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KOffice Descendent Calligra Office and Creativity Suite Hits Release

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the sometimes-they-come-back dept.

KDE 72

jrepin writes "The Calligra team has announced the first release of the Calligra suite of office and creativity applications. This marks the end of a long development period lasting almost one and a half year. It is the first release in a long series which is planned to make improved applications every 4 months. Calligra is a continuation of the old KOffice project and it may be interesting for KOffice users to know what they will get. Some highlights are: a completely rewritten text layout engine that can handle most of the advanced layout features of OpenDocument Format (ODF), simplified user interface, support for larger parts of the ODF specification (for example line endings like arrows), and improved import filters for Microsoft document formats. There are also two new applications: Flow for diagrams and flowcharts, and Braindump for the note taking. Calligra Active is a new interface for touch based devices and especially for the KDE Plasma Active environment. Several companies have already used Calligra as a base for their own office solution. One of them is Nokia with their N9 high end smartphone where Calligra is embedded into the so called Harmattan Office."

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A related question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39661853)

This got me to thinking on something that I've kind of lost track of in recent years. When people used to ask what the best alternative to MS Office was, especially on a budget, I used to tell them OpenOffice. But now I keep hearing about a slew of other alternatives, like this, too.

I guess what I'm asking (and I know this is subjective and I'm not looking to start a pissing contest here), is OpenOffice still the best alternative to Office out there? And how do some of these new alternatives compare (to each other and to Office)?

Re:A related question (2)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 2 years ago | (#39661917)

OpenOffice's fork libreoffice is probably the best. I haven't had a chance to play with calligra, but Koffice is a joke. Sure its fast and lightweight, but it doesn't really render any documment type very well (ODF or Microsoft formats) and crashes at every chance. There are individual applications like Krita the photo editing app that are solid decent apps, but the main Office aps ( word processor, spreadsheet, slide show presenter) suck.

Re:A related question (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39662131)

You should test it again. Calligra renders all the document types very much better, including MS formats, and it doesn't crash (we hope :) ).

And Krita is not a photo editing app but a painting app. It used to be a do-it-all for images but a few years ago they decided to become a pure painting app. Which they did.

Re:A related question (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662759)

Ach, forgot Krita changed. Calligra isn't really easy to test right now without going outside of my distro's binary packages. Not willing to destablize my daily desktop to try it. I'm sure they've improved it since the fork, they've had more than enough time to do so ....

Re:A related question (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39666505)

The equations, especially on page 12 and 13 of this ppt look good in libreoffice (3.5.1), but not on calligre (2.4.0) (from ubuntu 12.04):

http://www.cs.duke.edu/~reif/courses/alglectures/reif.lectures/ALG3.2.ppt [duke.edu]

Re:A related question (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39666551)

Yeah, mathematical formulas is a weak area right now. But there is going to be a Google Summer of Code project to improve that.

Re:A related question (1)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39669803)

That's a pity, b'cos I've used it a few times, and found it a lot simpler to use than GIMP. So does Calligra (glad they didn't spell it w/ a 'K') include any other do-it-all for images? I also agree w/ the GP about KOffice - used it, but found the spreadsheet woefully short of what I got w/ Excel 2003. However, would be happy to try Calligra - mainly important that their word processor, spreadsheet and slide show presenter are good. Also, do they include any database like Access?

Re:A related question (1)

KugelKurt (908765) | more than 2 years ago | (#39683987)

do they include any database like Access?

Yes: http://kexi-project.org/ [kexi-project.org]

Re:A related question (4, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662157)

I have heard this before, but i have not had problems with Koffice for a few versions now.

Sure, it was more lightweight ( by design ) and not real compatible, but it was a nice light alternative to the big boys. Espcially when you realize that 90% of the features in the larger suites go un-used by 90% of the users.

Re:A related question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39667789)

what on earth does lightweight mean ?
That it takes up less disk space ?
          In case you hadn't noticed, Disk space is ~ 100 $ US per *terabyte*
          Disk space worry is so '70s (unless you ahve a large p0rn video collection0

That it has fewer features ?
          so what - do the other features block your use of basic features ? I doubt it
So, when you say light weight, what you mean is that if you ever want to do something complex, you can't; you have deliberatly chosen a crippled platform to work on

Re:A related question (1)

Gavagai80 (1275204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39668649)

Lightweight means that when I start koffice it opens in a second, whereas when I start Libre Office I'm waiting 10 seconds and the whole computer feels slowed down by it.

