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274 comments

In California ?!?! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790215)

I guessed that only Washington, D.C. could be hit by the disease...

Re:In California ?!?! (5, Funny)

lennier1 (264730) | about 2 years ago | (#39790991)

The infection attacks the brain. It's been decades since one of those was anywhere near D.C.

Re:In California ?!?! (5, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about 2 years ago | (#39791139)

I have no mod points but I feel you should be modded insightful and not as funny. It's too sadly, tragically true to be funny.

Can I get a study on this? (1)

Fireking300 (1852630) | about 2 years ago | (#39790223)

I find it highly unlikely that these cows are mad. How would you test to see if they are insane?

Re:Can I get a study on this? (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#39790475)

How would you test to see if [cows] are insane?

observe if they make humans look stupid

in ca, apparently this was the case

Re:Can I get a study on this? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791015)

Ask them if they want to move to Texas, invade a nation, or vote republican. If they answer yes, then they are as insane as Charles manson.

American Culture (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790225)

It is completely telling that news of this appeared in the Business Section [google.com] (currently the second hit on Google News) before it appeared at all in the Health Section [google.com].

Re:American Culture (5, Insightful)

poity (465672) | about 2 years ago | (#39790399)

Maybe because the irrational fear that surrounds something with a transmission rate of 1 out of millions can affect the market far more so than actual health of the population at large. If this tells us anything at all (which I doubt) it would be something about the emotional factor in futures trading.

Re:American Culture (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790815)

You twits who keep sneering at people with "irrational fear" seem to think nothing should be done about an incident that could be the start of an epidemic if not dealt with promptly, or a massive disaster that could poison an enormous amount of populated land for generations.

Whether it's nuclear power in the hands of amoral incompetent business types or deadly diseases, you idiots believe you're experts and know better than the actual experts. Well, you don't, so why don't you just shut up and appreciate those who make tangible contributions to keeping you safe.

Re:American Culture (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790865)

Well said

Re:American Culture (5, Informative)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#39790911)

Indeed. Four cases of a disease in cows (in the US), with three humans infected is indeed extremely threatening. Never mind the UK had an actual epidemic, with over 180,000 cases in cows, and still only had 176 people infected (from Wikipedia). In my mind, that makes BSE less dangerous than... well, just about everything. Hell, there have only been 280 reported cases of infected humans from BSE, ever. Tell me again why people should be scared? Yes, health officials should be careful: damned careful. The average person? Don't worry about it.

No one said nothing should be done. They did what needed to be done: euthanized the cow and dispose of the corpse properly.

Re:American Culture (5, Insightful)

Cyberax (705495) | about 2 years ago | (#39791113)

The problem is: 1) Cows SHOULD NOT even get infected. That means that cows are fed lightly processed cow meat. 2) BSE is a disease with very long incubation period. If BSE infected food supply then we can start getting many new infections. 3) BSE is incurable and always leads to death.

Re:American Culture (5, Informative)

Eivind Eklund (5161) | about 2 years ago | (#39791279)

It doesn't mean that the cow are fed cow meat at all. The prion [wikipedia.org] that cause BSE [wikipedia.org] can be created naturally through mutation, and then reproduce. This kind of mutation happens very occasionally, but it does happen often enough that we have seen it happen several times. This is believed to be such a case; to quote the Associated Press coverage [ap.org]:

Clifford said the California cow is what scientists call an atypical case of BSE, meaning that it didn't get the disease from eating infected cattle feed, which is important.

That means it's "just a random mutation that can happen every once in a great while in an animal," said Bruce Akey, director of the New York State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Cornell University.

Eivind.

Re:American Culture (0)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | about 2 years ago | (#39790879)

Honestly. Tell me that when you kid dies because of the "1 out of millions" hit them

Re:American Culture (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790941)

Then ban cars.

