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Samsung Passes Nokia As Biggest Handset Manufacturer

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the changing-of-the-guard dept.

Cellphones 133

rtfa-troll writes "Tomi Ahonen reports that Samsung has become the largest manufacturer of smartphones (overtaking Apple) and of mobile phones (overtaking Nokia). During the first quarter of 2012 Samsung sold 93.5 million phones, with 44.5 million (48%) of those being smartphones. Apple would still lead on 'smart mobile devices' with 52 million sales including iPads, but not iPods. The last time the lead in mobile phone sales changed was in 14 years ago, in 1998, when Nokia overtook Ericsson. Ericsson never recovered and began leaving the mobile phone market three years later, creating Sony Ericsson, later Sony Mobile. It looks like the mobile phone market is going to be brutal, with Apple and Samsung crushing everybody else except possibly HTC, which is still rising, and Motorola (which has Google to look after it)."

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133 comments

no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825507)

thanks to the microshit idiot in charge, nokia will fail and microshit will pick up the remains for pennies on the dollar.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (5, Interesting)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825673)

thanks to the microshit idiot in charge, nokia will fail and microshit will pick up the remains for pennies on the dollar.

That would be a repeat of Microsoft's Sendo strategy [theregister.co.uk] and would make sense. Sendo seems to have ended in court with a loss / really expensive settlement though; I'm just wondering how Eliop got a worse deal than that past the Nokia board and lawyers though?

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (-1, Troll)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825785)

Good job submitter, on getting the rabit, rambling and incoherent anti-Nokia troll Tomi Ahonen's article as the main link instead of the many other saner sources of the same news. I am just glad that it's not a rambling ten page mess as his usual articles tend to be.

> I'm just wondering how Eliop got a worse deal than that past the Nokia board and lawyers though?

If you don't think Elop was specifically hired by the board to do precisely what he did, then you're really naive. The board realized that the strategy of trying to create another incompatible ecosystem and trying to attract developers was doomed to fail from the get go and installed Elop as the CEO to do what he did.

Atleast now, Nokia gets lots of advertising dollars and an outright $1bn/yr platform support from Microsoft, a luxury that RIMM does not have.

If you want more details, they are here: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/11_24/b4232056703101.htm [businessweek.com]

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (4, Interesting)

F69631 (2421974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826223)

The board realized that the strategy of trying to create another incompatible ecosystem and trying to attract developers was doomed to fail from the get go and installed Elop as the CEO to do what he did.

When Elop took over Nokia I was still a software engineering student and I currently work for a company that develops smartphone apps.

When Nokia was still developing Meego, there was a lot of buzz about it all around the world: Other students (who're now also developers) mentioned it quite often, considered installing it on their netbooks, etc... Nokia was making very good progress at creating the ecosystem. Whether or not it would have soared like an eagle or crashed to the ground will remain forever unseen but what we do know is that Nokia and MS have utterly failed in building ecosystem around what they decided to go with.

That said, the article you linked was pretty interesting. I think that some parts were worse than others (I nearly laughed when I read how good Elop is at transparency) but it's still a nice point of view.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1, Insightful)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826291)

> Nokia and MS have utterly failed in building ecosystem around what they decided to go with

There are 85,000 apps in the Windows Phone marketplace now, not stellar but nothing to sneer at either. With Windows 8, the software platform will be unified, and porting a Win 8 Metro app to Windows Phone will be super easy, with only the UI layer needing tweaks. Nokia going it alone would've faced much bigger challenges.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826455)

> Nokia and MS have utterly failed in building ecosystem around what they decided to go with

There are 85,000 apps in the Windows Phone marketplace now....

Most of which are repeat copies the same app linking to a web site. This goes on to the extent Microsoft actually had to end up rate limiting [cnet.com] the number of spammy apps uploaded. Even so, they allow developers to put up 20 apps per day each!

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826519)

There are 85,000 apps in the Windows Phone marketplace now, not stellar but nothing to sneer at either.

Really? Let's see if it's nothing to sneer at. Here's [windowsphone.com] a list of the top apps in the entertainment category on the windows phone app store. It is a cesspool of misogynist "boob" apps, sex position apps, rip-off iOS and Android apps and the rest is just pure throw-away junk.

*sneer*

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1, Informative)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827407)

There are 85,000 apps in the Windows Phone marketplace now, not stellar but nothing to sneer at either.

Really? Let's see if it's nothing to sneer at. Here's [windowsphone.com] a list of the top apps in the entertainment category on the windows phone app store. It is a cesspool of misogynist "boob" apps, sex position apps, rip-off iOS and Android apps and the rest is just pure throw-away junk.

*sneer*

It's not much different in the Android Marketplace... excuse me... Google Play.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/category/ENTERTAINMENT?feature=category-nav [google.com]

However, I am sure "Pocket Girlfriend' is an app that you'd need.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39827615)

There is one girl app in that entire list. The rest are actual legitimate "entertainment" apps like the Talking $ANIMAL series that is so blatantly ripped off on the windows phone entertainment app page.

Just scanning the windows phone page again, not only are there multiple sex and boob apps but some enterprising dev even combined two stupid concepts into one and called it...wait for it...Beauty Fart. Yes, folks, an app about girls farting is a "top" windows phone app. What a fucking joke.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (4, Insightful)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826745)

There are 85,000 apps in the Windows Phone marketplace now, not stellar but nothing to sneer at either.

The problem is more apparent when you look at what those apps actually are. I mean, WP is still the only platform that doesn't have a fully functional Skype client (what it currently has does not work in background).