Re:A related question (1)

KugelKurt (908765) | more than 2 years ago | (#39683993)

what on earth does lightweight mean ?

It means that Calligra can run on smartphones while LO cannot.

Re:A related question (2)

spookthesunset (1562927) | more than 2 years ago | (#39669179)

And that 90% is different for every user. You might use all the charting in excel, I might use all the financial functions. You might use the templates in word, I might use the collaboration tools.

Re:A related question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39662195)

I had issues with koffice too, but I recently tested Calligra and it works fine (I've only tested it with open document and office 2003 files tho). So I'd say Calligra is a very good option, specially if you take into account the GUI factor.

Go for standard formats! (0, Troll)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662283)

'libreoffice is probably the best'

That competition is ok and a good thing, as opposed to the stupid kde/gnome/unity/kfce/lxde joke. The office suits whirl around the standards, whereas the kde/gnome/unity/xfce/lxde joke more is about penises less than 6 inches.

Go for standard formats and keep up competition where it works!

Re:A related question (1)

MetalliQaZ (539913) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662351)

Libreoffice's community is definitely better than OpenOffice, but I'm not so sure that it is better. It is still a young project, and I have had terrible trouble installing and upgrading the software. It is also very slow and contains plenty of bugs still.

Caligura him start quick !?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39666091)

You thinking not fast start ? Claigra him start super quick ! this main feature of office suite, I no want wait ! Features they bit nice, but no need to use them if not starting now !

Re:Caligura him start quick !?! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39667855)

The Force is strong with this one.

Re:A related question (1)

Roobles (1880882) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662549)

I've heard a lot of people on /. state that libreoffice is better than OpenOffice, but I haven't heard many reasons why. What advantages does it have, beyond not being controlled by Oracle?

I've been using Open Office for years and have no complaints about it. (But at the same time, I don't use it in many advanced ways. After a certain point of complexity, I switch over more specific tools like Scribus.) Am I missing some fatal flaw in Open Office though, that libreoffice somehow fixes?

Re:A related question (3, Informative)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662717)

Libre office simply has more features. There were a lot of features people wanted to add to open office but couldn't get past the Sun gatekeeper. That lead to the Go-oo fork with all of those added in. Now they've merged with libreoffice, so all of those features and developers have been added into libre. Basically the bigest features for me are improved MS format fiedelity in reading and writing.

Re:A related question (1)

westyvw (653833) | more than 2 years ago | (#39674409)

Yes, LibreOffice is the king here, but I at least Caligre is trying new things. Look at the sidebars in the spreadsheet program. This is an interesting placement for extra functions, and there are quite a lot of them. This is an alternative to menu's and ribbons, that is a different (no judgement on better or worse yet) approach, and is consistent throughout the application suite. I have to hand it to them for using the power of QT and will want to see how that works for me.

I want to add that I feel very fortunate that I have 3 free options for working with spreadsheets. I have found ideas and features not available in the others that do come in handy working with data that people provide in Excel format. I have worked around Excel numeric bugs, performed sheet counts, auto renaming sheets, provided quick data entry forms for example.

Re:A related question (3, Informative)

pavon (30274) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662923)

Significantly decreased memory usage
Significantly improved compatibility/speed with OOXML and other formats.
Look & Feel better matches native applications
Improved Font Rendering on Linux
New import filters: Lotus Word Pro, MS Works
SVG import
Spreadsheets support RxCx cell references.
Can use online help for more up-to-date documentation.

Re:A related question (2)

ratboy666 (104074) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662953)

Libreoffice (sorry, I am going to mash up versions). No "fatal" flaw fixed -- but there are a lot of improvements.

- improved text display
- better typography (true small-caps, etc.)
- bug fixes
- improved ergonomics (dialogs, previews)
- better header/footer editing
- better import/export, including Visio import
- dead code removal
- grammar checker

Anyway, OpenOffice is no longer Oracle, so there may be a merge

Re:A related question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39665369)

I switched because of a print preview related crash bug which was fixed in the libreoffice but still present in the OO 3.0. Faster bug fixes is a benefit, harder verification of the installation packets on the Windows platform is a disadvantage. I believe many translation teams have migrated already, so if you are using a translated version with spell checkers and the rest you might want to switch.

Re:A related question (1)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39667239)

Depends in part on whether you're starting from go-oo or regular OO. Go-oo was a set of patches created by merging all the independent patches created by Novell and Debian, and not accepted by Sun. Most Linux distros offered Go-oo under the name OpenOffice. Go-oo had several features not supported by upstream OO.

