Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

The Liberated Pixel Cup: a Game Making Contest From the CC, FSF, and OpenGameArt

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the get-your-game-face-on dept.

Open Source 53

Lendrick writes "OpenGameArt.org, the Free Software Foundation, and the Creative Commons are teaming up to bring the Liberated Pixel Cup, a free-as-in-freedom game making contest starting on June 1st and going through July 31st. The contest will be divided into two phases: the first phase will be about adding on to a consistent set of art commissioned specially for the contest, and the second phase, starting on July 1st, will be about building games using the provided art."

cancel ×

53 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Gamemaker (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39646759)

Gamemaker you nigger lovers!

Re:Gamemaker (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39646853)

Your suggestion is bad and you should feel bad!

Re:Gamemaker (1)

subanark (937286) | more than 2 years ago | (#39646951)

Your code may only depend on free libraries.
From the rules:
Platform: Your code must be able to be compiled and run on a 100% free-as-in-freedom platform. It may not make use of any proprietary libraries or VMs. Just to be clear, we cannot accept games that require any of the following: Flash, Silverlight, XNA, Unity, Windows, MacOS (or OSX), iOS, the official Oracle JVM, or similar. It is perfectly acceptable if your game runs on any of these platforms, but it must also work on an open platform (we strongly recommend making sure that your program run on modern flavors of GNU/Linux, as all of the judges will have access to it).

Fortunately for me, my code typically doesn't depend on the "official Oracle JVM" (Please no snarky comments about how Java is old/bad/ect... its what I use and I like it).

Re:Gamemaker (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647197)

This makes me wonder what, if any, frameworks or APIs are left. I get that they want the end product to be free, but the reason that those frameworks and the like are used are that they make creating the game so much easier. If they can't use any of the available ones, then this contest will suck: canned artwork so they all look alike and no shortcuts coupled with the short time limit will get in the way of innovation. Oh well, GIGO.

Re:Gamemaker (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647273)

> ... then this contest will suck ...

Correction: The games will suck, but the contest will clarify what the 100% free world is missing in terms of game development. I would argue that currently there is a lot of guesswork and misinformation involved; the contest will give more solid data.

Re:Gamemaker (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39688595)

No, there was a previous competition that did largely the same thing: http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?board=37.0 [tigsource.com]

Basically, one group made art, another group made games from the art. A pretty successful game called Realm of the Mad God came from that: http://store.steampowered.com/app/200210/ [steampowered.com]

Yeah, many games will suck, but it doesn't mean they all have to. Hope we see some great results like from the first Assemblee contest (http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?board=38.0)

Re:Gamemaker (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647423)

There are a few of these frameworks, and APIs. Pygame is the only one I ever played with but if all this contest does is generate interest in such frameworks that would be a success.

Re:Gamemaker (1)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647683)

SDL has binaries for many platforms and is open-source, so I would imagine that will be allowed.

Re:Gamemaker (1)

Novus (182265) | more than 2 years ago | (#39650639)

OpenJDK is pretty much GPL 2 (with exceptions to allow applications to have other licenses), so Java should be OK as long as you don't use any Oracle-specific stuff. The blog clarifies that open source OpenGL implementations exist and may be used. Lots of game programming libraries can be found in most Linux distributions (e.g. SDL, ClanLib, PyGame); as far as I can tell they should all be OK.

No thanks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39646961)

Considering there's never been a good open-source game, ever, the idea that one would get made in a one-month contest is extremely unlikely.

Re:No thanks (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647477)

Battle for Wesnoth was decent.

Re:No thanks (1)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 2 years ago | (#39648335)

And Tremolous. And Ufo:Alien Invasion.

Re:No thanks (1)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647699)

Ever tried Nexuiz?

Re:No thanks (1)

HeckRuler (1369601) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647749)

I liked Armagetron. Pretty close to what the original source depicted.

Re:No thanks (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39648453)

Singularity [emhsoft.com] is pretty sweet. and addictive.

So is FreeCiv [wikia.com] .

Re:No thanks (1)

Internetuser1248 (1787630) | more than 2 years ago | (#39650751)

The corsix-th [google.com] theme hospital project is coming along nicely. I am also avidly following the openclonk [openclonk.org] project. Yes I know neither of these are finished, and I know that is main complaint about oss games, but corsix is totally playable, and openclonk is one of those projects that is never meant to be finished, but will instead simply grow and improve forever, much like the original clonk series.

No offense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647033)

... but it already looks like a shitty game.

Two pixels ... (3, Funny)

danwiz (538108) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647049)

Two pixels ... one cup?