With Windows 8, the software platform will be unified, and porting a Win 8 Metro app to Windows Phone will be super easy, with only the UI layer needing tweaks.

Since there have been no public statements on the future version of Windows Phone, so far this is just wishful thinking (or, if you're an insider, a leak).

In any case, the problem is the word "will". No-one cares about what "will" be there - it'll matter when it'll be there, which we still don't know yet. Meanwhile, iOS and Android are here already.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 2 years ago | (#39829107)

No-one cares about what "will" be there - it'll matter when it'll be there, which we still don't know yet. Meanwhile, iOS and Android are here already.

Sounds likes history repeating itself from what happened with iPod/Zune.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39829539)

The last iteration of the Zune, the ZuneHD, was really good. It had a clean, nice looking interface.

So they scrapped that and and copied it in WP7, which didn't look as good, but is still decent. At least as good as Android (yeah fanboys, flame on).

Then they copied it in Windows 8, where it looks downright horrific. And so does the next generation of Microsoft apps built to go with it (have you seen Visual Studio 2012??)

Every generation they copy gets worse. Sad.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39829669)

And so does the next generation of Microsoft apps built to go with it (have you seen Visual Studio 2012??)

What you see in VS11 is not "Metro" by any measure, though. Making everything flat and monochrome does not make it Metro.

Also, don't render your final verdict yet. It's only a beta for now, and people have already been screaming their lungs out over the new theme - and yes, it did get heard. Wait and see.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

dubbreak (623656) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830059)

I don't understand all the screaming. I use VS11 on a daily basis using the dark theme. Works fine for me and is nice and easy on the eyes. Though I guess that's what people are complaining about (not enough contrast). What's needed is a theme configuration tool. That way people can create whatever they want and I can have an elflord style colorscheme.

As a side-note: I've been impressed with how stable VS11 is (used dev preview now beta). My previous job we used 2005 targetting CF 2.0 for WinCE. It was was not very stable. We moved up to 2008 which was better but still crashed periodically. 2010 was out at the time but we weren't able to use it (no support for WinCE device deploy/debug IIRC.. at least at the time). VS11 has been quick and smooth. Mind you I'm not trying to live debug on a WinCE 6 device anymore so it's kind of apples to oranges.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830117)

Mind you I'm not trying to live debug on a WinCE 6 device anymore so it's kind of apples to oranges.

lol it's not the same at all!!

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

dubbreak (623656) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830167)

lol it's not the same at all!!

True, but it generally crashed just in the editor when writing code not when attached to the process on the device. 2005 was especially bad for that. I'd boot my machine up fresh in the morning, write code half the day then boom crash.With 2008 (on the same machine) that kind of behavior was a rarity (comparatively).

My biggest issue was moving from XP to Win 7. MS dropped Active Sync and replaced it with Windows Mobile device center. Active sync would always recognize the device first time. WMDC was hit or miss. Funny thing is running Active Sync under XP mode within Win7 worked fine. Of course WMDC didn't officially support WinCE 6. Having dev's spend more than a minute trying to get their damn devices to connect is a definite productivity killer.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830209)

I don't understand all the screaming. I use VS11 on a daily basis using the dark theme.

Therein likely lies the problem. Monochrome is pretty decently looking in dark theme, especially since people who use it want to focus on the code in the first place in any case (and the point of monochrome is really to let you do that - let the editor be the focal point due to its syntax highlighting being the only blot of color in the IDE). But have you tried the light theme for any considerable period of time?

What's needed is a theme configuration tool. That way people can create whatever they want and I can have an elflord style colorscheme.

For VS2010, there was this [microsoft.com] . It doesn't do all, but at least it lets you change colors. Matthew said in a comment there that he'll try to find the time to update it for VS11 sometime after the release.

As a side-note: I've been impressed with how stable VS11 is (used dev preview now beta). My previous job we used 2005 targetting CF 2.0 for WinCE. It was was not very stable. We moved up to 2008 which was better but still crashed periodically. 2010 was out at the time but we weren't able to use it (no support for WinCE device deploy/debug IIRC.. at least at the time). VS11 has been quick and smooth.

As one of the guys who works on it (and especially the "smooth" part... I hope you do like the new background solution load experience!), I'm really glad to hear it. Just keep filing those bugs [microsoft.com] for when it's not stable, or when performance is not on par with what you'd expect in some specific scenario, or when you see something obviously silly in the UI - especially the new or revamped stuff (e.g. like this [microsoft.com] ).

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

Airline_Sickness_Bag (111686) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827921)

>

But it won't run on a WP7 phone. And Microsoft has been **VERY** silent on the upgradability of the current WP handsets to WP8.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39829503)

Last I saw they weren't silent. You couldn't upgrade.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39829009)

You're most likely responding to a Nokia or Microsoft employee.

They're all over online discussions involving their products and they don't mind playing dirty.
http://www.moneylife.in/article/nokia-lumia-800-why-the-nophone-review-draws-ire-from-nokia-and-microsoft-employees/22283.html [moneylife.in]

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (1)

Troed (102527) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826967)

anti-Nokia troll Tomi Ahonen

If there's anything Tomi isn't, it's anti-Nokia.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39828381)

Um yes he is. He blames their entire situation on Elop, Elop works for the board, the direction Nokia is taking is the direction the board wants the company taken. Tomi ignores this fact constantly.

