=disney.go.com [netcraft.com]

SYSCO: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=sysco.com [netcraft.com]

KRAFT FOODS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.kraftfoodscompany.com [netcraft.com]

PEPSI: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.pepsico.com [netcraft.com]

INTERNATIONAL HOLDINGS CORP.: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=intlfcstone.com [netcraft.com]

DOW CHEMICAL: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.dow.com [netcraft.com]

MARATHON OIL: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.marathon.com [netcraft.com]

UNITED TECHNOLOGIES: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.utc.com [netcraft.com]

WELLPOINT: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.wellpoint.com [netcraft.com]

COSTCO: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.costco.com [netcraft.com]

BRISTOL MYERS SQUIBB: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.bms.com [netcraft.com]

AMERISOURCE-BERGEN: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.amerisourcebergen.com [netcraft.com]

KROGER: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.kroger.com [netcraft.com]

UNITED HEALTH GROUP: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.unitedhealthgroup.com [netcraft.com]

MCKESSON: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.mckesson.com [netcraft.com]

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.berkshirehathaway.com [netcraft.com]

CONOCO-PHILLIPS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.conocophillips.com [netcraft.com]

CHEVRON: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.chevron.com [netcraft.com]

EXXON-MOBIL: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.exxonmobil.com [netcraft.com]

PLAINS ALL-AMERICAN PIPELINE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=paalp.com [netcraft.com]

INTL FCStone Inc.: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=intlfcstone.com [netcraft.com]

WELLPOINT: Runs their domain on IIS7 -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.wellpoint.com [netcraft.com]

CHRYSLER: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.chryslergroupllc.com [netcraft.com]

CHINA NATIONAL PETROLEUM: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.cnpc.com.cn [netcraft.com]

ENEL: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.enel.com [netcraft.com]

DOW JONES: Runs their domain on IIS (oddest mix I ever saw) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.dowjones.com [netcraft.com]

---

(2006 BEST COMPANIES TO WORK FOR/TOP 100 FORTUNE 100-500 COMPANIES TO WORK FOR -> http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/bestcompanies/full_list/ [cnn.com]

64++ 2011 BEST COMPANIES TO WORK FOR/TOP 100 FORTUNE 100-500 COMPANIES TO WORK FOR -> http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/bestcompanies/2011/full_list/ [cnn.com] )

"TOP 30 MEMBERS USING WINDOWS FROM BOTH 2006 & 2011 TOP 100 COMPANIES TO WORK FOR:"

---

VALERO: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=valero.com [netcraft.com]

GRIFFIN HOSPITAL: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=griffinhealth.org [netcraft.com]

VISION SERVICE PLAN/VSP: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=vsp.com [netcraft.com]

J.L. SMUCKER: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=smucker.com [netcraft.com]

S.C. JOHNSON: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=scjohnson.com [netcraft.com]

BOSTON CONSULTING GROUP: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=bcg.com [netcraft.com]

PLANTE & MORAN: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=plantemoran.com [netcraft.com]

HOMEBANC MORTGAGE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=homebanc.com [netcraft.com]

REPUBLIC BANCORP: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=republicbancorp.com [netcraft.com]

BAPTIST HEALTHCARE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=ebaptisthealthcare.org [netcraft.com]

ALSTON & BIRD: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=alston.com [netcraft.com]

KIMLEY-HORN & ASSOCIATES: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=kimley-horn.com [netcraft.com]

---

(OVER 1/2 of the TOP 30 (12 of 20 of the 2006 &/or 2011 pack) are using Windows & QUALCOMM #23 + STARBUCKS #29 exist already above using Windows in capacities besides running their websites!)

---

QUIKTRIP: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=quiktrip.com [netcraft.com]

DAVID WEEKELY HOMES: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=davidweekleyhomes.com [netcraft.com]

ROBERT W. BAIRD: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=rwbaird.com [netcraft.com]

ALCON LABS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=alconlabs.com [netcraft.com]

AMERICAN FIDELITY INSURANCE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=afadvantage.com [netcraft.com]

TDINDUSTRIES: Runs their domain on IIS -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=tdindustries.com [netcraft.com]

MARRIOTT: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=marriot.com [netcraft.com]

CAMDEN PROPERTY TRUST: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=camdenliving.com [netcraft.com]

SCOTTRADE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=scottrade.com [netcraft.com]

JM FAMILY ENTERPRISES: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=jmfamily.com [netcraft.com]

STEW LEONARDS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=stewleonards.com [netcraft.com]

METHODIST HEALTH: Runs their domain on IIS -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=methodisthealth.com [netcraft.com]

DPR CONSTRUCTION: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=dpr.com [netcraft.com]

UMPQUA BANK: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=umpquabank.com [netcraft.com]

BINGHAM LOANS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=bingham.com [netcraft.com]

NUSTAR ENERGY: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=nustarenergy.com [netcraft.com]

PAST TOP 30, into the 30-100 range now (of the "top 100 fortune 100 companies to work for" from CNN Money)

CHESAPEAKE ENERGY: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=chk.com [netcraft.com]

SOUTHERN OHIO MEDICAL CENTER: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.somc.org [netcraft.com]

PCL CONSTRUCTION: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.pcl.com [netcraft.com]

AMERICAN FIDELITY ASSURANCE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.afadvantage.com [netcraft.com]

BALFOUR BEATTY CONSTRUCTION: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.balfourbeattyus.com [netcraft.com]

DEVON ENERGY: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.devonenergy.com [netcraft.com]

BAPTIST HEALTH S. FLORIDA: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.baptisthealth.net [netcraft.com]

SHARED TECHNOLOGIES: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.sharedtechnologies.com [netcraft.com]

JOHNSON FINANCIAL GROUP: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.johnsonbank.com [netcraft.com]

NOVO NORDISK: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.novonordisk-us.com [netcraft.com]

BAKER DONELSON: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.bakerdonelson.com [netcraft.com]

PERKINS COLE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.perkinscoie.com [netcraft.com]

MILLENIUM/TAKEDA ONCOLOGY CO.: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.millennium.com [netcraft.com]

AFLAC: Runs their domain on IIS -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.aflac.com [netcraft.com]

CHILDREN'S HEALTHCARE OF ATLANTA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.choa.org [netcraft.com]

OHIOHEALTH: Runs their domain on IIS -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ohiohealth.com [netcraft.com]

EOG Resources: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.eogresources.com [netcraft.com]

PUBLIX GROCERY: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.publix.com [netcraft.com]

ARKANSAS CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.archildrens.org [netcraft.com]

GILBANE: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.gilbaneco.com [netcraft.com]

ERNST & YOUNG: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ey.com [netcraft.com]

SRCTech: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.srcinc.com [netcraft.com]

CARMAX: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.carmax.com [netcraft.com]

KIMPTON HOTELS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.kimptonhotels.com [netcraft.com]

BRIGHT HORIZONS: Runs their domain on Windows/IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.brighthorizons.com [netcraft.com]

KPMG: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.us.kpmg.com [netcraft.com]

MERIDIAN HEALTH: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.meridianhealth.com [netcraft.com]

CH2M HILL: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ch2mhill.com [netcraft.com]

EVERETT CLINIC: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.everettclinic.com [netcraft.com]

MORNINGSTAR: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=corporate.morningstar.com [netcraft.com]

DARDEN RESTAURANTS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.darden.com [netcraft.com]

CERN: Runs their website on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.cern.ch [netcraft.com]

GOULDS PUMPS: (former Fortune 500 I worked for) Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.gouldspumps.com [netcraft.com]

AXA FINANCIAL: (former company I worked for) Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.axa.com [netcraft.com]

---

20++ UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT - STATES USING WINDOWS:

---

STATE OF CALIFORNIA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ca.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.pa.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF TEXAS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.texas.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF CONNECTICUT: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ct.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF ALASKA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.alaska.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF FLORIDA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.florida.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF ILLINOIS: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.illinois.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF KENTUCKY: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.kentucky.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF MARYLAND: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.maryland.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF MONTANA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.montana.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF NEVADA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.nevada.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF NEW MEXICO: Runs their domain on Windows/IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.newmexico.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ncgov.com [netcraft.com]

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=sc.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF OHIO: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ohio.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=sd.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF WASHINGTON: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=washington.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.wv.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF WISCONSIN: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.wisconsin.gov [netcraft.com]

STATE OF WYOMING: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.wyoming.gov [netcraft.com]

---

90++ TOP RANKED UNIVERSITIES USING Windows (from -> http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/national-universities/ [rankingsandreviews.com] )

---

Baylor University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.baylor.edu [netcraft.com]

Texas Tech University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ttu.edu [netcraft.com]

Temple University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.temple.edu [netcraft.com]

Drexel University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=drexel.edu [netcraft.com]

Pace University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.pace.edu [netcraft.com]

Southern Methodist University (SMU): Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.smu.edu [netcraft.com]

Colorado State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.colostate.edu [netcraft.com]

Washington University in St. Louis: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.wustl.edu [netcraft.com]

