Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Company Designs "Big Brother Chip"

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the me-and-my-shadow dept.

Privacy 166

Taco Cowboy writes "Here comes a chip that can pinpoint you in-door and out, it can even tell others on which floor of a building you are located. It's the Broadcom 4752 chip. It takes signals from global navigation satellites, cell phone towers, and Wi-Fi hot spots, coupled with input from gyroscopes, accelerometers, step counters, and altimeters The company calls abilities like this 'ubiquitous navigation,' and the idea is that it will enable a new kind of e-commerce predicated on the fact that shopkeepers will know the moment you walk by their front door, or when you are looking at a particular product, and can offer you coupons at that instant."

cancel ×

166 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Get ready for it, Slashtards. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617893)

Your tin foil hats will protect you no more! Mwahahahaha!

Re:Get ready for it, Slashtards. (5, Funny)

burne (686114) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617917)

Time for tinfoil overalls.

At least it will be a shiny future.

Re:Get ready for it, Slashtards. (1)

daktari (1983452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618377)

Sweet! I am so getting into the tinfoil overall business. Just think of all the people who would care about this very issue! Oh wait...

If I could mod you up past 5/funny, I would. Thanks for making us laugh.

Re:Get ready for it, Slashtards. (1)

Mysticeti (69304) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618555)

Get ready for the "bite my shiny tinfoil ass" Futurama jokes.

Re:Get ready for it, Slashtards. (2)

DigitalSorceress (156609) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618927)

So... THAT explains why folks are always depicted wearing shiny jumpsuits in those old sci-fi shows!!! Downright prophetic.

Re:Get ready for it, Slashtards. (1)

JavaBear (9872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617929)

My trusty OLD Nokia 6150 from 1998 to the rescue :P

No 911 gps support = carriers will disconnect you (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618433)

Your 6150 can't provide the FCC-mandated support for 911 geolocation so any US carrier detecting it in their network will ban its IMEI to avoid being fined by the FCC.

Funny how they "can't" ban stolen phones to protect their customers but they can do it to protect their own pocketbook...

Potato, potato (5, Insightful)

samazon (2601193) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617897)

When you say "coupons" I hear "pushy advertisements."

Re:Potato, potato (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618051)

What's this double potato thing?

Anyway if you're having trouble with your hearing, best to see an otologist.

Re:Potato, potato (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618353)

My oto is in full working order, you inconsiderate clod!

Re:Potato, potato (1)

transporter_ii (986545) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618095)

Yeah. They are going to spend a fortune to give everyone a percentage point or two off an item. Why not save the money and JUST LOWER THE PRICE OF THE ITEM.

This screams, "let's drive our last remaining customers to Amazon.com."

Who comes up with this crap?

Re:Potato, potato (3, Insightful)

s0nicfreak (615390) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618403)

Many reasons, including but not limited to: If you like the product, you may buy another when you don't have a coupon. You may recommend it to friends, who may buy it without the coupon. Many people think they are too cool to use coupons, and will purposely forgo the coupons.

Re:Potato, potato (1)

Mr0bvious (968303) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618729)

Please, please - When I try to bargain a price down and receive the 'Oh you're one of those hagglers' attitudes, I just want to say "put the real fsck price on the product and I won't need to even talk to you' but that will never get me a good price - retail, makes you feel dirtier than sleeping with a $2 hooker.

coupons, capitalist games and santorum redux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618885)

Yeah. They are going to spend a fortune to give everyone a percentage point or two off an item.

Wrong. They are going to continue to spend piss-pots full of your money (and give you back 3% of the 100% of your money that they took, in order to fool you into thinking you got a deal (people are easily fooled), when in fact your were reamed by them.

Then they will take the 90% of the balance of your excess money to profits, to give the owners/shareholders (you know, the real customers) more profit and the other 10% of your money (remember, it is you who pays the extra costs - they take profit) and use it to lure other like-minded suckers with alleged "deals" (as in: "hey kid, have some free crack").

It's just one of hundreds of tricks up their devious sleeves.

Why not save the money and JUST LOWER THE PRICE OF THE ITEM.

Because its a mind-game that has fuck-all to do with giving the money supplier (remember: that's YOU) a break.

Game-playing is such a superior way to fool people into letting them be screwed. Businesses give it to you. And they always get their rewards out of you, their "sugar-daddy"(/ies).