Re:no huge surprise .. nokia is engineered to fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39828883)

Wouldn't the anti-Nokia people here be Elop and the board, then?

Meego (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825541)

If only I could buy a new phone with Meego on it...

Re:Meego (5, Informative)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825703)

If only I could buy a new phone with Meego on it...

In some countries, you can, such as Australia, Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, etc. But not in the US, UK, Japan, or Germany (the Germans apparently are buying them from Switzerland). The Nokia N9 [wikipedia.org] runs on Meego "Harmattan", which is actually intermediate between Maemo and Meego. It's deliberately withheld from the larger markets, because it causes some embarrassment to the Lumia series of WinPhones.

Re:Meego (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825801)

And, despite the lack of marketing, way more N9s have been sold than Lumias. It's a realy pity because Harmattan's swipe interface is lightyears ahead of anything Android has to offer.

--
Sundar Pichai is the asshole whose incompetence has resulted in the closing down of the Atlanta engineering office. Great work!

Re:Meego (1)

mystikkman (1487801) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825981)

>And, despite the lack of marketing, way more N9s have been sold than Lumias.

Citation needed.

Re:Meego (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826075)

The best available numbers are on the site linked to Who Wants Numbers? Lumia on T-Mobile? Lumia 800 vs Lumia 710? How Many Nokia N9? [blogs.com]

Nokia could just publish the activation numbers as Google and Apple do, but instead they seem to only publish the number of phones sent off to operators and even that they do rarely. I wonder why?

Re:Meego (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826449)

Those also seem to be the worst available numbers, since it's from the disreputable anti Nokia troll pulling numbers out of his ass.

For example, lets look at Statcounter Data for mobile OSes in Finland.

http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-FI-monthly-201201-201203 [statcounter.com]
(click on the legend for other OSes to make them disappear from the graph).

You see that it's a straight up increase for the Lumia since launch in Feb and taking about 5% share in less than 3 months of launch and still uptrending, with the N9 pretty stagnant at 2%.

Re:Meego (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826803)

For example, lets look at Statcounter Data for mobile OSes in Finland.

And Finland is not representative of the entire world in any way whatsoever. You might as well look at the stats for Orange County California and try to draw a conclusion from it.

Re:Meego (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826951)

Yeah, and if you look behind [statcounter.com] a bit, you'll see that Meego took 5% in less than three months of launch as well.

Second, s/Lumia launch/Lumia 900 launch/. Two previous Lumia models weren't all that sunny for Nokia, and the link speaks about 710 and 800. There are no official 900 numbers yet, AFAIK.

Third, Finland, as Nokia's home turf isn't quite representative - in most other countries neither WinPhone nor Meego can even break out of "Other (dotted)". Though you can see Nokia's decline as Finland's favourite by Symbian being steadily replaced by Android, but it's tangential to current topic.

Re:Meego (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827421)

>Yeah, and if you look behind [statcounter.com] a bit, you'll see that Meego took 5% in less than three months of launch as well.

I am sorry, I looked at that graph in the link but it's nowhere close to 5%. Please get your eyes checked.

Re:Meego (1)

wiedzmin (1269816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826011)

Harmattan's swipe interface is lightyears ahead of anything Android has to offer.

Checked out some videos. Looks very similar to BB10 swipe interface. Unfortunately whoever gets most third party app support will win in the end.

Re:Meego (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827047)

Actually even *building* the N9 was marketing. Marketing isn't just about the ads you see on TV or buses, it's what products even get out the chute.

If you're making crap no one wants, FIRE YOUR MARKETING DEPARTMENT.

Re:Meego (1)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827059)

This is just some bullshit made-up stats pulled from someone's asshole. It doesn't become true through being perpetuated on internet messageboards.

This information brought to you from an N9 owner.

Re:Meego (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39829545)

Sundar Pichai is the asshole whose incompetence has resulted in the closing down of the Atlanta engineering office. Great work!

lol what is that?

Re:Meego (1)

mystikkman (1487801) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826035)

The same old fairy tale bullshit. Except that people would've complained about lack of apps and developer support. No Angry Birds, no Netflix, no nothing. Except for a few hundred geeks on Slashdot, nobody would've bought it since people would prefer Android for the apps. Remember OpenMoko?

Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825639)

Just the beginning of the end. Nokia was doomed the moment Microsoft was whispered in the head office. Any company to work that closely with MS always gets burned.

Right now the mole is just tanking the company, making it cheaper for the inevitable buy out.

I'm dead serious about all of this. You'll mod me down now, but I'll be laughing when it happens 8-18 months from now.

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (4, Insightful)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825869)

> Any company to work that closely with MS always gets burned.

Lets see, Intel,AMD, Nvidia, HTC(who started out as a only-Windows Mobile OEM), Dell, HP, Sony, ASUS, Acer, Samsung, Lenovo... all of these got burnt and didn't make lots of profits because of their partnership with MS right?

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826283)

Oh, hi shill. Amazing how quickly you spout this copy-pasted list of companies whenever Microsoft's nasty tendency to kill and absorb their partners.
It's amazing how often I see this list of companies on various tech sites.

The above companies are OEMs that make generic hardware that can run Microsoft software. Not what I'm talking about.

Of course, Microsoft has other ways to burn it's regular partners.. Remember "Play's for sure"? Remember how they threw every non-apple music player under the bus when the released the Zune, with it's own exclusive music store and ties to other services like windows live and xbox?

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826521)

>Oh, hi shill.

Oh hi, anonymous troll. Please get some balls and post with your real account especially when trying to call others shills.

