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Samsung TVs Can Be Hacked Into Endless Restart Loop

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the you-were-warned dept.

Security 187

Gunkerty Jeb writes "Italian security researcher Luigi Auriemma was trying to play a trick on his brother when he accidentally discovered two vulnerabilities in all current versions of Samsung TVs and Blu-Ray systems that could allow an attacker to gain remote access to those devices. Auriemma claims that the vulnerabilities will affect all Samsung devices with support for remote controllers, and that the vulnerable protocol is on both TVs and Blu-Ray enabled devices. One of the bugs leads to a loop of endless restarts while the other could cause a potential buffer overflow."

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187 comments

Great trick (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39783805)

Haha! I broke your TV!

Re:Great trick (5, Informative)

xclr8r (658786) | about 2 years ago | (#39783917)

The buffer overflow is worrisome . A lot of the newer BluRay Players have additional features like netflix over wifi/homenetwork. The basic consumer may put in their credit card (or ____ forbid their debit card) info to start their netflix account.

Re:Great trick (5, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 2 years ago | (#39784331)

Hey! Deja Vu,

I think I've seen this movie before...

Hey! Deja Vu,

I think I've seen this movie before...

Hey! Deja Vu,

I think I've seen this movie before...

Hey!

Re:Great trick (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784373)

(or ____ forbid their debit card)

And?

Unless you have a very terrible bank and/or don't bother checking your account ever, this isn't exactly a big deal. I just went through this a few weeks ago, when yonder random payment processor got owned hardcore.

Checked my account - like I do regularly, and found a weird charge. Called up my bank, said, "What is this I don't even?" Bam. Charge killed, money returned, new card in the mail, before I could even say, "Wow, you guys aren't nearly as evil as the Internet led me to believe."

Of course, I suppose the fact that I actually bother checking my account activity regularly makes me some sort of Fiscal Wizard compared to your average person. :p

Re:Great trick (4, Informative)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 2 years ago | (#39784933)

Some banks have very good fraud detection systems and it is in their interest to have them. The sooner they detect it, the less headache they have to deal with. One of my banks froze my card after I made several unexpected large purchases in one day. Another one called me when they noticed suspicious charges to confirm that I did make them. Someone got my card number, but I still had my card so I would not have reported it stolen or lost.

Re:Great trick (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784961)

Unless you have a very terrible bank and/or don't bother checking your account ever, this isn't exactly a big deal. I just went through this a few weeks ago, when yonder random payment processor got owned hardcore.

You are completely clueless.

Debits from your account can sometimes take months to recover. In better and most likely cases, sometimes a week or two. Some people can simply not have an empty bank account for a week or two. If you use a credit card rather than a debit card, you don't have to worry about the same kind of nonsense.

Sorry, but you're completely out of touch with the risks involved with debit card use.

Re:Great trick (3, Informative)

jimbolauski (882977) | about 2 years ago | (#39785267)

What the GP is saying is that many banks will issue refunds immediately for fraudulent purchases, and will remove any overdrafts fees if any occurred. In my experience that is how banks work, legally they are not obligated to do so but do so to keep their customers happy. I don't use my debt card for purchases due to the risks but have not heard of any body getting told by the bank that it's not the banks responsibility. Further any overdrafts that occurred from the fraudulent charges will not be assessed because of how they occurred.

Re:Great trick (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about 2 years ago | (#39785277)

Any issues I've had from debit card or credit card fraud from my bank, has had the money fixed/cleared in under 24 hours.

Some people have faster / more responsive banks. That doesn't make them clueless. You however...

Re:Great trick (1)

SydShamino (547793) | about 2 years ago | (#39785279)

You know you pay for that, right? The service charges your bank and/or credit card processor charge the vendors take into account their work to prevent fraud. I believe they pass all fraudulent charges back to the merchant who rang them, so in this case wherever the thieves used your card will lose the funds. All of that is passed back to the consumer in the form of higher prices.

So no, it's not a tragedy if a card is occasionally misplaced and misused, but it's still a leech on the system - EVERYONE's system - to allow it to happen systemically.

