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Survey Says Bosses Fear Being Filmed By Employees

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the it's-attaching-the-mic-that's-tricky dept.

Businesses 159

New submitter Cazekiel writes "If you think your boss is a fearless, miserable beast whose only worries lie in how well his company or business competes, think again. The 'Business Video Behavior Project' survey conducted by Qumu reveals that those in-charge are growing more and more paranoid about something the Average Joe fears just walking down the street nowadays: employees who will 'secretly film him with his metaphorical pants down and then post the footage for public delectation.' It would seem that it doesn't matter if you're powerful, wealthy and lording over hundreds of cubicles; they know the internet exists, everyone has a cell phone camera and thick wallets don't make discarded banana peels magically move out of their path." The company that paid for the study, note, promises to "securely distribute business video simultaneously over multiple Edge routes," so they probably don't mind some workplace paranoia.

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Another (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617683)

First Post!

I have an idea (5, Insightful)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617695)

No, he's scared you might use your new technological tools to make naughty videos -- the worst of which would be to secretly film him with his metaphorical pants down and then post the footage for public delectation.

My brilliant idea is that if you're a boss BEHAVE APPROPRIATELY, ethically and fairly. It's not that hard.

Re:I have an idea (4, Informative)

furytrader (1512517) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617711)

That's Business Ethics 101 - if you're doing something at work that you wouldn't want posted on the front page of the local newspapers, don't do it.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617751)

That's Business Ethics 101 - if you're doing something at work that you wouldn't want posted on the front page of the local newspapers, don't do it.

That's true. But if TFA is to be believed maybe they skipped that class :-)

Re:I have an idea (1)

daktari (1983452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617791)

That's Business Ethics 101 - if you're doing something at work that you wouldn't want posted on the front page of the local newspapers, don't do it.

Your statement has very little to do with ethics per se. Our society allows for plenty of ethically dubious stuff to go down while still perfectly okay to land the front page.

I guess, your statement has more to do with simply not wanting to get caught than being ethical.

Re:I have an idea (4, Insightful)

causality (777677) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617881)

I guess, your statement has more to do with simply not wanting to get caught

That's about the only thing a sociopath fears. That's why the "threat" of video documentation is so effective.

than being ethical.

I don't see what ethical people would fear from this. Not at the workplace, anyway.

I think this situation has merely arisen to cope with a modern reality: that altruism and enlightened self-interest are at an all-time low. Many people won't even fake them anymore to be thought of as "good" because it is the value of those things itself that is eroding. People like this are self-absorbed and often live as though other people don't exist and could not be inconvenienced or harmed by their bad decision-making, something you can witness in traffic daily. It's not that they are malicious, it's that they don't even notice how their actions affect other people. They don't even have sense enough not to block doorways or other basic things like that. People like this need a selfish reason to do the right thing, like avoiding embarassment, because they can no longer be trusted to have any other kind.

Of course there have always been bandits, assholes, etc. The difference is they used to be rare enough to stand out. Self-absorbed obliviousness as a societal norm is the next logical step after ADD and perpetual victimhood ("nothing's ever my fault"). That's where we are today.

Re:I have an idea (4, Interesting)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618093)

Problem: 100 people on a sinking boat, only enough lifeboat space for 50

Ethical solution: Pick 50 people at random for the boats

Politically-correct statement the public wants the captain to say: "Put a few extra people in the boats! We'll save as many as we can!!">

Politically-correct statement the company wants him to say: "We'll make a lottery, remove ourselves, and pick 10 people at random, then we'll let them take their families, and pick more until we run out of space"

Quick statement: "We'll pick 50 people at random. There will be orphans."

Frankly, I'd be pissed if my knee-jerk reaction statements were recorded, too, regardless of whether my behavior is ethical or not. The public at large is so quick to become enraged, and the media is so willing to sensationalize, that anything but silence in a bad situation is a PR mess.

Re:I have an idea (4, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618227)

Reality solution [wikipedia.org] : Crew grabs lifeboats and leaves the sinking ship, passengers will survive, or not, who cares.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618307)

We were talking about ethical people. Or are you saying there's no ethical people in reality?

Re:I have an idea (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618535)

Sure there are. Sadly, since elbows determine your advance on the career ladder, they are rarely in charge.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39619373)

In the case mentioned by GP, there was an ethical person yelling at the captain over the phone/radio/dunnowhat, urging him to get the Goddamm hell back into the ship and do his job. The problem was, that guy was not physically where the events were taking place, so there was not much he could do about it except hope the scumbag in the lifeboat would come to his senses and act like he had something resembling a sense of duty.

Re:I have an idea (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619639)

We were talking about ethical people. Or are you saying there's no ethical people in reality?

There are, but they all drowned trying to save those who are not.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Dodgy G33za (1669772) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619069)

Ethical Solution: Everyone sits discussing the relative worth per kilo of the various passengers. All drown.

Re:I have an idea (1)

s73v3r (963317) | more than 2 years ago | (#39620103)

If you have a boat going down, you've already got a PR mess.

Re:I have an idea (1)

daktari (1983452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618101)

That's about the only thing a sociopath fears. That's why the "threat" of video documentation is so effective.

