×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Raspberry Pi Arrives, With a School Debut In Leeds

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the when-a-plan-comes-together dept.

Education 148

hypnosec writes "It seems fitting that the first batch of Raspberry Pi computers landed in the UK in the hands of school children based in Leeds as what many consider as another wave of grass-root computing revolution, another BBC Micro 2.0, begins. The Raspberry Pi has been designed from scratch to get anyone interested in computer programming to do so without forking out much; the base unit can connect to a television like the Commodore C64 or the Sinclair ZX81. According to the BBC, the first batch has been presented [Friday] by Eben Upton, the school project coordinator, in an event held at the Leeds offices of Premier Farnell, one of the official PI distributors."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

148 comments

At the price. (5, Interesting)

zippo01 (688802) | about 2 years ago | (#39684145)

This is also a great way/price for people to get into building and operating clusters. I plan on dropped 200 and building a 8 system cluster, just for fun.

Re:At the price. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684181)

Ordering now means you'll probably get yours at the end of summer. You'll have to wait longer still if you want several, because right now orders are limited to one per person. If you just want to get experience working with clusters, create a couple of VMs and a virtual network. If you want to cluster Pis to get more performance, get a real computer: cheaper and faster (and available).

Re:At the price. (4, Informative)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 2 years ago | (#39685199)

who said he wanted performance. He said he wanted fun, which you obviously have no sense of. Good day sir!

Re:At the price. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684187)

What is,
I plan on dropped 200 and building a 8 system cluster, just for fun.???

Re:At the price. (1)

game kid (805301) | about 2 years ago | (#39684225)

I think he meant "dropping", not "dropped". He'll pay USD200 (I think he'll pay USD, given his prior comments) to get 8 Raspberry Pis to connect together.

As the other replies to him note, there might be some problems with that.

Re:At the price. (2)

drosboro (1046516) | about 2 years ago | (#39684213)

Of course, if you're looking to spend $25 each (to get 8 for $200), you're going to get the version with no Ethernet... the Model B with Ethernet is $35...

no (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684165)

The BBC microcomputer revolution was about a British company demonstrating to curious schoolkids how they could be part of the microcomputer revolution. It involved a group of local academics building a computer from a 6502 and generic parts, writing a simple OS and powerful BASIC interpreter, and providing lots of interface options. It involved liaising with and providing en masse to a vaguely enlightened primary and secondary school system pre-1988 Education Reform Act.

This is about one of a dozen generic ARM system-on-a-chip + connector boards being hapharzardly built in China (in fact, many smaller projects have gone *more* smoothly!), over-advertised to second rate geeks who don't have the talent to build something themselves or the clue to choose one of several existing systems. It's not even setting a good example of local electronics manufacture - hell, they lied about import duty etc.

The only thing it *is* is a sad example of what British consumer industry has become: go work for an American firm; select a few chips designed at another company; ask China to glue them together for you; choose a third party distributor; and market them badly. Maybe the ex-Acorn people who clearly have had an influence on this project have become comfortable doing what they do now - or maybe they're sad that they couldn't have made this into something more, overshadowed by sponsoring Broadcom. I guess we'll never know.

Re:no (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684211)

Oh, there's a surprise - downmodding is being used to indicate disagreement.

Rather than actually tackle the question of why British industry, particularly high-tech consumer industry, is almost non-existent, why not just ignore the problem and hope it goes away? Why don't we continue letting America and Israel do the complex design work and allow China to build the boxes? All 60 million of us can continue to exist as financiers, shell company managers and their underlings. Surely those who actually build stuff will never accumulate capital or discover that they can manage processes themselves.

Re:no (3, Interesting)

xaxa (988988) | about 2 years ago | (#39686011)

The Raspberry Pi charity is trying to improve computer education in British schools. Better education is important for the country.

What have you done to help?

Re:no (5, Interesting)

drosboro (1046516) | about 2 years ago | (#39684223)

Lied about import duty? One of the most interesting things about this whole process has been how upfront and transparent they've been. When they discover some new roadblock or detail that they weren't aware of (such as the status of the Pi wrt import duties, or the requirement for CE testing), they've been quick to post to their blog and tell the world about it.

As for "and market them badly"... really? How much do you suppose they've spent on marketing, exactly? Are you aware of how much publicity they're getting, worldwide, for free? Even my local newspaper, which is absolutely dreadful for tech news, has carried very positive (and nearly accurate!) stories on the Raspberry Pi. Seems to me that, if there's one thing they've done extremely well, it's creating a huge buzz around their concept, WITHOUT blowing a huge pile on marketing.

Re:no (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684265)

Lied about import duty?

1) They claimed crippling import duty but could not highlight which specific duty worried them - N.B. there is a ~15% maximum for EU imports across all electronics categories;

2) The duty applies to parts, not completed gadgets;

3) They claimed they would be building it abroad because a completed gadget wouldn't attract duty;

4) But then they claimed that they didn't think it needed EMC testing because it's not a completed gadget.

One of the most interesting things about this whole process has been how upfront and transparent they've been.

Not really. People building homebrew 6502 computers are more upfront and interesting about their development process. And at the end of reading their stories, you actually understand a great fucking deal about how a computer works and can build one yourself - you don't end up with the "and you can do the same... by contracting out to a Chinese fab".

As for "and market them badly"... really?

Has this been marketed so many dilettante geeks who didn't already know about the myriad of options may buy them? Yes.
Is there any evidence this is starting a BBC Microcomputer style revolution, i.e. is it backed up by a project in the style of the BBC Computer Literacy Project and mass marketing to schools? No.

How much do you suppose they've spent on marketing, exactly?

Clearly a lot more than they've spent actually putting a fairly simple device together.

Seems to me that, if there's one thing they've done extremely well, it's creating a huge buzz around their concept

And there's the rub. A "huge buzz" is not a sustainable plan. The Internet is a hive of huge buzzes - stripping the market-spin, we call this "hype". What is it about the Pi that sets it apart from this continuing buzzing that the Internet provides? What is unique? What good example does it set? What educational policy has been built around it?

Re:no (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684379)

did you read the reasons behind No. 4 on your list?

Initially the foundation expected the R-Pi would be only picked up by enthusiasts and developers (Like Arduino boards) so EC mark was not a requirement. Since it was being sold as a "Development" board NOT a finished Consumer item.

But when they realised the demand and reached out to the 2 companies to licence it, the companies WANTED the EC mark before they would sell it.