Re:Great trick (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784775)

But, it seems to require a remote controller. You need to be in their home or walking by with a remote controller to cause this to happen.

I didn't read if both required the remote controller but that is what the summary leads me to believe.

Re:Great trick (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 2 years ago | (#39784829)

That depends on how they implement it. For my bluray player netflix setup, they put a unique ID on the screen and told me to authenticate it on my account using my computer. So the bluray player never accessed any information about my account. My bluray doesn't have a web browser built-in only Internet access.

val ha la (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39783869)

Life's a journey. Enjoy it over and over.

TV (3, Interesting)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#39783879)

My parents recently got a 52" Internet connected Samsung TV. Any way I could use this to replace the crap Samsung apps with something better?

Re:TV (3, Interesting)

Cenan (1892902) | about 2 years ago | (#39783935)

If the second bug he found really is a buffer overflow vulnerability, there could be no end to the funny shit you could do to your TV.

Re:TV (3, Interesting)

AmberBlackCat (829689) | about 2 years ago | (#39783991)

I'm thinking "biggest Android tablet ever". With a Kinect instead of a touchscreen. Or at least a real web browser instead of only being able to look at sites of their "partners".

Re:TV (4, Funny)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#39784053)

My parents recently got a 52" Internet connected Samsung TV. Any way I could use this to replace the crap Samsung apps with something better?

Sure. Just give me the IP address...

Re:TV (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784245)

Sure. Just give me the IP address...

207.46.19.254 :)

Re:TV (5, Funny)

JoeCommodore (567479) | about 2 years ago | (#39784247)

My parents recently got a 52" Internet connected Samsung TV. Any way I could use this to replace the crap Samsung apps with something better?

Sure. Just give me the IP address...

It's 127.0.0.1 - hack away!

Re:TV (4, Funny)

higuita (129722) | about 2 years ago | (#39784413)

hey, you already created my username and setup my personal password?! ! how did you know then!?

I will teach you a lesson, i'm doing pipe the /dev/zero to your HD right now!!

Re:TV (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784421)

Hey, it's time to move to IPv6 already.

Running out of IPv4 addresses and all that...

Re:TV (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784871)

Is http://127.0.0.1 your web site? I think it looks terrific!

But then again, I'm a bit biased since it looks a lot like mine.

Re:TV (1)

gstrickler (920733) | about 2 years ago | (#39784657)

From TFA:

To exploit Auriemma’s vulnerabilities requires only that the devices are connected to a wi-fi network.

Solution, hard wire and use a firewall. Update the firmware when Samsung fixes it.

On The Up Side ... (4, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | about 2 years ago | (#39783891)

On the up side you can't be inundated with endless commercials if your TV is in an endless restart loop ;-)

Re:On The Up Side ... (1)

pkinetics (549289) | about 2 years ago | (#39784279)

I'm just imagining getting stuck watching the trailer credits / ads on the blue ray discs... over and over and over again...

Re:On The Up Side ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784637)

On the up side you can't be inundated with endless commercials if your TV is in an endless restart loop ;-)

That also take care of the reality shows.

Init Level 6 (0, Offtopic)

jellomizer (103300) | about 2 years ago | (#39783907)

I remember back in the good old days when Linux wasn't configured to automatically start in X. So I did what I have done a hundred times before, edit the inittab file. However for some reason that day I was thinking that init level 6 was the init level to Start X in...
Well at least I had a bootable CD.
# mount /dev/hda1 -t ext2 /mnt
# vi /mnt/etc/inittab
(changed it to 5)
# umount /mnt
# sync; sync; sync; reboot

Re:Init Level 6 (0)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39783999)

What?
Relevance to this story?

Re:Init Level 6 (2)

Jahava (946858) | about 2 years ago | (#39784163)

What? Relevance to this story?

Init level 6 [wikipedia.org] is "Reboot", so the system was configured to boot up ... and then reboot ... and reboot ... and reboot... This is relevant to the story because the story is also about an "endless restart loop"!