Agreed. But I think we're getting some things backwards: ethical people have little to fear re becoming front page copy since their ethical actions are generally not deemed "news worthy". If however, a sociopath decides not to do something out of fear of being caught it has little to do with his/her burdened conscious.

Backwards, as if Descartes would have said: I am, therefore I think. And we all know that not always to be the case.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39620083)

I think this situation has merely arisen to cope with a modern reality: that altruism and enlightened self-interest are at an all-time low.

Well, the high priests of economics and similar keep trying to hammer the idea that everyone is a greedy bastard into the public consciousness. Why? Because it's one of the founding axioms their theories are based on. Without it (and others, like the greedy bastards operating from perfect information) their theories are bunk.

Their theories *are* bunk. Sadly they don't really do science. They do politics. Their political masters use them and their dogma to retain power.

One of humanity's greatest strengths is our ability to cooperate. If we were all utter greedy bastards we'd never have created civilization.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617907)

These days, the newspaper seems to just make up controversial headlines (the headloine in the form of a question) and tells only certain parts of the whole story often times making a "story" out of nothing at all. Rarely do you get both sides of a story, only one sided juicy bits and clips. The news media who believes the public and their advertisers are only interested in shock and awe and not the actual story, facts or news, provides exactly that. Who really gives a fuck that some prince and his wife went skiing last weeked? I sure as hell don't and in my mind, that will NEVER be news.

Re:I have an idea (4, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618081)

Business ethics gets very complicated very quickly.

Here is an example. Your job is to sell your product to a foreign country (You sell a good product at a good price). In this country offering bribes is common and legal, however it is considered immoral and illegal for you and your culture and country to offer the bribes. So you go to the business deal the the owner says, you are offering a fine offer however what is in it for me (wink, wink).

Do you.
1. Turn down the bribe and loose the business.
2. Offer the bribe and hope they don't find out.
3. Offer to close the deal near your headquarters in Orlando Florida, and give him prepaid tickets and cover expenses (and his family who should be leaving his side) to come to headquarters to fill out the deal.

The problem is the more diverse set of people you meet the more muddy ethics get.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618309)

I would do number 1. This is not a hard question. There is no muddy ethics. Don't do business with corrupt countries.

Re:I have an idea (2)

cyn1c77 (928549) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619145)

I would do number 1. This is not a hard question. There is no muddy ethics. Don't do business with corrupt countries.

Is that why you are posting anonymously? :)

Re:I have an idea (5, Insightful)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618315)

Business ethics gets very complicated very quickly. Here is an example. Your job is to sell your product to a foreign country (You sell a good product at a good price). In this country offering bribes is common and legal, however it is considered immoral and illegal for you and your culture and country to offer the bribes. So you go to the business deal the the owner says, you are offering a fine offer however what is in it for me (wink, wink). Do you. 1. Turn down the bribe and loose the business. 2. Offer the bribe and hope they don't find out. 3. Offer to close the deal near your headquarters in Orlando Florida, and give him prepaid tickets and cover expenses (and his family who should be leaving his side) to come to headquarters to fill out the deal. The problem is the more diverse set of people you meet the more muddy ethics get.

It only seems complicated because (most?) businesspeople think there are a separate set of rules just for them. Hence the fact that the term "business ethics" even exists. Option 1 is the correct answer.

Re:I have an idea (0)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618843)

Ok lets say your product will save the lives of people, who would die without it?
Or lets say your competitor is willing to pay the bribe sells a poorer quality product?

The problem isn't that they think there is separate rules but more to the point that the rules are conflicting.

Country A requires action that is illegal in Country B. Country A and Country B are allowed to trade with each other. Your job is to trade with that country.

Option 1. You will get fired for not doing your job.
Option 2. Will get you in jail.
Option 3. Whiny Liberal Activists will whine a little bit but in the end everyone who matters is happy.

Re:I have an idea (1)

HapSlappy_2222 (1089149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619229)

You had me right up until Whiny Liberal Activists.

Option 3 happens all day, erry day, in the business world, and the only time anybody actually complains is when the "gift" becomes fur coats, stock options, straight up cash, etc. In your example, Option 3 actually had value from a business standpoint, in that the client gets to see your facilities, staff, meet you in person, etc. It is simply a way to cover all the bases, get the client into your sphere of influence, and attempt to show him the value of buying your product. Throwing fur coats or cash at a potential client is nothing more than an attempt to pay him to buy from you (literal bribe). This is one reason a golf course is such a powerful place to conduct business. The difference is on a personal level, and while it's subtle to some people, it's most definitely there.

If you've ever paid for a lunch for your friends, family, girlfriend, etc to talk about something important, you've done the same thing. By offering to pay for lunch at your favorite restaurant, you're bringing them further into your social circle, strengthening the relationship, and providing a comfortable place for the discussion to unfold. It's FAR different from, say, mailing $300 cash and a proposal note to your girlfriend (by the way, if this actually works, you should hit the eject button. Just sayin.)

Re:I have an idea (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619785)

I'll take Option 4: Avoid idiotic, leading question written so there is no right answer while maintaining personal ethics, by someone with an obvious agenda to create a fantasy world where doing the wrong thing is the only way to survive.