The R-Pi foundation was waiting for the initial surge of orders to pass so they could concentrate on the "Educational Version" of the device which WOULD go through EC testing since it was being sold as a complete consumer product.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684503)

Initially the foundation expected the R-Pi would be only picked up by enthusiasts and developers (Like Arduino boards) so EC mark was not a requirement. Since it was being sold as a "Development" board NOT a finished Consumer item.

Confirming that "we must manufacture abroad because finished gadgets don't attract import duty" is bunkum.

Either they contracted China because they thought it to be a finished item and believed that building a finished item would not attract duty; or
They regarded it was not a finished item and the duty argument was nonsense.

But when they realised the demand and reached out to the 2 companies to licence it, the companies WANTED the EC mark before they would sell it.

Huh. Neither Upton nor anyone relevant at Broadcom would have any idea that one of the largest electronics distributors in the UK would expect EMC testing on a finished product? The English are great at feigned ignorance, I must admit.

Re:no (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684835)

Couldn't resist the racial slur then?

Re:no (4, Interesting)

Zaiff Urgulbunger (591514) | about 2 years ago | (#39685151)

Initially the foundation expected the R-Pi would be only picked up by enthusiasts and developers (Like Arduino boards) so EC mark was not a requirement. Since it was being sold as a "Development" board NOT a finished Consumer item.

Confirming that "we must manufacture abroad because finished gadgets don't attract import duty" is bunkum.

The Raspi was always going to be sold as a finish board; it's not possible for it to be hand soldered. The original intent was to manufacture in the UK but that proved to be too expensive in part due to the import issues... I believe the duty costs on the parts was greater than the duty costs on a completed board. Which is dumb, but not the fault of the Raspi Foundation.

The original plan was that the Raspi would be sold like Arduino/Beagle boards - i.e. as development boards - and thus would not require CE certification in the first instance. However, either due to the volume of demand and/or the way it was being promoted - i.e. as a board you can just plug straight into your TV for immediate use - the distributors then decided they needed certification from the get-go.

And before you say "but they should've known the demand would be high; how would they have delivered it to millions of school kids like this", the original manufacturing volumes were always going to be low, but they had expected the types of people who would pick up the intial Raspi's would be nerds/developers who would help in creating the eco-system for when production ramped up and certification had been completed.

And I guess for RS/Farnell, the problem was that with such huge demand, they'd be legally vulnerable if the product wasn't certified.

But when they realised the demand and reached out to the 2 companies to licence it, the companies WANTED the EC mark before they would sell it.

Huh. Neither Upton nor anyone relevant at Broadcom would have any idea that one of the largest electronics distributors in the UK would expect EMC testing on a finished product?

Think I mostly dealt with this above, but just to reiterate, nope neither Upton nor Broadcom would have expected that *because* they expected it to be treated the same as other "development boards". In that sense, the Raspi was a victim of it's own success... had the launch been lower profile, and the demand lower, CE certification probably would not have been required initial. Indeed, it might be that RS/Farnell would not have been brought on-board so early.

The English are great at feigned ignorance, I must admit.

Casual racism... smooth! You do understand that the people running the show actually have day jobs and that they haven't done this before. They're smart people, but much of this has been a learning experience... albeit, if you've ever started a business yourself, you'd recognise the whole "on-going learning experience" that is running a business. However, since you'd don't appear to understand this, I have to assume that you're just one of these people who coasts along in life whilst snearing at others who *do* make the effort.

You seem to be making a lot of effort poking holes in a product that you apparently feel is worthless, which srikes me as odd.... it's almost as if you're some kind of... I dunno... internet troll or something! If you don't like the product and feel that other products exist and are better, buy those.

But just to get things in some kind of perspective, the Raspi is approx. 6 months late against what the foundation originally said. This seems entirely consistent with the rest of the industry as far as I can tell, but the difference here is that Upton and co. have been entirely up-front with where they are and what the problems are. And for a first effort, and entirely for charity, I'd say they've done fantastically well and should be getting credit they deserve.

**Note: this comment is entirely based on what I know purely by following the Raspi news. I'm not affiliates with the Foundation or anything, and I'm still waits for my Pi!

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685269)

The original intent was to manufacture in the UK but that proved to be too expensive in part due to the import issues...

Duty is 15% at most on electronics imported into the EU. That doesn't make anything "too expensive". It makes things slightly more expensive in the short term, while manufacturing is ramped up, but... to reiterate... improvement in local tech manufacturing would surely be a primary aim of any BBC Microcomputer-like project. The Computer Literacy project was thinking long term. This isn't.

and/or the way it was being promoted

Yes.

And I guess for RS/Farnell, the problem was that with such huge demand,

No. It depends on what you're selling it as. For example, as a radio amateur, nothing I buy for ham purposes has to be EMC certified. But it's my fault if it transmits naughtily.

Casual racism... smooth!

See, there's another example. You know perfectly well that suggesting some fault in our English culture is not the same as being racist. You might as well say that it's racist to suggest that Nigeria has a large proportion of, well, "Nigerian" scammers.

You do understand that the people running the show actually have day jobs and that they haven't done this before.

Yes, and no. 1) Broadcom own Element 14 was Acorn. 2) Broadcom are a semiconductor company and Upton's a smart techie and entrepreneur. For example, "distributors require EMC testing on consumer electronics" is something that, well, everyone knows, and they in particular would know.

if you've ever started a business yourself, you'd recognise the whole "on-going learning experience" that is running a business.

I've used Acorn computers on and off since, err, 1985, and used them to interface with mechanical and electrical wizardry in school about 5 years later. I started my first business in 1999. I've built a 6502-based computer from scratch, mostly as an aside to ham radio projects. And I just don't get the Raspberry Pi *thing* at all, sorry. It's marginally less annoying than that Wintel company which took the Acorn brand name + logo.

If you don't like the product and feel that other products exist and are better, buy those.

I'm trying to highlight problems with British attitudes toward high tech and manufacturing. I know the alternatives, thanks. I'm here to have an idle chat - as you are - and perhaps get a few ideas out.

and entirely for charity

what

Re:no (1)

julesh (229690) | about 2 years ago | (#39686409)

Duty is 15% at most on electronics imported into the EU

You don't know what you're talking about. The situation is very complicated, and varies depending on the type of component and the country of origin, but, for example, the duty on DRAM imported from Korea is 32.9% [hmrc.gov.uk].

Stifling Regulation in U.K. Kills Jobs (2)

stoicio (710327) | about 2 years ago | (#39685623)

From what you are saying regarding the costs of discrete components vs. a finished board, perhaps someone in government should be noticing that the organisation of these regulations is stifling manufacturing in the U.K..