Hofstra University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.hofstra.edu [netcraft.com]

DePaul University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.depaul.edu [netcraft.com]

Texas A&M University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.tamuk.edu [netcraft.com]

Clarkson University: -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.clarkson.edu [netcraft.com]

Fordham University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.fordham.edu [netcraft.com]

Texas Christian University (TCU): Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.tcu.edu [netcraft.com]

Florida A&M University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.famu.edu [netcraft.com]

St.John Fisher University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.sjfc.edu [netcraft.com]

St.John's University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.stjohns.edu [netcraft.com]

Kent State University of Ohio: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.kent.edu [netcraft.com]

Ball State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=cms.bsu.edu [netcraft.com]

Jackson State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.jsums.edu [netcraft.com]

North Dakota State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ndus.edu [netcraft.com]

South Carolina State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=scsu.edu [netcraft.com]

Northern Illinois University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.niu.edu [netcraft.com]

South Dakota State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=sdstate.edu [netcraft.com]

Michigan University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.cmich.edu [netcraft.com]

Indiana State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.indstate.edu [netcraft.com]

Indiana University of Pennsylvania: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.iup.edu [netcraft.com]

Texas Southern University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.tsu.edu [netcraft.com]

Northern Arizona University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=nau.edu [netcraft.com]

Tennessee State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.tnstate.edu [netcraft.com]

East Tennessee State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.etsu.edu [netcraft.com]

Oakland University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.oakland.edu [netcraft.com]

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.esf.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Southern California (USC): Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.usc.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Pittsburg (Pitt): Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=pitt.edu [netcraft.com]

University of California (UCLA): Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ucsc.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Massachusetts (UMASS): Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=uml.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Texas @ El Paso: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.utep.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Texas @ San Antonio: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.utsa.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Tulsa: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.utulsa.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Ohio: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ohio.edu [netcraft.com]

University of North Carolina @ Charlotte: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.uncc.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Colorado @ Denver: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ucdenver.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Wyoming: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.uwyo.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Cincinnati: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.uc.edu [netcraft.com]

University of South Florida: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.usf.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Nevada @ Reno: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.unr.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Idaho: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.uidaho.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Missouri - Kansas City: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.umkc.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Montana: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.umt.edu [netcraft.com]

University of New Orleans: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.uno.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Northern Colorado: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.unco.edu [netcraft.com]

University of Toledo: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.utoledo.edu [netcraft.com]

University of the Pacific: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.pacific.edu [netcraft.com]

University of St. Thomas: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.stthomas.edu [netcraft.com]

University of San Francisco: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.usfca.edu [netcraft.com]

Colorado Tech University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.coloradotech.edu [netcraft.com]

Wichita State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.wichita.edu [netcraft.com]

Wilmington University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=wilmu.edu [netcraft.com]

Widener University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.widener.edu [netcraft.com]

Catholic University of America: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.cua.edu [netcraft.com]

Clark University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.clarku.edu [netcraft.com]

Lynn University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.lynn.edu [netcraft.com]

Morgan State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.morgan.edu [netcraft.com]

Spalding University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=spalding.edu [netcraft.com]

Biola University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.biola.edu [netcraft.com]

Edgewood College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=edgewood.edu [netcraft.com]

Immaculata University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.immaculata.edu [netcraft.com]

American University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.american.edu [netcraft.com]

Pepperdine University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.pepperdine.edu [netcraft.com]

Barry University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.barry.edu [netcraft.com]

Benedictine University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ben.edu [netcraft.com]

Cardinal Stritch University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.stritch.edu [netcraft.com]

Bowie State University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.bowiestate.edu [netcraft.com]

Texas Women's University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=twu.edu [netcraft.com]

Our Lady of the Lake University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ollusa.edu [netcraft.com]

Clark Atlanta University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.cau.edu [netcraft.com]

Trinity International University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.tiu.edu [netcraft.com]

Trevecca University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.trevecca.edu [netcraft.com]

Alliant International University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.alliant.edu [netcraft.com]

California Institute of Integral Studies: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ciis.edu [netcraft.com]

Capella University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.capella.edu [netcraft.com]

National-Louis University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.nl.edu [netcraft.com]

North Central University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ncu.edu [netcraft.com]

Trident University International: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.trident.edu [netcraft.com]

Union Institute and University:http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=afadvantage.com

b/bb> Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.myunion.edu [netcraft.com]

Walden University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.waldenu.edu [netcraft.com]

New School NYU: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.newschool.edu [netcraft.com]

Yeshiva University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.yu.edu [netcraft.com]

(90 of the 200 "top 50" run Windows for their domain)

---

TOP 50/200++ RANKED NORTHERN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES USING Windows (from -> http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/regional-colleges-north [rankingsandreviews.com] )

---

LeMoyne College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.lemoyne.edu [netcraft.com]

Loyola University Maryland: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.loyola.edu [netcraft.com]

Providence College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.providence.edu [netcraft.com]

Alfred University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=alfred.edu [netcraft.com]

Canisius College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.canisius.edu [netcraft.com]

Bentley University: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.bentley.edu [netcraft.com]

Scranton University: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.scranton.edu [netcraft.com]

Quinnipiac University: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.quinnipiac.edu [netcraft.com]

Emerson College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.emerson.edu [netcraft.com]

Mount St. Mary's University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.msmary.edu [netcraft.com]

Hood College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.hood.edu [netcraft.com]

Nazareth College: Runs their domain on IIS (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.naz.edu [netcraft.com]

Iona College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.iona.edu [netcraft.com]

SUNY - New Paltz: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.newpaltz.edu [netcraft.com]

Notre Dame of Maryland University: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.ndm.edu [netcraft.com]

St. Bonaventure University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.sbu.edu [netcraft.com]

Arcadia University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.arcadia.edu [netcraft.com]

Assumption College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.assumption.edu [netcraft.com]

Salve Regina University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.salve.edu [netcraft.com]

College of St. Rose: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.strose.edu [netcraft.com]

Kings College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.kings.edu [netcraft.com]

Monmouth College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.monmouth.edu [netcraft.com]

Sacred Heart University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.sacredheart.edu [netcraft.com]

Salisbury University: Runs their domain on IIS -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.salisbury.edu [netcraft.com]

SUNY College - Oneonta: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.oneonta.edu [netcraft.com]

Manhattanville College: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.mville.edu [netcraft.com]

Roger Williams University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.rwu.edu [netcraft.com]

Saint Francis University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.francis.edu [netcraft.com]

Mercyhurst College: Runs their domain on Windows (mix) -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.mercyhurst.edu [netcraft.com]

Towson University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=towson.edu [netcraft.com]

Gannon University: Runs their domain on Windows -> http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=

U dared post facts/truths @ /.? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606961)

U get "insta-downmodded" due to facts penguins cannot handle!

Time 2 have a "FIELD DAY" on U (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606927)

"You mean the already irrelevant niche for the home user - in which the mobile devices outnumbers the PC-es?" by c0lo (1497653) on Saturday April 07, @11:52AM (#39606849)

Ahem: Millions of PC's & Servers running Windows vs. other OS != irrelevant.

(Far from it, do the math. I wager you just posted your reply from a PC in fact vs. a smartphone).

Oh, & on Windows Server usage from the Fortune 100/500, top-notch educational institutions & more?

This was also some "FYI" for you too:

http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=2772023&cid=39606887 [slashdot.org]

"EAT MY DUST!"

---

"Also, I think you shouldn't shout that loud about the failure of Linux on the server, you may cause a market crash if some of the following decide to enter voluntary administration when they hear you qualifying as failures the followings: Google internal infrastructure, NASA and the other major users of OpenStack, IBM and other modern supercomputer builders, VMWare baremetal virtualization products, NYSE and London Stock Exchange..." by c0lo (1497653) on Saturday April 07, @11:52AM (#39606849)

Yea, "fine showing" @ LSE with Linux, lol:

---

London Stock Exchange serving malware:

http://slashdot.org/submission/1484548/London-Stock-Exchange-Web-Site-Serving-Malware [slashdot.org]

I mean hey - NOT ONLY DID LINUX FALL FLAT ON ITS FACE less than a few minutes into the job:

http://linux.slashdot.org/story/11/02/19/0147232/London-Stock-Exchange-Price-Errors-Emerged-At-Linux-Launch [slashdot.org]

& it crashed!

(Not only ONCE, but TWICE there? You see "Linux 'fine security'" in motion @ the LSE too!)

---

ESPECIALLY ONLY MINUTES INTO THE JOB @ LSE (lol, where it "fell flat on its 'penguin beak'" only minutes into the job!) above!

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (1, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606385)

It's as much Linux as an Xbox is a Windows platform.

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606461)

It's as much Linux as an Xbox is a Windows platform.

You can develop software on Windows that will run on both Windows and Xbox 360 with little more than a recompilation if you develop with that intent. That makes Xbox a Windows platform.

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606471)

Android is a Linux system like Ubuntu is a Linux system. Even the smallest and cheapest Android devices run a full-fledged Linux kernel that could just as well be used as a basis for a desktop system. The XBox(360) does not use a Windows kernel, not even one of the embedded "Windows" kernels. The API is similar to the Windows API, but not the same either.