Re:I have an idea (1, Interesting)

HapSlappy_2222 (1089149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619129)

Option 1 is not necessarily the best answer. It could be argued that Option 1 is the worst answer, ethically, because you're not even trying to come up with a solution for all parties involved (including yourself); you're simply avoiding deeper thought about the decision to help only yourself.

Option 3 seems like the best compromise, all around, and if the company is willing to bring the client and family out for a visit (which happens all the time), the option of showing him OUR culture opens up. This seems like the best ethical decision, long-term, because you have a better chance, over time, of teaching said client how business is done ethically in the US, just as he has a chance to teach you more about his own culture does business. Without this type of compromise on a broad scale, what you're suggesting leads to a breakdown of international trade.

The point is, just because you say "Option 1 is the correct answer" without providing support for your argument doesn't make it so, and there are hundreds of permutations that should be considered in situations like this. It's not as easy as you make it sound, nor are the "businesspeople" all a bunch of greedy douchebags bribing their way to the top to make a quick buck (most, maybe, but not all. =)

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39619913)

#3 is still unethical. It's just how bribes are done in America. Ethics aren't complicated. Trying to cheat is complicated.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618339)

It is illegal for American companies to offer bribes anywhere in the world.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618509)

Business ethics gets very complicated very quickly. ...
1. Turn down the bribe and loose the business.
2. Offer the bribe and hope they don't find out.
3. Offer to close the deal near your headquarters in Orlando Florida, and give him prepaid tickets and cover expenses (and his family who should be leaving his side) to come to headquarters to fill out the deal.

The problem is the more diverse set of people you meet the more muddy ethics get.

Every corporate environment I've ever worked in would consider #1 the only appropriate response. It's only 'complicated' when you think the fact that you get the sale or not should bear in any way on the ethics of the situation.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Stu101 (1031686) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618713)

If you work for a large company, even the IT guys have to abide by the FOCA act https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_Corrupt_Practices_Act [wikipedia.org] . We spend days (Seriously) learning what we can and cant do, even though we are IT. We don't even speak to customers, sell anything or buy anything and we have it 24/7!

If you get caught, worrying about your employees is the last thing you will be doing.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Almandine (1594857) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618735)

It's not complicated and #1 is the answer. A few years ago at my former workplace, a top performing President of our division was quickly "removed" from the company to the surprise of everyone. Internal rumors (not publically announced in print) from management indicate that it was an ethics violation of the type you described. Shortly afterwards, everyone had to take related ethics training. In the annual mandatory ethics classes of the following years, there was a new true story of a real life example (with names changed) that seems similar to the event.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Patch86 (1465427) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618747)

Option 1. That's how ethics work- you do the right thing even if it isn't the most profitable or convenient thing to do. If the most ethical option were the most profitable and convenient, you wouldn't need a code of ethics anyway.

If it were customary in some country to murder a dozen orphans to celebrate closing a deal, while it is obviously illegal (and considered somewhat unethical) to do so in your country, you opt for Option 1- you don't do it. Justifying doing it in order to make more money is the absolute height of ethical failure.

Re:I have an idea (1)

HapSlappy_2222 (1089149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619389)

Maybe I totally missed what's wrong with Option 3 then. Sure, it seemed packaged to resemble a hidden bribe, but flying foreign contacts into the country to conduct business happens near-daily at all the companies I've worked for that have a foreign presence. By your logic, fronting the cash to set up a video-conference is just as unethical. Perhaps the offer to bring the family with is the issue people are making, but I don't see how it's any worse; having the client's family see the local area facilitates easier trips in the future. If a company offered to fly you and your family out to China to discuss a very lucrative offer for your latest software creation, would you turn down the trip and the business? No, because in only the most asinine thought-bubble is this even CLOSE to the same thing as a cash bribe.

Your comparison of flying my new Chinese buddy out here so the board and I can chat with him about the direction we're taking the semiconductor division over the next 4 years to murdering orphans is stupid as hell. Also, it's not about "making more money" it's about doing your fuckin job, which, in sales, is to make and maintain as many relationships as you can. Even outside the business world, a friendship that isn't maintained is lost. Not getting this simple fucking point is why we in IT harbor such contempt for sales people; they're working just as hard as we are, and while, admittedly, many of these folks get into a gray area ethically, the vast majority are just trying to follow the rules and do a good job, just like us.

Re:I have an idea (0)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619847)

Your comparison of flying my new Chinese buddy out here so the board and I can chat with him about the direction we're taking the semiconductor division over the next 4 years to murdering orphans is stupid as hell.... it's about doing your fuckin job, which, in sales, is to make and maintain as many relationships as you can.

So, if your fuckin job required you to murder orphans, you'd do it? Because that's what OP was asking.

Where you got the idea they were comparing client flights to orphan murder is know only to you and your Creator.

Re:I have an idea (1)

HapSlappy_2222 (1089149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39620043)

How are the two NOT being compared? The GP's question, rephrased: "Offering bribes is unethical, but you're willing to do it for cultural reasons. Well, what if murdering orphans was a cultural tradition. Would you do it then?" For fuck's sake, YOU compared the two by basically asking "Since your job requires offering bribes, if your job required orphan killing would you ALSO be ok with MURDERING ORPHANS, you scum?"