Re:Stifling Regulation in U.K. Kills Jobs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686573)

A careful trawl through all the tariff codes (c.85 [businesslink.gov.uk], and assembled stuff in c.84 [businesslink.gov.uk] for comparison) suggests that all the components would be zero rated - heading 8532 for capacitors; 8533 for resistors; 8534 for the PCB; 8541 for crystals/diodes and 8542 for the various ICs.

This is one of those herd mentality episodes where a lie's been repeated so much that everyone believes it. OP is exactly right.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684443)

Not really. People building homebrew 6502 computers are more upfront and interesting about their development process. And at the end of reading their stories, you actually understand a great fucking deal about how a computer works and can build one yourself - you don't end up with the "and you can do the same... by contracting out to a Chinese fab".

What's that got to do with anything? R-Pi isn't an exercise in teaching kids how to design and build a computer.

Has this been marketed so many dilettante geeks who didn't already know about the myriad of options may buy them? Yes.

We should all care about that, because?

Is there any evidence this is starting a BBC Microcomputer style revolution, i.e. is it backed up by a project in the style of the BBC Computer Literacy Project and mass marketing to schools? No.

Again, so what?

You don't seem to have much of a point. You seem to be angry about something and can't articulate why.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684545)

What's that got to do with anything? R-Pi isn't an exercise in teaching kids how to design and build a computer.

Well, it certainly isn't an exercise in teaching kids how to merely "program" because - well - we have every single deskop and laptop in the world for that. Nor is it an exercise in teaching kids how to electronically interface to the outside world - a dozen boards already provide that, as does a parallel/serial to USB interface. So what unique property do you think the Pi offers? Why exactly would anyone want a Pi, apart from "it seems hyped a lot so it must be good", please?

We should all care about that, because?

Because there seems to be the belief that this is something more than just another single board computer for the hobbyist market.

You don't seem to have much of a point.

Perhaps you ought to improve your reading comprehension skills. I've made lots of points. If your counterargument is "this is just another Arduino-style project" then that's fair enough, and I'd kinda agree. Except it's marketed with the passion and inevitable fizzling-out of the OLPC project.

Re:no (3, Informative)

CnlPepper (140772) | about 2 years ago | (#39684673)

Re item 1) the tax is on individual components in the EU, but apparently excludes assembled PCBs. Hence (ignore also higher labour rates etc) it is more expensive to assemble the RPIs in the EU then get them made in china and shipped back. They spelled this out clearly on the blog. Its a stupid situation and one they have taken up with the UK minister for business.

Re:no (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685191)

Re item 1) the tax is on individual components in the EU, but apparently excludes assembled PCBs.

One more time: this fabled "tax" ( technically a duty ) DOES NOT EXIST. There is no evidence of it. None. The Foundation have ignored all requests for information on it. MPs have raised questions about it in the Commons and no-one has the faintest idea what they're talking about.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685283)

You mean it was a *LIE*? But they're a charity. I don't think charities are supposed to lie...

Re:no (1)

xaxa (988988) | about 2 years ago | (#39685845)

One more time: this fabled "tax" ( technically a duty ) DOES NOT EXIST. There is no evidence of it. None. The Foundation have ignored all requests for information on it. MPs have raised questions about it in the Commons and no-one has the faintest idea what they're talking about.

That should be an easy statement to back up with a citation.

I can't find one. Can you?

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686115)

One more time: this fabled "tax" ( technically a duty ) DOES NOT EXIST. There is no evidence of it. None. The Foundation have ignored all requests for information on it. MPs have raised questions about it in the Commons and no-one has the faintest idea what they're talking about.

That should be an easy statement to back up with a citation.

I can't find one. Can you?

Tariff code 85:8542 [businesslink.gov.uk] covers electronic integrated circuits. Note that all the tariff rates are zero: the supposed "tax on importing components rather than finished goods" does not exist.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686493)

That's nice. What about the tax on the passive components(resistors, capacitors, connectors) which is everything else on the board except for the 3 chips that would fall on this schedule.

Thanks, please try again.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686619)

That's nice. What about the tax on the passive components(resistors, capacitors, connectors) which is everything else on the board except for the 3 chips that would fall on this schedule.

Thanks, please try again.

Do I have to do everything for you?

Capacitors, all 0% [businesslink.gov.uk]

PCB, all 0% [businesslink.gov.uk]

Diodes, all 0% [businesslink.gov.uk]

Resistors, all 0% [businesslink.gov.uk]

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685403)

What a surprise that a factually accurate and non-trollish post was censored by the slashdot community simply because they dislike reality.

Slashdot sucks and so does the trollish, idiotic community supporting these troll-moderator morons.

Re:no (1, Interesting)

citizenr (871508) | about 2 years ago | (#39684515)

One of the most interesting things about this whole process has been how upfront and transparent they've been

Yes, like when they said they are sitting on 10K units ready to ship, or when they announced official launch and started selling nonexistent boards, or when they said that this time around they _really_ have 2K boards and to prove it they posted a picture of a chinese factory :). Or how now, 2 months after official launch, first people to get their hands on the boards are children in UK and not people who paind for the boards 2 months ago thinking they are buying something and not preordering.

WORST product launch ever. I just hope thats the end of rasppi drama and there wont be any more hurdles (for example lack of mpeg4 hardware acceleration, lack of camera interface documentation and so on)

Re:no (2)

Serious Callers Only (1022605) | about 2 years ago | (#39686647)

WORST product launch ever. I just hope thats the end of rasppi drama and there wont be any more hurdles (for example lack of mpeg4 hardware acceleration, lack of camera interface documentation and so on)

This is a £16 computer intended for education, I'd be very surprised if it has either initially. If that surprises you or upsets you, perhaps you shouldn't be trying to order a £16 computer.

Re:no (4, Informative)

horza (87255) | about 2 years ago | (#39684667)

That's an interesting rewrite of history. The BBC Microcomputer revolution was about entrepeneurs Chris Curry and Herman Hauser bidding against other rivals (Sinclair, Newbury, Dragon) to produce a computer under contract for the BBC. Acorn was already selling the Acorn Atom commercially and the BBC Micro was an upgrade to this. There was no liasing en masse with schools. The academics, inc Sophie Wilson and Steve Furber, were working for Acorn not acting out of charity.

The sad thing is you don't recognise the 6502 had nothing to do with British engineering, yet the ARM chip 100% is. This is very much the BBC micro revolution Mark 2, minus the OS.