Re:American Culture (5, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 2 years ago | (#39791111)

Actually the odds are better that you kid will be killed by a car (77 to 1), drowning in a bathtub ( 685,000 to 1 ) slipping and killing himself/herself in the shower (2,232 to 1) even being struck by lightning (576,000 to 1 ) hell they even have better odds of dating a supermodel (88,000 to 1) or striking it rich on antiques roadshow ( 60,000 to 1). Here is the source [funny2.com] so I'd say out of ALL the things we parents ACTUALLY have to worry about BSE is pretty damned low on the list. Not saying that can't change, not saying we shouldn't do our best to protect the food supply, just saying panicking is probably pretty unwarranted ATM.

Re:American Culture (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791265)

never tell me the odds!

Re:American Culture (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790403)

Maybe because the dairy *industry* is, well, a business?

Just sayin'.

Re:American Culture (3, Informative)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 2 years ago | (#39790683)

That and we're more likely to see the effects of trouble in the beef industry than we are to actually get Mad Cow. But, hey, it's fashionable to take pot-shots at America right now.

Re:American Culture (1)

Monchanger (637670) | about 2 years ago | (#39790515)

Or it's just that it's lower down in the health section because it's simply far more important for people to know that you can't fix migraines with... botox? [webmd.com]

Yeah, we're all screwed up over here. Thanks for the reminder.

Re:American Culture (1)

b1scuit (795301) | about 2 years ago | (#39791317)

Migraines negatively impact far more people than BSE, so that's probably an appropriate priority.

Re:American Culture (4, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | about 2 years ago | (#39790657)

As markets shut their doors to US beef, the disease is far more likely to affect your 401k than your brain.

Re:American Culture (1, Troll)

tmosley (996283) | about 2 years ago | (#39790829)

Unless you drank a glass of milk containing a single unit of the malformed protein, in which case you are going to die in 10-30 years.

There is some promising work on "vaccines" in mice, but the way this country is screwed up with regards to medical regulation, I'm not sure we'll see it in time.

Re:American Culture (5, Informative)

dr_dank (472072) | about 2 years ago | (#39790687)

It's definitely telling... telling that you didn't see the disclaimer on the bottom of the Google News page:

The selection and placement of stories on this page were determined automatically by a computer program.

Re:American Culture (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790797)

What does this have to do with human health? BSE is a cow disease.

Re:American Culture (3, Interesting)

tmosley (996283) | about 2 years ago | (#39790851)

The same protein is present in human brains, and it is absolutely transmissible to and between any mammal (or at least any mammal that uses that protein, or one similar enough to be similarly affected). My great aunt died from it decades ago. She contracted it in England as a child, apparently.

Re:American Culture (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#39791275)

Maybe that's because even the rumor of it threw cattle futures into the garbage? It was "noticed" before it was confirmed, which is when it would be proper to be in health sections.

Whew... (2)

d'baba (1134261) | about 2 years ago | (#39790251)

FTA: The Centers for Disease Control reports that the chance of contracting mad cow disease, even after consuming contaminated products, is less than one in 10 billion, if at all.

I figure since we won't even have 10 billion people for a while yet, we're safe!

Re:Whew... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790301)

proving once again that the cdc is full of s%*#

Cods Whallap! (5, Insightful)

Mr0bvious (968303) | about 2 years ago | (#39790379)

So we only have an estimated population of around 7 billion people, yet as of November 2006 there were 200 individuals worldwide diagnosed with mad cow disease, including 164 people in the United Kingdom, 21 in France, 4 in the Republic of Ireland, the 3 in the US, 2 in the Netherlands, and 1 each in Canada, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, and Spain, according to the CDC. Of these individuals, most (170) had lived in the UK for over 6 months during the years 1980-1996; 20 others had lived in France during that time. [taken from: http://rarediseases.about.com/od/rarediseases1/a/vcjd.htm [about.com] ]

So using CDC math we should only have a 0.7 reported cases........

Re:Cods Whallap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790401)

You're applying the statistics to a different data set that from which they were derived.

Re:Cods Whallap! (3, Insightful)

ravenshrike (808508) | about 2 years ago | (#39790461)

How often did they eat contaminated meat?

Re:Cods Whallap! (1)

Mr0bvious (968303) | about 2 years ago | (#39790495)

That is a good point...