But whatever, I'm obviously in the minority here, and I'm getting more pissed off than it's worth. I'll keep taking my clients to lunch to keep my little shop running, and hope my competitors agree with all you dumbasses.

Re:I have an idea (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39620117)

How are the two NOT being compared?

Here, this should help: http://www.rhlschool.com/reading.htm [rhlschool.com]

The GP's question, rephrased: "Offering bribes is unethical, but you're willing to do it for cultural reasons. Well, what if murdering orphans was a cultural tradition. Would you do it then?" For fuck's sake, YOU compared the two by basically asking "Since your job requires offering bribes, if your job required orphan killing would you ALSO be ok with MURDERING ORPHANS, you scum?"

Again: http://www.rhlschool.com/reading.htm [rhlschool.com]

But whatever, I'm obviously in the minority here, and I'm getting more pissed off than it's worth. I'll keep taking my clients to lunch to keep my little shop running, and hope my competitors agree with all you dumbasses.

Yea, you do that, since you obviously need all the practice talking to folks without being a total self-absorbed dick that you can get.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618737)

That's Business Ethics 101 - if you're doing something at work that you wouldn't want posted on the front page of the local newspapers, don't do it.

You'll never get far in American business with that kind of ethics - well really, any kind of ethics at all.

Re:I have an idea (2)

garcia (6573) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617867)

I'm a supervisor. If my employees video me at work they're going to show the world that I use Putty and Chrome to get a more-than-occasional peek at Slashdot or Twitter.

As long as they are getting their work done to my expectations and especially the expectations of the customer, they can pretty much do what they want as well.

So why would I care that they video me and why would they want to in the first place? Are supervisors really that unethical and misbehaving so often that this is really a concern?

Re:I have an idea (3, Insightful)

tophermeyer (1573841) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618065)

I think my concern would be that someone is trying to collect video of me that, out of context, puts me in a bad light. I say this because I once had a junior employee (not a direct report) try to throw me under the bus for one of his mistakes by presenting an email that appeared to show me giving him specific directions. It was dumb because, you know email. But without context it might be difficult to defend yourself from false allegations.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618715)

I think my concern would be that someone is trying to collect video of me that, out of context, puts me in a bad light. I say this because I once had a junior employee (not a direct report) try to throw me under the bus for one of his mistakes by presenting an email that appeared to show me giving him specific directions. It was dumb because, you know email. But without context it might be difficult to defend yourself from false allegations.

WOW! I've had similar things happen to me, but as an employee, and NOT as a boss. I've been told to do things that were questionable, and then one time I was "caught" and I explained that I was just following orders. When I try to formally explain myself my supervisors always framed it in such a way as; "puts me in a bad light.".

I've always noticed that there's always a perception of denial and grandiosity when it comes to Management. I am completely in favour of employees gathering evidence against their employers. I am also against employers who spy on employees, because there is a power disparity in such cases which makes this "monitoring" unethical.

Re:I have an idea (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618105)

Some bosses, really get out of the professional category. When the S**t hits the fan they just don't know what to do. They will just start yelling and making crazy threats and become insane. The things with middle managers is they are directly targeted. If they don't get promoted to upper management in a few years, they need to leave and find an other job, else when there is a company reorg they will be the first to go.

Re:I have an idea (1)

HapSlappy_2222 (1089149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619411)

Well you, sir, are obviously happen with what your naughty bits look like. Good for you! The rest of us supervisors are terrified.

Re:I have an idea (1)

HapSlappy_2222 (1089149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619423)

*happy. Damn.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617885)

For a moment, pretend that you are a boss (if you aren't already). Say you supervise an employee who holds a grudge against you. Could be over money, power, they're insecure...whatever.

Now you have to worry that this disgruntled employee sneaks around with his cellphone to catch you having handling a situation less than ideally and posting footage out of context.

Nobody likes having someone look over their shoulder and judging. Why should bosses be different?

Re:I have an idea (2)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618253)

Because of the double standard where they do it with impunity while we shouldn't.

Re:I have an idea (1)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617895)

My brilliant idea is that if you're a boss BEHAVE APPROPRIATELY, ethically and fairly. It's not that hard.

There are many appropriate, ethical, and fair things one can talk about or do with employees, but that are nevertheless not intended for public distribution. However, people who break confidentiality without (the intention of) exposing something illegal can be disciplined or fired anyway, so yeah, following that suggestion is a good way to avoid embarrassment.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617931)

I don't know any companies these days with the old fashioned us and them attitude (at least overtly).

article seems to mention company parties - which from now on will be cancelled of course to the detriment of your colleagues and the revenue for the hospitality industry (congrats!)

filming in an office - pretty much expect this to be unprofessional and breaking your contract, and let's not forget damage to the company = damage to everyone including your colleagues (congrats!)

In fact given the security risks in general i'm surprised cell phones aren't just banned at the door in most cases.

Re:I have an idea (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618265)

Because then your boss couldn't call you while you're at the toilet.

Re:I have an idea (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617933)

It is forbidden to film where I am. They do not film us, so why would we film them? I have no desire to do so, nor have I heard of anybody else having that desire.