Phillip.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684883)

The BBC Microcomputer revolution was about entrepeneurs Chris Curry and Herman Hauser bidding against other rivals (Sinclair, Newbury, Dragon) to produce a computer under contract for the BBC.

IOW it was "about a British company", the BBC, "demonstrating to curious schoolkids how they could be part of the microcomputer revolution," through a contract with...

a group of local academics

...Acorn, predominantly a collection of Cambridge University researchers and undergrads.

There was no liasing en masse with schools.

Now you see that the "British company" promoting microcomputer literacy was the BBC, not Acorn, I hope you can revise that.

The sad thing is you don't recognise the 6502 had nothing to do with British engineering,

A particular CPU is not "a computer".

yet the ARM chip 100% is.

Erm, the original few ARM iterations were. Pretending that Britain has done something wonderful and new just because a project involves something initially designed in Britain a quarter of a century ago... is typically British.

This is very much the BBC micro revolution Mark 2, minus the OS.

An American company provides a chip for a cookie cutter board built in China, surrounded by a hype and no long term plan.

This is not "the BBC micro revolution Mark 2".

Sorry.

Re:no (1)

horza (87255) | about 2 years ago | (#39685665)

Again you are wrong. Acorn was not a group of academics, it was a company. IBM employes academics and undergraduates but that doesn't make them an educational establishment. I have no intention of revising the fact: Acorn were not philanthopists liasing with all the schools to produce the ideal education computer, they fought for a contract with the BBC who came up with a spec in order to make money.

You fail to see the discrepancy between your "glory days" of the BBC Micro being a bunch of foreign components glued together and the new BBC Micro being a bunch of foreign components glued together. Next you will be trying to warp semantics to justify your argument of what is a "computer". The fact is that the world is now more global. The Pi is a British designed processor, running a kernal designed by a Finnish guy, using memory designed in Asia, viewed via graphic chips designed in America, and assembled in China.

Phillip.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686057)

Acorn was not a group of academics, it was a company.

Maybe you're wrestling needlessly with the definition of "academic". A group of people forming a company in their university town as current or ex-researchers and students (e.g. Wilson working during the holidays) can be safely labelled as a "group of local academics" . Consider:

academic n.
1. A member of an institution of higher learning.
2. One who has an academic viewpoint or a scholarly background.

Chris Curry would be an example of someone in Acorn who wasn't really an "academic" - he wasn't part of the Cambridge circle nor recently involved in university work.

I have no intention of revising the fact: Acorn were not philanthopists liasing with all the schools to produce the ideal education computer

No - the BBC were. You misinterpreted my original post, I explained this, and you reply to me completely ignoring the clarification.

But it appears that your whole argument is based around a chip on your shoulder: you think that there's some huge issue to be made out of the fact that Acorn specifically were a profit-making company.

You fail to see the discrepancy between your "glory days" of the BBC Micro being a bunch of foreign components glued together and the new BBC Micro being a bunch of foreign components glued together.

The BBC Micro comprised a 6502 and a bunch of low density components arranged and built in the UK, fully packaged and documented, reflecting the state of the art in home computing and maximising expandability. A locally-written OS and language interpreter were created, and the system was promoted as part of a wider educational policy by the state broadcaster.

The "new" BBC Micro comprises two or three large scale, old multipurpose chips in a very routine configuration, using third party OS, developer tools, manufacturer, etc. It has nothing significant to offer, either technically or in a business sense, over a dozen similar projects.

Next you will be trying to warp semantics to justify your argument of what is a "computer".

You're the only one here who tried to make the CPU = computer argument.

The fact is that the world is now more global.

The world is global by definition. Try to say something substantive.

The Pi is a British designed processor,

No. It's a derivative of a British-designed instruction set but today's ARM chips aren't the chips made 25 years ago. Broadcom is American and the SoC is American-designed.

running a kernal designed by a Finnish guy,

The Linux kernel as it is today was designed by people residing in America.

using memory designed in Asia,

Not sure. Chip manufacture will be in one of China, Korea or Taiwan, I expect. While I wasn't really discussing chip fabs, I could bring that up, I guess.

viewed via graphic chips designed in America,

Yes.

and assembled in China.

Yes.

So, as I said, American design built in China. I'll add Korea's involvement somewhere if you want.

I reiterate my initial concern that Britain's doing fuck all today.

Re:no (1)

petes_PoV (912422) | about 2 years ago | (#39685055)

Although the ARM chip was (past tense: the version in the RPi is quite an old generation) designed in GB, it is manufactured in foreign parts - just like the 6502 was never manufactured in GB.

If you wanted a through-and-through british design, development and manufacture you'd have to look at something like a transputer which WAS built in Britain during the mid 80s and would have wiped the floor with an 6502 based machine. Sadly it went the way of most british innovation and withered on the branch.

Re:no (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 2 years ago | (#39685029)

In the 80s it was possible to build a computer like the BBC Micro yourself, but now all the parts are surface mount. Often you can't solder them without a some serious equipment, assuming you can order the parts in quantities of less than 1000.

I will be getting one to run from solar.

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685061)

It's an annoying problem, yes. Fortunately, all the 8-bit DIP parts are still available, and it only takes one budding entrepreneur with good SMT skills (not me!) to resell components with these attached [logicalsys.com]. Whether the chips can then be run at the highest clock speeds remains a question, but again, does it matter for learning?

The First Hurdle (4, Insightful)

Duncan J Murray (1678632) | about 2 years ago | (#39684197)

As people have mentioned before, simply creating the product and making it available isn't going to miraculously rejuvenate computer programming in the UK amongst children. After all, many children already have access to computers capable of running python as it is - and so do schools. If schools want to teach computer programming, it doesn't actually need a raspberry pi.

I think the next step is to create tutorials for the raspberry pi, and to ensure that schools aren't penalised for teaching computer programming (as in it won't detract from teaching time and achieving targets in other subjects), and I think the only way to do that is to make computer programming a new GCSE, with a curriculum, exams, and formal teaching time.

Re:The First Hurdle (5, Informative)

Techmeology (1426095) | about 2 years ago | (#39684281)

You're absolutely right! The Raspberry Pi foundation is interested in a lot more than simply making a (very cool) machine available. The general thought is that a lot of parents are anxious about the notion of allowing their children to experiment on an expensive home PC (being able to experiment with root access, while not mandatory to learn to program, is useful to get to understand how the computer works) - that's part of the reason why the foundation developed the computer. The foundation is also working to create a library of educational materials that are intended to help children learn to program and find out about their machine, as well as promote and encourage changes to the teaching of IT/Computing/Computer Science.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

FORTRANslinger (950850) | about 2 years ago | (#39684313)

You're absolutely wrong! The focus should be on "educating" children to learn how to self-discover and self-learn using this low cost device. Spoon feeding some government sponsored syllabus is not going to achieve that.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

bheading (467684) | about 2 years ago | (#39684521)

Spoon feeding some government sponsored syllabus is not going to achieve that.