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606965)

It's as much Linux as an Xbox is a Windows platform.

Just for the challenge... one of this days I'm going to write a simple application (I don't know, maybe involving some fork/exec and file I/O to hit some syscalls as old as UNIX), cross-compile it on my lubuntu for the ARM in my recently bought tablet, put it on a SD-card and attempt to execute it on the tablet...

Good chances it will work. If it will, would it be proof enough for you that Android is a Linux?

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (1)

AmazingRuss (555076) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606855)

But you prove his point...

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606929)

But you prove his point...

I admit, I'm dumb, I fail to get it... exactly what his point would be?

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (3, Funny)

axlr8or (889713) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606273)

Now wait though, this guy has provided a perfectly good point. As you can see, there are some instances where a computer is a complete waste on some individuals.

Answer a question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606329)

QUESTION: IF Linux is "so great", why's it last place in marketshare/user mindshare on PC's & Servers combined from the home end user level right up into corporate production environs?

Re:"Seize the youth/seize the future" FAIL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606319)

LOL, an insta-moddown 4 telling the truth around here always happens.

ANDROID Mini Laptop Notebook (0)

dgharmon (2564621) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606863)

"ANDROID RED 7" Mini Laptop Notebook Netbook PC WiFi TONS of Apps Games Android 2.2 Market Flash Player Built-in Camera 4gb HD 256mb Ram 1-2HR Battery Life by WOLVOL" link [amazon.com]

Re:Ha, here's problem. (2)

errandum (2014454) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606201)

I don't know if you're serious or not, but in Portugal that was considered one of the main failures (Linux). Most teachers had no idea on how to use their heavily modified linux distro ( custom flavor of http://www.caixamagica.pt/ [caixamagica.pt] ) so they simply ignored the computers, that in turn became more of a plaything than a teaching tool.

It's not enough to get Linux to computers, laymen need to be educated or an intuitive shell needs to be developed (like OS X did with unix).

Re:Ha, here's problem. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606691)

Actually, that's a one-sided opinion about the IT situation in Portugal's schools. If you were able to just step back and look at things subjectively you'd be able to understand every issue has opposing viewpoints and you can always find opinions similar to your own. Here in America there's a number of people who want to return our society back to one that is segregated and discriminatory. Whether you support that or not, it's not hard to find some article that you can tout as, "...see, this is what's going on..." There was recently an posting about the success of Munich's migration to from Windows to Linux -- but I'm sure someone like you can pull up a blog entry somewhere detailing how badly the move is going.

Re:Ha, here's problem. (1)

Fallingwater (1465567) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606769)

Honestly, I don't really think that merely teachers ignoring the computers is going to be much of a problem. A lot of teachers don't care about new teaching methods, and many aren't keen on learning new skills to use new tools.
But as long as the computers aren't just tossed in the trash and the children receive them, they'll still help. How better to encourage children's curiosity than to give them a computer to play with and no adults telling them how they should or shouldn't use it?

I still maintain, however, that the main screwup of the OLPC project is their refusal to sell the computers worldwide. They could then use that profit to finance the original plan, probably a lot faster/better than is being done now.

Re:Ha, here's problem. (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606209)

There are good reasons for choosing GPL or BSD licensed software for OLPC, if you take the time to think about the point of the project. The ultimate goal of OLPC is to help developing nations bootstrap their computing infrastructure, so that they will not be dependent on others for their computing needs. It is pretty hard to make a case for proprietary software furthering that goal -- even if we ignore licensing, how are these countries supposed to break away from their dependence on the west if they never have access to source code, and if their OS is designed to prevent them from hacking?

Just GNU/Linux? No, *BSD, ReactOS, Minix, etc. could have been used, but would you complain less if they pushed Sugar on FreeBSD?

OS doesn't matter in failure (5, Insightful)

xzvf (924443) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606221)

First, the project couldn't have even been done financially using any other OS/hardware combination. Second, the real reason technology doesn't improve education is we are treating it like magic and not as a productivity enhancement tool. The first computers used by government and business replaced rooms full of people by calculating stuff faster and with fewer errors. Even today, a smart phone replaces the need to have a map, newspaper and phone booth in a strange city when you want to see a movie (recent experience). In education, you don't have the incentive, or the viewpoint, to use technology to make the teacher more efficient at educating, and/or the student better at learning. For example, in the United States, teachers and other workers in education, but not educating, spend a significant amount of time on non-educational activities. Putting effort into automating and reducing the impact of those activities on the learning day, is a good use of technology. A bad use of technology, is replacing an existing working tool with a complex device that does the same thing, but adds overhead and requires more effort.

Computers and education (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606285)

Part of the problem with the standard approach to computers in education is that they are treated as tools for helping students learn how to use pre-computer techniques for solving problems. There is a tendency to treat computers like a combination flash-card/homework-grading system. We give students prepackaged education "solutions" that are supposed to reinforce traditional book learning, and lock down their computers so that they can only use the software they were given.

We should instead focus on teaching children how to solve problems by writing programs. We should have a completely different approach to computers in education, because computers are different sorts of tools than what we had previously. Let students hack, and moreover create an environment that is friendly toward programming. We live in a computerized world; programming should be considered a matter of basic literacy at this point.

Re:Ha, here's problem. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606457)

Would that "circle" be the Commercial-Global-Domination Collective?

Re:Ha, here's problem. (1)

AmazingRuss (555076) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606845)

Which, given the current unpolished state of linux desktop apps, might just put the kids off computers altogether.

OVdGGPC (5, Insightful)

paleo2002 (1079697) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606097)

One Van de Graaff Generator per Child

What if we made sure that every classroom in the world was supplied with a solar-powered, fully recyclable, free-trade produced Van De Graaff generator? We've seen how such devices can spark the interest of physics students in western classrooms over the years. Surely it will have the same effect in classrooms throughout the world! Just present one to the teacher and . . . science!

The Grand Delusion and How To Beat It! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606117)

"Everything we see has some hidden message. A lot of awful messages are coming in under the radar - subliminal consumer messages, all kinds of politically incorrect messages..."
- Harold Ramis

=

âoeRFID in School Shirts must be trial runâ

The trial runs began a LONG time ago!

Weâ(TM)re way past that process.

Now weâ(TM)re in the portion of the game where they will try and BRAINWASH us into accepting these things because not everyone BROADCASTS themselves on and offline, so RFID tracking will NEED to be EVERYWHERE, eventually.

RFID is employed in MANY areas of society. RFID is used to TRACK their livestock (humans) in:

* 1. A lot of BANKâ(TM)s ATM & DEBIT cards (easily cloned and tracked)
* 2. Subway, rail, bus, other mass transit passes (all of your daily
activities, where you go, are being recorded in many ways)
* 3. A lot of RETAIL storesâ(TM) goods
* 4. Corporate slaves (in badges, tags, etc)

and many more ways!

Search the web about RFID and look at the pictures of various RFID devices, theyâ(TM)re not all the same in form or function! When you see how tiny some of them are, youâ(TM)ll be amazed! Search for GPS tracking and devices, too along with the more obscured:

- FM Fingerprinting &
- Writeprint

tracking methods! Letâ(TM)s not forget the LIQUIDS at their disposal which can be sprayed on you and/or your devices/clothing and TRACKED, similar to STASI methods of tracking their livestock (humans).

Visit David Ickeâ(TM)s and Prison Planetâ(TM)s discussion forums and VCâ(TM)s discussion forums and READ the threads about RFID and electronic tagging, PARTICIPATE in discussions. SHARE what you know with others!

These TRACKING technologies, on and off the net are being THROWN at us by the MEDIA, just as cigarettes and alcohol have and continue to be, though the former less than they used to. The effort to get you to join FACEBOOK and TWITTER, for example, is EVERYWHERE.

Maybe, you think, youâ(TM)ll join FACEBOOK or TWITTER with an innocent reason, in part perhaps because your family, friends, business parters, college ties want or need you. Then itâ(TM)ll start with one photo of yourself or you in a group, then another, then another, and pretty soon you are telling STRANGERS as far away as NIGERIA with scammers reading and archiving your PERSONAL LIFE and many of these CRIMINALS have the MEANS and MOTIVES to use it how they please.

One family was astonished to discover a photo of theirs was being used in an ADVERTISEMENT (on one of those BILLBOARDS you pass by on the road) in ANOTHER COUNTRY! There are other stories. Iâ(TM)ve witnessed people posting their photo in social networking sites, only to have others who dis/like them COPY the photo and use it for THEIR photo! Itâ(TM)s a complete mess.

The whole GAME stretches much farther than the simple RFID device(s), but how far are you willing to READ about these types of instrusive technologies? If youâ(TM)ve heard, Wikileaks exposed corporations selling SPYWARE in software and hardware form to GOVERNMENTS!