>The above companies are OEMs that make generic hardware that can run Microsoft software. Not what I'm talking about.

You were talking about Nokia, which is definitely an OEM that makes hardware that can run Microsoft software.

From HTC's wiki:

The company has a rich heritage of many "firsts", including creating the first Microsoft-powered smartphone (2002) and the first Microsoft 3G phone (2005).[6] Their first major product was made in 2000 and was one of the world's first touch screen smartphones.

So your statement:

>Any company to work that closely with MS always gets burned. ..is bullshit and you know it.

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39827197)

"Play's for sure"

I *distinctly* saw Kid put that there.

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39829023)

Remember when SGI and MSFT partnered, and then SGI circled the drain? They sucked out the valuable bits, made directx better by ripping off GL? seemed like some fishermen cut sharks' fins off, and then "throw them back".

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826633)

Microsoft's new "strategic partnership" with Nokia is not its first. For a decade the software company has courted and consummated relationships with a variety of companies in mobile and telecom. Here are the ones I can remember:

LG. In February 2009 Microsoft Corp. signed a multiyear agreement for Windows Mobile to be included on devices from LG Electronics Inc. LG would use Windows Mobile as its "primary platform"for smartphones and produce about 50 models running the software.

What happened? LG made a few Windows Mobile devices but with WinMo uncompetitive, they abandoned the platform and moved to Android losing years of market presence and all their profits.

Motorola. In September 2003, Motorola and Microsoft announced an alliance. "Starting with the introduction of the new Motorola MPx200 mobile phone with Microsoft Windows Mobile software, the companies will collaborate on a series of Smartphone and Pocket PC wireless devices designed to create a virtual "remote control" for the Web-centric, work-centric, always-on-the-go mobile professional." In addition, the alliance includes cooperation on joint marketing and wireless developer programs.

What happened? Motorola launched a series of Windows Mobile phones culminating in the Motorola Q "Blackberry killer". As Motorola hit the rocks in profitability new management reached for the Android liferaft. The company now relies exclusively on the Droid franchise.

Palm. In September 2005 Palm and Microsoft announced a strategic alliance to "accelerate the Smartphone market segment with a new device for mobile professionals and businesses. Palm has licensed the Microsoft Windows Mobile operating system for an expanded line of Treo Smartphones, the first of which will be available on Verizon Wirelessâ(TM) national wireless broadband network."

What happened? Palm shipped a few Windows Mobile, famously dismissing Appleâ(TM)s potential entry as something "PC guys" could never achieve. A new CEO, a private placement and an acquisition later the company is a division of HP making its own operating system.

Nortel. When Steve Ballmer was famously laughing at the iPhone and saying that he likes the Windows Mobile strategy "a lot" he was sitting next to the then-CEO of Nortel (Mike Zafirovski formerly of Motorola) with whom the company had just closed a strategic deal. "an alliance between Microsoft and Nortel announced in July 2006 ⦠includes three new joint solutions to dramatically improve business communications by breaking down the barriers between voice, e-mail, instant messaging, multimedia conferencing and other forms of communication".

What happened? Nortel declared bankruptcy two years later.

Verizon. In January 2009 "Verizon Wireless has selected Microsoft Corp. to provide portal, local and Internet search as well as mobile advertising services to customers on its devices. The five-year agreement will go into effect in the first half of 2009 when Microsoft Live Search is targeted to be available on new Verizon Wireless feature phones and smartphones." The deal would ensure Bing distribution to all of Verizonâ(TM)s smartphone customers.

What happened? Bing did ship on some devices but in October 2009 Droid came to Verizon.

Ericsson. In September 2000, "Ericsson and Microsoft Corp. today launched Ericsson Microsoft Mobile Venture AB. This previously announced joint company will drive the mobile Internet by developing and marketing mobile e-mail solutions for operators. The first solutions are expected to be on the market by the end of the year. The company is part of a broader strategic alliance between Ericsson and Microsoft"

What happened? Ericsson divested itself of the mobile division forming a joint venture which would go on and make more strategic alliances with Microsoft over Windows Mobile culminating in a loss of profits and eventual flight to Android. Sendo. In February 2001, Microsoft announced a partnership, in which Microsoft bought $12m of Sendo shares and a seat on the board. Sendo was to be Microsoft's "go to market partner" for the Stinger smartphone platform that would become Smartphone 2002.

What happened? Sendo after litigating IP issues with Microsoft went bankrupt in 2005.

And finally,

Nokia. No, not this OS deal, but in August 2009 âThe worldwide leader in software and the worldâ(TM)s largest smartphone manufacturer have entered into an alliance that is set to deliver a groundbreaking, enterprise-grade solution for mobile productivity. Today, Microsoft Business Division President Stephen Elop and Nokiaâ(TM)s Executive Vice President for Devices Kai Ã-istÃmà announced the agreement, outlining a shared vision for the future of mobile productivity. This is the first time that either company has embarked on an alliance of this scope and nature.â The plan was to bring âoeMicrosoft Office Mobile and Microsoft business communications, collaboration and device management software to Nokiaâ(TM)s Symbian devices.â What happened? One and a half years later the same Stephen Elop announced that Symbian will be deprecated.

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (3, Informative)

1s44c (552956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825875)

I 100% agree right up to the bit where you mention laughing. This isn't a laughing matter, it's a tragic commercial suicide. They could have been winning, instead they stabbed themselves in the gut with the Microsoft deal and limped around the marketplace dripping their lifeblood on the floor.