The funny thing is that the experience the Raspberry Pi draws its inspiration from (the BBC Micro) practically was a spoon-fed government syllabus. The BBC (a government body) specified the computer, and the education authorities were all encouraged to purchase BBC machines for the schools they were in charge of.

It was a very good thing.

Re:The First Hurdle (0)

petes_PoV (912422) | about 2 years ago | (#39684881)

parents are anxious about the notion of allowing their children to experiment on an expensive home PC

Most parents don't have the vaguest notion of what their offspring do on a computer. The only thing they are more lacking in, is the ability to fix it if the little darlings do manage to screw it up.

In practice, the simplest, cheapest and quickest way to get children programming on a small Linux platform would be to install VirtualBox, whatever Linux image is suitable and then let rip. If this image does become irrevocably broken, a simple VM reinstall costs nothing and has no inherent risks. An alternative: simpler to produce but not as flexible would be a standalone RPi/Linux bootable CD with their "educational" environment on it.

If the RPi foundation was truly interested in improving programming skills in a classroom, they would have gone down either of these routes - not tried for 6 years to produce a cheap piece of hardware that needs everything from a keyboard to a power supply to be added on before it will do anything. I question their motives.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

jimicus (737525) | about 2 years ago | (#39685001)

I disagree. As soon as you start suggesting "install this software on your PC" - or even "boot from this LiveCD" you wind up with a plethora of support issues, ranging from "I tried it on the underpowered PC my parents bought at the height of the Vista debacle and found it too slow to be able to do anything", going through "My computer's been on the verge of failing for the last year; in a rather unfortunate coincidence it stopped booting immediately after installing your software and now I'm blaming you" and finishing up with "My offspring ran this CD and now they've broken the computer!".

Every single one of those issues has the same ultimate result: not-terribly-computer-literate Mum & Dad banning the use of "this raspberry pie stuff" on the PC.

Most of these issues evaporate if you provide a cheap & cheerful SBC to run it on.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 2 years ago | (#39685243)

Most parents do have a good grasp of what their kids do, its play games, surf the web, chat on facebook. Not necessarily in that order.

The problem here is that everyone is running Windows, and that's been sold to them as a 'consumer device' rather than a general purpose computer. Its no wonder the vast majority of users knows how to program on it, it's practically not designed for that. Its designed to sell a pre-packaged box to people.

Your suggestion to "install virtualbox" shows your geek credentials - and that you'd be useless in business. You have no idea of the (lack of ) technical capabilities of the majority of people out there. This is why RPi is here, it's to promote those skills to the kids so they'll be able to understand what you were talking about.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

horza (87255) | about 2 years ago | (#39684475)

I think you are wrong. The difference at school between using an Acorn Archimedes and using a Microsoft PC was huge. The latter was always locked down, you couldn't tinker with the OS (even if you could understand the mess of DLLs), limited as to what software you could install on there, couldn't drop down to assembler at the drop of a hat, and couldn't write full-screen arcade games in a few lines of BASIC. If I was forced to use Microsoft Windows rather than the Acorn computers when I was a child I would not be a software engineer today, that is for sure.

Forget tutorials for the raspberry pi. Load it up with Python, QtDesigner, and plenty of other goodies. Have a box full of them kids can pull out and play with during lunch and after school. I was publishing software by 14 yrs old and I never had a computer programming class. Don't bind them into a curriculum. Some might be inspired to write games, others control robots, maybe create a disco lighting system, an advanced art project, who knows??

Phillip.

Re:The First Hurdle (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684797)

I'm much more exicted about the EOMA-68 [elinux.org] stuff. Particularly these guys [rhombus-tech.net] who are making an EOMA-68 compliant board with a BOM of $15 and almost all the interesting signals broken out into easy to access headers. They are basing it on the Allwinner A10 [rhombus-tech.net] 1.2ghz ARM Cortex A8 which has great specs (SATA, USB, etc) and seems to have datasheets available (try to get those for the Broadcom chip) All the hardware can be run by open source drivers with the exception of the hardware MPEG decoder which you can just ignore if you don't need it.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

CnlPepper (140772) | about 2 years ago | (#39684863)

They have provided the spec sheet for the RPi SoC, it just has the gfx chip section removed (see the RPi blog). So hardly very different to the chip on the board you just wrote about.

Re:The First Hurdle (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685985)

Wait. WHAT? This board has two connectors. One is a connector to a TV display. AND YOU DON'T GET DOCS FOR THE GRAPHICS CONTROLLER? Wow.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 2 years ago | (#39685323)

good thing its not being introduced in tennessee.

they'd have to spend equal time 'theorizing' about how the raspi got created; and also if 2 ARM chips that are in a tightly coupled union are committing a sin while co-computing.

Re:The First Hurdle (5, Interesting)

Niten (201835) | about 2 years ago | (#39685547)

The thing you might not have taken into account is the actual experience of the teacher who would like to introduce students to programming. I have no experience with the British school system, but I did work for IT in a K-12 U.S. school system not too long ago, so I think I have something to say about this.

Where I worked, students' computers were heavily locked down Windows machines running a restricted set of software. Because of the machines' age, the bad third-party GPO-wannabe software that the school district used to manage the systems, and various virus infections, these computers were not the friendliest things to teachers and students – and both groups were perpetually scared to death of "messing up" the computers and getting in trouble. In reality, these PCs were used primarily as overcomplicated interfaces to various bits of flash- and web-based educational software, and anything else was deemed too troublesome.

The point is that between the technical deficiencies and the bureaucratic ones, getting school IT to allow students to run a new type of program and then support it can frankly be a nightmare. You say these computers are capable of running Python, and this is true in the strictest sense, but in reality it's just not going to happen when half of the admins don't even know what Python is, and the other half are too scared of deploying a new, "nonstandard" interpreter.

And if that's how IT feels about the prospect, just think of how frightening it looks to the teachers.