Re:Init Level 6 (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 2 years ago | (#39784023)

Hey, speaking of which, anybody know how to boot to a vterm in Ubuntu?

Used to be you could do that in Redhat by going to a different runlevel. Not sure the recommended way for that in Ubuntu and friends.

(Also, anybody remember running "win" to start Windows from DOS and getting looks from the old-timers in the office when you started that new-fangled graphical thing?)

Yes, I have a great DOS on it. (1)

goffster (1104287) | about 2 years ago | (#39783909)

I throw it from the top of a building.

Re:Yes, I have a great DOS on it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784403)

Or just stand directly in front of it. Or steal the remote. Or you can DDoS, steal the remote and then play keepaway with it.

Anybody pine for that golden age (5, Insightful)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 2 years ago | (#39783965)

Where we had dumped carburetors for computer-controlled engines, but they didn't need to get updates, and those updates weren't wirelessly and remotely pushed?

Where we had dumped cathode ray tubes for flat, liquid crystal displays, but hadn't put the tubes back into TV by stuffing the Internet (and viruses) into them?

Where we had dumped both rotary and touch tone land line phones for cellular phones that could do most anything you'd want them to, and you carry it whereever you went, but you didn't have to have an antivirus running on the phone and didn't have to worry about your contact details being sent to Nigeria?

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784077)

I miss the ability to buy "monitors" instead of TV's. I have never used all the features that come with TV's - tuners, speakers, etc. and I would try to buy a monitor - just a plain screen. Those are getting harder and harder to find.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | about 2 years ago | (#39784349)

They're not in the 40-60 inches range, but most decent computer monitors now have at least one HDMI input.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39785021)

Except that HDMI input has no bearing on whether it is a TV or a monitor. The difference between a TV and a monitor is the presence of a tuner, televisions have one, monitors don't. It's still plenty easy to get a monitor.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | about 2 years ago | (#39785109)

The parent was asking for a "monitor" instead of a TV and said he never used TV features such as tuners and speakers.

I was pointing out that there is monitors with HDMI inputs, which means they can be used by non-computers devices.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 2 years ago | (#39784523)

What's crazy strange is how computer makers assume all that people do all day is watch movies (widescreen at that!) all day.

Look at any laptop advertisement. They play up the movie-related features (black blacks! full HD!) On the one hand TV's are too small and yesterday for people to watch movies on, and on the other, people are going to watch on 14-15in screens?

And "full HD". Come on, you got 1080 by dropping 120 pixels off of 1200. It's not like they increased the size. It's annoying how they say "make use of your full screen size". So you've got a huge screen, but your movie takes up only a portion so you're going to lop off the part you're not using? People better hope that doesn't get applied to lone rangers driving a 5-person car. ("Use your full car capacity").

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

bratloaf (1287954) | about 2 years ago | (#39784651)

You can easily buy REALLY GOOD lcd monitors in whatever size you can imagine. I install them in office conference rooms all the time, generally large samsung in the 42-60" range. These are designed as transportation and information displays, and are very rugged and last a long time. You just won't find them in your local walmart or best buy. And they won't cost $399 on sale either...

http://www.samsung.com/us/business/commercial-display-solutions [samsung.com]

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39784117)

The larger programs become, the more likely unexpected states (bugs) will sneak in, and then later be exploited.

Life would be vastly improved if programmers wrote code as small and easy-to-understand as Kolibri OS (fits on a floppy). Or even smaller - the early Mac and AmigaOS fit inside ~64 kilobytes. It is easy to find and located bad states in such small programs.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784497)

Good luck adding unicode support in just 64KB.

Many researchers study "c. elegans" instead of more complex creatures, but it doesn't do as much.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (2)

Ksevio (865461) | about 2 years ago | (#39784121)

No, all those things are crap compared to the wealth of features and connectivity we have now.

A flaw in a car required a full recall to repair it.

TVs could only watch content dictated by the cable company.

Smart phones can do a crap load of handy things.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 2 years ago | (#39784271)

Maybe this is false remembrance, but it seems things worked better then.