An iphone like Nokia Linux phone would have been 100% win!

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826335)

An iphone like Nokia Linux phone would have been 100% win!

You mean the N9?

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826761)

Yeah, but it would have had to been out 2-4 years ago. While nokia was still dicking around with symbian. They fiddled while their Rome burned and now they hope that this sale of the company to MS marketing will pay off better than just closing up shop. They have chosen a slow death over a quick one.

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (5, Insightful)

Jeppe Salvesen (101622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825905)

Nokia was doomed several years ago. They ridiculed Apple while they failed to streamline Symbian app development, while they failed to research and develop touch-screen mobiles, while they failed to build a proper app store that was easy to use, while they failed to build.

Making a deal with Microsoft was just an act of desperation. They were already bleeding profusely from the consequences of all their dumb-ass decisions made around 2005-2007 when mobile internet was beginning to take off. The Ovi store could have been launched in 2005-2006 with over-the-air app downloads. Had Nokia remained on the leading edge and focused on making their products better from a consumer-point-of-view, then Apple would have had a much harder job in invading the mobile phone market.

But Nokia was not focused. Apple and Google had them for lunch.

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39829045)

They were very focused. Unfortunately it was on the wrong market ie the next billion phone users.

Re:Already warming up my "I told you so" dance. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39828989)

Perhaps we'd turned the corner, where Microsoft is the new poison pill??

Large does not automatically mean best! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825671)

Largest manufacturer of smartphones and mobile phones does not automatically mean that they are the best.

I don't own a Samsung device but I have to say: Well done! Well deserved!

Re:Large does not automatically mean best! (1)

colinnwn (677715) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826007)

You can say that again. The first Samsung product I bought (and the only one I still like) was my first LCD computer monitor. Everything else our family bought since then, two DVD players, a DVD recorder, a CRT TV, a LCD TV, and a Galaxy smart phone either died before their time, or wasn't fully functional from the factory. The CRT TV was supposed to do clear-QAM reception, but it doesn't due to a Samsung known glitch. The DVD recorder also fails to successfully record on a disc 95% of the time due to a Samsung known glitch that they decided not to recall. The Galaxy feels cheesy in the hand, asks me if I want to mount the flash memory or use the Samsung sync suite every time I plug in the charger, and takes a long time to get a GPS lock, and it is always about 30 meters due west of the actual location.

It still surprises me that HTC fell from grace. I loved my G1, my brother's Nexus One, and my 3G Slide, and G2. They feel substantial, are still reasonable dimensions, and actually work, especially the G1, 3G and G2 on Cyanogen which came much faster than the Galaxy version.The One series looks super nice. But I really want smaller screens and a physical keyboard.

Re:Large does not automatically mean best! (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#39828061)

I've got a HTC Sensation (actually, two of them, one for my wife), and I'm pretty happy with it. It isn't perfect by any means; it has some glitches here and there, but overall it works great. The hardware, as you say, feels substantial, and most things work pretty well on it. Plugging in the charger just charges it; if I plug it into a USB port on a computer it asks if I want to charge only, or mount as USB drive, which is very handy. The GPS is accurate, the compass and gyro are amazing; the way they all work together on Google Sky View is simply phenomenal: I can hold the phone up to the sky and it'll show me what every star or planet is, in realtime, no matter how the phone is oriented. And unlike Apple crap, if the 8GB of flash inside isn't enough for me, it takes seconds to open it up and replace the SD card with a bigger one.

My main complaints are 1) it seems to reboot now and then, and 2) the stock Android (Gingerbread) dialer and contact manager kinda sucks, but for #2 I replaced it with Touchpad Dialer which works great.

Turns out they had a great plan! (2, Interesting)

RocketRabbit (830691) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825677)

Copying Apple was the best plan Samsung even devised. Not only is it a really cute move, but it has paid off in the market. The only problem is that Samsung makes about a nickel on each phone it sells.

Re:Turns out they had a great plan! (1)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825799)

To quote the actual article; which even the Microsoft trolls should have had a chance to study in advance

And we hear the profits are very strong in the Samsung handsets unit, so this is done with a healthy business, won fair and square, not in slashing prices and buying market share. Excellent job Samsung, excellent

I think you will find plenty more evidence that Samsung's profit isn't too bad [google.com] . Having the dominant position in Mobile phones in terms of numbers also tended to lead to very high long term margins. It will be interesting to see how that plays out when there seem to be two stable positions in the market (Apple and Samsung). Although others seem to think one or the other will dominate, I don't think so. The mobile operator's like this situation with real competition and know that Microsoft is out to kill their business so they will probably end up keeping it.

Re:Turns out they had a great plan! (4, Informative)

Hope Thelps (322083) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825871)

The only problem is that Samsung makes about a nickel on each phone it sells.

Okay, doing a quick search on "samsung ,mobile phone profits". I see things like:

"reported its highest quarterly profits since 2008, with net profit almost doubling to 5.05 trillion won ($4.5 billion) for the three months to March 31." (http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/business/120427/samsung-profits-jump-mobile-phone-sales-outstrip-apple-and-nokia)

and

"Samsung’s quarterly handset division profits nearly tripled to 4.27 trillion won ($3.8 billion U.S.), accounting for 73 per cent of total profit" (http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1169494--galaxy-phone-powers-samsung-to-record-profit)

Now, maybe those reports are wrong. And very possibly Apple makes much much more on their phones (I haven't checke but I believe it) BUT I really doubt Samsung are crying over results like that. This looks like a very very succesful business for them.