Now contrast that with using something like the Raspberry PI. You can program without messing up your "real" computer! No IT support required, you can reset it to factory configuration in a heartbeat, and even if you do manage to physically break it somehow... hey, it was only $25. Perhaps most importantly, you can write a grant proposal to get a classroom full of them without having to go through the IT department. The Raspberry PI, or something like it, is the programming tool that teachers will be able to use in practice.

Re:The First Hurdle (1)

kenh (9056) | about 2 years ago | (#39686445)

Apparently you spent time in a poorly-run K-12 school district. Where you see a panacea to all that you imagine is wrong in education where computers are concenred, I see problems. The $25 price point is cute, but tarted up for the education market (case, PS, etc) it becomes $50, but that's still cheap. Imagine walking back into your old job, going into a classroom, taking the current "heavily locked-down Windows machines" and replacing it with a Raspberry Pi - what would the teacher think? Would they cheer for a technological revolution OR wonder why they were singled out to have their computers removed?

You can program on a Windows machine without "messing up your 'real' computer - it's called a web server.

No IT support required? Ha-Ha! That's a good one - K-12 school districts have support for VCRs and overhead projectors.

Hey, it was only $25? Or about 1/3 the likely cost of the approved textbook to support the computer... And don't forget the cost of sending the teachers out to professional development courses to train them to use/teach these new systems.

Rather than "revolutionize" their educational computing environment, why not hire a part-time Windows Admin to properly implement GPO policies?

Actual cost? (2)

arisvega (1414195) | about 2 years ago | (#39684199)

I know about the target price. What is the actual price?

Re:Actual cost? (3, Informative)

drosboro (1046516) | about 2 years ago | (#39684209)

For this model (the Model B, with Ethernet), the target price is $35. The actual price, including shipping & handling, depends a bit on where you are in the world, but it's pretty much bang on $35 plus whatever shipping charge Premier Farnell or RS has come up with for your country. They've done an amazing job at keeping this thing on track, despite delays and major changes in manufacturing plans...

Re:Actual cost? (2)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | about 2 years ago | (#39684267)

No, he means the actual price minus the Broadcom subsidies.

Re:Actual cost? (1)

s0litaire (1205168) | about 2 years ago | (#39684399)

It's probably $40 per Model B if you don't count the discount they got from Broadcom for the SoC
With the discount the Foundation makes around $2 per device.

Re:Actual cost? (2)

petes_PoV (912422) | about 2 years ago | (#39684921)

The actual cost would add on a case, a power supply, a mouse, a keyboard and an HDMI display, per $25 board - say 200USD minimum.

Since these boards are intended for schools, these extras would need to be purchased, as they can't just be "scrounged" from other equipment - which would then, itself become unusable. In addition there is cost associated with integrating all these parts, reckon on at least 1/2 hour per unit (which is probably cross-charged at the same $25 price of the board) So the whole "we can give schools a computer for the children to learn on for $25" turns out to be completely misleading

Re:Actual cost? (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 2 years ago | (#39685763)

Here's where a smart entrepreneur can make some money by making a basic switch a la KVM and marketing it towards schools. Still have full access to the computers they already have but just plug in the RPI, flip the switch, and keyboard, monitor, mouse, and power, are all now connected to the RPI. This way students can carry around their PI's and just plug them into any available computer.

Some people just see problems, others see solutions.

Re:Actual cost? (1)

kenh (9056) | about 2 years ago | (#39686279)

Your $200 estimate for a complete kit is a bit "optomistic" (low), but let's work with it.

I'd like to encourage anyone considereing deploying these "systems" in a public school system take a moment and try to explain to a concerned parent how this cobbled-together "system" at $200 is a better educational tool than a $400 Win 7 PC or even a $300 Linux PC. Once you get past "it has a web browser" answer most parents will find it sorely lacking in comparison and wonder why their children can't get access to the same computers other US kids are using in schools all across the country.

Obsolete on arrival (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684215)

I'm restraining myself from yawning, but you can get more powerful android platforms for the same price. $20 S&H? Seriously?
http://www.slashgear.com/eser-tablet-presents-the-50-android-02221101/

This project was mismanaged to the extreme.

Re:Obsolete on arrival (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684271)

Down-modded? Android devices for education actually have MIT's App Inventor backing them up. WTF does the Raspberry Pi have other than "if you build it, the open source community will come" and missed delivery dates?

The Raspberry Pi is a low volume breakout board for an unobtanium SoC, made in china, with closed source drivers. No development community to speak of. The wankers on their forums have ZERO arm dev experience and are all expecting an Arduino learning curve.

No example code = no chance in hell this product is going to "educate" anyone except on critical thinking, caveat emptor, and how to get rich making big promises and delivering lackluster results. 100% guaranteed these developers have been on full salary as they bumble their way to a deliverable.

Late delivery on a price target technology product is as pointless as releasing a movie-based video game 6 months after the DVD release.

Re:Obsolete on arrival (1)

CnlPepper (140772) | about 2 years ago | (#39684693)

Wow, so bitter...did they bugger up a business plan of yours Mr AC?

Re:Obsolete on arrival (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686543)

Please. I predicted that this project would be an abortion the minute 1001 inappropriate uses for a Rpi became a meme. Everything from Pirate Bay wanting to attach them to balloons to reading stupid shit on their forums.

It's noteworthy that NONE of the imangineering that surrounds these useless devices involves using them as intended(in a fixed location staring at a computer monitor tethered to a wall outlet).

We live in the age of mobile computing and they've figured out that they can bundle a video card with ram and a CPU. Whoopde fucking do. If I don't need the portability then I'll pick up a boat anchor system with more power from Goodwill's collection dump. If I need the portability I'll get an Allwinner tablet.

They are trying to compete with USB flash drives which I haven't used to do anything but repair broken computers in almost 3 years. I'm gonna dial the chuckling to "hardy harr harr" the minute a UK school bans hooking on of these up to their network when they realize that it's being used to DoS their Norton sever or packet sniff the network.

On a tablet I play by my rules. On a borrowed computer monitor, I'm fixing to get expelled or worse: NEVER FUCKING USE THE THING IN THE FIRST PLACE.

This device is about as useful as a carrying handle on a Gamecube.

Re:Obsolete on arrival (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 2 years ago | (#39684273)

Since when is 20 equal to 50?

Re:Obsolete on arrival (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684321)

$35+$20S&H

I write bills of materials for a fucking living. If that $20 S&H doesn't stink to high heaven then you're sipping on the kool aid.

Why is it limited to 1 per customer? Because they are hiding profit in that outrageous shipping and handling fee like a shameless ebay vendor.