A two-phase art competition?

>> the first phase will be about adding ...
>> the second phase ... using


I'm seeing way too many similarities for comfort.

Re:Two pixels ... (2)

paroneayea (642895) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647167)

I'm the one who coined the name, and yes... it's been pointed out already: http://evan.status.net/notice/1367418 [status.net]

Two free culture non-profit foundations, one cup.

I have a good sense of humor about it, though. :)

Re:Two pixels ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647719)

As well, I think "liberated" may not have been the best verb to apply as it is a synonym for theft. A theme most hobbyist game programmers want to distance themselves from.

Though actually the Stolen Pixel Cup sounds pretty cool.

Re:Two pixels ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647789)

As well, I think "liberated" may not have been the best verb to apply as it is a synonym for theft. A theme most hobbyist game programmers want to distance themselves from.

You're publicly projecting [wikipedia.org] again.

Re:Two pixels ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647907)

You're publicly projecting again.

...as will every news outlet beyond the nerdsphere.

Naming stuff isn't easy, no doubt there, but a little care can be taken too.

Heck, the "All Free Pixel Cup" means the same thing but sounds so much better, whatever, I hope they do well and have fun...

Re:Two pixels ... (1)

Lendrick (314723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39649355)

Just to be absolutely clear about this: Any art that is found to be submitted in violation of copyright will be immediately disqualified. We want to add a body of art to the commons so people don't have to rip art from other places. :)

Fantasy themed content only? (1)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647127)

I can't tell if all submitted art must be fantasy/steampunk based (as they comment in their blog post as their "base theme"), or if thats just their own contribution and others are free to submit whatever themed content they want?

Re:Fantasy themed content only? (2)

paroneayea (642895) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647177)

Hi! You're welcome to submit in whatever thematic style you like (steampunk, fantasy, zombie office attack) as long as it matches the style guide (perspective, lighting, etc). We'll have that out soon. I'd love to have a lot of variety in content!

Re:Fantasy themed content only? (2)

Bram Stolk (24781) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647421)

The lighting in your example is inconsistent.
The trees have shadows straight below.
The house has the light coming from the left.

Re:Fantasy themed content only? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39667137)

The example was made with some now outdated art, it will be fixed in the actual artwork to be used in the contest.

Seems legit... (1)

mitzampt (2002856) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647141)

... when is the release date and where can I buy it from?

Re:Seems legit... (2)

paroneayea (642895) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647223)

Not sure how serious you are, but as in terms of "dates" the contest dates are set in the rules: http://lpc.opengameart.org/content/lpc-rules [opengameart.org]

And if you want to "buy it"... well you can donate to us here [fsf.org] ! :)

Re:Seems legit... (1)

mitzampt (2002856) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647729)

Well you blew my funny remark, but it's ok. Thank you. You realize that when the games are ready and the word gets out people will try to buy it, until they find them advertised as free. FSF is an example of civic sense in the global village, it's a shame that so few get it. I'm looking forward to see the results.

Re:Seems legit... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647559)

It's an opensource game, you only have to buy support for it.

I could be wrong (1)

Draconi (38078) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647203)

But I believe the 32x32 tile size is the same for RPG Maker. Regardless, like the contest says, these tiles could work in a variety of genres and its exciting to see more art become available from the community!

I am against restrictive art (1)

Moosader (1410323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647237)

It feels almost like the concept of 'Free' has gone to the other side of the spectrum in that it is also very restrictive in how it can be used. I have read through the OpenGameArt FAQ and one example is that- if someone's art they're providing is licensed as GPL, then the code must ALSO be licensed as GPL. At first I thought that possibly the license would only apply to modifying and redistributing just the art itself, but I find the idea that using specific assets dictates how you produce your project to be annoying, at the very least. Now, the idea that making a game also has to run only on 100% free-platform sounds even more asinine. So I think for me, personally, and the developers I hang out with, we'll prefer to go the way of offering and using only CC-0 and CC-by works. I understand the concept of having control and freedom over the devices you use, but at this point in time it also seems like you're doing yourself a great disservice if you restrict yourself to only using FSF-approved software/hardware.

Re:I am against restrictive art (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647355)

So don't use their free art. Make your own.

The game does not have to only run on free-platforms, but has to run on them as well. There is no point to a FREE game that requires non-FREE software to run it.