Re:Cods Whallap! (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | about 2 years ago | (#39790555)

With a name like yours you'd think you would have figured out such an obvious answer. The CDCs number was one in ten billion per consumption of contaminated meat. Of course, the number is still horseshit, but your analysis is obviously wrong Mr. Obvious.

Re:Cods Whallap! (5, Insightful)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 2 years ago | (#39790465)

No, using improperly-applied statistics we have 0.7 cases.

Now consider that the CDC statistic likely refers to the per-exposure chance. 200 people worldwide with the disease, a one in 10 billion is about 2 trillion exposures, which works out to about only needing 285 exposures per person since 1980. I've personally been exposed to risky meat more than that.

I am not an epidemiologist, though, and I'd wager that your and GP aren't, either.

Re:Cods Whallap! (2)

Mr0bvious (968303) | about 2 years ago | (#39790527)

I see the flaws in my comment :)

Oh well, at least the other's thinking the same silly idea will now see where our thinking was flawed.

Thanks for correcting my blabber!

(indeed, I am far from a epidemiologist)

Re:Cods Whallap! (1)

ehynes (617617) | about 2 years ago | (#39790593)

How do you know how many times you've been exposed to BSE contaminated meat? How do you know how many times people throughout the world have been exposed over the last 30 years?

Re:Cods Whallap! (2)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 2 years ago | (#39790993)

I don't know about BSE-contamininated, but I chose my words carefully... I just said "risky". Between volunteering in Africa and traveling around Europe, I've had my share of meat that I knew had unclean sources. I've had the intestinal worms to prove it.

Curse you (0)

alcmaeon (684971) | about 2 years ago | (#39791197)

Curse you and your logically impeccable math. This is propaganda, dammit, we don't need your stinkin' maths.

Re:Whew... (5, Interesting)

No, I am Spratacus! (2281684) | about 2 years ago | (#39790819)

Yeah, perhaps the American Red Cross will now allow people from Europe or who have lived in Europe to donate blood.

As of now, people who have "spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 5 years or more from January 1, 1980, to present, in any combination of country(ies) in Europe" are ineligible to donate; the time is even shorter (3 months) for the UK, all because of mad cow paranoia.

Re:Whew... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791289)

Total U.S. beef consumption:
        2002: 27.9 billion pounds
        2003: 27.0 billion pounds
        2004: 27.8 billion pounds
        2005: 27.8 billion pounds
        2006: 28.1 billion pounds
        2007: 28.1 billion pounds
        2008: 27.3 billion pounds
        2009: 26.8 billion pounds
        2010: 26.4 billion pounds

~50 billion (chances) 1/2lb burgers a year.

Re:Whew... (1)

currently_awake (1248758) | about 2 years ago | (#39791315)

I would think that statistic is per serving, meaning a big mac per day for a year gives odds of 1 in 7 million or 5 deaths in California per year (approx).

Dang (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790273)

Better stay away from ground beef, pink slime, and beef bone and nerves for awhile.

Re:Dang (1)

plopez (54068) | about 2 years ago | (#39790349)

I've given up on commercial beef. I will by free range from someone I know but rarely get the chance these days. How long before I go completely vegetarian?

Re:Dang (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790935)

How long before I go completely vegetarian?

Enjoy dying horribly from contaminated spinach, tomatoes, lettuce, et cetera.

If eating is going to kill me, I choose to die by the steak.

Re:Dang (1)

outsider007 (115534) | about 2 years ago | (#39790897)

Won't the ammonia they treat pink slime with kill BSE? Yay Pink Slime!

Re:Dang (2)

Cyberax (705495) | about 2 years ago | (#39791121)

Nope. BSE is caused by mutant (misfolded) _proteins_ (not even viruses!) which can even survive cooking. Ammonia is no danger for them, as it doesn't affect proteins.

Re:Dang (-1, Troll)

ravenshrike (808508) | about 2 years ago | (#39791195)

Well, it's assumed that the cause is prions. Unless there's been a development since the last time I read up on it that's still unproven.

