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TSA Tests Automated ID Authentication

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the thanks-bruce dept.

Privacy 190

CowboyRobot writes "Last year, a Nigerian man boarded a plane from N.Y. to L.A. using an invalid ID and a boarding pass issued to another person. A week later he was caught again with 10 expired boarding passes. In response to this and similar events, the Transportation Security Administration has begun testing a new system at Washington's Dulles International Airport that verifies an air traveler's identity by matching photo IDs to boarding passes and ensures that boarding passes are authentic. The test will soon be expanded to Houston and Puerto Rico."

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a first (4, Funny)

zlives (2009072) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766499)

sign of sensibility from TSA... the world will end in 2012

Re:a first (4, Funny)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766627)

What they haven't announced yet is, for the automated system to work, you first step into a room where a bunch of robotic arms probe your various orifices as painfully as possible. Then, for no apparent reason, you are hit with a high dose of radiation. If you oppose this sensible security measure, clearly you support the terrorists!

Re:a first (2, Insightful)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766777)

They'll never use automation, no sport in it.

"The smallest minority on earth is the individual.
Those who deny individual rights cannot
claim to be defenders of minorities."
- Ayn Rand

First they came for the Jews and I did not speak out because I was not a Jew.
Then they came for the Communists and I did not speak out because I was not a Communist.
Then they came for the trade unionists and I did not speak out because I was not a trade unionist.
Then they came for me and there was no one left to speak out for me.

Re:a first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766967)

This is precisely why America is going down the crapper. It's all well and good to extoll the virtues of individuality, but at some point you have to take one for the team, holding up everything because only 99.99999% of the people want to do something really just represents a tyranny by the minority.

Also, it's disgusting of you to coopt that particular Martin Niemöller to mean something different from what it was originally intended.

I agree that the TSA is a disgusting abuse of power, but you're comparing the rounding up and persecution of specific groups against one where most people can and are affected. The more appropriate comparison would be with the treatment of Arabs and Muslims following 9/11.

Re:a first (1)

Goocifer (2609931) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767191)

99.99999% of people never want to do anything the same way. America is going down the crapper because anyone who can subjugate individual rights will do so while acting like some stock footage of 1% of the population is 99.99999% of the population - add all the 1%'s up in the worst manner possible for Human rights, and you have us.

Re:a first (0, Offtopic)

Idarubicin (579475) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767383)

I don't know what's more disappointing--that you put Martin Niemöller up next to Ayn Rand and pretended that those quotes pulled out of context belong side by side, or that someone with mod points didn't know better than to tag your post as 'Insightful'.

Rand's philosophy embraced selfishness as its highest ideal.

Re:a first (1)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767531)

Too bad you can't see past her nonsense to the truth in those words.

Re:a first (1)

jaymemaurice (2024752) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767613)

But what is truth when taken out of context?!

Re:a first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767619)

No matter what the context it was said in is, the truth of it remains the same. The words themselves are still true, just like 1 + 1 = 2 will always be true.

Re:a first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767879)

The correct answer is "misunderstood truth", which is not as good as "understood truth", and pretty much just as bad as "untruth". You fail.

Re:a first (4, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767527)

"The smallest minority on earth is the individual.
Those who deny individual rights cannot
claim to be defenders of minorities."
- Ayn Rand

I believe this statement ignores the possibility that the individual may be discriminated against for traits they share with other individuals who, collectively, do not make up a plurality or simple majority of the population.

That or it's a logically necessary starting point for Randian philosphy to work.
I'm inclined to suspect it's the latter, since Randian philosophy is full of assumptions that don't quite match the reality of human behavior.

Then they came for the Communists and I did not speak out because I was not a Communist.
Then they came for the trade unionists and I did not speak out because I was not a trade unionist.

Didn't Rand hate unions and think Communists were evil?

Re:a first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767821)

Didn't Rand hate unions and think Communists were evil?

Does that mean they shouldn't have rights? I hate racists, but I would still defend their right to free speech.