LibreOffice started with Go-oo, then undertook a massive code cleanup which resulted in a functionally identical, but much smaller, faster, and easier-to-maintain, code base. Then they started adding more improvements (beyond those offered by Go-oo), some of which have been mentioned by other posters.

Meanwhile, OO got relicensed and dumped into the Apache incubator. It's currently undergoing an audit to make sure that all the components (including third-party libraries and such) are compatible with the Apache license. This may or may not end up in a slight reduction in functionality (I'm not following the development that closely, since I don't care). Once that's complete (if it's not already), they'll still be quite a bit behind where LO started, even if they don't end up removing any functionality, because Go-oo wasn't donated to Apache, and is still under the GPL. So, they'll have something that is much larger, much slower, much harder to maintain, and they'll be way behind on features. At that point, the question becomes can they possibly catch up?

Here's what LO's got: a big head start, a much-improved code-base that provides a much lower barrier for potential new devs, a solid core dev team (there's a big question about how much of the old OO team Oracle will allow to keep working on OO, since it's no longer a Sun/Oracle product) and a much better product, both in terms of features and performance.

Here's what OO's got: name recognition, a license that allows proprietary derivatives, and (as a result of that last) strong support from IBM, who used to have a separate license to the old OO codebase, and doesn't want to dump or GPL Notes.

My money's on LO, but the name recognition and IBM support are nothing to sneeze at, so I'm not making any big bets at this time. But it's probably going to take the OO devs somewhere between one and two years just to catch up with where LO is now, by which time, LO will have added even more.

Frankly, I think you should probably try LO just for the performance improvements, even if you don't use any of the new features. You've got nothing to lose.

Re:A related question (1)

andrew3 (2250992) | more than 2 years ago | (#39667753)

Once that's complete (if it's not already), they'll still be quite a bit behind where LO started, even if they don't end up removing any functionality, because Go-oo wasn't donated to Apache, and is still under the GPL. So, they'll have something that is much larger, much slower, much harder to maintain, and they'll be way behind on features. At that point, the question becomes can they possibly catch up?

Well IBM is apparently ending the Symphony fork [robweir.com] , which may help in terms of features. Besides, the Apache license is better than the LO tri-license. I always thought having three copyleft licenses was kind of defeating the purpose of copyleft, since someone could easily fork the code under only one of the licenses which would be useless to the original project.

Re:A related question (1)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39668197)

How is three explicit licenses any more prone to forking than one promiscuous license that allows all sorts of sublicensing? I can create a GPL-only fork of ApacheOO just as easily as I can create a GPL-only fork of LO. Your argument makes no sense.

Good news about the Symphony fork I suppose. I wish both projects the best of luck, but my money's still on LO at the moment, and OO is going to have to do some amazing things to change my mind.

Re:A related question (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 2 years ago | (#39671607)

What advantages does it have, beyond not being controlled by Oracle?

Oracle doesn't control it.

Re:A related question (-1, Troll)

SCHecklerX (229973) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662891)

This is how I feel about anything that starts with a 'K' or spawned from it. Not a big fan of the "Let's copy Microsoft's really bad interface, and not use established standards by requiring our own huge set of daemons to run for IPC instead" crowd.

Re:A related question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39663187)

And you're of course wrong. Very wrong. Just to start with your first "point". Calligra's interface has basically fuck all in common with Microsoft Office. The rest of your little rant is as relevant. Go back to mommys basement.

Re:A related question (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39665289)

This is how I feel about anything that starts with a 'K' or spawned from it. Not a big fan of the "Let's copy Microsoft's really bad interface, and not use established standards by requiring our own huge set of daemons to run for IPC instead" crowd.

Versus whom else's huge set of daemons to run? Gnome's?

Re:A related question (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39671665)

Not a big fan of the "Let's copy Microsoft's really bad interface

How do I enable the ribbon in KDE applications and koffice? I can't find it.

Re:A related question (3, Informative)

pwizard2 (920421) | more than 2 years ago | (#39662629)

I guess what I'm asking (and I know this is subjective and I'm not looking to start a pissing contest here), is OpenOffice still the best alternative to Office out there? And how do some of these new alternatives compare (to each other and to Office)?

If you are still using old fashioned .doc files or ODF, you can get away with using OpenOffice/LibreOffice. I've used OO.o with MSOffice 97-03 files for the past 6 years with minimal compatibility problems. However, all that goes out the window with OOXML files, since support for that is still abysmal in OO.o or LO. For instance, don't even think of editing a moderately complex (multi-level headings, lists, tables, etc.) docx in Writer. Writer makes a passable docx viewer but the file will be fucked up every single time if you modify it in Writer and then open it again in Word. I found that out the hard way.