Good news bad news (5, Funny)

poity (465672) | about 2 years ago | (#39790299)

At least we can look forward to cheaper steaks for a while

Re:Good news bad news (2)

Nesa2 (1142511) | about 2 years ago | (#39790393)

Prices go up when supply is down... unlikely for demand to go down as well... BBQ season!

Re:Good news bad news (2)

poity (465672) | about 2 years ago | (#39790429)

You can bet demand will go down in the short term as Americans get into paranoia mode about beef, and supply isn't going to go anywhere (in fact they may go up as exports decline due to international fear of US beef) Yummy steaks here we come!

canada needs to close its border to american beef (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790331)

they need to do the same thing the americans did when they found one cow in canada! but this will never happen, they should at least close off all american beef to americans now, but they'll never do that either. such democracy.

Re:canada needs to close its border to american be (1)

RyoShin (610051) | about 2 years ago | (#39790353)

But is that because the Canadians are not as powerful as America, or because the Canadians are more level-headed and less vengeful than America?

Re:canada needs to close its border to american be (2)

Monchanger (637670) | about 2 years ago | (#39790599)

Neither, because they can just switch to using ground moose for a couple months.

But seriously, they probably don't import very much beef from California dairy farms so this is a non-issue.

No wonder (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790363)

I'll just leave this [unc.edu] here.

Mad cows come from California (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790365)

As a Wisconsinite who always snickers a little when I see one of those moronic "Happy Cows come from California" commercials on TV, I'll probably tear something from laughter the next time I see one. Cheese is part of our holy trinity: Beer, the Packers, and Cheese. Californian dairies probably aren't aware of the fact that a cow udder with one teat ain't an udder.

Re:Mad cows come from California (0, Flamebait)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | about 2 years ago | (#39790583)

Your beer is shit (Milwaukee's Best tastes like Mike Rowe's piss), the Packers suck, and you wouldn't know gouda cheese if a Frenchmen slapped you with a roll of brie.

Re:Mad cows come from California (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791051)

Wisconsin has some of the best beer in the world: five of our many awesome breweries won seven medals in the last World Beer Cup in 2010 (Germans come here to drink beer, not the other way around), the Packers are the only football team worth watching because they're the only one that is part owned by their home city (ever other team is at best a fucking parasite), and Wisconsin is home to best-in-the-world Gouda [schoolhous...cheese.com] and brie [eatwisconsincheese.com] so good it makes Frenchmen cream their shorts.

Re:Mad cows come from California (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791087)

Randomly inappropriate, but....

Apparently for a long time, the "happy cows" from California were actually filmed in New Zealand. Now, this is illegal today (as per the California legislature), but it still amuses me that 1) the California dairy industry bothered faking their shoots by moving to New Zealand, and 2) that the California legislature cared in the least.

Re:Mad cows come from California (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791263)

Cheese is part of our holy trinity: Beer, the Packers, and Cheese.

As a CALIFORNIAN it always makes me smile to think that California produces more cheese than Wisconsin.

You're right about the one teat, though. Some of these city dwellers are duumb.

Here I thought happy cows come from California? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790421)

If TV says it, it must be true!

Don't eat T-Bones (5, Informative)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 2 years ago | (#39790459)

Prions are primarily present in nerve tissue. The major concentration of nerve tissue is in cuts of meat like the T-Bone, which by their nature may still have traces of the spinal cord. Stick with cheaper, lesser cuts of meat (that aren't pink slime...) such as chuck, shank, and brisket, and you'll be fine.

Re:Don't eat T-Bones (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790529)

Very true.

In any other country the herd it came from would be automatically quarantined then slaughtered. Other countries test all sick cows, the US only samples so the big question is how many did not get found.

Re:Don't eat T-Bones (4, Interesting)

Lil'wombat (233322) | about 2 years ago | (#39790705)

Absolutely. A random test of a cow supposedly not destined for the food supply gets tested positive. And we are to believe everything else is OK? I think a new guy on the job didn't get the memo and tested the wrong cow. Lets see how quickly they expand the testing. All QC policies I've worked under, allowed for decreased sampling until a defect was found, then a full statistically sample had to be pulled and tested.