But they always give it to you "up the ass" and leave you broke, busted and feeling like you've been reamed in the end (LOL - an inadvertent "double-entendre").

It's called "capitalism".

Like the dimwit said "keep shoppin', folks".

And pick up some Prep-H while you're out spendin' up a storm.

Re:Potato, potato (1)

daem0n1x (748565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618267)

I don't need anything, anyway, and if I did I don't have money. They can stuff their coupons up their asses.

Why is so much money spent in shit like this? I can think of many uses for these chips that would make people's life better. How come the first thing that comes up is targeted advertising?

Re:Potato, potato (2)

Dishevel (1105119) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618317)

The money is being spent because it is profitable to spend it.
These companies are not out there trowing their money away. They are investing.
Just because you would hate it and see through the shiny coupon to the advertisement and rebel does not mean that most people will.
Most people are fucking cattle. Cattle are profitable.Coupon! Must spend money.

Re:Potato, potato (2)

Loughla (2531696) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618387)

My favorite phrase to hear after a co-worker, family member (or even once my wife) goes shopping, "I had to buy it, I saved sooooo much money on it," or, "I had to spend $x to save $x. But who can pass that up? Look at how much I saved!!!"

You do realize that a better way to save money is to not spend it in the first place, right? People that purchase an item only because of the 'deal' they get on it are cattle. People that shop smart and look for coupons/deals/discounts on something they need anyway are smart. The breakdown comes because we've been trained to believe that wants are now needs.

Re:Potato, potato (1)

s0nicfreak (615390) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618411)

If you don't have money but have coupons, and do things right, you can get stuff for free.

Re:Potato, potato (1)

Scoth (879800) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618425)

My wife's gotten into some couponing stuff, but fortunately she's pretty practical about it. In our travels, we've run into people who don't seem to understand that just because you have a coupon for something doesn't make it the best deal. They'd rather use the $1 off coupon than buy another brand that's $3 cheaper than the one they have a coupon for. The "coupon savings" number on their receipt is their high score and all they care about, even if the total cost is a little more.

Coupons are probably the most effective form of advertising - give people an appearance of great savings and they're more likely to buy your brand and not a cheaper one. Give some of these people the ability to get instant coupons on things they're specifically looking at, and they'll eat it up. At least at first.

Re:Potato, potato (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618515)

But guys! guys! OMG u leik groupon, right? This is just like groupon! you know groups of coupons for groups? Groupon is cool, right? So if we call 'em coupons, everyone will like it! Who doesn't like coupons? You'd have to be some kind of a fascist to not like coupons. Especially groups of coupons!

Perfect Match (1)

foobsr (693224) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617925)

... with cellphones and NSA databases.

CC.

but only if (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617935)

you have the chip on you - otherwise, piss off

Re:but only if (1)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618007)

It's only big brother if it's transmitting its location to the power that be or some company. Else it's just a very accurate GPS receiver

Re:but only if (2)

AchilleTalon (540925) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618529)

If we can make these chips mandatory to Jeovah Witnesses so we can predict when they are about to knock at our door, it would be a great life improvement.

How long? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617937)

How long until these chips are mandatory for "our own safety"?

too late, I have them beat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39617947)

I have walk thru scanners that can be installed at the doorway to your retail establishment that, upon walking through, will determine how much money you have on you in cash and credit, and then will place a gold necklace with a dollar sign around your neck, with the thickest chains and largest jewelry placed upon visitors with the most money. What I DON'T do is track you around the store. That would be a violation of privacy.

Not exactly a new threat, but... (5, Interesting)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617955)

The "one-stop-shopping" nature of the chip is chilling. Consider, Broadcom has seen enough of a market to warrant developing a sophisticated device, the stated purpose of which is to determine it's position and "phone home" with that information. Worse yet, it will also phone in all the personal details about you that it has access to, so that those "coupons" can be quickly crafted. If that's not scary enough, consider that also available to any given "shop keeper", is a list of all the other shops you've visited, and when. Still not bugged enough? Think about this technology in the hands of entities far more dangerous than merchants; law enforcement, for example.

Re:Not exactly a new threat, but... (2)

daktari (1983452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618209)

Think about this technology in the hands of entities far more dangerous than merchants; law enforcement, for example.

More dangerous than merchants? Is that even possible?

Looks like another example of technology catching up with our greed.