But then I live in Communist Europe where we tend to not have cubicles and instead can directly communicate with our boss and anybody else.

Sure, there are bosses who are complete assholes, but I am sure that there are employees who are complete assholes and the percentage is not that different. That includes CEOs of pretty large companies as well as the lowest in the treadmill.

The main difference is that if those in the lower regions don't behave ethically and fairly, people won't care. If they are higher up, they do.

That woudl be ok (2)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617951)

But only if people would stop being hypocrites and decide that the things they do themselves are appropriate for others to do.

You can do nothing legally, morally, or ethically wrong at work and still not want to be filmed because you still can do things that people will hate on you for or make fun of you because.

Like maybe when you listen to music, you rock out and dance in your chair. You don't even know you do this, but you do. Suddenly there's a video of it online and people mock you for it, including people who do it themselves! They are fine to mock others for it, but would themselves not want to be mocked for it.

Trust me, if I put some cameras on your for a week, I could find enough footage in there that you wouldn't want other people to see. You probably do nothing wrong, but you do things that are embarrassing in one sense or another. If I've the video to pour over, I can find it, and with a NLE I can cut it down to just the shit you don't want others to see.

Worse still if I've got audio with it. I can get you saying shit out of context and unguarded. Don't tell me you've never badmouthed someone behind their back. Maybe you didn't even do it that directly, you said something like "For such a brilliant guy sometimes he's such an idiot about things because he jumps to conclusions too fast. I wish he'd slow down and think things through." I cut that to just "he's such an idiot."

Just remember if you aren't willing to have surveillance on you all the time at work, ask yourself why. Those same reasons apply to everyone.

Re:I have an idea (1)

robmv (855035) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617987)

I extend that to "If you are a human being...."

Re:I have an idea (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618011)

Easier said then done. That said they should have company policies that would allow employees to record their boss with out them knowing... To keep them honest. What often happens some Middle Manager gets a big head, because he is charge of a unit without much oversight just as long the money comes in there won't be much complaining, it really doesn't matter if they could bring more in if they did a better job... Or they could bring in more money if they just wasn't there. So when given power and they get use to employees acting meek to them, they get use to the power and abuse it a little more. Not to say all bosses are this way. It really depends on the motivation of the boss. Some bosses are all about power, they like controlling others lives (Micro-manager/bully boss), others are in it for the prestige they just like people looking up to them (self promoter), and others like authority to implement their ideas (visionary, sometimes a bit too abstract). Normally there are mixture of those. For the most part people are a mixture of different degrees of these. However if a Boss is strong in power they will be more likely to be caught doing things they don't want posted. The self promoter will be doing less of these things but really doesn't want anything negative posted. The visionary is sometimes too out there to care either way.

Re:I have an idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618465)

No, he's scared you might use your new technological tools to make naughty videos -- the worst of which would be to secretly film him with his metaphorical pants down and then post the footage for public delectation.

My brilliant idea is that if you're a boss BEHAVE APPROPRIATELY, ethically and fairly. It's not that hard.

Behaving properply has little to do with it.

The problem is now the boss has to be extra cautious all the time and cant even speak his mind for fear of being recorded and it taken completely out of context. They are worried they cant be friendly, worried they cant make honest social commentary, worried they cant express things infront of employees for fear of it being used against them.

Re:I have an idea (1)

skovnymfe (1671822) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618589)

Isn't that what they always tell us? If you're doing nothing wrong, you have nothing to fear from these CCTVs we're installing everywhere so we can protect your children.

I'm A-OK with recording every single move made by CEOs all over the world. We all know it's big business that writes the laws these days anyway, so let's see how they like having their privacy invaded for a change.

Re:I have an idea (1)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619813)

What you are describing is pretty much a rule for all of humanity from now on. If you don't want it posted, permanently, for everyone on the planet to see, don't do it.

That means having a beer with friends is pretty much off-limits. Not only might you do something stupid, but there are plenty of people that think instead of out having a beer you or your friends should be home with the wife and kids. And they will call you on it. Loudly.

Ever fallen down? Expect someone with a camera to record this moment and make sure it can never be forgotten. How about a TV show titled "Funny Falls" where they just edit together some posted videos.

We have gone way, way beyond anything that could be considered "civil". Basically it is you are on camera 24x7 and the slightest transgression will be made public. Permanently.

Relevant Quote (5, Funny)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617709)

You know, the courts may not be working any more, but as long as everyone is videotaping everyone else, justice will be done.
- Marge Simpson

Re:Relevant Quote (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618153)

Och! They no catch me with my breeks doon! I wear a metaphorical kilt! - Groundskeeper Willie

Re:Relevant Quote (1)

fermion (181285) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618787)

We all go to movies? Is what in the movies real? Is there anything real about the situation? Should be arrest Anthony Hopkins as a serial killer? Of course not.

As we see with dubious edits by James O'Keefe and his co-conspirators of films at NPR and Planned Parenthood, there is little way for the public to know if a film depicts other than a particular viewpoint. Any recording is this way. Take the NBC edits of the 911 call. In the original it appeared that a question was being answered, in the edit it appears that a racial bias was being promoted, in either it is not absolutely clear what the real situation is.