A good suite? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39670017)

I just had a look @ their site. There are several things I liked about it. For starters, they chose sane names - like have the name Calligra precede Words, Sheets, Stage, Plan and Flow. Kexi didn't make sense - why not re-use the term dBase, since dBase IV has been dead for decades, and for notetaking, I'm not sure I liked 'Braindump' - maybe something like 'Scratchpad' would have been better? But Krita and Karbon both need to be renamed - no offense to Swedish users.

In KOffice, I used to use KWord, KSpread and Krita. The last was somewhat unintuitive, but still simpler than GIMP, which for me was overkill. Now, they've simplified the interface by combining the multiple docs, which is good - both Krita & GIMP were dock city for me. I'm glad they use ODF file formats. I'm not sure whether they can edit pdfs, but that would be a nice feature to have. Incidentally, does Flow have the same capabilities as Visio, or does one have to use Karbon? Is Kexi the equivalent of Access?

They will also have a version for tablets and phones called Calligra Active and Mobile respectively, which right now is a viewer only. Hopefully, it will be as good as Numbers and Keynote. One question - if Calligra sits on top of KDE, why does it need different versions for Linux and BSD? Speaking of which, while they currently offer it as a tarball, I'd like them to at some point offer it in .deb, .pbi, .ports, .rpm and other popular package managers.

Re:A good suite? (1)

KugelKurt (908765) | more than 2 years ago | (#39681861)

Kexi didn't make sense - why not re-use the term dBase

Because dBase is still used and trademarked: http://www.dbase.com/ [dbase.com]

But Krita and Karbon both need to be renamed

Karbon was just renamed -- from Karbon14. Any other renames won't happen.

Is Kexi the equivalent of Access?

Are you capable of reading the Kexi website? http://kexi-project.org/ [kexi-project.org]

if Calligra sits on top of KDE, why does it need different versions for Linux and BSD?

You must confuse KDE with some sort of VM like Java -- which KDE never was and probably never will be.

Speaking of which, while they currently offer it as a tarball, I'd like them to at some point offer it in .deb, .pbi, .ports, .rpm and other popular package managers.

Why? The Linux distributor should just ship the latest Calligra release in its repos.

Re:A related question (1)

temcat (873475) | more than 2 years ago | (#39671329)

The best non-free one is Softmaker Office. Multi-platform support, low price, almost perfect compatibility and good old menu-based UI. What you don't get with it is macro recorder - you have to write macros yourself in a VBA-like language called BasicMaker. And BasicMaker is Windows-only.

COCS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39662087)

They seriously called it COCS?

Re:COCS? (2)

marcello_dl (667940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39663317)

COCS for UNIX.
It figures.

Re:COCS? (4, Funny)

Barefoot Monkey (1657313) | more than 2 years ago | (#39664593)

COCS for UNIX.
It figures.

I know - it's appalling. As a KDE application they should put a K somewhere in the abbreviation.

Re:COCS? (1)

KugelKurt (908765) | more than 2 years ago | (#39682073)

They seriously called it COCS?

Wow, posting a dumb comment after only reading the headline -- not even the summary.
The software is simply called Calligra and comes in three flavors:
Calligra Suite -- complete package for desktop PCs
Calligra Mobile -- smartphone version (limited feature set)
Calligra Active -- tablet version (limited feature set)

No Thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39662141)

Caligula's Creativity Suite?

I think that's one to stay away from.

Re:No Thanks (1)

million_monkeys (2480792) | more than 2 years ago | (#39665147)

Caligula's Creativity Suite?

I think that's one to stay away from.

That's how I read it at first too. I was intrigued, then disappointed when I realized my mistake.

do77 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39662699)

has run faster anyone that thinks Moans and groans bloodfarts. freeBSD where it belongs, teeth into when and the bottom against vigorous

Interface is crazy (1)

burdickjp (2530248) | more than 2 years ago | (#39663075)

Something I've liked about KDE recently has been the push for movable, sizable, and groupable widgets and sections in the UI. Some follow some sort of convention. Most don't. I'm hoping Calligra standardizes their UI stuffs, as right now it's kinda random.