A car update might have required a recall, but such problems were infrequent. Going forward, it seems they are going to be very frequent.

Reason being, the thinking will be "it's just software". Hardware gets tested till it works. Software gets tested (if at all) till it's time to ship.

Since "it's only software," it can always be updated. So there's not real discipline to get it right the first time.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#39784671)

A car update might have required a recall, but such problems were infrequent. Going forward, it seems they are going to be very frequent.

Reason being, the thinking will be "it's just software". Hardware gets tested till it works. Software gets tested (if at all) till it's time to ship.

Since "it's only software," it can always be updated. So there's not real discipline to get it right the first time.

Car updates require work on the dealer side paid for by the manufacturer, so they have a vested interest in keeping it stable (every warranty issue, including recalls, eat into the profits of the cars). So there's a vested interest in not having to do the updates. And aside from the Toyota one (which didn't really do much since it was fat-footwork to be the cause, but since the cars were going back anyways...).

Anyhow, I thought the open-source mantra was "release early, release often". We're just seeing the effects of it applied throughout since more and more stuff is software controlled.

And yes, we're better for it. Cars with electronic fuel injection are pretty much "twist and go" - you don't worry about chokes, flooding, or temperments (as long as the car is in reasonable mechanical shape). The computer does everything to ensure reliability. It doesn't matter that it's -20C or +35C. You get in, insert key, twist, engine runs and car is ready to go after a brief warmup. Doing the same in an old carburetted model tended to involve a lot more work - from choking in cold days to vapor lock on the hot.

Anyhow, the notion of having to do frequent updates is a recent one - I mean, EFI cars were standard by the 90s (20 years ago), and there were much fewer software updates required back then.

Perhaps the ease at which stuff can be updated, and the ease to which we're notified about updates is part of the cause. "Release early, release often" wouldn't work too well if one had to keep downloading over long-distance phones or floppy disks/CDs in the mail (by the time you got it, you were 3 releases out of date...).

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784833)

Since "it's only software," it can always be updated. So there's not real discipline to get it right the first time.

Oh hell, you went and did it. You insulted the "discipline" of "software engineering". Now you'll be eternally hunted down on this site and all of your comments will be modded into oblivion. These code monkeys are probably already hooting like rabid baboons and reading all of your old posts.
Of course, I'm posting AC to protect my precious karma.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784409)

TVs could only watch content dictated by the cable company.

Apart from the fact that a TV doesn't watch content, but only show it, you must have had a crappy TV if it only could show content from the cable company. My TV showed terrestrial and satellite content quite well (OK, for the latter it needed a separate satellite receiver), and even content played to it from my VCR. And in the early times, it even showed the output of my computer.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (2)

sjames (1099) | about 2 years ago | (#39784981)

Because a flaw in a car required a full recall on the auto maker's dime, they made damned sure they got it right the first time. Now that they can just pester the end user with the updates they're approaching the old "OMG It compiled, SHIP IT!!!!!"

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (2)

autocannon (2494106) | about 2 years ago | (#39784231)

Sloppy coding and sloppier testing. Welcome to the new world of consumer products.

I bought a Philips HDTV a few years back. I noticed after a few months that the tv would just turn itself back on 10 minutes to a few hours after I turned it off. At first it was kinda freaky to have it flip on in the middle of the night like that! However, quickly realized that others were having the same problems. Contacted Philips and the first thing they did was send out a thumbdrive with the new firmware that "should" fix it. Wouldn't do a thing until I had done that. Of course it didn't solve the problem because it was a faulty motherboard for that series. They did send a tech out to replace it in warranty and the tv still works fine today (5 years now).