Re:Turns out they had a great plan! (3, Informative)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826821)

At 44.5 million phones and $3.8B, Samsung is making $85 profit per smartphone. Apple sold 35.1M iPhones with revenue of $22.7B. At a modest 30% margin, that is $6.81B or $194 per smartphone. The margin might be higher on the iPhone though so Apple is killing on profit.

Re:Turns out they had a great plan! (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826913)

At about a nickle profit they must have sold 76 billion phones. That means everyone on earth bought 10 phones each.

Re:Turns out they had a great plan! (1)

organgtool (966989) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826473)

You're absolutely right. Who could get behind a company that sells devices without obscenely high markups on their prices?

Re:Turns out they had a great plan! (1)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827023)

Samsung copied the device shape of the iPhone (which wasn't terribly original to start with) - but the real technology, like the breakthrough touchscreen displays is developed by them. Which is the reason why Apple buys those from them - they'd go elsewhere if another manufacturer could make that.

Re:Turns out they had a great plan! (1)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827161)

Wow, you fanbois are really great at supporting each other. A positive mod for this?

Motorola, Nokia (4, Interesting)

Dynamoo (527749) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825679)

Two things.. one, don't assume that Google gives a shit about Motorola, except for the patents. Once the patents have been stripped away, I would expect it to be sold on again.

Secondly.. Nokia is in a mess, but it isn't Stephen Elop (the CEO) who created it. He inherited the mess from the previous CEO Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo, who basically doomed the company after borking the launch of the N900 and the Maemo platform. Elop sent out his now famous "burning platform" memo and chose to leap off the platform into Microsoft's lifeboat rather than the Android one. Why? Well, Nokia has much more influence over Windows than it would do with Android and has a chance of building a decent ecosystem.

Honestly though.. if Nokia made a decent Android handset, then I would probably go and buy it.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (3, Insightful)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825715)

With Windows Phone Nokia has to do whatever Microsoft wants. They have very little wiggle room.

With Android they can go to any extreme, from working directly with Google to forking the whole thing like Amazon.

Using a poor platform like Windows Phone was a huge mistake for Nokia and it's probably going to be a fatal one.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825803)

With Windows Phone Nokia has to do whatever Microsoft wants.

This is half-true. Microsoft has very hard minimum specs, if any company attempts to undercut those, they can lose the licensing. On the other hand, there isn't a lot of incentive to make a more powerful Win phone because of how smoothly the core OS runs at those minimum specs.
This leaves the manufacturers in a position where their main competition in-OS is to get better cost, size, UI hardware, and batter life. All of which are trade-offs against each other and often fairly small advantages.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825949)

This sort of cynical hardware marketing will ultimately doing Android in; as few customers actually care about nonsense tech-specs such "quad core" etc. Rather they blame the platform for slow-stuttery performance characteristics.

Before someone points at sales figures, check user satisfaction surveys on Android phones. Apple is making a mint selling "upgrades" to smartphone customers dissatisfied with their low-end Android phone.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826417)

Very true, it happened with me, my first smartphone was a Nokia 5800, after that I had a htc magic, and then when it was upgraded to android 2.2 and became dog slow I moved to a Samsung galaxy ace. When I got the ace I was starting to become massive Samsung fan, I had a Samsung NetBook, a samsung camera and a Samsung phone, I was virtually a Samsung fanboy. I really liked the ace for about the first 3 months, unfortunately it's ridiculous and clearly deliberate design flaw crippled it, insanely tiny onboard storage. I quickly ran out of space to install apps, It had less space than my magic from 2 years earlier. That design decision really pissed me off, it was clearly done so as not to spoil sales of the Samsung galaxy and totally crippled the ace. I already had an iPad 1 from launch, i was going to give it to my mum and get a Samsung tablet, but when I realised how much the ace had been ruined I held off. Anyway to cut a long story short, I know own a MacBook pro, and iPad (3rd gen) and an iPhone 4s those purchases all would have been Samsung ones instead of apple if they had not gimped the ace.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826865)

It's the bullshit that the PC industry has been doing since day one -- punish the lowend customer by selling them a pile of crap, so they will learn their lesson and spend more next time.

However, it only works when there isn't a viable alternative. With subsidized cellphone prices, the "expensive" iphone only costs $99 more than the Android shitphone. (Plus $20 for a case if you hold it wrong.)

It also doesn't help that Android marketing is mostly ninjas and giant robots ... almost as if they acknowledge nobody except teenage nerds care about cellphone specs.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 2 years ago | (#39828101)

Right and Apple is only marketing to foppish gay men.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (2)

klingens (147173) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826081)

With Windows Phone Nokia has to do whatever Microsoft wants.

This is half-true. Microsoft has very hard minimum specs, if any company attempts to undercut those, they can lose the licensing. On the other hand, there isn't a lot of incentive to make a more powerful Win phone because of how smoothly the core OS runs at those minimum specs.

This is wrong. I just checked the current Windows Phone 7.5 Systems. From the cheapest 195€ one to the most expensive 579€ Lumia.
ALL of them have 512MB RAM, a single core CPU, no SD card slot, a 800x480 screen and either 8 or 16GB flash storage. Every single one of them. These are all hard limits you can't go over or under when you want a license. Microsoft killed any product differentiation for the vendors. Even Apple has more differentiation.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826443)

Faster hardware != better phone
Faster hardware may lead to a better toy.