The problem is that many employees, and many employers, are going to create an adversarial relationship at work. Do what I say or you will be fired. You are picking on me because you don't like me. Employers are going to want more work than the employer feels paid for, the employee is going to want to do only the work that is necessary. Obviously there is motive on both sides to create a biased representation. I don't think employees want to be filmed any more than employers. The lack of context in any film is just too potentially incriminating.

treat people right (1)

chr1st1anSoldier (2598085) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617715)

If you didn't treat your employees like crap then you wouldn't worry about this.

Re:treat people right (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618177)

Well there is sometimes a fine line.
If the employee is not doing their job correctly, it is your bosses jobs to correct their actions or dismiss them. Now people don't like change and may see this corrective action as treating the employee poorly. If you have a good employee who gets their work done, and is helpful to other members, vs someone who doesn't get anything done and distracts other workers. The boss may allow the first to get by browsing the web, talking to their family during company time. Vs. the latter where he will make sure they follow the company rules to a tee.

Re:treat people right (1)

AdrianKemp (1988748) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619417)

A thousand times agreed. If your employees are out to get you, there's a goddamn reason.

Not My Boss (1)

GeneralTurgidson (2464452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617727)

His is something along the lines of "the building is burning".

My boss doesn't fear this (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617731)

Because I work in a secure facility, where cellphones, cameras, and anything that transmits are banned. If someone videotaped them, the one with the videocamera would be fired immediately. I guess because I am used to working in this kind of environment, I hadn't thought of this being a problem.

Hiding under a bed (2)

readin (838620) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617753)

Isn't there a French saying to the effect of "No man will check under his wife's bed unless he himself has hidden under a woman's bed."?

Re:Hiding under a bed (5, Funny)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617781)

Isn't there a French saying to the effect of "No man will check under his wife's bed unless he himself has hidden under a woman's bed."?

Not sure about that because this is Slashdot and I've never had a GF -- let alone a wife. But I do check under my bed before I go to sleep in case there's monsters or ghosts hiding under there. Sometimes I check twice just in case there's a nymphomaniac under there, but no luck yet.

Re:Hiding under a bed (0)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617927)

You are doing it wrong! Everybody knows that most nymphomaniacs hide in

Re:Hiding under a bed (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618021)

Nymphomaniacs sound like fun, until you actually live with one Mine had daddy issues, and printed out loads of really fucked up fantasy porn stories. While reading those, she raped me, repeatedly. Seven times in one night. After seven times, walking hurts, sitting hurts, and not just outside, but inside, too.

Say that you decide you don't want any that particular night. Well, that's just too bad, because you're her fuck toy so you just have to put out. Mine used to accuse me of being gay, if I didn't want to bend her over and fuck her stupid five times a night, whether or not she was bleeding or had just got over a yeast infection. What I wanted didn't come into it.

The emotional and verbal abuse are early indicators that she might need help, but by the time that starts, it's already too late.

With a nympho, you have no choice. You never do. The more fucked up they are, the more you want to get away from them, and the more abusive they are toward you to make sure they keep you.

Saying you'd just leave is easy, because you have no emotional attachment. I wasn't strong enough to leave her, she left me, then strung me along for months afterwards. That bitch was incredibly fucked up, and she made sure that she fucked me up, too. It's 14 years later, and I still have issues to deal with.

Re:Hiding under a bed (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618141)

Thanks for reporting this Anon. It's important for people to understand that in real life, things are not necessarily the same as all the common stories. (And yikes, that sounds like a really rough situation.)

I hope that your recovery continues swifter than expected.

You're sure? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618165)

You're sure you're not gay? Not that there is anything wrong with that, but come on...

Re:Hiding under a bed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618191)

Daaamn! Did you date my ex or something :o) (pretty much the same situation, 6 years later and I've still not had another GF, having certain trouble forming bonds with girls, trust is surprisingly hard to regain after being badly hurt). I hope you recover fully! Good luck! :)

Re:Hiding under a bed (0)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618825)

Nymphomaniacs sound like fun, until you actually live with one

Live with?? Dude, you're doing it wrong!

You keep them in their own apartment and drop by whenever. When she starts to get pissy, you just leave until she calms down.

They are fun to take to the local swinger's club too. When you get tired, you just hand her off to the next guy. And while all the guys are busy piling on her, you get some time with their wives/GFs.

Re:Hiding under a bed (1)

jitterman (987991) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618319)

VERY funny post :) Still, hang in there - I hope it will happen for you. I was over the average age of "first contact," but eventually all of those things came about in my life. In fact, I just proposed yesterday (seriously, I did) - and yes, she accepted. Second time for both of us, but that's okay. Trust me, if someone would have ME, you have hope!

Re:Hiding under a bed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617799)

Well, I've heard the saying in English, except s/under\([^b]*\)bed/behind\1door/g...

so what? (1)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617763)

I'm sure. Most employees would fear being filmed by their bosses as well, if they thought that was likely.

It has much more to do with recording/distributing copies of something that might show ones deficiencies than it has to do with behaving ethically.

It's the same reason people have a fear of public speaking.

Re:so what? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617801)

Bingo.