You have to wonder, âoeWill my anti-malware program actually DISCOVER government controlled malware? Or has it been WHITELISTED? or obscured to the point where it cannot be detected? Does it carve a nest for itself in your hardware devicesâ(TM) FIRMWARE, what about your BIOS?

Has your graphics card been poisoned, too?â No anti virus programs scan your FIRMWARE on your devices, especially not your ROUTERS which often contain commercially rubber stamped approval of BACKDOORS for certain organizations which hackers may be exploiting right now! Search on the web for CISCO routers and BACKDOORS. That is one of many examples.

Some struggle for privacy, some argue about it, some take preventitive measures, but those who are wise know:

Privacy is DEAD. Youâ(TM)ve just never seen the tombstone.

#

The Final Battle Is For Your Mind And Soul!
:
Google: The Mind Has No Firewall, it's written by the military and is a must read!
:
Until they have plugged us all into the internet with our minds and keyboards/mice are tossed behind us, ways to ID us in every aspect of our lives will continue, because the machine of blackops is never satisfied, never full. It won't be until we're all hardwired into the global manufactured, false reality, second life like abomination of Internet 6.0!

Smartphones = lie with a sweet name
patriot act = lies with a sweet name

Just as I'd imagine they'd call some type of legislation against Christianity, the "True Cross act of 2029!" it's all a big game of lies, folks! Lies!

Your soul is what they're after! Rebuke all entities trying to communicate with you in the name of Christ Jesus, Yahweh, Holy Spirit, watch them run, watch them flee! They are scared of the mighty One True God. Do not be fooled by darkness, it has no real power.

But there are those who will accept what these evil entities have to offer, delusion and a false belief they've gained hidden knowledge. Remember, "nothing is new under the sun".

Everything hidden will be exposed when God returns, and the evil creatures fear Him, and rightly so! The humans who have been lulled by these evil entities are afraid, too, they do their best to bash precious Christ, but they will be defeated in the end, unless they choose God. They will be thrown in the same lake the invisible serpents and scorpions will be thrown into.

The "don't tread on me" flag is illuminati garbage, the same snake image is on Metallica's black album cover. The Bible gives Christians the power to TREAD ON SERPENTS AND SCORPIONS and OVER ALL POWER OF THE ENEMY. These are mentions of real, spiritual enemies! They should be tread upon at all times! They are weak but God is strong!

They're running ANCIENT ALIENS on THC and aliens everywhere, occult symbolism in everything you could imagine, popular music, movies, television shows, comics, entertainment magazines, you only need to know what to look for, this whole world is polluted by the occult, they want you to kneel on the commands of evil, do not fall for the trick, do not fall for the false illumination, come to Christ and CLAIM the power over ALL EVIL!

Never forget: The beast system longs to trick and absorb us all, for any true Christian is a threat to the beast system and its lies.

When you gain confidence in your faith, they will send messengers in human likeness or humans taken over to try and pollute your belief, to try and sway you from your faith. If you follow a paganized form of Christianity or give up your belief, the attacks will not be as pronounced, or they may stop altogether, for you will have "fallen away" and aren't a spiritual threat.

WE are ETERNAL beings, the powers of darkness despise this and want to rob us of our heavenly place in our heavenly home.

Avoid ghost-hunter shows, anyone searching for ET or other such garbage, they are all manifestations of the same evil. Trust God and His Word. People posting against this truth are likely a part of the delusion.

The cover of The Dark Side of The Moon album is illuminati proof, summed up in one photo, of a (spiritual) transformation which is a lie. Don't be fooled by creatures appearing as light or bathed in light or blinding you in light. Reject them all through Christ and they will flee like the cowardly vermin they are.

maximizing sales (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606119)

Nothing to do with Linux or teaching children something. It was for maximizing sales of allied hardware-vendors to potential new customers. It used comparable sales-methods as bird-flu medicine, but little less scare-techniques.

Sound like related to the SW crisis (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606121)

We always find out how to do the lower layers properly first, with the higher layers lagging behind, the higher the layer the worse its state. We have marvelous manufacturing technologies, slightly less but still sufficiently marvelous CPU architectures, fairly good graphics libraries and toolkits, fairly screwed applications and overall totally incompetent users and processes based on these applications. We can only hope that the situation will improve. Unfortunately, there is human factor involved and that's a spell of doom almost for certain.

Re:Sound like related to the SW crisis (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606311)

We've been teaching a lot longer than we've been making computers and software.

And we're not getting better at it.

"THEM" and Bubblegum! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606129)

"I mean the people when you look at them or talk to them it's like there clueless and their mind is off in outer space.And even a simple conversation seems like something their not capable of,whats up with them."

I swear there is another, even larger thread about this same issue. Maybe more people are just waking up to this. When you're in a place where people are waiting or in transit in large groups, a Subway, a Bus station, etc. in checkout lines in stores, at amusement parks in long lines, etc.

(I am not promoting or suggesting you or anyone watch one or any of the following films. I haven't since I've awoken and I intend to avoid them from now on):

Films that have always bothered me when considering what you've said, in the real world:

* They Live: but what if he was going *too* far and these *aliens* were just possessing the people and he saw the evil which was front and center while the human was "asleep" (Matrix possible connection) in the background of the mind?

* Truman Show: if not "one" individual, what of "millions" all duped by another race?

* Dark City: what if not only the "dead" were/are being used as vessels, but living ones
as well? (remember "Dax" from ST:DS9? and her "parasite" like being inside her?)
Something interesting if you should ever watch Dark City, potential spoiler,
one guy who "woke up" was concerned about "them" getting to him, so he found
a way out, and he jumped in front of a train to his death..
if you go frame by frame around the time or after he jumps in front of the train,
or press pause exactly at the right moment (it's difficult to spot if you use
pause) there is a poster on the wall, where one normally wouldn't be in real
life, and it mentions HELL, I forget what it says exactly, but HELL is mentioned
on the poster. It's been a long time since I've sat down with Dark City, and
honestly I won't again, it's too jarring to the mind once you've explored all of
this Illuminati crap.

* Matrix: In my opinion the movie is a lie, IMOthe red pill symbolises the opposite, being
pushed into a frame of mind or (sub)reality in which you are a puppet and controlled.
vs. "awakening" to truth, instead you are "deceived" through lies. Symbolism of
the creature taken from Neo could be related to a soul or more likely a protective
(holy) spirit, extracted by Satanists. The whole "Matrix" world, when viewed in
reverse (no, I don't mean watching it from ending to beginning) and perverted *for*
Satanist world-view/goals is eye opening, the same with Dark City. This movie only
bothers me, not for the fake/real awakening/reality concepts but in that I feel
the whole movie, IMO is a lie and the real meaning is perverted, kind of like..

* Fight Club: On many levels this movie bothers me, but I see the dark female character in the
movie as an evil angel which is involved in the split of the two identities of
the one leading role. In the same way I perceive her role in the film I see the
same, or feel the same vibe for the role of the female evil creature in the movie..

* The Ninth Gate: both the "odd" female role in this and in Fight Club shout out to me in
that they are both playing a similar or the same role. Please don't watch
this movie, I'm sorry I ever did.

#
This one, not so much as the method of alien attack as for how it sometimes "feels" for the person played by NK, in public once they've awoken to the aliens around them and how they act, or rather what actions the aliens DON'T display:

* The Invasion (I) (2007) | Nicole Kidman in lead role
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0427392/ [imdb.com]

Tucker: When you wake up, you'll feel exactly the same. (possible tie-in to the movie, "Dark City")

"As a Washington psychiatrist unearths the origin of an alien epidemic, she also discovers her son might be the only way it can be stopped."

Yorish: I say that civilization is an illusion, a game of pretend. What is real is the fact that we are still animals, driven by primal instincts. As a psychiatrist, you must know this to be true.
Carol: To be honest, ambassador, when someone starts talking to me about the truth, what I hear is what they're telling me about themselves more than what they're saying about the world.
#

* The Arrival (1996) | Charlie Sheen in lead role
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0115571/ [imdb.com]

"Zane, an astronomer discovers intelligent alien life. But the aliens are keeping a deadly secret, and will do anything to stop Zane from learning it."

Zane Ziminski: I come to you with what may be the preeminent discovery of the 20th century, the possibility of extra-solar life, and I get shit-canned for it?

[right before he kills an alien]
Zane Ziminski: Do you want to see the ruins, my friend?
#

* Starman (1984) | Jeff Bridges in lead role
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088172/ [imdb.com]

"An alien takes the form of a young widow's husband and asks her to drive him from Wisconsin to Arizona. The government tries to stop them."
#

* The Last Starfighter (1984) | Lance Guest in lead role

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087597/ [imdb.com]

A video-gaming boy, seemingly doomed to stay at his trailer park home all his life, finds himself recruited as a gunner for an alien defense force.

#

Starman
and
The Last Starfighter,
when compared together,
is interesting.

In Starman, the "alien takes the form of a young widow's husband"

In The Last Starfighter, the character Alex Rogan goes into space to do battle while a clone,
Beta Alex, is left behind. Notice the lizard reference:

Alex Rogan: Teriffic. I'm about to get killed a million miles from nowhere with a gung-ho iguana who tells me to relax.