I still prefer my phone to be a phone first and a toy second. That also means no weird bugs/design flaws (Android's increasingly weird bugs come to mind, as does antennagate. WP7 had something as well, but I can't remember what...)

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#39828105)

You're missing the big difference between Android and WinPhone7/iOS: with Android, a phone maker has a huge ability to customize or differentiate their phone. With WinPhone7, they don't: every WinPhone7 looks like every other one. The hardware may be a little different, but the UI is exactly the same, the way MS made it. Android lets phone makers radically customize their phones, so an HTC phone will look and feel different from a Samsung phone, using a different start screen, dialer, widgets, etc. Carriers also have a lot of control over what goes on the Android phones; they can add their own custom apps. This is one of the big selling points for Android (to the phone makers and carriers). Manufacturers and other sellers (namely the carriers) don't want to make commodity products that are exactly like their competitors', because then they're just competing on price alone.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1, Insightful)

mystikkman (1487801) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825963)

>With Windows Phone Nokia has to do whatever Microsoft wants. They have very little wiggle room.

Nokia negotiated the right to change any part of the WP OS.

>With Android they can go to any extreme, from working directly with Google to forking the whole thing like Amazon.

You mean the same Google that also owns Motorola? Or the same Google that gave preferential access of new releases to Samsung first for the latest two major revisions?

http://androidandme.com/2012/04/smartphones-2/google-picks-samsung-for-4th-generation-nexus-phone/ [androidandme.com]

Say what you will about MS, but they never played favorites with or bought OEMs.

Not to mention that the Kindle Fire cannot access the Google Marketplace and is doomed to be a few versions behind the latest Android while Amazon waits for Google to throw code over the wall at release(the same code that Samsung/Motorola has access to for months).

Re:Motorola, Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826157)

Nokia negotiated the right to change any part of the WP OS.

That could be their salvation - they can change it by replacing the whole thing with Android.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1)

Hope Thelps (322083) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826183)

Say what you will about MS, but they never played favorites with or bought OEMs.

Nokia certainly like to claim that they got a favoured position due to their (at the time) market strength. Are you saying they didn't?

Re:Motorola, Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826621)

> Nokia negotiated the right to change any part of the WP OS.
> Say what you will about MS, but they never played favorites with or bought OEMs.

Great job contradicting yourself there!

I'm also sure billion dollars yearly that MS pays Nokia for Lumias is just a sign of good will and doesn't signify any preferential treatment or special arrangements.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (0)

Threni (635302) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825941)

Nokia was in trouble, but the mess - what's going to end Nokia - was purely down to Elop. You just don't announce that you're going to abandon your own system in a years time and plump for the doomed Microsoft experiment which had no phones due for many months and expect people to keep buying your stuff.

How does Nokia influence another companies operating system? If they'd chosen Android they could have literally done whatever they wanted to it (a la Amazon, samsung, htc etc). With Microsoft they just make phones to run the OS.

I agree entirely with your last paragraph. Nokia made great phones. We're not alone. There's still a chance someone at Nokia will realise that Nokia is competing with other Android phone manufacturers even if they don't actually make one.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826043)

> and has a chance of building a decent ecosystem.

Not with Windows because users dont want Windows on their phones. It will be an ecosystem without users.

> Nokia has much more influence over Windows

They can have as much influence over this smelly piece of shit as they want, but they cant force users to buy it. Nobody buying Windows it is not a sign of "exclusivity", as Nokia seems to have thought, it is a sign that it is a piece of shit.

> than it would do with Android

Why should Nokia not be able to make money with Android like Samsung is making money with Android?

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1)

wiedzmin (1269816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826045)

Two things.. one, don't assume that Google gives a shit about Motorola, except for the patents. Once the patents have been stripped away, I would expect it to be sold on again.

And rightfully so. I will never buy a Motorola product ever again.

Re:Motorola, Nokia (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826555)

Sitting here with my Droid X and my Xoom Tablet I have to wonder, Why not?

Re:Motorola, Nokia (2)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827143)

Nokia is in a mess, but it isn't Stephen Elop (the CEO) who created it.

No, but he made it worse. Nokia had a decent strategy, but failed to deliver in time. That cost them dearly, but they still had a chance to recover. Now they swiched to another strategy putting all their eggs in one basket.

It sounded crazy to me from the start, but fair enough: you don't really know before you tried. They did try though, and they do know now. The only reason they are hanging on to the Windows-only strategy is because of Elop's ego - that is his fault.

Still longing for something... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39825793)

I find the current state of the smarphone market less than appealing. I'm not interested in iPhone (too restrictive, dumbed down, etc), and not so much Android (you basically have marry Google to make good use of it). Symbian was great for its time, but with Nokia as the sole user and distributor, have been too slow with updates and appealing user interfaces. Even Belle (which I find more appealing overall than either iOS or Android) suffers from slow update cycles and bug fixes.

So I had great hopes for Maemo/Meego. Nokia's plan was to support Qt on both Symbian and Meego, thus providing a clean transition path for application developers. N9 was possibly the most awesome phone yet in terms of the OS. That is, until that Microsoft lackey Elop hijacked the company and turned it into a tool for one last-ditch marketing campaign for Microsoft and their even more hopeless Windows Phone OS (probably on the behest of his former boss, Ballmer).

Nokia abandoned anything they had which held promise. Sony (sans Ericsson), Motorola and also Samsung are now nothing more than generic run-of-the-mill Android pushers. Apple -- they are basically a one trick pony, and are not likely to become any less arrogant anytime soon.