Re:Not exactly a new threat, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618233)

Still not bugged enough? Think about this technology in the hands of entities far more dangerous than merchants; law enforcement, for example.

This technology in the hands of the government is the highest concern. Imagine, this chip being implanted in every prisoner; nay, in every citizen. samzenpus' use of "Big Brother Chip" in the title is definitely fear-inducing.

Re:Not exactly a new threat, but... (2)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618297)

The "one-stop-shopping" nature of the chip is chilling. Consider, Broadcom has seen enough of a market to warrant developing a sophisticated device, the stated purpose of which is to determine it's position and "phone home" with that information. Worse yet, it will also phone in all the personal details about you that it has access to, so that those "coupons" can be quickly crafted. If that's not scary enough, consider that also available to any given "shop keeper", is a list of all the other shops you've visited, and when. Still not bugged enough? Think about this technology in the hands of entities far more dangerous than merchants; law enforcement, for example.

And you'll even be stuck with the bills for calls/SMS/data as the phone reports your whereabouts which are then passed on to nearby merchants or watchful agencies. And perhaps also for the calls/SMS/data returned as so-called coupons or comforting security notifications ("wait there, an officer has been dispatched" or "you're not allowed to enter that movie theater").

Re:Not exactly a new threat, but... (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618365)

Think about this technology in the hands of entities far more dangerous than merchants; law enforcement, for example.

So which other entities where you talking about, because as far as I know merchants and law enforcement are the same side of a coin.

Re:Not exactly a new threat, but... (1)

Loughla (2531696) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618427)

Still not bugged enough? Think about this technology in the hands of entities far more dangerous than merchants; law enforcement, for example.

Honestly, at this point government is so inefficient that I'm not concerned about them having my personal information (except maybe when they don't secure said information.

So my name, blood type and address sit in a government storehouse for a hundred years? It'll be at least that long before someone is hired that can properly design, then complete form F-AA11b.1.1.X2 'request for acquisition of Loughla's account information'.

In all seriousness, though, government agencies don't scare me as much as private entities.

Re:Not exactly a new threat, but... (4, Informative)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618523)

TFS is highly misleading. The chip doesn't "phone home" or give data to marketers. It is just an integration of existing phone tech to reduce cost and power consumption. Just like current phones any snooping will be software controlled by the vendor.

Re:Not exactly a new threat, but... (1)

skids (119237) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618833)

Think about in less dangerous hands. Like the guy who currently has to walk around buildings painstakingly clicking his location on a map in order to complete a WiFi quality survey (no, the major vendors haven't couple a high quality GPS/DR system in yet.)

seems like a power hog with all the radios in it (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617961)

seems like a power hog with all the radios in it also there are building where the cell phone signal is poor and GPS may not work in them as well.

Re:seems like a power hog with all the radios in i (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618187)

seems like a power hog with all the radios in it also there are building where the cell phone signal is poor and GPS may not work in them as well.

Yes, but it's also got gyroscopes, accelerometers, step counters, and altimeters -- though I suppose you could be dancing a jig in a hyperbaric chamber with high vibration somewhere in that building with poor mobile and GPS signals?

Re:seems like a power hog with all the radios in i (1)

Mr0bvious (968303) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618205)

Radio receivers? I thought they in themselves were cheap (power wise). I thought it was the transmitters that were power hungry, I think receivers will be fine.

Re:seems like a power hog with all the radios in i (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618287)

Wrong. Receiving costs about as much as transmitting (power wise).

Re:seems like a power hog with all the radios in i (1)

Mr0bvious (968303) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618605)

I thought, I thought, I think I'm wrong :).

I promise to never make this mistake again.

Hmmm, seems my thoughts and reality are, well, different :)... I've always believed (I don't know why) that transmitting cost orders of magnitude more energy than receiving radio waves.. I'm sure this is a common misconception, anyone care to explain why it's not true?

Re:seems like a power hog with all the radios in i (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618831)

This sounds wrong...so take AM/FM radio...let's say I have some multi-megawatt station. All my listeners need multi-megawatt pocket radios to listen?
Or are you high?

Re:seems like a power hog with all the radios in i (1)

mikael (484) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618341)

Samsung Galaxy II does the GPS / Wi-Fi geolocation bit. Google put together a list of all the WiFi hotspots in the world and uses that to augment GPS. Makes me wonder whether these phones are calling home with all the WiFi zones they have detected.