(it's all just a clever "mistake"):

Centauri: The amusing thing about this, it's all a big mistake. That particular Starfighter game was supposed to be delivered to Vegas, not some fleaspeck trailer park in the middle of tumbleweeds and tarantulas. So it must be fate, destiny, blind chance, luck even, that brings us together. And as the poet said, the rest is history.

Alex's "twin" or "clone":

Beta: Wait a minute, what are you doing back?
Alex Rogan: Are you kidding? It's war up there!
Beta: Oh, save the whales, but not the universe, huh?

[Beta is about to sacrifice himself]
Beta: [grimly smiling] You owe me one, Alex.

Alex Rogan: Hey, you look like me!
Beta: Of course I do. I'm a beta unit.
Alex Rogan: What the hell is a beta unit?
Beta: A beta unit is a simuloid. An exact duplicate, only not as loud!

Did you read that? "An exact duplicate" - so one tie to the "Starman" movie.

(Ask yourself, have YOU ever had "something", notice I didn't say someone, as to suggest
a human being, ask YOU if you wanted to FIGHT in SPACE? Be honest, now, and you don't have
to tell us, just know inside that that "voice" was of evil) In many "space" themed and
science fiction stories there's often this "split" personality or "other" being involved
somewhere, usually with the leading role.

#

Hebrews 13:2
"Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares."

Are they ALL good angels? Are some bad?

Are some people possessed? Do some of these people have their true nature/soul either
extracted from them and the "walk in evil being" is in control or what?

Or are we simply more "self aware" and notice differences in people around us who
are not as self aware? Have we isolated ourselves too much playing games, using computers,
being nerds, etc. and simply notice people aren't as fully animated as television and movie
characters?

I believe there's more to it, and I believe it's spiritual. One crazy commercial had a ton of people riding a train with the "shh!" finger at their lips. I've seen a lot of ads with the "shh!" sign and trains and cars of different colors being used as "spiritual" symbols as vehicles in a spiritual way, colors having their own defining characteristic.

If you watch much television, you've probably noticed the increase in evil themed shows,
if people aren't simulated as killing other humans it's zombies, vampires, or showing
vampires and other "evil" creatures as "good", which is a Satanic lie.

#

One thing is for sure, whatever the truth is: I cannot wait for this "ride"
to end.

Independent learning (4, Interesting)

Nithron (661003) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606139)

This kid [youtube.com] seems to have gotten the right idea. Maybe even if the teachers aren't using them properly, giving naturally curious kids access to a whole world of information will help them out anyway.

Or maybe that guy was just a unique case, I don't know. That video made me feel all warm and fuzzy inside however.

(If you can't be bothered to watch the video, shame on you! But also, it's about a child in Peru who works cleaning people's shoes on the streets. He has an OLPC laptop, though, and he uses it to educate himself with wikipedia.)

Re:Independent learning (4, Interesting)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606213)

I feel this is really the type of thing OLPC is aiming for.

Probably more importantly though, I suspect OLPC was always going to disappoint - after all, it's goal wasn't an integrated software and hardware package that would do everything right (although they have put a decent amount of thought into the software) - the goal was to get the price of the laptops to a point where we could conceivably offer them to every child on the planet.

It's things like the Kahn Academy which are ultimately going to drive the very important software aspect of this - and in that respect OLPC is good since it will be able to define the minimum hardware standard we should aim for.

Teacher's perspective (5, Insightful)

coffeechica (948145) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606161)

The concept of needing laptops at all for good education is questionable, I think. I'm a teacher in a business college for 15-19-year-olds (Austrian education system has these sorts of schools), and we run some student groups with laptops, while others only use computers for IT classes.

There is a difference in how you need to teach the students, depending on their equipment. But there's no absolute need for laptops, or technology beyond a calculator. For business concepts or for accounting, it's actually better to run things via pen and paper because the students are less tempted to copy and paste, and because it slows down the pace so they have time to think about what they're doing. There is a time and place for internet research, use of spreadsheets for complex accounting or finance calculations, and for plenty of other areas. Get them computer literate, definitely, because a lot of our students end up working in offices and they need the knowledge to use the tools available. But there's no need to get them addicted/dependent on technology to a point where they can't perform simple calculations without Excel anymore, or use their brains without prompting from Google.

The OLPC project is worthy, that's for sure. But I can't say that the results surprise me, they mirror the experiences we're making in a completely different environment. You can run lessons without laptops, and depending on the subject, it's often the more effective way of teaching.

Re:Teacher's perspective (4, Insightful)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606245)

That's all well and good, but the OLPC project was always aimed at trying to short-circuit the endemic problems of many poorer nations. The point has never been "technology enables learning" the point has always been along the lines of "what would happen if we could make sure everyone had access to wikipedia?"

You're dealing with environments where it may not even be possible to maintain a regular structured classroom environment for all sorts of reasons. But if you can get the price of the technology to the right level, then we can in fact begin to think about good software-based solutions for things - remembering that in many cases the goal is less "gets a business masters" and more "can read and write proficiently".

Re:Teacher's perspective (5, Informative)

coffeechica (948145) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606315)

Giving them access to wikipedia won't solve anything, though. They need to know how to use the information they find, and for that they need to know basic technologies, models and methods to apply this. It's something we struggle with in our laptop-equipped classes - they're amazing at first glance, but once you actually look for comprehension, you discover that they copy-paste and don't question or even understand what they've found.

It all needs balance. Show them that the information is out there, and give them the means to get to that info. But right now, there are a lot of areas where you simply can't use laptops consistently because it takes more time to get things running than to sit students down and simply run them through the matter the old-fashioned way.

Also, I'll commit murder if I ever meet the designers of some of the educational software platforms out there. The software aspect is absolutely lacking at the moment when it comes to educational stuff. If the software doesn't exist, then good luck at getting it down to a reasonable price. I'm still stunned that Moodle currently gets promoted as the best solution.

Re:Teacher's perspective (3, Interesting)

tomhath (637240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606367)

The point has never been "technology enables learning" the point has always been along the lines of "what would happen if we could make sure everyone had access to wikipedia?"

What you say is true; someone assumed that giving each child their own computer would enable them to do something. But the assumption that the "something" would be educational doesn't appear to be correct. I saw it in the computer lab at my own kids' school; most of the effort by the students was listening to music or trying to find a way around the Net Nanny so they could view porn. They didn't know how to use it as an educational tool, and the teachers had no clue what to do with it.

The big problem now is that every child learns differently, has different interests, and (what many don't want to acknowledge) many students are just plain dumb. A good teacher can adjust to each student in real time, but how do you write software that will help all of them learn?

Re:Teacher's perspective (3, Interesting)

axlr8or (889713) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606369)

You've kind of missed the bigger picture here. And that is, the intention is FREEDOM. The guy that started this wanted to get an infrastructure out into the world that provided an avenue for truth in information. Before you SHOULD educate you need the truth. This would allow kids and adults alike in these countries access to a form of media not directly manipulated by their government. It was going to be done on the back of Linux not because of price but because no one wants a world addicted to one product (Windows). He had toyed with the idea of using windows at one point because (as the devil often does) they were going to offer a version of windows to him in an attempt to familiiarize all those little kiddies with their products. Yay. Despite good intentions the more worldly of us know that all that was going to happen was these governments would weaponize the systems. And lock them down with network restrictions in their DNS's and backbones only to continue pushing their selfish agendas. This is/was a clear indication that this particular country failed to use these devices in a proper manner. Yes, this is about education but its also about freedom.

Re:Teacher's perspective (1)

coffeechica (948145) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606423)

If you want laptops to be used in school, they need to be useful in the lessons. OLPC fails in that regard. It's something that is highly frustrating for teachers - they're expected/forced to use tools which aren't ideal for the job, and then get beaten up when the results aren't the optimum. If you want OLPC to promote freedom of information, then you can't push it into schools without also providing the educational tools to actually use them in class. Teachers need to meet their educational goals first, and they aren't usually free to set them individually. So if laptops don't help you get there, you'll ignore them.

Perhaps OLPC would have been more successful if it had been implemented independent of the educational system.

Re:Teacher's perspective (3, Insightful)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606523)

And right there, is why this project is failing. The kids of the world need education, and you (like the project's leaders) are more interested in subjecting them to political indoctrination.

Followed by a CSB (3, Insightful)

Crash Culligan (227354) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606371)

coffeechica: The concept of needing laptops at all for good education is questionable, I think.

The concept of needing anything/em> for a good education is questionable. The computer is a tool which is capable of good (through assisting the teaching of subjects), evil (distracting the students or supplanting the teacher), or pointlessness.

First, the tool has to be assessed, to see if it's suitable to assist in the teaching of a subject. The computer can be mighty flexible, and beside running Excel to actually do the accounting, it can present information, quiz students on topics being learned, and even make corrections based on incorrect answers. (And yes, I include properly done Powerpoint under the heading "present information." LibreOffice's Presentation tool qualifies too.)