Re:Don't eat T-Bones (1)

mirix (1649853) | about 2 years ago | (#39790591)

So the 'T' bone is half a vertebra? Never dawned on me before, I guess that makes sense.

Re:Don't eat T-Bones (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790955)

Why are t-bone steaks asymmetric if they're from around the spine?

Re:Don't eat T-Bones (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791285)

The spine doesn't go down the middle, it goes through the edge. A T-bone is from the left or the right side.

Thank-You for the information... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791213)

As I like steak & hamburger a great deal. This had me "spooked" in fact.

(No - Not only for myself, but also my cats (they like when I mix in raw hamburger into their catfood, which also "extends it" to last longer too - (the soft type in cans, might co$t me more, but they're my little pals & worth it))).

* I don't need to get myself sick (or of course, dead either) that way, & I certainly would not wish it on my animals (best cats in the whole world imo & my "best pals" that are constantly amusing, especially during their "CAT BATTLES", & they both just dumped 9 kittens which are every bit as smart + loving as their 2 moms are...).

So again, on that account(s) above? Thanks much!

APK

P.S.=> I just hope they can "contain the situation", so this doesn't turn into somekind of seriously life-threatening syndrome & all that - that would be terrible... apk

Re:Don't eat T-Bones (1)

Grayhand (2610049) | about 2 years ago | (#39791293)

Prions are primarily present in nerve tissue. The major concentration of nerve tissue is in cuts of meat like the T-Bone, which by their nature may still have traces of the spinal cord. Stick with cheaper, lesser cuts of meat (that aren't pink slime...) such as chuck, shank, and brisket, and you'll be fine.

The problem is how beef is processed. The very first cut is right down the middle of the spine spraying bits of spinal cord all over the meat. A tiny amount of prions can cause infection so avoiding certain cuts will have no affect. Avoiding organ meats that involve brain and nerve tissue isn't a bad idea but the only sure way to avoid exposure other than avoiding beef is to thoroughly cook the meat. Eating rare meat is risky. The fact that they only test downer cattle means that there is contaminated meat available for sale.

Private BSE Testing (5, Informative)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#39790483)

There was a suggestion to do private testing for BSE by individual ranchers the last time there was an 'outbreak'. The idea was to market their product as having been tested. But that was banned by the USDA [life-enhancement.com].

Re:Private BSE Testing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790639)

Congress shall make no law blah blah blah insert standard excuse here for why everyone but congress is allowed to violate the constitution and congress is allowed to whenever they can pawn the blame off on someone else or restructure the judicial system to prevent people from ever appealing their shit to the supreme court to have it fixed.

Someday one of the parties will say "hey this Constitution thing is pretty cool we should stick to it when we're in power". They'll probably be voted right out by the masses who're more interested in telling others what to do than caring whether they're giving someone else the power to tell them what to do later.

Re:Private BSE Testing (2)

DrkShadow (72055) | about 2 years ago | (#39790767)

http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=949053&cid=24814727 [slashdot.org]:

[The "rapid" BSE test in question] can detect abnormal prions only if they exist in a relatively high concentration, and abnormal prions typically reach detectable concentrations only two to three months before an animal exhibits observable symptoms. The incubation period for BSE (i.e., from infection to observable symptoms) is two to eight yearsâ"the average being five yearsâ"and cattle younger than thirty months are rarely symptomatic. Because most cattle for slaughter in the United States go to market before they are twenty-four months old, ...

http://www.mad-cow.org/00/dec00_mid2_news.html [mad-cow.org]:

Asked what scientific evidence he could give to reassure the public that a negative BSE test result was not a "false negative," Schimmel replied: "Nobody can do that." The report said it is usual for all biochemical tests used in medicine or animal welfare to be assessed against hundreds or even thousands of different samples to test how sensitive they are at detecting "true" negatives, and how specific they are at determining "true" positives.

However, this has not been done with any of the Commission-approved BSE tests, used in the context of assessing whether an apparently healthy animal is incubating the disease.

one cow (1)

ozduo (2043408) | about 2 years ago | (#39790573)

says to the other cow "are you worried about mad cow disease?" "No" "Why?" "because I'm a little teapot!"