Re:a first (3, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767861)

Does that mean they shouldn't have rights? I hate racists, but I would still defend their right to free speech.

Rand would not support unions' rights.
She would actively oppose their existence.

And she thought Communist ideology was evil.
Like... her whole ideology was formed as a counterpoint to Soviet communisim.
I'm not sure where I was going with that point, but I doubt she'd have kicked up much of a fuss if anyone collectively went after the communists.

The moral of this story is twofold:
1. Randian philosophy isn't very useful as a governing ideology and
2: you shouldn't mix your aphorisms.

Re:a first (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767391)

They're trying to come up with a better name than The Probulator.

Also, every 1 in 100,000 test subjects has a testicle "popped" for no apparent reason (TSA of course says it is 1 in 10,000,000).

Re:a first (4, Insightful)

cgenman (325138) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767715)

Don't forget: The system only costs 5 million dollars per gateway, per year.

If we only put this much effort into curing heart disease, we'd probably save a life or two.

Re:a first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766755)

Yeah, to be honest, after all the security theater bullshit we get from the TSA these days, this actually sounds like a pretty decent idea. I mean, a decent idea in the sense of "why exactly WEREN'T we doing this to begin with?", but still...

Re:a first (1)

Goocifer (2609931) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767169)

Sensibility would be just having it in place where it happened - we all know all the world's phonies come from L.A.

Re:a first (1)

guises (2423402) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767209)

Given that you're already ID'd when you get your boarding pass this isn't a new outrage, I don't see this as positive news though. It's a reminder that we seem to have permanently ceded our right to travel anonymously, and put up hardly any fuss about it in the process.

Re:a first (1)

mrmeval (662166) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767295)

No, it's a sign of institutional stupidity they're trying to compensate for. What is different between ID in the US and in Israel?

What the goal will become is biometrics regardless of how flawed that is.

TSA is more about terror than what they claim to be preventing.

What a waste! (5, Insightful)

skipkent (1510) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766523)

One person did this, and it seems he was caught both times. Wouldn't that mean that the original practices were working? I guess any way to strip our rights and waste money is a good one. Did all of you know there is a clause allowing airports to opt out and use private security firms?? San Francisco, crazy isn't it, is one of the few airports that has used the option; and guess what, the passengers applaud the effort and can't believe how friendly and quick they are.

Re:What a waste! (4, Informative)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766593)

Lots of people do this without getting caught.

http://www.dubfire.net/boarding_pass/ [dubfire.net]

Glad they are closing this loophole, it is one of the very few things the TSA has done or is doing that makes sense.

Re:What a waste! (4, Insightful)

zoloto (586738) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766695)

The TSA aren't needed at all. This is just a case of making sure those who get on the plane have paid.

Re:What a waste! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767695)

"The TSA aren't needed at all. This is just a case of making sure those who get on the plane have paid."

Yep, can't have cheap bastards flying into our buildings.

Re:What a waste! (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767867)

The TSA aren't needed at all.

T,FTFY.

Re:What a waste! (5, Interesting)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767131)

it is one of the very few things the TSA has done or is doing that makes sense

Why should you need to present ID to fly? I'm 45 - I remember flying in the 80s to a student conference using the ticket of a buddy who couldn't go. (I also had a TRS-80 Model 1 in my checked luggage, but that's a different tale...)

Re:What a waste! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767219)

That being the case, you probably also remember this: the whole photo ID and only passengers allowed at the gate stuff started in (over) reaction to the TWA 800 terrorist incident.

Oh, wait: later, the government decided it wasn't a terrorist incident. So if it wasn't a terrorist incident then what was the reactiion for and why wasn't it done away with?

Well, of course it doesn't do crap to enhance security. It pacifies the infantile minds who equate violations of liberty with actually being safe, of course, but the real effect was to kill the secondary market for airline tickets and enhance corporate profits.