!new (4, Informative)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617969)

Japanese mobile phones have had this for a while. Personal navigation apps that can guide you through underground stations and inside buildings using wifi and accelerometers when GPS is unavailable.

Honest it really is for e-commerce (0)

NSN A392-99-964-5927 (1559367) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617973)

Was this funded by retailers or just another piss poor attempt to implement another good big brother idea. It never ceases to amaze me how many people get conned into this type of technology. Mind you if you are female and blonde; you will accept this with open arms and cannot resist a discount on those pair of new shoes.

It also reminds me of the old joke " Two Blondes walked in to a shop. You would have thought one of them would have seen it"

Re:Honest it really is for e-commerce (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618863)

Mind you if you are female and blonde; you will accept this with open arms

just like the sex pest stalker who's following her.

Engineering oppression (3, Insightful)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617977)

Growing up in the 80s, living through the boom times of the 90s, and looking back today. What I used to think was was a path to freedom and salvation of the intellectual variety, I now see as our oppression. Slavery of a new type. Step by step we are sealing our own doom while at the same time handing over the keys to a new elite. The social consolidation is giving rise to the new aristocrats.

I really hope I'm wrong.

Re:Engineering oppression (2)

gottspeed (2060872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618005)

No, you're right, but don't worry; Its the way of things. This situation can't be avoided. There are more smart people than dumb people, its why elite do their best to rise to the top, they know what happens when you don't.

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

gottspeed (2060872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618017)

*More dumb people than smart people. I haven't had my coffee yet.

Re:Engineering oppression (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618459)

Well, from my history book I learned what happens after they piss off the peasants too much.

Re:Engineering oppression (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618617)

No, you're right, but don't worry; Its the way of things. This situation can't be avoided. There are more smart people than dumb people, its why elite do their best to rise to the top, they know what happens when you don't.

Huh? Half the population has an IQ of under 100. And of those who fall into the other half, "dumb" thinking is hardly uncommon. Consider Shockley's ideas on race, for example.

I don't know how you define "elite", but I know more than one Mensa member who has strenuously avoided rising to any sort of top.

Umm... which half are you in? (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618877)

IQ is an average, not a median.

therefore half the population is not necessarily under 100,

their aggregate score on the other hand........

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618917)

We've seen the elite in charge recently.

They are not as you describe.

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

MrKaos (858439) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618103)

Growing up in the 80s, living through the boom times of the 90s, and looking back today. What I used to think was was a path to freedom and salvation of the intellectual variety, I now see as our oppression. Slavery of a new type. Step by step we are sealing our own doom while at the same time handing over the keys to a new elite. The social consolidation is giving rise to the new aristocrats.

I really hope I'm wrong.

Technology has always been a gift to humanity from humanity. It can be used to free us or enslave us, it all depends on who is in control of the technology.

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618133)

Technology has always been a gift to humanity from humanity. It can be used to free us or enslave us, it all depends on who is in control of the technology.

When is humanity in charge of the technology, as opposed to the elite and their bourgeois followers?

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618131)

Its a new location chip that is optional and doesnt exactly tell everyone else where you are. Did GPS phone home? Was it "sealing our doom and handing the keys over to a new elite"?

Seriously, what does this chip have to do with what youre talking about?

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

pla (258480) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618203)

Did GPS phone home? Was it "sealing our doom and handing the keys over to a new elite"?

Um, yes, actually - Subpoenaing cell phone records (for the few providers that don't just hand them over to any moron that asks) has become standard practice for legal cases ranging from murder to plain ol' divorce, and Zeus help you if you just happen to have taken a scenic route on the "wrong" day.


Seriously, what does this chip have to do with what youre talking about?

GPS can only reliably track you in the open - As soon as you go into a building, if you have any signal, you can count on it having an error larger than the building itself.

Now "they" can not only tell where you went in terms of address, but a play-by-play of every step you take. Every move you make. Someone will be watching you.

Re:Engineering oppression (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618461)

and Zeus help you if you just happen to have taken a scenic route on the "wrong" day.

Citations, or simple conspiracy?

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

pla (258480) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618659)

Citations, or simple conspiracy?

More common than you might think [lmgtfy.com] .