Second, the tool may need to be tweaked to work for a specific purpose. The last two, quizzing and correcting, ride on the assumption that somewhere behind the scenes, someone in the school's employ is using a relatively simple scripting tool (LiveCode comes to mind) to create the lessons, and to further present on correct techniques when wrong answers are given.

Third, the tool has to be accepted and understood by the teacher. A tool unused is meaningless, but a tool misapplied can do more harm than good.

And fourth, the tool has to be accepted and used correctly by the students. Same principle as above: if they don't know how to get the information out of it, they won't larn nuffin'. A sweet UI and finely honed educational software stand no chance against a blithering idiot.

My mother taught learning disabled preschoolers. I watched with some horror as she sent one student after another back for "computer time" unattended, and they kind of puttered around with it. The worst was what I dub a "click-monster"—he might as well have been blindfolded and firing a machine-gun the way he was clicking. It was like recess, but nothing was being exercised except index finger and wrist.

With a little time, expense, and staff education, the computer can be a fantastic tool for teaching and learning. I can appreciate that without that time and expense, the tool isn't nearly as useful.

Re:Followed by a CSB (1)

coffeechica (948145) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606465)

With a little time, expense, and staff education, the computer can be a fantastic tool for teaching and learning. I can appreciate that without that time and expense, the tool isn't nearly as useful.

Unfortunately, a lot of educational managers/rule makers don't understand that point. Every few months or so, we get a missive to use computers more in class, and to try out this and that wonderful toy.Usually those toys turn out to be incredibly buggy and don't do much beyond frustrate students because they're dumbed down and limited. A lot of my colleagues never had any sort of IT education, so it doesn't exactly foster confidence.

Add to that the sad fact that educational software in general seems to be more about cute design and "encouraging" animations to hide their lack of usability, and it's no longer a mystery that teachers try not to rely on the stuff.

The problem is the education level of the teachers (4, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606167)

Almost ALL teachers from the richest of schools to the poorest of schools have a horrible education level in computer technology operation and use. I have met multiple PHD holding professors that cant operate a projector to save their life. Even ones that have been dumbed down with a control system that have an ON and OFF button that will do everything. IF the ON button did not work they freak out and never use it again.

WE need to start with all education degrees being REQUIRED to have several computer operation classes. Something a lot more than "how to type letters in word 101" and "internet for idiots 102" They whould be requlred to go through a couple of more advanced classes like "education systems troubleshooting and use 204"

Once you get the teachers comfortable with the technology, they will start using it. Did the OLPC people give the devices to the teachers a YEAR before the kids? Because the teachers should have been given them AND classes on their use in the classroom.

I will bet you the OLPC people simply dropped a shipment in the schools and said "we givith! use this wisely" and walked away.

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (2)

coffeechica (948145) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606249)

Amen on the comfort level of teachers with technology. But you also need to get them to a point where they know when to use computers and when to stay away from them, or you'll raise students who're incapable of solving problems without internet access.

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (1)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606289)

A lot of people say this, and I'm extremely skeptical of the sentiment, since it very much mirrors "you can't give students calculators!" and has many of the same fallacies, since anyone who has done basic algebra or calculus knows a calculator won't help you at all - and neither will me getting stuck on a sample problem for 16 hours, until I can ask for help from a teacher...who may not be interested or available or even particularly knowledgeable on how to solve it.

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (3, Insightful)

coffeechica (948145) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606345)

You need the balance, just like with calculators. Give them calculators. But also make sure they're able to estimate whether the result of their calculation/research/query is correct. If you train them solely by using a specific sort of tool, they become dependent on that. Show them a few alternatives to get to a result, then let them choose.

It may depend on student age, but the amount of times I run into teenage students who blindly trust their calculators and don't pause to think whether 4% of 200 really can be 500 is startling. I'm not a fan of deprieving them of the technology, but they need to realise that they'd better do a rough mental double-check as well.

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (1)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606259)

I don't know if giving them to the teachers a year in advance would help anything. With no impetus to use it, and no students who have it, they could just as easily ignore it completely. I'd wager more that we're dealing with the very serious issue of how you write good educational software - which has been at a horrific standstill for a very long time.

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (3, Informative)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606327)

WE need to start with all education degrees being REQUIRED to have several computer operation classes. Something a lot more than "how to type letters in word 101" and "internet for idiots 102" They whould be requlred to go through a couple of more advanced classes like "education systems troubleshooting and use 204"

Well, if this is what you're trying to accomplish, just print out this handy graphic [xkcd.com] and you're done.

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606499)

WE need to start with all education degrees being REQUIRED to have several computer operation classes. Something a lot more than "how to type letters in word 101" and "internet for idiots 102" They whould be requlred to go through a couple of more advanced classes like "education systems troubleshooting and use 204"

I think that part of getting a degree in instruction ought to involve an A+ cert class and maybe a N+ too, and certainly some type of programming class but it can be a really conceptual kind of thing, psuedocode for all I care. Computing and networking are fundamental building blocks of learning in the same way that mathematics or history are. Having a computer and not being a programmer is like having a swiss army knife and only knowing how to use the corkscrew. I did have some pretty pedestrian programming classes -- we even learned BASIC once a week in elementary school from about fourth grade on, while BASIC with line numbers may be evil at least I was open to the idea and took LOGO in Junior High, and today I can at least do some sorts of programming tasks, making the computer vastly more powerful for me than for someone who can't. I don't want a medal; the ability is its own reward. More ability would be more rewarding :)

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (1)

paleo2002 (1079697) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606671)

I've seen this from both sides. One of the schools I work at used to have an older chemistry professor that basically refused to use modern computers. The department had to hire a part-time student worker to do email and submit attendance and grades for the guy. He wasn't a technophobe - he used an old Pentium PC to run research software - he just stopped keeping up with computer progress.

On the other hand, I can see why teachers might avoid technology in the classroom. In my experience, schools seem to hire IT professionals out of the business sector who tend to bring business-class technology solutions along with them. Like help desks and call centers that treat students and staff like they are low-priority clients. Smart board systems that require a remote control and a pointer/wand device to fully utilize . . . the remotes and wands disappeared within months of deployment, so now the boards are very expensive marker boards and projector screens. Access to and quality of classroom technology can be highly inconsistent and, thus, frustrating to use.

Re:The problem is the education level of the teach (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606703)

In the school system I grew up in, teachers would never admit they could use a computer even if they could. There were so few qualified computer teachers, that merely admitting you knew more than how to browse the web meant you'd be teaching computers the next year.

Love the idea; poor execution (4, Informative)

quixote9 (999874) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606171)

I own one of the first OLPCs. The problem isn't Linux. (I hate to think of Win XP running in 256MB system, 1GB storage.) The problem is the whole philosophy of "it's not a computer, it's an education tool." (Or however they put it.)

No. A computer is whatever the user wants it to be. If you try to make that difficult, it'll fail sooner or later. The less money behind it, the sooner.

The educational philosophy they were pushing works for some subjects, some of the time. But they should have made it easy to use the OLPCs any way people wanted much earlier. It was only some time last year that a simple desktop switcher (sugar - gnome) was included with the basic OS. For me, at least, not having an ordinary filesystem available was a showstopper. I'd been dualbooting debian since the beginning, but all the trial and error to accomplish that isn't something a lot of teachers would do. But initially, for the first four years!, there was a lot of resistance to just giving people a familiar interface.

Then there were the hardware limitations. Even for Linux, at least the Fedora they're using, 256MB is barely enough to breathe. The keyboard takes a lot of getting used to. I'm not sure they ever got the expanded touchpad working.

So, like I said, nice idea, but they should have put more effort into improving hardware, providing the software people want, better distribution so they had a larger community of enthusiasts to write code for the project and help on (better organized!) forums, and kept their goofy educational philosophy for the people who wanted it.

Re:Love the idea; poor execution (4, Insightful)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606483)

I own one of the first OLPCs. The problem isn't Linux. (I hate to think of Win XP running in 256MB system, 1GB storage.) The problem is the whole philosophy of "it's not a computer, it's an education tool." (Or however they put it.)

That's the surface layer - but the real problem lies deeper. The real problem is that it was designed to be a [computer|education tool|portal to information|flavor of the week] (I.E. somewhat confused goals) that adhered to the (idiosyncratic) design theories of people with little to no actual experience in developing such tools*, and to support the political agenda and social theories of Nicolas Negroponte. And it's last item that's the real killer, because everything else was subordinated to that agenda and those theories.
 
Not helping much was the decision to set the price to a politically attractive level long before they had sufficient experience with the software and hardware to know whether or not that price was a reasonable goal for their laundry list of features. When it turned out not to be, they slashed performance to target those political goals.
 
And that's not even touching on the myriad of other things they fouled up on...
 
* to be fair, nobody really has such experience - everything in the developed world to date has been somewhat ad hoc.

Re:Love the idea; poor execution (2)

swillden (191260) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606565)

For me, at least, not having an ordinary filesystem available was a showstopper.