Almost like somebody was waiting for an excuse to do that or something...kind of like the impossibly large Patriot Act which was allegedly written after 9/11 instead of sitting around waiting for a different excuse.

Re:What a waste! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767647)

This isn't enhancing safety. The thing that matters is passengers aren't bringing dangerous weapons (bomb, guns, etc) onto planes. There is no need for identification from a safety perspective. Even taking measures to prevent bombs and weapons like screening passengers isn't a good idea. It introduces hazards like radiation and / or discourages flight which results in more deaths from people driving (driving is far more dangerous than flying). Our airports have come to a standstill for no good reason. For short distances in particular (NYC to Boston) or Boston to Washington DC people actually drive over flying despite the time potentially being about an hour flight compared to many hours to drive. This is insane considering driving is MORE dangerous.

Re:What a waste! (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767091)

One person did this, and it seems he was caught both times. Wouldn't that mean that the original practices were working?

I don't know. How would we know if somebody did it and wasn't caught?

Re:What a waste! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767165)

In the age of the internet? Read their blog..

Re:What a waste! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767771)

We would be able to tell when they blew up their planes.
Just like this Nigerian man obviously would have if the TSA hadn't caught him.

loopholes (4, Insightful)

Mr. X (17716) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766549)

So it's taken the TSA over 10 years after 9/11 to attempt to close this loophole? Good work guys!

Re:loopholes (4, Funny)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766609)

"We are already scanning the luggage, irradiating the passengers and groping their balls... What else can we do?"

"Check to see if they are actually on a flight?"

Re:loopholes (2)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767355)

This was not a loophole. This was shear laziness or stupidity.

Ensuring that each piece of baggage matched a passenger was a requirement after the Lockerbie bombing. And it's just now that the TSA figures out it's a good idea to match boarding passes to passengers IDs?

Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766563)

There have been stories of people being denied ability to fly because their ticket didn't EXACTLY match their ID. I'm sure this will result in more of the same.
(note to Westerners: in many many parts of the world, people have names with no exact relationship to how it is put on official documents... some people also have two birthdays (one is based on the moon, one is based on the calendar))

Strict unbending rules are the bane of society.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (2)

Kneo24 (688412) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766861)

People from all over the world seem to play nicely with putting their names on documents exactly the same way every time and having birthdays that match up. I'm sorry, but if you can't play along with the rest of the world and have all of your legal documents use the same birthday, you can rightly fuck off. People will do anything to be different. Really, it's quite simple to follow this rule. What does your ID say? Use that information. Problem solved.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (4, Interesting)

isilrion (814117) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767081)

Really, it's quite simple to follow this rule. What does your ID say? Use that information. Problem solved.

Unfortunately, it isn't nearly that easy. I have two first names, and two last names. My official document lists the four words (I've seen people with more than 4). A some airline systems are just not prepared to deal with those very long strings with spaces in the middle. Checking in with Air France, for instance, is a pain, because even if I go buy my ticket with my passport in hand to show them the exact spelling, they still truncate my names, my last names, and remove the spaces. So I've easily had to spend 30 mins at the check in counter while they try to find what combination they used. Needless to say, I avoid Air France, but other airlines aren't much better: at least Air Canada and WestJet insist on deleting the spaces from my name(s). I can tell you that I have never flown with a ticket that shows my exact name (the one in my passport and the one I give when buying it).

So no, its not nearly as easy as just using the same name everywhere... most of the places I visit wont let me use my full name! (But thank you implying that it's my fault)

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767297)

Welcome to the modern world. It might be popular in your village to sing a little song of grandure for a name, but it turns out that's not recognized as a name in international situations. And you know what? Get it sorted out with your own government -- the whole purpose of a passport is to make you internationally recognizable.