Fault: Obama (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790577)

Prior to this outbreak, standard policy was to shoot, shovel and forget. Now Obama is forcing hard working american farmers to lose their entire markets for bullshit like this? RIDICULOUS.

Re:Fault: Obama (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790757)

"Prior to this outbreak, standard policy was to shoot, shovel and feed it to the rest"

FIFY.

Re:Fault: Obama (1)

swalve (1980968) | about 2 years ago | (#39790801)

If that were actually the real policy, then there would never be any outbreaks. The disease only transfers by eating brains and nerves. The cows can only catch it if the farmers are feeding their cows brains and nerves. From sick cows. Which is pretty disgusting considering they are herbivores.

Re:Fault: Obama (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791167)

If that were actually the real policy, then there would never be any outbreaks. The disease only transfers by eating brains and nerves. The cows can only catch it if the farmers are feeding their cows brains and nerves. From sick cows. Which is pretty disgusting considering they are herbivores.

Um, you do realize that this is exactly what they do, right? The remains from slaughtered animals are processed and put back into animal feed.

But... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790627)

Many more people go hog wild yet BSE seems to get all of the attention. I suppose because having hog wildness is not necessarily terminal. Though, there's often more collateral damage.

since BSE (1)

nimbius (983462) | about 2 years ago | (#39790779)

can exist in a cow for years before symptoms manifest clearly for visual detection, its possible the steak at the supermarket is infected regardless. early symptoms include the inability of cattle to stand properly, so instead of testing the USDA simply mandated that downed cattle cannot be used for slaughter. this of course has been sidestepped as a regulation in the past.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bovine_spongiform_encephalopathy#Regulatory_failures [wikipedia.org]
in some cases, we cant even get it together to regulate things that will cause BSE in cattle
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bovine_spongiform_encephalopathy#Practices_in_the_United_States_relating_to_BSE [wikipedia.org]
we're talking about an industry thats basically run its own government sanctioned regulatory board. this board is a shining example of why an agency charged with regulating as well as promoting is flawed on a fundamental level.

California cows... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39790871)

Since I went to college in California... All I have to say is "Mad cows? (sarcastic) Yeah! Where the hell has the FDA been!?!?"

Natural case, not transmitted through feed (4, Informative)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | about 2 years ago | (#39790913)

If you RTFA, it points out:
  1. This cow was never going to be sold for meat.
  2. This was a single point case of BSE; it wasn't the result of a transmission vector like contaminated feed, it just arose naturally (like prion diseases do in most mammals on rare occasions)

Ever since we stopped feeding ground up cow parts to other cows, the rate of BSE has dropped to near zero; it's only when cow engage in cannibalism that the disease spreads to enough cattle to produce a measurable risk to any human.

Re:Natural case, not transmitted through feed (3, Funny)

Brett Buck (811747) | about 2 years ago | (#39791269)

it's only when cow engage in cannibalism that the disease spreads to enough cattle

    Never turn your back on one, that's for sure!

Might by my canadian bias (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39791309)

As a cattle farmer during the crisis a handful of years back, where american calves/steers were bought by canadians, who ended up with bse, and american and japanese markets blocked all trade of canadian beef because even though the bse wasn't diagnosed until they were inside canada, they were all bought from the u.s. it was pretty annoying. A friend of the family couldnt afford to feed his stock, walked into the field and shot them all, then put the barrel in his mouth. Will we see the same blockade of US beef? I doubt it. And don't i sound like a hypocrite? Eat less meat ALWAYS. do not go vegan or raw food, or whatever. Our ancestors were omnivores (evolutionary, not our european christian ones). But meat every day, or 3 times a day isnt normal, red meats are bad for you. but on topic again, bse should be dealt with swiftly and markets should respond for the short term. but with government funding, or non-profit funding to testing (hello bill and melinda) there should be some confidence so the animals who dont have BSE who are generally slaughtered humanely (lets not bring up halal or kosher...gross) dont die of starvation as a result.
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