It Sucks that Word has Won (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 2 years ago | (#39663079)

I miss the days when there were a bunch of word processors / office suites competing. I switched through various versions of Ami Pro, WordPerfect, Word Star, and a couple others I can't remember right now. Then in the mid 90's Word started to dominate and has become a defacto standard. Competitors are judged by how well their Word filters work. Bummer.

Re:It Sucks that Word has Won (1)

EdwinV (87210) | more than 2 years ago | (#39664573)

It's not like the others were much better. I fact, I clearly remember ditching WP at some point because it kept messing up the layout of my documents. Eventually after a lot of crap I started doing my scientific stuff in latex. After that it was quickly clear why it's still the number one document processing enviroment for technical reports.

Wat really sucks is that the open alternatives mostly tried to copy word. They're still trying to play catch-up and haven't improved on the way you write reports one bit. LyX made some nice steps in the right direction. If only it wasn't so much work to create your own layouts.

Re:It Sucks that Word has Won (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39666581)

Well, that's the nice part about KWord/Words. It's apparently drawing a lot more from FrameMaker than Word. Never actually having used FM, I can't really say anything about that, but working with Words is a lot like InDesign, IME. Everything is frames/boxes and can be managed rather freely, rather than the Word way, where you get a glorified typewriter with added crap on top.

Latex is nice, but the learning curve is steep, and trying to layout your doc quickly becomes a PITA. It's still very early days for Calligra, but it's definitely the most promising of all the free alternatives. OO/LO is a resource sink that should be buried and forgotten ASAP.

Diagramming/Flow charts (2)

Patch86 (1465427) | more than 2 years ago | (#39663343)

There are also two new applications: Flow for diagrams and flowcharts, and Braindump for the note taking.

If it has something comparable to MS Visio, suddenly I'm interested. Visio is pretty much eh only piece of software in the MS Office suite which I haven't found at least a very rough FOSS competitor to. I've been pinning my hopes on Libre/Open Office coming up with something, and never given KOffice much thought. This makes it a bit of a game changer for when I'm deciding which free office suite to throw on my home computers.

Anyone have any experience running this software under Windows 7? Or Gnome/XFCE/LXDE for that matter? Any good?

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39663483)

I have found XFIG to be a good option :)

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39665273)

I like XFig too, but I seriously wish its UI was more like ANY other program, and that it didn't itself look like ass.

Ah well, hopefully CO's replacement is as good as Visio.

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39663877)

There are some very early Windows builds for Calligra, but they are alpha quality at best and the team concluded that to maintain them there should be a developer on the team developing solely for Windows. I personally think that eventually that will happen, but I wouldn't count on a decent Windows-port for at least the coming year.

As for Gnome/XFCE/etc, it will run just fine. The biggest downside will be a higher memory consumption due to the Qt and KDE libraries needing to be loaded next to the existing Gtk/glib/etc libraries. Unless you are short on RAM this will not be a problem though.

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (1)

KugelKurt (908765) | more than 2 years ago | (#39681941)

There are some very early Windows builds for Calligra, but they are alpha quality at best

It really depends on the individual application. Eg. I found Calligra Words to be quite OK (limited testing only) but apparently the format filter for old .doc files is broken under Windows and had to be disabled before release.
Could be that Flow is in a better state.

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (1)

undeadbill (2490070) | more than 2 years ago | (#39664389)

"Flow is an easy to use diagramming and flowcharting application with tight integration to the other Calligra applications. It enables you to create network diagrams, organisation charts, flowcharts and more."

That is all they have on their website. About as useful as a box of rocks. If anyone has some experience with the latest Calligra Flow, can they post whether or not there is any ability to use Visio compatible figures, or read Visio documents? Or, at the very least, easily import images and set glue points in some kind of sane fashion?

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39670565)

Visio import filter via libvisio is in the master already, so it will be available in 2.5 (it will be released in 4 months or something).

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (3, Informative)

fast turtle (1118037) | more than 2 years ago | (#39664739)

then you've never looked at Dia have you? It's a reasonble competitor to Visio and it's opensourced.

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39665749)

It's impossible to pick up and use, and its icons (last time I tried it) looked like they were so old they had fallen into the public domain (you see what I did there?).

Come back when it uses a single window and you can draw basic shapes and link them together with lines, arrows, and objects have "snappy" corners and midpoints of their edges. That's really what 90% of people need.

Re:Diagramming/Flow charts (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39668941)

Come back when it uses a single window and you can draw basic shapes and link them together with lines, arrows, and objects have "snappy" corners and midpoints of their edges. That's really what 90% of people need.