But one of the core ideas behind OLPC is incompatible with having an ordinary file system available -- and not an idea meant to limit the utility to education, but one intended to hugely improve the ease and safety with which random code could be exchanged between machines. The Bitfrost security model is really interesting and has huge possibilities for making "promiscuous computing" safe, but it requires making the whole user-visible system run within the model. One of the key components is that all code runs within its own extremely restricted view of the file system. Accessing any file requires going through the system to get the user's permission to access a particular file, which is then mapped into the restricted view.

Providing easy access to the full file system completely breaks this -- which is fine for power users who are wiling and able to take full responsibility for their system security, but exactly what you don't want for kids who you'd like to allow the ability to explore and tweak in arbitrary ways. Under the OLPC model, there was always the option to get a developer key and get deeper access to the system, but the limitations imposed on non-developers were intended to give them the opportunity to safely explore until they could learn enough to safely go to the next level.

This is all related to one of the goals of OLPC that seems to have gotten lost along the way: Putting easy-to-program computers in the hands of millions (or hundreds of millions) of kids. The idea was to give them computers that actually allowed them to modify and adjust the system behavior in an environment where it was nearly impossible for them to break anything. The "first world" model of computing has gone the opposite direction, turning our computers into limited-function devices which allow users to do only whatever is listed in the menu, and OLPC wanted to give the rest of the world an opportunity to find and create a better way.

I suppose that this idea boils down to one of programmer-centric computing "activism", trying to create a chance for millions of bright youngsters to be exposed to and become accustomed to the idea that computers are machines which can be made to do what the user wants. I guess the idea failed. Apparently people want computing appliances... that certainly seems to be the message of the mobile world, especially the hugely-successful iDevices. But I think it was an idea very much worth trying.

Re:Love the idea; poor execution (1)

quixote9 (999874) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606821)

Interesting. I'm a biologist, and had no idea that the filesystem thingy was down to Bitfrost. I'm very impressed with the kinds of things Bitfrost let people do. Just for starters, preventing every early OLPC from winding up on the black market. It would have been nice if they could have wrapped that around a familiar-looking filesystem that was more than a jumble of recently accessed stuff.

Negroponte and IT fundamentalists are the problem (4, Insightful)

fantomas (94850) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606175)

If your project is led by somebody who believes that the way forward is to drop OLPC laptops out of helicopters into villages [olpcnews.com] and completely bypass locally respected educators, because of the belief that outsiders giving people technology will educate them, what hope have you got?

If the project doesn't seem to respect local teachers, then claims that the reason the project has failed is because of the teachers, well I am suspicious of the findings, or maybe at least suspect a bias.

Is the project too technology led rather than built on sound pedagogical frameworks to support children's education?

Providing teacher training to enable teachers to better employ the technology in their teaching practice (what The Economist article suggests) before dropping all the laptops into classrooms would have been less media friendly but perhaps a more successful strategy.

It does feel like the old story of rusting high tech white elephants in developing countries: well meaning, lots of money spent, not much time understanding local grassroots needs, working with the local educators on the ground. Stuff just gets dropped in with no support and surprise surprise doesn't get used well or technically maintained.

The technology is the easy bit. Engaging with local communities to understand their needs is time consuming and more difficult.

Re:Negroponte and IT fundamentalists are the probl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606731)

Well, that depends. I can tell you that the computer/programming education I got at my school interested 0 people. Everyone who was into computers got into them at home, in their own time. I wouldn't put much faith in educators over the curiosity of some of the kids.

as Gomer would say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606189)

"Surprise, surprise, surprise!"

The summary sounds weird to me (1)

TheRealQuestor (1750940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606207)

"The One Laptop Per Child project has disappointed in Peru" I don't know why but that just sounds weird to me. Maybe "The One Laptop Per Child project has been a disappointment in Peru" or something, I don't know, but the way it's written just makes me want to cringe.

You can't teach what you don't know (4, Insightful)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606225)

Before educating the students, they should have taught the teachers how to use the tehnology.

The result will always be the same (3, Insightful)

rudy_wayne (414635) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606247)

Somehow we have developed this absurd idea that you simply have to place a computer in front of a child and ~POOF~ they are magically educated, with no thought or work required by a teacher or anyone else. As a result, many billions of dollars have been spent putting computers in every classroom, and it has been a gigantic waste of money, because computers are completely unneccesary in education. Maybe in the last couple of years of highschool it makes sense, but in the early years, a computer serves no useful purpose in school and actually hinders important learning.

Computers are fantastic, powerful and useful tools. but so is a bulldozer, and we don't insist that young children must learn to operate a bulldozer or else they will not get a proper education.

Re:The result will always be the same (1)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606313)

I do like that your argument centers on how computers can't magically help children learn, but then you invoke the same fallacy to declare that they'll definitely hinder children from learning.

It's got nothing to do with computers, and almost everything to do with software and discipline (to some degree). Being the black box that they are, computers are simply a big source of students goofing off in the common experience (usually because we the students are way more knowledgeable and effective in the first place). But the more serious problem is that educational software, by and large, sucks and sucks badly.

But to a big degree, I very much wonder if this is an actual failure of software design, or a reflection of the fact that the "standard curriculums" for a lot of subjects are actually horribly designed, and largely salvaged by thinking teachers or intelligent parents. Because that is, very much, something we should deal with because it's easily possible to wind up with neither.

Re:The result will always be the same (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606333)

In the more afflulent countries, I see many schools making the same mistake with the iPad. Not even just tablets in general - they all go straight for the iPad without even considering other options. A lot of the time administrators or teachers see a cool toy first, and then try to figure out how they could use it.

That's how the school at which I work ended up with a piece of crap called a Spykee. Little more than a toy ROV, but someone thought having a cool-looking robot would help stimulate student interest in engineering. It doesn't, even on the rare occasions we can make the thing work.

Re:The result will always be the same (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606353)

Man, I would have just loved a bulldozer in high school.

Re:The result will always be the same (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606355)

Maybe in the last couple of years of highschool it makes sense, but in the early years, a computer serves no useful purpose in school and actually hinders important learning.

It is not the computer that matters, it is the software. The problem with computers in school is the software that we use -- software that is designed to be impossible to hack and which encourages students to pull out pencils and paper to solve their problems. Students are given computers with more restrictions than China's firewall, and if they dare to defeat those restrictions they are punished more severely than students who start fistfights.

Is it any surprise that the computers are not helping? We give students prepackaged software, and do little to help them learn how to solve problems using computers. We teach students how to add, and then we give them a computer that tells then whether or not they added correctly -- yet at no point does anyone think to have students implement addition as a computer program, let alone how to do solve more complex problems. More time is spent worrying about students using computers to access pornography and how to prevent that from happening than about teaching students about how to solve problems using a computer.

Re:The result will always be the same (2)

swillden (191260) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606603)

It is not the computer that matters, it is the software. The problem with computers in school is the software that we use -- software that is designed to be impossible to hack and which encourages students to pull out pencils and paper to solve their problems.

If that's the only problem, then the OLPC should have been a huge success, since it was designed from the ground up to be a hackable, tweakable system, with a "Show Source" button on the keyboard that allowed you to display and modify the source of whatever you were using and a Python interpreter as one of the main "activities".

I'll admit that I thought the hackability of the OLPC would make it successful, at least at educating kids on computing. It appears I was wrong.

Re:The result will always be the same. teach histo (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606693)

This idea is nothing new. In the sixties it was typewriter skills which led to a lot of schools using IBM selectrics for typing class. In the seventies, it was ten key calculators which led to 6 to 8 week courses in using a calculator to add and subtract. In the late seventies, it was programming on cards in a high school lab and then led into Apple IIs in a dedicated computer lab. In all of these cases, the idea was that the technology was so earthshaking, that you just drop these machines in front of teachers and have a coherent lesson plan materialise out of nothing. (and if I sound biased, it is because my mother, a jr.high math teacher, was given the plum job of running the computer lab where her major worry was keeping the students from stealing the computers, keyboards or mice. She was the best available choice for the job but had no training or experience, only that she was a math teacher was over thirty years teaching experience.. She was provided with little materials other than showing students how to turn the computer on, copy files to a floppy, and use a notepad type editor. Not a lot to work with.)

Right now, these technology grants are being spent on tablets. What would be a good curriculum for those devices?

I taught in schools in Ecuador for a few months... (3, Informative)

datorum (1280144) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606261)

... this doesn't come as a surprise to me. Teaching in Ecuador is mostly "frontal assault", the kids are told all the time what to do. Copy that, etc. One student told me - after I quit - I was a go teacher and he liked me, because I didn't tell them all the time "copy that fast"... Basically my impression was that the schools condition the students to be "recipients of orders" ("Befehlsempfänger").Now on the one hand there is quite an authoritarian rule and on the other they just don't care too much mixed up with some totally unnecessary bureaucracy, e.g. every teacher had to sign that he arrived on that day in school and that he left, also entering the time - makes sense. But you would sign twice at once, also if I was late, it wouldn't matter I should write the time I should have been there... furthermore a teacher was running around and taking these signatures, usually interrupting the lessons by doing it...