This quote made me laugh:

""If you think your boss is a fearless, miserable beast whose only worries lie in how well his company or business competes,

Very few people are really that naive. We know that the boss is a miserable beast because he's afraid of anything which might challenge his position or authority. He doesn't give a shit about the company, he gives a shit about what happens to him as a result of the company's performance.

It's always the same with these kinds of sociopaths- they really don't give a shit about anything which doesn't affect them personally. Anything which has that potential is feared, and if you observe their behavior you'll see most of their efforts are a direct result of such fears, and are directed towards making sure that when Shit Flies, it doesn't land on them.

Re:so what? (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617915)

It's always the same with these kinds of sociopaths- they really don't give a shit about anything which doesn't affect them personally. Anything which has that potential is feared, and if you observe their behavior you'll see most of their efforts are a direct result of such fears, and are directed towards making sure that when Shit Flies, it doesn't land on them.

Congratulations, you just described every living person. Not that I don't think that people in power are in general shitty people, but if the past is any example, you'd be the exact same way, and so would I.

Re:so what? (2)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617837)

Well, yeah... Bosses are human, too, of course. They don't want to be embarrassed any more than anybody else, but being at a higher position within the company, their reputation is directly tied to many other people's reputations as well. That goes for any other collective entity, too, including churches, charities, sailing crews, police, etc... Nobody wants to have anything recorded, because they know they might make a mistake, and that recording will be used against them, out of context and long after any reasonably limited time. Being nice and friendly regarding recording just isn't worth the risk of having a mistake get blown out of proportion.

This is Slashdot, though, where we love the Average Joe who does whatever he wants with whatever he wants, and damn the corporations that make it happen! Managers are the personification of the corporation, so we hate them, too. Any story that attacks a company or anyone in the company (except the lowest tier, who's always oppressed and overworked by their superiors) is instantly approved and the hivemind lauds its message.

I suppose this will head off into the world of "Flamebait" if I continue ranting... There's no "Annoyed at Slashdot" mod.

Breaking the law? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617825)

Like taking a picture of SJ's Mercedes parked in a handicapped spot in front of 1 Infinite Loop Drive?

Doesn't seem to have stopped him much.

The rapidly expanding boss video market? (2)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617829)

The company that paid for the study, note, promises to "securely distribute business video simultaneously over multiple Edge routes," so they probably don't mind some workplace paranoia.

So, what, they are proposing that companies pay for the secure distribution of their employee's secret boss videos? A delicious thought, but I don't see that as a rapidly expanding enterprise market.

do7l (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617849)

800 w/512 Megs of

News Flash: Bosses are human (1)

retroworks (652802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617851)

Boss doesn't want to be filmed on the toilet. Nor do cashiers. Correlation |= causation. The fact that bosses don't like the same thing that potato farmers and pre-school teachers don't like isn't really news.

Re:News Flash: Bosses are human (1)

jxander (2605655) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619487)

I thought that was the whole point of the piece.

Potato farmers and Pre-School teachers have dealt with Big Brother spying on them for years now, but "Little Brother" turning the tables is a fairly new phenomenon.

Hopefully once the bosses and higher-ups have been on the ugly end of some questionable video painted in a negative light, they'll grow slightly more sympathetic to the general populace's fear/mistrust of "Big Brother," and maybe, just maybe, this shared discomfort will lead to more mutual respect... though I somehow doubt it

A Crackdown By Corporations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617855)

On the excesses of managers has been long overdue. In the case of the corporation I work for (a major player in film, a #1 three letter TV network, radio and publishing), the HR Departments have been instructed to take any sort of abuse by managers very seriously. It only makes sense to weed out the people who may potentially create a situation where a lawsuit is all but assured. The bosses should be scared because they can no longer act like bullies and buffoons with impunity.

Obvious answer is obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617857)

queue of comments saying that a boss has the same privacy rights as a person in... 3.. 2.. 1... ...

0...

-1... -2... -3... -4... :o

Two can play this game (3, Insightful)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617887)

The bosses have been spying on employees for years. Feels kinda different now, doesn't it?

Re:Two can play this game (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618829)

Exactly my thoughts.

- I used to be the sysadmin for an elementary school, and sick of my incompetent principal, I interviewed for the same position in another elementary school in the same school district. Upon this principal calling my current principal to tell her that he was "taking" me, my principal read me the Riot Act, telling me "I can say things about you to make sure you never work in the district again".

- Later on, I was the sysadmin for a high school in the same district. The principal dragged me into his office, and offering no further details, asked me "Did you apply for a job?" (I had...several...because of the principal's antics); he most likely got a reference call, or a teacher's spouse, employed somewhere, received my application and ratted me out. He them told me that faculty re-appointments are coming up, and he's going to save mine for last.

In other words, I was--twice--threatened with termination for looking for another job. Where I work now, management feels comfortable enough with how they compensate and treat us that they practically _beg_ us to look for other jobs--I've joked that, if anything, I'd get in trouble for not doing it.

One of the worst I had heard of: when I was in college, I knew someone who had a part-time clerical job at a law firm--your typical low-paid undergrad job. Her boss, a lawyer, found out that she had been accepted to law school--and fired her.

So yeah...sorry about that, bosses, but you've spent way too much f**king time keeping us under the microscope when we're not at work. Our turn.