Oh, it is not a single window app. The remaining is there.

LibreOffice 3.5 imports Visio today ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39670905)

If you want to move away from Visio, LibreOffice can import it's files today, grab it and have a go. Of course, improving it's diagramming functionality would be good too - currently it's not so wonderful.

Slashdotted (2)

Qubit (100461) | more than 2 years ago | (#39663753)

Coral Cache link [nyud.net] to the press release/notes.

Use it.

Download for windows (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39664157)

is here: http://www.kogmbh.com/download.html

Looks like they're still using all-Qt libraries... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39667523)

Which sucks, because the Qt libraries for font rendering and printing are pretty godawful for something like a word processor. Just look at the serious kerning problems in the screenshots. I would advise Calligra to take a page from Scribus--another Qt-based project that chose to implement their own font rendering libraries to work around the shortcomings of Qt.

Re:Looks like they're still using all-Qt libraries (1)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39670065)

Why, what's wrong w/ the Qt libraries for fornt rendering and printing, and is that a common problem b/w the different versions - 3, 4 and 5?

Re:Looks like they're still using all-Qt libraries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39671349)

Look at those font renderings... They are ugly and with jazzed edges and normal fonts look like they are bolded.

That is a typical problem.

1. Start new document in libreoffice writer and set specific letter format. Then type one line full of same letter.

2. Open that document in Calligra Words and notice the difference with same font etc.

Re:Looks like they're still using all-Qt libraries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39674065)

This, and it's been this same way since day 1 of KOffice. Font rendering has always sucked in Koffice and continues to suck in Calligra. Which is a shame because I've been jazzed about using KOffice since I first heard about it, and this is the only real problem I see in the product today. And yet it's such a major problem it's pretty much unusable for me.

Printing is actually more of a problem with KDE4. KDE4 STILL hasn't caught up to KDE3 in how well it handles printing, and it's because the KDE4 team has decided to hamstring themselves by using all-Qt libraries instead of writing their own.

In my opinion, use existing libraries when they are good. Write your own when the existing ones are no good. Apparently this sort of thinking is revolutionary...

Re:Looks like they're still using all-Qt libraries (1)

KugelKurt (908765) | more than 2 years ago | (#39682027)

KDE4 STILL hasn't caught up to KDE3 in how well it handles printing, and it's because the KDE4 team has decided to hamstring themselves by using all-Qt libraries instead of writing their own.

Well, considering that no one in his/her right mind still prints these days, I find it understandable that no KDE dev has any interest in developing that.

Re:Looks like they're still using all-Qt libraries (1)

KugelKurt (908765) | more than 2 years ago | (#39682013)

Which sucks, because the Qt libraries for font rendering and printing are pretty godawful for something like a word processor. Just look at the serious kerning problems in the screenshots. I would advise Calligra to take a page from Scribus--another Qt-based project that chose to implement their own font rendering libraries to work around the shortcomings of Qt.

Newsflash: The screenshots on the Calligra website are from older development releases. Since then Qt 4.8 was released which fixes the problems.

I am expecting... (1)

FithisUX (855293) | more than 2 years ago | (#39670085)

the KDE on Windows distribution of Calligra due to problems launching VBscripts on my XP box. However I installed it and launched from the command line. It is very nice and opened some .docx files.

How does it stack up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39670765)

What is missing from TFA is how well it stacks up with other software. When you want me to switch to your new system, you have to make your case. What is compelling about your product compared to e.g. OpenOffice, LibreOffice, MS Office? What makes it stand out? You have to be specific and say our software does X where product Y fails. Otherwise you're just wasting people's time.

Re:How does it stack up? (2)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39671633)

What is missing from TFA is how well it stacks up with other software. When you want me to switch to your new system, you have to make your case.

Sorry, you're not the target audience.

SLOW (0)

WD (96061) | more than 2 years ago | (#39672397)

I can't decide which is slower: The website or the software itself?

Re:SLOW (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39684169)

I can't decide which is slower: The website or the software itself?

The software is pretty snappy for me.

We need William Wallace to unite the clans! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39681705)

When will the free software office suites realize that Braveheart was actually a metaphor about the whole office scene. We need WW to unite all these great projects into one great scottish product! UNITE THE CLANS against the those evil dirty brits (M$) :)

The other stuff in Braveheart was fluff, and if you listen close at the end. Right before they chop his head off, in his second last breath, whispers "software". Then takes a deep last breath and yells, FFFFRRRRREEEEEDDDDDOOOOMMMMMM! :)

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