If you're finding my post to "insensitive" to your cultural standpoint, please keep in mind that myself and billions of others come from ancestors with naming schemes that are unworkable today. We adapted to the Present. It's your turn.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (-1, Troll)

pete6677 (681676) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767415)

I agree with the Anon poster. Fix your name(s). International travel with 55-some characters in your names is just going to cause you no end of aggravation.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (4, Insightful)

isilrion (814117) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767701)

That's an eye opening statement. Really. It is your opinion that all people from, let's say, Spain [wikipedia.org] and Latin America should change their names to please you, because you are incapable of printing a document that reads [first name] [paternal last name] [maternal last name]. And that we all are from a "village to sing a little song of grandure for a name". That's beyond arrogant. And pretty stupid, too: it can be solved by just /not/ using a "lastname char(10)" field in the database (which is an amazingly dumb design).

But the ridiculous suggestion of "changing my name" doesn't even address my point: that the GP stated that it was just as easy as writing the name as it appears in your ID. If all Latin Americans and Spaniards need to change their name, then you are conceding the point that it is not that simple (imho, it should be: the only reason why you can type something in your 'lastname' field, and get something else printed out in your boarding pass, is incompetence). Mind you, most Americans and Canadians I know, have a middle name. Given that the aforementioned airlines have gotten my first+middle name wrong (FIRSTNAMEMIDDLENAME or FIRSTNAMIDDL instead of "FIRSTNAME MIDDLENAME"), I suspect that your suggestion of changing our names should probably apply to you as well.

(Did I just fed a troll?)

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (2)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767829)

Fix what names? I'm a westerner, with a romaji stylized last name, and a 'western' first and middle name. My entire name is over the 55, in fact it's 63 and it's on my passport without a problem. When I flew out west around two months back. Of the characters on my boarding pass there was 6 of my first, 3 of my middle and 8 of my last. Domestic travel in Canada? Not a problem, traveling in the US, haven't had a problem yet. Though it's not my problem you have an issue with "long" western names for us of mixed ancestry. Really the only problem I see, is a broken naming system that believes that everyone should fit under 55.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (1)

dark12222000 (1076451) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767211)

Yeah, after all, if you aren't doing it like America, you're clearing doing it wrong! How dare you have a long name, it's unpatriotic!

What exactly does "rest of the world" mean? Like America? Like the UK? Do we take a tally and run the results? What if your country uses a different calendar system?

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767361)

I have a simple short English name. No funny symbols No hyphens. I had trouble on a flight to Germany because I had a PhD. Delta Skymiles has a "title" field on your profile. They use this nicely and discretely UNTIL you book a title. Then there merge the title string with my last name so I become LASTNAME PhD which does not match my passport or drivers license. Also I had a bad birthdate put on my passport once when it was renewed. I didn't notice that until the customs agent on the return trip said Happy Birthday to me and I was confused. Luckily that wasn't noticed in a way that mattered.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (3, Informative)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767493)

What does your ID say? Use that information.

Well, let's see. My native ID says: _a_string_that_can't_be_rendered_by_slashdot_ which is my name.

My driving license and my old passport say "Alexey". My new passport and my US visa say "Aleksei". Both are valid transliterations of my name (world doesn't use only English, you know) from the point of view of Russian laws (US consulate that issued my visa also agrees). Yet I've had a problem with a TSA officer and almost missed my flight.

Oh, I also have a patronymic which was mistaken for my last name a couple of times.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (2)

Screen404-O (1174697) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767881)

Ad to this, I had my name also spelled in French. So in my passport it was Serguei, Sergey, and Sergei. Try getting on the plane with that.

Re:Will cause more headaches due to EXACTNESS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766931)

"System knows best." Lol.

Spotted at SEA (3, Interesting)

4pins (858270) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766567)

I took four flights over the last week. Monday I left SEA and I did not notice anything new. Friday I flew out of SEA again and the security guard took my boarding pass, scanned it, my name came up on the readout, he then did the usual comparisons against my ID and let me through. I gestured at the scanner and said, "That is not a trick I have seen before," there was glint in his eye and a small smile but no audible reply.