I can get free S&H from deal extreme on an Allwinner A10 tablet and have it here in 2 weeks. $70. That's cheaper on a $/ghz basis and it comes with more peripheals and a screen that doesn't involve an 8ft RCA cable and a 200 lbs CRT color Television.

Re:Obsolete on arrival (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 2 years ago | (#39684417)

But what if your intended use does not include adding a screen or high GHz? And I doubt that with a screen you'll get the low energy consumption. And does that tablet have a comparable form factor?

Re:Obsolete on arrival (1)

CnlPepper (140772) | about 2 years ago | (#39684711)

Actually if you have ever ordered from Farnell and RS, you'll find that the shipping charge is about typical, especially for orders that require airfreight. Our company has accounts with both of them.

Re:Obsolete on arrival (1)

VMaN (164134) | about 2 years ago | (#39684291)

That tablet will NEVER be anything but a painful experience to use.

The Rpi can be perfect for a number of projects, and infinitely more configurable.

Re:Obsolete on arrival (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684363)

You're high.
That tablet has a resistive touch screen. Rpi has... an RCA Jack.
That tablet has a 3 axis accelerometer. Rpi has... the "Gertboard".
That tablet has a wifi adapter. Rpi has... a broken Ethernet port.
That tablet has a GPS reciever. Rpi has... a paper map used to shield the Ethernet jack from EMI.
That tablet has a Lithium battery. Rpi has... a specification on what switch mode power supply to buy.
That tablet had an enclosure with buttons. Rpi has... exposed header pin solder blobs to short out on metal surfaces and scratch wooden table tops.

That tablet has a 1.5ghz processor with 1gb of RAM. Rpi chokes on Google Chrome like a bag of dicks.

Re:Obsolete on arrival (1)

VMaN (164134) | about 2 years ago | (#39684551)

All of those, including the garbage resistive screen and 3hr+ battery are irrelevant for this project.

Why are you bringing up Google Chrome? Do you want to run a desktop on the thing? All that says is that you have NO idea what to use it for. I'd take a debian install with repos ANY day over android for what this thing can be used for.

This has gone far too well (3, Insightful)

RotateLeftByte (797477) | about 2 years ago | (#39684235)

and if it takes off in the US i forsee a plethora of LawSuits alledging patent, copyright and anything else the syhsters can think of just to stop this in its tracks.
If this becomes really successful I have no shadow of a doubt that the likes of Microsoft will see this as a threat to their business and try by whatever means to stifile if not downright kill it.
You really can't have people building a computer now can you? Whatever next? Desiging their own Operating System and giving it away?

On a personal note, this device really takes me back to my Degree project in 1975 where I build a DtoA and AtoD converter board for the NatSemi IMP16 Microcomputer. in the years afterwards I build a number of UniBus devices for the PDP-11.
Interfacting 'kit' to computers has gotten a lot easier these days.

Re:This has gone far too well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684293)

Lay off the crack.

Nobody cares about this project enough to sue them. If it wasn't for the hype, this products release would be lost in the news. The fan boys will quietly disappear when they realize that they can't think of a single use for these boards and aside from some lame hackaday blog posts showing off their analog video "hello world" projects, the inability of this product to make motivated talented programmers out of them will be a huge disappointment.

Re:This has gone far too well (3, Insightful)

CnlPepper (140772) | about 2 years ago | (#39684777)

Anyone who can't think of a use for these boards is lacking a serious amount of imagination.

1) Educational tool
2) Media center
3) Robotics controller (CNC tools, experimental robots)
4) Homebrew NAS
5) Cheap linux box
6) Point of sale machines
7) Disposable computer for test industries

and that was 1 minutes thought.

So many uses it's stupid...and the reason it is so damn useful is that it will be have good support and it is so damn cheap for the power you get.

Re:This has gone far too well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684917)

Unfortunately, (2) is dead out of the box due to zero MPEG-2 support.

Unless you want to convert everything to AVC and don't want to play any DVDs at all and some Blu-Rays.

Sucks they didn't make it an add-on at extra cost, because I know the licensing is expensive, but there you have it.

Arduino and similar stuff is probably more suited to a robotics controller since it's always nice to have real-time control without extra hassle.

I'll give you the rest, though. :) Guess all us media center folks are a little butt-hurt over the MPEG-2 debacle.

Re:This has gone far too well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685059)

The Raspberry Pi uses the same Broadcom BCM2835 multimedia SoC as the wildly successful Roku 2 [roku.com] media player, which has sold over 4 million units. So much for your "dead out of the box" nonsense.. :-)

But you're missing the entire point of the Raspberry Pi anyway. It's not intended to give you a cheap media player. You can get lost as far as the project goals are concerned. It's intended to provide a cheap computer for education, not to turn kids into media consumers.

Your objections fail completely.

Re:This has gone far too well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685307)

The decoders are part of the GPU firmware blob. They have chosen not to include decoders for some popular formats and no encoders at all, due to the licensing costs. Other systems with the same SoC can support many more formats if they come with a different firmware. The RaPi is not going to be a good universal media player.

Re:This has gone far too well (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 years ago | (#39685531)

But can someone point out what exactly are the codecs that they have enabled. I remember seeing the Pi tech specs PDF and I remember it saying that there was 2 codecs enabled of the Broadcom chip.

Re:This has gone far too well (1)

Zerth (26112) | about 2 years ago | (#39686575)

They will be including the encoders at a later date once they have picked a camera for the CSI port.

Re:This has gone far too well (1)

kenh (9056) | about 2 years ago | (#39685761)

How many P3 and P4 computers will be replaced in schools with Raspberry Pi systems?

If only there was some way to load a development environment onto those surplus computers being shiped by the, uhm, ship load, to China to be recycled - that would be sweet!

Re:This has gone far too well (1)

kenh (9056) | about 2 years ago | (#39686013)

In order:

1) Educational tool - seriously? You imagine this will be some sort of "stone soup" revolution in education, all centered arounf a $25 circuit board with no case, PS, keyboard, ouse or display, no course materials, and on a platform unlike the Macs or PCs the students have at home, their parents use at work?

2) Media Center - When most folks discuss a media center they don't imagine an appliance that could easily be replaced by a refurbished XBox, $50 Roku, or an Apple TV. They usually look for a system they describe as an HTPC with enough "umph" to decode blu-ray discs.

3) Robotics Controller - the educational market is littered with dozens and dozens of purpose-built robotics controllers, with course material readily available to support it's use in the classroom.

4) Homebrew NAS - this is better than a $29 Pogo Plug how, exactly?