Re:Engineering oppression (1)

mikael (484) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618405)

You don't need GPS in a mobile phone to determine location. Cellphone towers are arranged in a hexagonal pattefn. That way, the signal strength from the nearest tower can determine location to a few dozen meters.

Since cell-phone towers dont move around, this gves the cell phone company the ability to track your location.

Re:Engineering oppression (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618473)

MY cellphone company can track you, but not me as I have no cellphone...

Re:Engineering oppression (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618783)

Slavery. Riiiight.

Settle down, Francis.

circumvention (5, Funny)

mug funky (910186) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617993)

wet a towel and wrap it round your head.

then get your ass to Mars.

Hack / Jailbreak This (2)

retroworks (652802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39617995)

My wife accidentally ran my new passport with its RFID tag through the washing machine. I still get through customs. The existence of the chips does not make them infallible.

Re:Hack / Jailbreak This (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618075)

I was an idiot, and didn't pull my new passport with its RFID tag out of my pockets, before my wife did the laundry.

FTFY

Re:Hack / Jailbreak This (1)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618097)

My wife accidentally ran my new passport with its RFID tag through the washing machine. I still get through customs. The existence of the chips does not make them infallible.

Have her accidentally run it through the microwave for a few seconds. I believe you'll find more satisfactory results. Or not..., depends on what "satisfies" you.

Re:Hack / Jailbreak This (1)

bytesex (112972) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618419)

She'd get hot ?

Stop the Coupons! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618025)

Just lower your damn price!

Re:Stop the Coupons! (1)

game kid (805301) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618117)

But then there'd be no excuse to push tracker technology and sell newspapers! Think of the lost sales, friend, the lost sales!

Re:Stop the Coupons! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618479)

Pretty much this.

The only thing a coupon tells me is simply that your prices are too high. If it wasn't, you could not afford giving me a lower price. If that's not a good enough reason NOT to go to your store, I don't know what is.

Who do i invoice ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618027)

for using my data communications processing service ?
ii have costs, electricity, device wear and tear, commercial reading services ?

you thought i was just giving you that data for free ? think again chump

Re:Who do i invoice ? (1)

Loughla (2531696) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618485)

How many 'free aps' do you have on your smartphone? How much did you pay for your internet browser?

The submitter is a moron (2, Interesting)

klingens (147173) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618035)

This is an improved GPS chip, allowing a phone to pinpoint its location even when GPS is spotty.
Shopkeepers won't get the data, even if the phone companies would be allowed to sell location data cause there is no ROI: not enough people will have such a chip to even make it worthwhile. Neither do they need data that detailed. As some other poster already wrote: they'd rather know how much money the customer has, not where he is right now. Both, the have not and the billionaire can watch the same Mercedes 600SL or Smart car with their phone in their pocket. Doesn't tell the shopowner who can actually afford the luxury car.

What can happen is that the government subpoenas the telco location data for a subscribe just like they do now and that the better accuracy helps them to pinpoint the location of the subscribe better. This can be used for "OMG evil gubmint!" or it can be used, probably a lot less of course, for finding a missing person e.g. inside an avalanche.

Of course without deliberately wrong sensationalism like this, the pagehits aren't coming.

Re:The submitter is a moron (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618157)

Skimming TFA, I see nothing about surveillance, or reporting someone's location back to any Big Brother entity. It talks about a nice new chip that can use many different resources including GPS, WiFi SSIDs, Bluetooth beacons, and dead reckoning to accurately determine location in adverse circumstances. The only reference to the retail industry at all is this:

"The use case [for Bluetooth beacons] might be malls," says Pomerantz. "It would be a good investment for a mall to put up a deployment—perhaps put them up every 100 yards, and then unlock the ability for people walking around mall to get very precise couponing information."

So I can walk around a mall, and my phone will tell me that the restaurant I just passed is having a special. Wow. I'm terrified by the implications here. I might actually have to exercise some willpower!

The summary is utter sensationalist crap.

Re:The submitter is a moron (2)

kenh (9056) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618371)

And if every shop participates, your "device" will never stop vibrating, and you will soon turn it off - information overload. I pass by many more stores than I stop in, and no discount imaginable would suffice to get me into Yankee Candles or Talbots...

Why? (2)

linuxdude96 (1382885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618045)

Why would i want this chip? And who would put in their products? Will it not make the products less appealing?

Re:Why? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618491)

You haven't been on this planet too long, have you?