Re:I am against restrictive art (4, Insightful)

Lendrick (314723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647451)

Just want to set the record straight on a couple of things:

The FSF considers art to be non-functional data that does not trigger the GPL's linking requirement:

Data that has an aesthetic purpose, rather than a functional one, may be included in a free system distribution as long as its license gives you permission to copy and redistribute, both for commercial and non-commercial purposes. For example, there are some game engines that have been released under the GNU GPL, and have accompanying game information—a world map, game graphics, and so on—released under such a verbatim distribution license. This kind of data can be part of a free system distribution.

Source: http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-system-distribution-guidelines.html [gnu.org]

Secondly, the art will be dual licensed as CC-BY-SA, so even if you happen to not like the GPL, you need not use the art under that license. Also, while the contest requires your art to be CC-BY-SA and GPL for the sake of consistency, you are also entirely free to license it under a less restrictive license as well.

Finally, your assertion that the game has to run only on a 100% free platform is false. Your game can run on any platforms you want it to. It's just that those platforms must include a 100% free platform.

We don't want to restrict what you do with your code and art. However, we do have a set of standards for entry -- as long as those standards are met, you can do anything you want with your work.

Re:I am against restrictive art (1)

Moosader (1410323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647595)

Just want to set the record straight on a couple of things:

The FSF considers art to be non-functional data that does not trigger the GPL's linking requirement:

Data that has an aesthetic purpose, rather than a functional one, may be included in a free system distribution as long as its license gives you permission to copy and redistribute, both for commercial and non-commercial purposes. For example, there are some game engines that have been released under the GNU GPL, and have accompanying game information—a world map, game graphics, and so on—released under such a verbatim distribution license. This kind of data can be part of a free system distribution.

Source: http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-system-distribution-guidelines.html [gnu.org]

Secondly, the art will be dual licensed as CC-BY-SA, so even if you happen to not like the GPL, you need not use the art under that license. Also, while the contest requires your art to be CC-BY-SA and GPL for the sake of consistency, you are also entirely free to license it under a less restrictive license as well.

Finally, your assertion that the game has to run only on a 100% free platform is false. Your game can run on any platforms you want it to. It's just that those platforms must include a 100% free platform.

We don't want to restrict what you do with your code and art. However, we do have a set of standards for entry -- as long as those standards are met, you can do anything you want with your work.

I was just referencing someone else's comment that made it sound like it had to be on a 100% free platform. I didn't see a comment it was responding to, so I didn't know if it was out of context. I am glad to find out that the art does not affect your software license; the FAQ page for OGA made it sound like this was the case.

Re:I am against restrictive art (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647589)

Your complaint can also be extended to the artwork itself, especially since the different CC licenses are not compatible with each other. According to their own FAQ page, if the resulting license is a CC BY-SA, you can only use artwork that is completely your own generation, in the public domain, licensed under the BY or BY-SA (but not BY-NC or BY-NC-SA) license or under another compatible license, in which case you better call your attorney (or the contest calls their's) to make sure it is compatible.

2d only (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647429)

I'm a blender 3d artist, and have worked on blow than a few games.. I was excited about this. Then I saw that it was 2d only..so I'm out.

Re:2d only (1)

Lendrick (314723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647517)

If this goes over well, we're discussing moving in different directions next year (and that may very well include 3D).

In the meantime, I'll plug a similar contest that might interest you on behalf of a friend of mine, that's going on right now. :)

http://tempestintheaether.org/index.php/news/133-open-tempest-3d [tempestintheaether.org]

Re:2d only (1)

Moosader (1410323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647621)

Coolcool. My community also just last year did a two-phase, "Make art/music for our CC-by/CC-0 community pool, then make games using only those assets" competition, which ended up going pretty well (for our size, that is). Maybe there should be a directory of art-generating competitions and projects.

Re:2d only (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647701)

So, what stops you from doing the art in 3d and rendering it to 2d "sprites" ?

Re:2d only (1)

Lendrick (314723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39649275)

Nothing at all, really. :)

That said, you'll probably need to "post process" it in a pixel editor to make it consistent with the art theme (since art entries are being judged on consistency, among other things).

Linux support pretty much required? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39647533)

I was sort of interested in this before reading the rules.

"Platform: Your code must be able to be compiled and run on a 100% free-as-in-freedom platform. It may not make use of any proprietary libraries or VMs. Just to be clear, we cannot accept games that require any of the following: Flash, Silverlight, XNA, Unity, Windows, MacOS (or OSX), iOS, the official Oracle JVM, or similar. It is perfectly acceptable if your game runs on any of these platforms, but it must also work on an open platform (we strongly recommend making sure that your program run on modern flavors of GNU/Linux, as all of the judges will have access to it)."