Duh (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617913)

That's kind of like saying "Survey says employees don't like being filmed by their employers." It would be incredibly stressful being under the microscope all the time. Doesn't matter who you are.

The Unrecorded Life is Not Worth Living (1)

stevegee58 (1179505) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617919)

Or was that "The Unexamined Life?" I can't remember.

Which is why I wear a LooxCie all day... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617963)

Works great, and all the executives act highly polite when they see it on me.

Fear my life streaming!

Re:Which is why I wear a LooxCie all day... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618099)

Cuts both ways. Give it a few years. Video included with bluetooth headsets will be the norm. Everyone will be able to record any and everything around them 24/7 on a FIFO basis. You only keep what you've decided to tag specifically that moment or last available video capture dump.

Now add the ability to record live to your phone and have it relay to an online website. The Twitterati may like this as will other attention whores. Now doubt the useful idiots will be gawking while flagging each moment of their lives in realtime.

"+1!! He picked up the COFFEE! EEeeeeekkkkk" He's sooooo hot!

Re:Which is why I wear a LooxCie all day... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618763)

Looxcie already works that way. but you CAN dump the whole video buffer if you want. having a 6 hour buffer means you can grab things you missed if they happened in the afternoon.

The cool part is the button on it when you hit tag grab the previous 30 seconds as well, so you get every bit of that punk kid crunching his crotch on the railing because he was trying to free run past everyone instead of being polite and waiting his turn.

Good! (4, Interesting)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618055)

No reason only ordinary people should go through life feeling like an amoebae under a microscope.

I enjoy the occasional article posted to Slashdot about law enforcement organizations lobbying against police being videod ( it is time to retire the word "filmed" as obsolete ).

I love the irony of the authorities, at least some of them, being told what they tell us.

"Gee officer, if you are doing your job and following all the rules then you have nothing to be worried about"

Re:Good! (1)

ChipMonk (711367) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618251)

Furthermore, if the LEO is indeed acting properly, your video will be his/her defense when the perp becomes vengeful.

Re:Good! (1)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618399)

The "acting properly" part is my guess as to why they have trouble with being on video

Consequences of this fear: End of BYOD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618089)

I don't think the Slashdot community is thinking of the consequences of this: a crackdown on handheld digital devices in the workplace. This was already a reality at a firm I did business with in India. Workers there had to check their cellphones and tablets at the security desk on their way into the office each day. This was in effect to protect the intellectual property and other secrets (bank account numbers, medical records, etc) that the staff worked with each day.

This simple fear could end BYOD efforts here, if it's as pervasive as the article suggests.

"People don't want to be filmed" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618189)

The article is misleading. People, whether employees or managers, or even CEO's, would prefer not to be filmed. For some, its vanity (my hair!), some its privacy, for others it is fear, and for a small portion, it is guilt.

Very few people *want* to be filmed and held accountable for their actions. Usually that comes with a tradeoff, like a large salary, professional training, groomers, and so forth.

Now I don't know about your workplace, (1)

javascriptjunkie (2591449) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618911)

but this never would have occurred to me. And I don't think my project manager would have thought about it either. At least here, we're way to busy working. If this is a real problem anywhere, there's only going to be one cause. Not enough to do. My advice for any manager who is legitimately worried about this: get busy, and this problem will magically go away. It's uncanny.

Bosses make rules (1, Interesting)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619009)

And one of them might be: No recording devices on company property. Another is: Anything recorded on company time/property belongs to the company.

I've worked at an outfit* where these were the rules. In addition, management refused to contact employees via anything other than company phones, voicemail, e-mail, pagers, etc. In other words, no records were to be left of any business on anything they didn't control.

*At one point, they were assessed a civil penalty of $500 million for ethical violations. It was civil only because they claimed they were unaware of the applicable federal regulations. Folllowing that, they carried on as before, but secured all intra-company communications that could demonstrate intent associated with subsequent activities.

Survey says... (1)

Senior Frac (110715) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619117)

I make dog jackets and I just performed a survey. (The participants were lImited to my existing customer base if you're interested). They apparently have a deep fear of their dogs getting cold. We need a press release on this immediately. Alert MSNBC, Foxnews, and TMZ immediately.

Nice propaganda piece (1)

doston (2372830) | more than 2 years ago | (#39619721)

"But they're scared, people. They're scared what you might do with your little video tools. They're scared that you might catch them, film them, embarrass them, and therefore destroy them. " Oh yeah, they're real scared. Make the little workers feel slightly empowered for a few minutes, so they'll feel better about running on their little hamster wheels . FYI...there's nothing you could ever do with any of it, because as an employee, you have virtually no legal rights. The most you and all your pitiful co workers might get is a much deserved giggle. Now get back to wage-slavery...the lot of you chattel.

No cameras are allowed in my office (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39619769)

I don't allow any cameras, camcorders, audio, or any other recording or data storage device into the building. The security company I employ does 100% search of everyone entering the building (metal detector and millimeter wave backscatter), and requires all employees and visitors to surrender such devices in order to be given access to the building.

There is also no access to the Internet from inside the building, except from approved terminals, and IT Security scrubs everything in and out.

It has nothing to do with paranoia about getting caught doing something. It is about protecting company assets from espionage and theft.

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