Who will want this? People who prefer paying a few bucks less on an overpriced product to having a privacy. In other words, pretty much every idiot out there.

The pitch for his product is wrong. (3, Interesting)

Karmashock (2415832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618069)

They're saying it would be great for merchants to know where you are but I'd actually have to carry it and keep it charged for it to work. So it has to offer me a benefit and instant coupons or getting bombarded by ads isn't a good selling point.

A better application for this would be urban GPS. A big problem with current GPS is that it doesn't work in dense urban cities. Try to use GPS in New York... it's almost useless. First off, you're underground half the time. Second, even when you're above ground you tend to be amongst big buildings that obscure the sky. However, I get great cellphone reception pretty much anywhere in New York and wifi hotspots are pretty ubiquitous even if they're mostly locked. If your mobile navigation could make use of other static radio signals for navigation then GPS would work deep within the urban jungle. And THAT is valuable.

The pitch of "oh merchants can predict your location" is asinine. if you wanted to sell the tracking feature then I suppose this would work for tracking boxes. After all, existing tracking technology that relies on GPS won't work in warehouses, underground, or even inside of industrial shipping containers. But something that could triangulate cell towers should work just about damn near anywhere there is "civilization"...

All and all, a neat little chip and I wish it well. Whoever is coming up with the applications for it needs to be smacked around a little with a frozen trout.

Re:The pitch for his product is wrong. (1)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618107)

They're saying it would be great for merchants to know where you are but I'd actually have to carry it and keep it charged for it to work.

Just like your mobile phone... Right?

Re:The pitch for his product is wrong. (0)

Karmashock (2415832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618279)

Why would I willingly let my cellphone tell them that?

Think about it.

The pitch is stupid. that doesn't offer the consumer an incentive to give away that sort of information. If we were getting something for it, fine. But we're not giving it away for free.

Not for free; for google navigation app (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618525)

Of course you won't give your geolocation information away for free. You will continue to trade it for the services provided by your phone's Google Navigation app like you do today.

You *did* read the google nav app's current terms of service that say you agree to give your geolocation data to Google even when your phobe's GPS is disabled, right??

Re:The pitch for his product is wrong. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618723)

Usable for targeting in general. Guided missiles, computer assisted rifle targeting, setting off bombs when two or more specific signals in appropriate range of each other,,,,

Investigative uses abound as well,,,

Model 666 on its way to everyone's bodies soon! You can locate your child with this! Think of your children!

Yay coupons! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618085)

All that jazz just to give you coupons? Rube Goldberg lives on.

Re:Yay coupons! (1)

kenh (9056) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618313)

Because big banners in the shop windows are useless at communicating with shoppers, right?

Living in the past much? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618111)

We have 2012. Only retards leave their house to do shopping.

The whole idea of
1) taking a shower
2) getting dressed
3) putting shoes on
4) driving a bike, car, tram
5) get into a shop
6) chose from the little they have to offer
7) standing in line
8) paying for the products you chose
9) leaving shop
10) getting home
11) shit doesn't work
12) back to 4).. ...is like.. the past, dude..

education is expensive... so we better tag stupid people with chips.. because we want to know where they are and what they are doing...

Or you can make your own, this came out in 2007 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618115)

http://obex.parallax.com/objects/713/ Here it is, open source and open design, to boot.

This is public data anyway (2)

concealment (2447304) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618121)

I don't have a reasonable expectation of privacy walking down the street. I have it in my home, or another person's home if I trust that person. Expecting that stores and service providers will give me this same courtesy is foolishness. It also seems that if I turn off my cell phone and laptop, I'll be invisible to this magic chip as well. Only the shadow knows.

More BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618183)

The Comercial world already invades our privacy and lives enough as it is. insurance companies track your driving, and lets not forget the government stormtroopers that will track you down anytime they don't like you talking about a specific subject.

And for all of those that think "You have nothing to hide if your not doing anything wrong", remember the Jews said the same thing in Nazi Germany and look where they ended up.

Time to take extreme measures and block all unauthorized communications such as your cell phone (and its hidden apps), and your credit cards, and ID, your car, and anything else you can think of. You will need to test your shielding also.

Other use cases? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618199)

Why malls? The hardware seems to be great! The chip might provide better navigation, it has more input sources which any sane implementation can turn into higher accuracy, with better availability & faster response times.
It just needs an on/off switch for the beacon or a broadcast-nothing mode to address privacy concerns.