Funny, they don't force the artists to use GIMP over tools they are familiar with. Sometimes people just like using a game competition as an excuse to make a game and not as a platform for some idealogical political crap. Why else would so many people enter into game jams where there aren't even winners? Can we also assume that the judges are savvy enough to compile and install my game on Linux (and it's dependencies)? Can I require them to have working OpenGL even if that means they need to install scary proprietary GL drivers?

The way these GPL people push their ideals really tick me off sometimes. I've sort of jokingly thought that I should change my open source projects from a BSD license to a modified one that doesn't allow static linking with GPL libraries. Seems fair right? Why shouldn't I also punish developers for using restrictive licenses (such as the GPL).

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647635)

This is free stuff, you are not losing anything by not using it.

These are FREE culture folks, why would they host a contest contrary to their beliefs?

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39647725)

Python, SDL, GTK+, OpenJDK etc - you just have to be able to run it on a system without requiring non-free software to be present.

Here's a good indicator: if you can also run it on a standard debian install, you are probably meeting the requirement.

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (3, Insightful)

mmmmbeer (107215) | more than 2 years ago | (#39648087)

They aren't forcing anything on you. They only insist that you don't force things on them.

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39649173)

Damn Commies! ^h^h^h^h^h^h^h Libertarians

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (1)

brit74 (831798) | more than 2 years ago | (#39650009)

Software under copyright doesn't force anything on anyone because everyone is still *free* not to use it. Similarly, if I give you a ride in my car, don't complain about how I'm "restricting your freedom" because me giving you a ride is contingent on you not yelling obscenities out of the window.

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (1)

armanox (826486) | more than 2 years ago | (#39648477)

I don't dabble in OpenGL, but I thought the 2D stuff was supported in the open source drivers?

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (3, Informative)

Lendrick (314723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39648613)

Funny, they don't force the artists to use GIMP over tools they are familiar with. Sometimes people just like using a game competition as an excuse to make a game and not as a platform for some idealogical political crap. Why else would so many people enter into game jams where there aren't even winners?

As has been stated earlier, it is perfectly fine if your game runs on any of those proprietary platforms listed. It just needs to also run on a free-as-in-freedom platform, since that's the point of the contest. To be clear, it's not about restricting developers, it's about not restricting users. If your game requires a proprietary toolkit such as XNA, you've limited yourself to people who have purchased Windows. If you build your game out of free libraries, as long as you do it correctly, it will run very happily on Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

Can we also assume that the judges are savvy enough to compile and install my game on Linux (and it's dependencies)?

The rules address this question:

Ease of use: Your game should be easy to compile and run. You won't be disqualified automatically if a judge is unable to run your game, but it will count against you. You are advised to avoid having large numbers of obscure dependencies or requiring bleeding edge (unstable) libraries.

I think it's pretty clear from that that the judges are willing to compile your game in order to run it, but would appreciate if you stick to relatively common libraries and make sure compilation is a smooth process.

Can I require them to have working OpenGL even if that means they need to install scary proprietary GL drivers?

Your tone here is unnecessarily rude. For the record, there are non-proprietary OpenGL drivers that work just fine, so you don't need to worry about OpenGL support.

The way these GPL people push their ideals really tick me off sometimes. I've sort of jokingly thought that I should change my open source projects from a BSD license to a modified one that doesn't allow static linking with GPL libraries. Seems fair right? Why shouldn't I also punish developers for using restrictive licenses (such as the GPL).

In the grand scheme of things, allowing contest entries to use any other license (even CC0) in addition to the GPL is a pretty poor way of "pushing" the GPL on people, don't you think? We're requiring it for licensing consistency, because it provides a level of freedom that we deem necessary for the contest. If you wish to grant your users additional freedoms by releasing your code under other licenses in addition to the GPL, that's completely fine.

Re:Linux support pretty much required? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39649389)

The way these GPL people push their ideals really tick me off sometimes.

So if Microsoft held a game competition, you wouldn't participate if they required you to use Windows or .NET? Come on.

Maybe we'll get another Xonotic out of this... (1)

tommasorepetti (2485820) | more than 2 years ago | (#39648559)

This could yield something amazing. Even if this round will comply with Richard Stallman's increasingly delusional understanding of free software, the results should be interesting to watch. This competition is unbiased enough also to merit the interest of the conventional video games industry and may be a way for new talent to make itself known. I think more importantly, though, this will again demonstrate the truly open source gaming is a very viable concept.

Re:Maybe we'll get another Xonotic out of this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39691967)

I'd love to see Carmack come up with something. I'd pay hard $$$ for a complete GNU/Linux friendly FPS.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?