Also I worked a bit in an Internet cafe, what you consider a power (or even normal user) in Western Europe would be an admin there...

Ecuador and Perú are quite similar. I was in the jungle region, which is probably the least "developed" one.

Wasn't this anticipated in design? (2)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606281)

I mean, of course most adults, anywhere, won't know how to take advantage of a computing engine or how it can help their child (even if they had explicit instructions). I kind of thought half the idea was to open a path for some of the children to find something special after tinkering with that little box.

The idea that you can automate something isn't something that just occurs to everyone. The young are most able to see something repetitive or annoying, and decide to figure out how to use a tool in a new way to make their lives less lame.

Those young people grow up, and start to see how they can do that to a lot more around them. They start to use resources in ways that would be seen as completely impractical just to automate more things... and change the country completely.

Yeah - the teachers and other adults aren't going to be 'creatively' using these things for much - because they're busy providing minimal resources however they can. Creativity takes time, something they almost never have anymore.

The adults teach the children by showing them the wrong ways to do things.

Ryan Fenton

Just Returned from Peru Visit of Electronics Shops (3, Interesting)

retroworks (652802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606365)

Seriously, I just returned six days ago from a week in Lima, where I visited partners who buy used computers (for repair, refurbishing, recycling business). At one of the shops (which had 22 repair employees) they showed me one of the One Laptop Per Child laptops they'd gotten their hands on. They were absolutely ridiculing it compared to the price of used Pentium III laptops they buy in bulk from off-lease. I just wrote about the trip a few days ago. http://preview.tinyurl.com/peruewaste [tinyurl.com]

The refurbishing business itself is falling off in Lima, however. (No joke, I saw used CHINESE CRT televisions - the Chinese cities are upgrading and selling their own used goods to South America and Africa). But the cheap white box models from China show the most growth in the market.

In short it's a mature market and the whole charity command-and-control, of "e-waste" and white box laptop sales, is rife with at best piss poor market research, and at worst just making things up out of thin air. Read Harvard Business Review Article, http://tinyurl.com/chinagoodnuff [tinyurl.com] The Battle for China's Good Enough Market (2007, written by Bain & Co consultants), to see how the changing consumer demand is being mis-marketed to. Lima had 9M residents, I had no problem finding wifi, and the geeks of color in the used electronics markets all had smartphones.

One Lampoon Per Child (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606381)

The OLPC project is a "has been" project and is no longer worth the effort. Most of the "innovators" have left the project to move on to other things. I believe this is because the show is over and it is a failure. The project was essentially a misguided attempt by the wealthy world to help the poor in order to make those wealthy innovators look good for their own resumes. Case in point, Ivan Krsti is a self absorbed douche and not as bright as he is made out to be. He has moved on to work for Apple, a company that exploits the third world instead of helps it. If he truly believed in the vision of OLPC he wouldn't have done this.

Don't be so pessimistic! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606435)

It's just natural that there is no 'common creativity'. That's how human's creativity-skill is distributed.

I see the project as great success if in the there are only say 100 pupils that are becoming skilled computer-freaks because they now got the chance to it!
The rest .. well, like if you give supercomputers to the crowd here, 99% would only surf facebook with it.

How is this better than a Trapper Keeper? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606441)

I remember getting an F in "computer class" (elementary school in the early 90s) because when we were supposed to be learning to use a drawing program, I instead wrote a BASIC script to draw the image we were supposed to draw. It didn't matter in the slightest to the teacher that I was able to attain the result in a far more efficient way or that I was able to actually write my own program, nope, I didn't do it exactly the way she said to (and thus exactly as the book said).

This always annoyed me in school, you put this incredible, mysterious and powerful machine in front of a student, the student already has a basic understanding of some of the amazing things this machine is capable of, so the student is incredibly excited. Five or so years later when the only thing the student has been taught to do is use the computer as an alternative to a pencil and paper, then you have a problem.

It's like putting kids in a giant room filled with Legos and only allowing them to use the blocks to build 3" tall numbers to answer math equations straight from a book.

Failure? Not at all. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606443)

Read the original report. "The intervention generated a substantial increase in computer use both at school and at home. Results indicate limited effects on academic achievement but positive impacts on cognitive skills and competences related to computer use." I would not call it a failure, more like a reasonable success.

So technology is not a silver bullet?!?!?!?!???!!! (2)

plopez (54068) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606453)

And in other news, the sky is blue, water is wet, and gravity sucks.

Seriously, let's stop looking for magic cures and start focusing on fundamentals, such as better teacher recruitment, selection, training, and retention. The add a layer of technology and facilities on top of that. Not sexy and a lot of hard work, but this approach will probably get the best results.

Like "Bibles for Haiti" (3, Interesting)

ivoras (455934) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606455)

The OLPC project was always one step near the infamous "Bibles for Haiti" project [imgur.com] - a condescending view that an "easy answer", one which is easily mass-manufactured will miraculously solve a hard social problem. That the OLPC-ers are technocratic instead of theocratic makes little difference with regards to the efficiency of the approach. What *should* have been sent are *teachers*, but it's much, much harder to send teachers into the wilderness when they are already so lowly regarded in the western world.

Microsoft visio 2010 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606613)

Use for IT, business process management, pre-drawn different shapes, sample graphics and templates you can quickly start drawing. No matter what kind of drawing, Microsoft visio 2010 [buydownloadvisio2010.com] can help you get started quickly.With the newly enhanced template that contains SharePoint workflow rules and logic, have been able to Microsoft SharePoint Designer 2010 and Microsoft visio 2010 download [buydownloadvisio2010.com] to export and import workflow, create and monitor the SharePoint workflow easier than ever before.

Primary school students do not need computers (2)

SilverJets (131916) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606615)

Kids that young do not need computers to learn. They need to be taught the same 3 simple basics that have been taught in every primary school for decades: Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. You do not need computers to learn or teach any of those. Introduce them to music and art to round out their education. Then in high school start introducing them to computers. And no, contrary to what some people like to think, these students will not fall behind the other kids that had access to computers. Using a computer is a skill. A very easily obtained skill. And high school is early enough to start teaching kids this skill.

No place in the classroom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39606635)

Technology never helps education. Classrooms in America are filled with outdated computers that barely work, because administrators never allocate funding for (adequate) tech support and repairs/upgrades.

If you want to "fix" education, use money to buy books, buy school supplies, to pay teachers, to bring back art, music, and vocational classes, to restore the regular school schedule (kids are in school less days per year than ever before), and to clean up and maintain the school campus.

Wait, why aren't these things being done? Because school administrators mismanage all the money. They funnel it into unworkable projects and into lavish expenses for themselves. They never ask teachers what they need, or ask students what they want, or look at real studies about what school programs are beneficial and which are not.

In a third world country I'd think they'd just want qualified teachers and supplies, period. I'm a huge backer of technology, but I also am passionate about education and it is beyond clear that giving everyone a computer doesn't help. It's trendy, hip, expensive, and pointless.

No kidding (2)

tsotha (720379) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606649)

Cliff Stoll is probably unsurprised [amazon.com] . As am I. A computer is a tool to accomplish a task, and giving computers to kids who don't have any use for them is likely to be less productive than giving them all math textbooks.

Lack of contents (1)

jgfenix (2584513) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606761)

Here in Spain politicians thought that they could improve the education problem by giving latops to the students instead of addressing the real problems and without providing educational contents. A computer can be a god teaching tool. for example: *A virtual tour of Pompeii using Google Street View *Some years ago I watched a cool 3D animations of various celular processes. I wish I could watch this in my high school days, it would have helped a lot. *Use plotting tools to manipulate mathematical functions. *A virtual laboratory But as far as I know they use the latops only for word processing or ebooks.

Creative use or choice of OS does not matter (1)

CptJeanLuc (1889586) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606775)

These laptops should serve primarily as a vehicle for providing cheap and convenient access to learning material, plus a means to become part of the online world. If it can render PDF files and various other formats, then anyone with an OLPC laptop can potentially have access to a vast archive of various subjects. Who cares about whether or not these devices are used "creatively".

It makes sense to put Linux on the laptop, because it does the job just fine without having to pay any 3rd parties for the privilege of distributing laptops to children in need. Plus it gives those kids an open platform for hacking away as much as they want.

Obviously, the device is of little use without content. I have never looked into the OLPC ecosystem so have no real idea what exists there, but I would imagine it would make sense to divert some of the funds that go into making the device, into making electronic books for various topics (basic math, world history, etc) and translate into some of the major languages.

Thinking about it, with a planet of 7 billion people and looking at all the money that go into various wasteful or pointless activities, it is quite sad that there does not seem to exist some universally available fits-on-a-USB-stick "learning package" for the first ~12 years of education.

We should know by now (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39606905)

Just throwing money and/or technology at a problem doesn't automagically fix it. The greatest tool we have is our brain, but we need to use it's full potential in making the most of our external manmade tools to get ahead.
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