The ease of these updates helps to drive the push to fast, sloppy coding with minimal testing. I just don't see anything on the horizon changing that perspective. If anything, I could see tvs and other internet connected things becoming more google-ish where they just boot up from the interwebz all the time...which is even scarier.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

21mhz (443080) | about 2 years ago | (#39785243)

This. Both my Samsung TV and the IPTV set-top box sent by my ADSL provider seem to have been coded by the cheapest monkeys taken off the street, and the development took just enough time to pass a very minimal set of tests. All internal errors are swept under the rug by some very deeply rooted fault handlers, with the result that the menu interface simply freezes for a time whenever it hits an error. Switching the menu language to a less usual choice for the target market leads to a litany of such freezes and other funky effects: apparently, allocation of dynamic buffers (or even sufficiently sized fixed arrays) for l10n strings was beyond their ability.

So this story surprises me, in a way: what, only two vulnerabilities? There must be hundreds of them. I only have faith left in the internet companies who know a thing or two about programming: Apple, Google, Hulu, Netflix, etc.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 2 years ago | (#39784257)

Where we had dumped cathode ray tubes for flat, liquid crystal displays

Which only work well with one particular resolution and don't handle interlaced legacy content well at all and...

wait, what?

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

oneiros27 (46144) | about 2 years ago | (#39784321)

I just want to go back to the days of the cell phones where you'd press the power button ... and it would turn on.

Not give you a 'booting up' screen or 'loading java' image/video for 3-5 minutes.

Now, if we still had the 100+ hr standby times, I might not have to turn my cell phone off so often, but it's still pretty crappy when you turn your phone back on after the plane lands, and you're already in baggage claim before you can finally check your voicemail.

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784685)

Yea I hate that too, thats why I ditched my droid 2 for an iphone. The iphone boots faster than any of my "dumb phones" turned on and had a signal (including analog era)

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (1)

xonen (774419) | about 2 years ago | (#39784749)

after the plane lands, and you're already in baggage claim before you can finally check your voicemail.

That was a good laugh for me.. It's only 10 years ago that you'd had to find a phonecell to call. If you had small change. Which was in europe even more fun - exchange notes, get small change, and only then call. Makes me smile that you find a phone in your pocket taking 3 minutes to get you connected to 3G (and only because you installed too many apps on it) is a serious concern...

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784533)

Actually, all the cars I've owned with proper PCMs have had updates available. Some of them pretty major, for example, on my Jeep I can unlock a "hidden" gear ratio in the transmission with an update factory produced 2 years after they sold the vehicle. And, for the same vehicle, the idle speed is set far too low in the original firmware, making the engine be just on the edge of cutting out (feels quite terrible when stopped). Another update produced after the transmission update has the vehicle idle a smige higher so it is a bit less horrible when stopped.

Not that this is worse than the mechanical parts at all--those had their fair share of issues, and those issues were the sort of thing you had to correct over and over (bad distributor, bad spark plug wires, bad throttle, bad timing, etc. etc.)

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784605)

Get Of My Lawn!!!

Re:Anybody pine for that golden age (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784891)

Not particularly. I like that my remote control can be updated with new features after its initial release. The only problem here is Samsung's lack of competency (which, given the number of broken firmware updates my Galaxy S has received, seems to be a company-wide issue).

TVs =/= PCs (2)

Dreth (1885712) | about 2 years ago | (#39783973)

So now that TVs restart, I'm guessing malware isn't far behind?

After all, if you expect to turn every household device into a typical computer, you're also gonna drag the bad things computers have.

Can we 'regedit' tvs so we can use our own splash logos?

Re:TVs =/= PCs (4, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#39784285)

So now that TVs restart, I'm guessing malware isn't far behind?

It's already there. Most TVs these days are infected with the HDCP malware.

Re:TVs =/= PCs (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#39784337)

Can we 'regedit' tvs so we can use our own splash logos?

Oh, man, combine that with goatse and malware ... imagine the hilarity of your grandmother or someone getting that every time they turn on their TV, or if it *only* shows that. *shudders*

Unfortunately, connecting everything to the internet seems like this is kind of a logical hack to occur. Especially if companies are going to be half assed about validating inputs and the like.

TV watches you (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784017)

In Soviet Russia, TV watches you!

Original article and scope (5, Informative)

enriquevagu (1026480) | about 2 years ago | (#39784055)

The vulnerability is originally disclosed here [aluigi.org], not in the posted link.