If you are still traveling on other peoples return flights (when the buy a round trip), it is time to stop!

Re:Spotted at SEA (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766711)

Just buy and refund another ticket in your own name, or get a lounge pass. Go through security with that. Then fly on the other one.

Checking names has nothing to do with limiting the introduction of weapons, incendiaries or explosives. It's payoff, in the form of revenue protection, to prevent the airlines from complaining about the TSA.

Re:Spotted at SEA (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766739)

That glint in his eye and small smile were his attempts to have a gay hookup with you.

Dear Mr. TSA: (5, Funny)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766569)

I recent inherited $30 million dollars US that I must hide from local tax collector. If you would kindly allow me to fly for free, I will deposit the sum of $2 million dollars in you account. Pleese allow my assistant to board your flight.

Thanks you,

Mujibar Undooku
Prime Minister of Financial Affairs, Nigeria

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766601)

Thanks for your anti-African stereotypes. Racism has always been here on slashdot.

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766623)

I find your anti-slashdot racism offensive.

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (-1, Offtopic)

zoloto (586738) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766701)

You're clearly the ignorant one here.

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766963)

You're clearly the ignorant one here.

Boy is he ever!

Realize that most of these scammers are in fact black Africans from Nigeria, and you're just stating fact.

Realize that most USA murders are committed by black males which is quite amazing since black males are about 6% of the US population, and conclude that blacks are more violent than whites, and suddenly you're a racist. Even though you didn't force those black males to murder, somehow this is your fault now stand in line and eat some white guilt wontcha?

Aren't double standards wonderful? I guess it's different when you're talking about a foreign national?

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766715)

Thanks for your anti-African stereotypes. Racism has always been here on slashdot.

While godfatherofsoul, maybe anti-African* he has not made any racist remarks unlike you. You see assume that all Nigerias are of the same race which is racism because if this assumption became "common knowledge" then that one race could "purify" it's land because aren't all Nigeria One Race, nobody would realize what had happened before it's too late.

*Actually, your stretching even the anti-Africanism because he didn't condemn more then one African country, You do realize there more countries then Nigeria in Africa, right?

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767359)

Nigerians have many races. 100m, 200m, 400m. What he said is most are won by blacks.

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (1)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766785)

We shall, of course, ignore the fact that the majority of these scams come from Nigera, for as we all know, its better to be politically correct than aware.

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (1)

Kneo24 (688412) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766869)

whoosh whoosh whoosh

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766851)

Some of you have no clue what racism is. Most Nigerian fishing emails I got were written by someone with poor English skills.

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (1)

NetNed (955141) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766883)

Oh Oh!!! I want to help!! Can I bring a cashiers check in to a US border country anywhere to help??? That's the only way I can think of helping

Re:Dear Mr. TSA: (1)

guttentag (313541) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767855)

Mitt Romney, is that you?

they already do that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766589)

Before I get to the rape-gate I must present my ID and boarding pass. Perhaps that waste-of-space at the kiosk could do his or her job. Just a thought...

Re:they already do that (1, Insightful)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766765)

Why stop at rape-gate? If they can confirm your name, address, and when you'll be back, they can visit your house and rape you again. Maybe steal some shit out of your house, not just your luggage.

New shiny (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766605)

A $100,000 a pop gadget to check people's photo ID against their boarding pass? I'm sorry TSA, but that's not good enough. It needs to at least show you my Willie and give me cancer.

They could just enforce the existing rules... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766615)

You know, they could just *enforce the existing rules* instead of implementing new ones. Note the boarding was with an "invalid ID".

And boxcutters were not allowed in carryon luggage planes on September 10th, 2001, either.

AC

Waitaminute... (5, Insightful)

Enry (630) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766641)

Weren't those called eyeballs on the first TSA person you run into? They wave the magic UV wand over your ID to make sure it's valid, then study the boarding pass, then the ID again, then look at you, scribble something on it, and then tell you to have a nice day.