5) Cheap Linux Box - Assuming you have an available TV with an appropriate digital input, keyboard, mouse, power supply and the inclination to assemple all the pieces, how, exactly, is this better than the P4 system rotting away in your neighbor's closet? Any chance you'd need an internet connection to really make this useful? That has you spending $20+ month on your internet connection to feed your $25 linux box.

6) Point of Sale machines - So you imagine a vendor will invest in a touch screen flat panel display, barcode scanner, and cash drawer and build them all around a $25 circuit board? Why? OpenPOS runs fine on a 386 or better machine.

7) Disposable computer for test industries - what does this mean? A data collection device? Please define "disposable" - any chance this "disposable coputer for test industries" would involve using sensors that sell for 10-100x more than the "disposable" computer?

"and that was 1 minutes thought" - that was pretty obvious.

Re:This has gone far too well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686379)

This board is a terrible selection as an embedded controller. Absolutely none of it's functions makes it well suited for robotics. It's peripherals are shit(Gertboard? Seriously?), it's power hungry, and aside from it's supposed CMOS camera interface, has absolutely no application it's suited for. Android has OpenCV running right now and you don't have to fuck with webcam drivers or ARM development(which is a royal pain in the ass for anyone who has never tried).

Call me when people are using this thing for Software Define Radio and I'll consider it worthy of more attention than a door stop.

Plenty of room for competition (4, Insightful)

Morgaine (4316) | about 2 years ago | (#39684531)

Although you're making a "glass half full" kind of prediction, it's not hard to imagine that the opposite of your guess might occur in the US: All the other ARM licensees might see this as a fantastic coup for Broadcom, and follow suit with their own competing $25 - $35 boards.

After all, Texas Instruments already has their own $5 SoC [ti.com] available and used in their BeagleBone [beagleboard.org], so they could quite easily remove features from that board and release something into the Raspberry Pi price niche for education. (The BeagleBone's $89 [adafruit.com] places it far outside the Raspberry Pi's price niche.)

The Chinese will of course follow suit with boards based on their wildly successful Allwinner A10 [rhombus-tech.net] ARM device, which is far better than Broadcom's SoC (on specs) and only costs $7 in production volumes. Expect a pile of competitors from that quarter!

Re:This has gone far too well (1)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 2 years ago | (#39685139)

Since when was I not able to build a computer before Raspberry PI? Everything from SBC's to cluster builds are easily availabe, just at a higher cost than RPI. RPI isn't innovative, it is just cheap.

Re:This has gone far too well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685707)

Since when was I not able to go from the UK to New York before airplanes? Everything from yachts to dinghies are easily available, just at a lower speed than airplane. Airplane isn't innovative, it is just cheap.

Since when was I not able to communicate across the country before email? Everything from telephone to postal mail are easily available, just at a higher cost than email. Email isn't innovative, it is just cheap.

I could go on...

Re:This has gone far too well (1)

kenh (9056) | about 2 years ago | (#39686133)

You seriously think this will ever be a threat to Microsoft? On what planet?

This system reminds me of the COSMAC ELF [cosmacelf.com] of the early 1970s, but with a an ethernet port and an HDMI connection for the TV. Those who think this is revolutionary need to expand their knowledge of computer history to at least a point prior to Saint Linus came down from the Mount with his Linux Kernel...

Why wait? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39684671)

Instead of waiting months for an RPi you can buy a BeagleBone right now. If you don't need video output then its better than an RPi (faster CPU, mounting holes connectors don't stick out every which way, better hardware documentation (i.e. it is available, unlike RPi's SOC.)) It costs twice as much but we're only talking $40 and you can have it next week. I'm glad I bought my BB back in February instead of holding out for RPi.

Excessive Raspberry Pi marketing on /. (2)

Grieviant (1598761) | about 2 years ago | (#39685127)

How many more RPi non-stories are going to appear on /. before the device is actually released to the masses? The device sounds great and all, but this has gone past the point of absurdity.

Re:Excessive Raspberry Pi marketing on /. (1)

turkeyfeathers (843622) | about 2 years ago | (#39685511)

Absurd? Wait until they post a Slashdot review of Packt Publishing's "Programming for Raspberry Pi" (available for pre-order now for only $19.95 or 2.375 bitcoins).

Deliveries have started (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39685671)

How many more RPi non-stories are going to appear on /. before the device is actually released to the masses?

It's a techie's bare board and its price point is totally revolutionary for a Linux machine with HDMI, so this kind of news is highly appropriate for the Slashdot audience.

Regarding "released to the masses", that started yesterday (Friday 13th April). A pile of people have already received their UPS tracking number for imminent delivery, and not just in the UK.

What about the backorders ? (1)

zzyzyx (1382375) | about 2 years ago | (#39685261)

I thought the first 10k batch had already been sold and they were scrambling to get them certified to be released from customs. All of a sudden they have a batch ready to give to a school. Looks just like more PR to me. Maybe I wouldn't be so suspicious if their didn't already have so much delay delivering the goods to the actual customers.

Project plans (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 years ago | (#39685549)

Do you already have some ideas about what you plan to do with the R-Pi? Aside the teaching programming part, it should be a wonderful platform for all sorts of embedded projects.

In other news... (2, Interesting)

kenh (9056) | about 2 years ago | (#39685715)

So could someone explain to me how these $25 circuit boards are "better" than any one of the countless millions of P4 computers that we dump in the cargo holds of contaner ships heading back to China to be "recycled" into a small amount of precious metals and a whole lot of toxic waste???

Last time I looked this system required a power supply, USB keyboard and mouse, case, and a display that can accept a digital signal - in comparison, the Vic-20, Commodore 64, and Sinclair ZX-81 all came with keyboard, case & and power supply, and only required a composite video capable monitor (or a TV modulator).

This is much more like the Apple I - the circuit board that could be bought unpopulated or completed, and was quickly snapped-up by a small community of enthusiasts and then made obvious the need to offer a complete system that included a keyboard, case and power supply.

How long till Raspberry Pi offers their version of the Apple II, a system in a case with a keyboard, mouse, and power supply?

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39686557)

Er, this has composite out, on both models.
Hell, that's 40% of the reason I want one.
Now, the lack of a case is outright stupid, but the lack of other things like a keyboard and mouse is to be expected at the sub-$40 price range.

I dont get this child angle (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#39686003)

What? are there NO computers in the UK? making a small cheap computer is not automatically going to spark a fire in a child who is surrounded by more powerful machines every moment of their lives capable of doing the exact same thing

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...