This vulnerability only works from the same broadcast domain where the TV is, since the remote control protocol relies on broadcast messages to announce the service. This means that your TV cannot be cracked from the Internet. Let's hope that Samsung apply a fix soon, in any case.

Re:Original article and scope (2)

sjames (1099) | about 2 years ago | (#39785079)

So that means you have to infect their PC first and use it to route the hack to their TV.

Or jump on their WiFi.

Re:Original article and scope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39785225)

A lot of hoops to jump through to find out if they even have a samsung tv

Sadly, not a surprise (2)

dgatwood (11270) | about 2 years ago | (#39784069)

I own two Samsung Blu-Ray players. I'm not surprised by this in the slightest. You can usually judge the security of an app by how reliably it does its intended function, and their Blu-Ray players are anything but reliable. (Their older TVs work well, but I've never used one of their newer, networked TVs, which I'm assuming are as buggy as their Blu-Ray players.)

For example:

  • After a firmware update, one player now stalls for half a second at every DVD layer skip.
  • The last two Harry Potter movies have audio glitches throughout (on both players, but not on an LG player).
  • After a firmware update, the other player how has sporadic problems switching between different types of media, sometimes requiring a power cycle to get it back into operational status.

And so on. In short, Samsung's software quality control appears to be utterly awful. So hearing that they have security holes is almost as surprising as hearing that Flash has security holes....

Buffer overflows? install Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784087)

Since Buffer overflows and similar flaws are what allow devices like the iPad to be jailbroken...does this mean that I could install Linux on my Samsung TV potentially?

Given that the TVs are running Linux... (4, Informative)

Anaerin (905998) | about 2 years ago | (#39784157)

Why is this such big news? Did you know you can replace the entire firmware inside your TV too? There's already a group working on getting something usable onto Samsung TVs like these: http://www.samygo.tv/ [samygo.tv]

Re:Given that the TVs are running Linux... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784587)

You posted that link in this discussion 3 times at least. I appreciate your enthusiasm for the project, but you're crossing the line from informative into shilling.

Re:Given that the TVs are running Linux... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784723)

Let me scroll around a bit. Dont see the other 2. So thank you for your information...

I see this as an advantage (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784173)

If that TV is exploitable, I can finally get my neighbors to stop watching Mexican variety shows at full volume at all hours of the night.

Already ran into this (1)

garlicnation (1168439) | about 2 years ago | (#39784299)

I was working for a company that was trying to develop an App for Samsung's Internet@TV. Twice we had to get the TV RMAd because we bricked it while messing around with the remote control protocol.

We're safe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39784353)

Italy is far, far away.

other unintended consequences (1)

nimbius (983462) | about 2 years ago | (#39784573)

include a reduction in empty consumerism, more time spent with families, a decrease in childhood obesity and a more rational approach to politics.

Some things .... (1)

DaMattster (977781) | about 2 years ago | (#39784615)

Just shouldn't be connected to the internet. There is really no good cause to connect your TV or Blu-ray to the internet. Instead, use a purpose built device like an AppleTV. I'll admit, the remote exploit is funny

Why should a TV have a built in computer? (2)

DickBreath (207180) | about 2 years ago | (#39784813)

Either the computer part should be a replaceable module, or it should be a separate box. (eg, a Google TV box, or an Apple TV box -- not built into the set).

Consider:
  • The TV will last you probably ten years
  • The computer will be hacked within one year
  • The computer will be obsolete within two years
  • The servers it phones home to will be gone within four years (eg, Zune, Plays For Sure, etc)

Similarly, a computer monitor should not have a built in computer (or vice versa), unless the computer is a replaceable module. The TV or Monitor still have a lot of lifetime (and economic value) long after the computer is hopelessly obsolete. (Yes, I'm looking at you, iMac integrated computer and monitor. But then Apple products seem to be for people with more money then sense.)


- - - - - - -
All that is necessary for Apple to triumph is for Google men to do nothing.

luigi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39785219)

mario is gonna be so pissed off when he finds out

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