Re:Waitaminute... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766801)

But that doesn't check if you go to the right gate and get on the correct plane. This is a real security hole that was known should have been closed years ago. Remember the kid that modified his borading pass before printing it off and then blogged about it?

Security should all be done directly before bording. It's just too expensive to put in that many scanners and hire that many guards.

Re:Waitaminute... (2)

fluffy99 (870997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767395)

But that doesn't check if you go to the right gate and get on the correct plane. This is a real security hole that was known should have been closed years ago. Remember the kid that modified his borading pass before printing it off and then blogged about it?

Security should all be done directly before bording. It's just too expensive to put in that many scanners and hire that many guards.

That's not TSA's job. That's the airlines job. It's their problem if they decide to honor an invalid boarding pass.

Re:Waitaminute... (1)

swillden (191260) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767469)

This is a real security hole

You mean, this was a real (if very minor) threat to the airlines' revenues. There's basically zero security value in requiring ID to fly.

Re:Waitaminute... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766987)

That's how they do it in Canada. Last time I flew out of Canada they checked my passport and ticket twice, once at security and one last time as I was boarding the plane.

The technology will ultimately fail at some point, and what about people who grow beards? The lifetime of an ID can be up to 10 years depending upon the type, during which time one could easily grow a mountain man beard that would confuse the equipment.

Re:Waitaminute... (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767417)

But they have no way to check it's a real boarding pass. It could be one you scanned from a month ago, changed the dates on and picked a flight to match one that is taking off that day, and otherwise tweaked to look legit to get passed the gates. Human eyeballs don't have the ability to read barcodes or QR codes and check them against the database of registered flyers for all airlines for that date. You still won't be able to sneak a bomb past security, but you can probably sneak onboard a plane without paying using this method if you're careful about it.

NICE! (3, Insightful)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766643)

Apparently you can and will get groped or cavity-searched for no reason, or denied clearance because your baby is on the no-fly list, but they do let you fly with a fake ID and invalid boarding pass. That's very sensible.

Matching photo ID? Why? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766649)

I mean, why they restrain themselves to photo ID only?

I bet they can do better... if only your ID will include everything those scanners can see! Even better... that groping, you know?... can be simplified by a simple visual inspection (to be replaced by automatic body recognition), as long as you take off more than your shoes.

So let's see, Photo ID isn't reliable. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766661)

Thanks, now we know why the Republican are REALLY pushing it at the ballot box.

Really? (1)

Adam Appel (1991764) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766671)

I thought thats what the TSA person at the front of the line does, you know when they take your ID and your boarding pass and match the information. I hate the TSA (you didnt have to work there to hate them, but i did for 6 months a number of years ago) and didn't rtfa, but I would guess that this new system just makes so sort of fuss and a "security" person then checks it again?

WTF, TSA? (5, Informative)

Peter Simpson (112887) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766729)

First, we all have to show picture ID and cryptically marked boarding passes
Next, we have to partially disrobe and empty our pockets
Then, we have to pass through a metal detector and a high-cost, dubiously useful (and even more dubiously safe) perv-scanner

You mean to tell me that TSA hasn't figured out, in cooperation with the airlines, of course, how to put some kind of cryptologic authenticator on boarding passes?
Perhaps they should have used some of the money they spent on perv-scanners to buy a computer, a bar code scanner and a crypto-hash generator for the boarding passes -- like they have at the gate when you board the airplane. They could scan the new high tech RealID[tm] licenses they forced on us, too, because you know they put an authenticator hash in them (right?)

Bruce Schneier hit it on the nose (and now, former TSA head Kip Hawley seems to agree: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303815404577335783535660546.html [wsj.com] ) -- TSA is broken.

Re:WTF, TSA? (4, Informative)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767039)

Bruce Schneier hit it on the nose (and now, former TSA head Kip Hawley seems to agree: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303815404577335783535660546.html [wsj.com] [wsj.com]) -- TSA is broken.