Alarmist much? (1)

gmarsh (839707) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618255)

Unless they're implanting this fucking chip in you, the big brother implication of this chip is pretty much bullshit.

It has one damn good application - reliable navigation, indoors and out. Suppose you've just arrived in Montreal and don't know a thing about the place, but you want to hit up Schwartz's for the sandwich and a pickle that everyone's told you to try. Now your phone can direct you to the nearest subway station, direct you to the correct platform so you don't take the train in the wrong direction, tell you when to get off the train, transfer you to a bus, and drop you off for some kosher deliciousness without having to ask anyone for directions. (Which in Montreal, will either get you told off in French, or you'll end up getting directed to the "club with the best girls" instead of where you want to go..)

As advertising, works until... (1)

jitterman (987991) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618281)

I could see this working as it does in some films, but eventually, just like with anything else, the "Ooh shiny!" factor wears off, and people will tune them (ads, discount offers, etc) out the same way we do regular ads, rough language on TV (compared to what was allowed a few decades ago in the US), and so on. Not that it won't have an effect at all, but our passive filters will adapt.

Let's think this through (3, Interesting)

kenh (9056) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618299)

OK, so I've got a device in my pocket - a cellphone, call it a tablet, whatever - and as I walk through the mall it vibrates with special offers from each retailer I pass in front of - how long do I leave this "feature" enabled? Two, three stores? The fact that the device is "smart" and will deduce from my facebook status of "single" and that I'm male that I'm not interested in offers from Yankee Candle, Bed, Bath and Beyond or Victoria's Secret doesn't really help much...

It will be the most disabled "feature" on personal devices, and will sink any product where the device is subsidised by the alerts.

I see a great market in the "I've fallen and I can't get up" device market - concerned children will buy them for their elderly parents who are still living independently, and let's not forget the "where's my kid" market segment, but this location-based direct marketing is a dumb idea. period.

Re:Let's think this through (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618803)

OK, so I've got a device in my pocket - a cellphone, call it a tablet, whatever - and as I walk through the mall it vibrates with special offers from each retailer I pass in front of - how long do I leave this "feature" enabled? Two, three stores?

You think there will be a "disable" button? I envy the alternative universe you live in - beam me up!

Article is overblown / Nothing to see here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618347)

While this all sounds good and true. The article takes BC's statement of WiFi integration allowed as WiFi integration provided. This is just a multi-constellation GNSS chip. It MAY have an engine to make use of WiFi / Cell tower integrated to the chip, but it doesn't have the DB, so, in short, already been done elsewhere (can anyone say iPhone?).

What this does do is make it less power consuming than most other chips, so that is nice... but aside from that... PR speak.

Just What I Never Wanted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618467)

How does this benefit the end user?

The Beast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618581)

And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

Sounds like the movie minority report (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39618625)

Yeah, there's no way this can be used for ill.

Go - Away - Advertisements (1)

Tyr07 (2300912) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618665)

I'd rather them give me an app that scans barcodes and gives me the best deal / price. That way I can also receive their competitors coupons.
Oh wait, that exists.

No, I do NOT want EXTRA ways to be BOMBARDED EVERYWHERE I GO WITH UR CHITTY OVERPRICED MERCHANDISE.

It has nothing to do with coupons to save you money, either. If they could be promised a way to advertise fake low prices to you instantly then they would raise the prices and the 'coupon' price would be regular price. They just want a new excuse to throw ads in your face nonstop about their products.

I've worked in stores that put things 'on sale' and their price actually goes up. It also has a false original price too. Maybe when it was brand new it was that prices months ago but it certainly wasn't before the sale.

Pitched for advertising (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618755)

Why is it that everything has to be pitched as a new and better way to do advertising? Is it just because marketers have no imagination and all want to be the next Google, or is it that marketing has gotten so out of control that it wags the dog now? Maybe all the ad supported stuff on the Internet has allowed salesmen to finally take over the world.

What kind of accuracy? (1)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618815)

Nifty but are we talking 10 meter accuracy? 10 meters could mean the difference between Hot Dog on a Stick and Sbarro.

Be afraid, I am an employer (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 2 years ago | (#39618835)

and I really want one of these to mount to a name tag....

and I am not the only one with these desires.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?