I kind of think that Mr Hawley learned some things when he debated Bruce [economist.com] . Because some of the arguments he makes in that article sound a lot like what Bruce Schneier has been saying for a while.

crazy waste (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766731)

So supposedly at some point in the future we will have positively identified some actual terrorists with a real plot but not be able to arrest them before they get to the airport where they will totally slip through all of the other defenses including passengers who will rip them to shreds. To stop that miniscule, theoretical threat we'll actually hassle billions of innocent travelers, incurring many billions of dollars in time and effort, not counting the fancy equipment and services that will enrich certain connected people.

Sounds good to me.

ID is irrelevant (5, Insightful)

island_earth (468577) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766743)

There doesn't seem to be any valid security reason to show ID at all before flying, much less proving that your ID and boarding pass match, any more than there is when you take a bus, ferry, subway, or train.

If TSA (or whoever would be there if we abolished this waste of an organization) is doing its job, explosives should be stopped using existing technology (x-rays, random chemical swabs, not to mention, you know, looking for nervous behavior or the wrong answers to a few basic security questions which has always worked for El-Al), and any other weapons are limited in their usefulness now that cockpit doors are secured and passengers know that "shut up and behave" no longer results in a safe landing in Cuba.

ID, matching or otherwise, doesn't matter. Most (all?) of the 9/11 hijackers had valid ID. The No-Fly list is a bloated joke. The only thing ID does is ensure that the airlines control the tickets more carefully.

Made-up crisis averted by more expensive technology that lines the pockets of some lobbyist. Woot!

Re:ID is irrelevant (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766779)

There doesn't seem to be any valid security reason to show ID at all before flying, much less proving that your ID and boarding pass match, any more than there is when you take a bus, ferry, subway, or train.

SSSSSSHHHHH! Pipe down, dumbass! They're already considering that for nationwide train service! Don't remind them!

Re:ID is irrelevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766815)

not considering, but have already impemented.

Re:ID is irrelevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766925)

We have nationwide train service? I though we had an intercostal route, slow, rare and expensive service on that, and only the big money to lawmaker route was useful for people who, you know, work for a living.

Re:ID is irrelevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766991)

Wait a minute.

Are you saying that you guys *don't* have to show your ID and boarding pass again at the departure gate immediately before boarding the plane?

Re:ID is irrelevant (2)

Trepidity (597) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767075)

In Europe it seems to vary by airline for intra-Schengen flights. Some ask for ID, others don't. Honestly I bet the ones who check ID are more worried about you selling tickets, cutting down on their margins, than they are about terrorism.

Re:ID is irrelevant (4, Informative)

AthanasiusKircher (1333179) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767141)

Are you saying that you guys *don't* have to show your ID and boarding pass again at the departure gate immediately before boarding the plane?

It's funny (and not widely known), but you actually didn't need a photo ID to fly domestically in the U.S. until maybe the past couple years. For quite a few years after 9/11, you could just say "Oh, I forgot it," and they'd stick you in an alternate line that usually got you through security faster (though often with an extra patdown).

Technically, there was a legal principle that you had a right to travel freely within the U.S. without having to present "papers" (a la Nazi Germany). People who "forgot" their IDs were usually fine, but the TSA started harassing those who just refused to show ID.

Around four years ago, it started to get harder -- they'd ask for any sort of ID even without a photo: credit card, whatever, and then they'd make mysterious phone calls and generally let you through.

But then around the time of the nude scanner crap, the TSA finally decided it was just going to ignore people's right to free travel and just officially admit that we've descended into the likes of Nazi Germany if we want to travel any distance within the U.S.

For all the harassment that has been shown to people by the TSA, most people are shocked that for about 8-9 years after 9/11, you still didn't even need ID to get on a domestic flight.

Re:ID is irrelevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767031)

Yes, exactly! It is impossible to transfer plane tickets, which gives airlines even more power in pricing than they had already. If people could trade tickets, maybe it would actually cost *less* to go to a destination without stopping than including a stop. What a concept. And tickets that offer refunds wouldn't cost 3x as much, because they'd know you can just resell your ticket.

Re:ID is irrelevant (2)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767161)

There doesn't seem to be any valid security reason to show ID at all before flying, much less proving that your ID and boarding pass match, any more than there is when you take a bus, ferry, subway, or train.

Exactly right - This isn't Soviet Russia. I can see needing to present a passport at check-in for International flights, but for domestic flights? No ID should be required to fly within the USA (or my country, Canada).

i agree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767491)

Unless...you are the pilot.

Then we'll need some ID.

Of course, if you're just dead-heading, who really cares?Right, Frank?

Resources misspent (4, Insightful)

Grayhand (2610049) | more than 2 years ago | (#39766799)

They waste a fortune on scanners that can't see a gun if you strap it to your side then they screw up on the basics. It's like laws, they insist they need new laws when they don't enforce the existing ones. They need to actually enforce the existing rules before they add more bureaucracy that simply adds more holes to exploit.

Re:Resources misspent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767429)

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Coming soon to a theatre near you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766827)

How come the TSA isn't doing this at *movie theaters*?? Or, maybe they could get some tips from the ushers. Just sayin, why are my tax dollars being spent to make sure only paying customers get on planes?

Lies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766879)

From TFA:

"Acceptable forms of ID, including passports, drivers' licenses, and permanent resident cards, carry encoded data in the form of barcodes, magnetic stripes, embedded circuits, or machine-readable text. The system also captures and displays the traveler's photograph. After verification, the data is deleted from the CAT/BPSS system."

Not after being sent to Utah first.

Catching up with the rest of the world (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766891)

Without an organisation like the TSA the rest of the world is practicing that for decades. Your name is checked against an ID when checking in. Before entering the departure area your ID is checked again against the boarding pass and your face, takes split seconds only. When going international that happens again at immigration and finally when you try to board the boarding pass is checked against the loading list and your ID. Nothing causes any queues.
Kind of strange that this practice seems to be new in the US.

Re:Catching up with the rest of the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767779)

"Your name is checked against an ID when checking in. Before entering the departure area your ID is checked again against the boarding pass and your face, takes split seconds only."

Since you print out your own boarding pass, if it doesn't match the fake ID you're planning to use, you're a moron.

getting sick of the security state (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39766983)

pretty sure Stalin didn't even monitor people's movements this much...

Consider.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767041)

We have to show ID to board a plane but still any old illegal, dead person or felon can vote without ID in far, far too many liberal states that want to scam the election process and steal elections.

Why does it matter? (4, Insightful)

Nkwe (604125) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767301)

I don't get why it matters who I am. As long as I am not carrying anything that is dangerous to the plane and its passengers, what difference does it make?

It happens (2)

neo8750 (566137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767351)

I've gotten through security at chicago o'hara airport using a boarding pass for my connecting flight that didnt say chicago anywhere on it. I didnt notice till i was through security.

Just like China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767611)

To buy a train or bus ticket a person needs to show their ID. The ID is also checked before entering the station, and sometimes when they arrive at the destination. Each person ID is validated and finger print checked at each stage.

Coming soon to a station near you.

TSA Cambridge Test Preparation (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39767723)

The standard TSA is available as an online and paper based test; the colleges of the University of Cambridge decide which format of the test a candidate will take. The Politics, Psychology & Sociology (PPS) version of the test however, is only available in paper format.
http://www.travestibestmodel.net/

Absolutely pointless. (1, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 2 years ago | (#39767877)

Terrorists don't have to bother getting on a plane anymore, and in fact they never did. The biggest, easiest target for mayhem is the crowd of people wrapped up in serpentine lines waiting to get to the obedience ritual machines.

The money spend on the entire TSA is a total waste. Put a tenth of that into bribing informants the way that Hoover did to the KKK, and what's left of Al-Queda will disintegrate.

-jcr

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