My interest in smartphones is waning...

Re:Still longing for something... (1)

Dishevel (1105119) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826461)

Why do you need to marry Google to get good use out of an Android phone?
It quickly sets up not only Gmail but Corporate Emails, Yahoo, Hotmail and pretty much just about anything.
You can make one account to use the Google marketplace (Play) or you can forgo that and use Amazons market.
If you choose you can have it linked to a Hotmail account and get apps from Amazon. No Google needed.
How exactly is that any worse than any other smartphone platform? Better than some.

Re:Still longing for something... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39828427)

Google Calendar.
Contacts.
Not everybody has a corporate Active Directory server to hook into.

When I was looking to get out of upgrading to Lion, I looked at the Android system (I have an iPhone currently) - the only way to get a contacts / calendar / email system that you could sync with other devices was to fall into the Google machine.

I upgraded to Lion.....

coincidence? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825911)

Lessee.... Nokia bets heavily on Windows 7, a few months later Samsung overtakes Nokia. Coincidence?

Instead of linking to a random blog post... (5, Informative)

Emetophobe (878584) | more than 2 years ago | (#39825965)

There are better sources at BBC News [bbc.co.uk] or Bloomberg [bloomberg.com] .

Re:Instead of linking to a random blog post... (3, Insightful)

tbird81 (946205) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826051)

But then how is the blogger (probably Soulskill's friend) going to make advertising dollars?

Stephen Elop (1)

lsolano (398432) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826101)

That 's it.

Every time I read something about Nokia I miss my beloved n900.

And I miss the GREAT Nokia6120 too.

what's in a name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826117)

All this means is that Foxconn is stamping "Samsung" more times on its phones than any other brand name.

Re:what's in a name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39829343)

Samsung does not just assemble others products and technology and throw their software on it. They design and produce a lot of their own components and build them in their own factories. In fact, they make parts that are sent to Foxconn that are put into the iPhone. Apples only real assetts are cash and a piece of paper that says we thought of something first. Great right now but one or two mediocre products and the house of cards could fall hard. Not that I would want it too because we need more players in the game to make our choices and prices in check.

Incompetent management (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826227)

Nokia is failing due to failures at the management level. Pessimists even rumour all the most competent developers to have already left the company since the Microsoft partnership. If the WP7 partnership was not an idiotic gamble unlikely to succeed to start with, how it has been implemented seems to have collapsed the card house for good. An enormous mistake was made when management thought that people would still buy Nokia's Symbian smartphones even as the company was loudly bannering it as a "platform on fire" that would be discontinued at first opportunity. A smoother transition would have been in place. For the techies, even more fatal mistake was not only to cancel the pioneering MeeGo/Maemo line, but to publish the final device in the line only in select markets despite even greater demand than all their "flagship" WP7 phones combined.

Nokia is currently making losses. It's only profitable unit is the one selling old "dumb phones", those famed "bricks" that would shatter concrete floors rather than take a hit. Dumphones are Nokia's core business, but it's a business that is becoming less and less profitable as East Asian competitors enter the market and are able to localize their phones, an important and big task easily ignored by US consumers. This is part of the reason why Nokia's share fell heavily this week and its credit rating was downgraded below investment grade. The losses from its other divisions have surpassed the profits from its dumbphone division, and dumbphone sales are further falling faster than anticipated.

Nokia seems to have never excelled in pioneering SW development. Although there are innovative and productive units, they are subject to irresponsible decision-making and unnecessary bureaucracy from mid-high management and other, non-cooperative units, which is part of the reason why Nokia was never able to come up with an iPhone of its own in time. The hiring of Elop was only result of the "panic reaction" when they realized (or got over to admitting to themselves?) that Google and Apple-based phones would marginalize them in a few years

What could still save Nokia is developing its dumbphone offering, and trying to compete with the East Asian manufacturers with more smartphone-like features. They are working on Meltemi, a Linux and Qt-based dumbphone platform. It's still highly classified and details are sparse. But an advanced $100 dumbphone with browser, GPS and 3rd party apps could well pose a fresh alternative to Google and Apple products in the minds of those consumers who don't want to invest in an overpriced phone-PDA.

As for WP7, it remains to be seen, but I wouldn't hold my breath. It's still a young platform, and Nokia has gambled a lot on it. If that gamble fails, the company will have to come up with a serious plan to avert disaster, or face the fate of many other companies that invested in bad technologies.

Re:Incompetent management (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827137)

Doesn't nokia also sell big iron for telco backends and other non-phone related goods? Did they spin that part of the business off? Do they make razor thin margins on that line of business?

Re:Incompetent management (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39828111)

Network unit (Nokia-Siemens Networks) is unprofitable with losses of €147 million (in Q1 2012), and laying off heavily. Location&Commerce unit (including former NAVTEQ) was €94 million in the red at the same time. Other operations have been sold or spun off since long (the conglomerate, founded in the mid-19th century, has before the digital age manufactured paper, cables, boots, tyres and TVs, among others.)

Huawei? (1)

Brian Feldman (350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826253)

Huawei should not be ignored. They're going to come onto the world market in a big way this year. For instance, I am truly looking forward to their new flagship [gsmarena.com] coming later this year -- 1.5GHz, 1280x720 and 2500mAH without crazy Android customization that every big manufacturer seems to be in love with. Samsung may make nice displays but they focus more on a diaspora of handsets rather than making exceptional ones.

Re:Huawei? (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | more than 2 years ago | (#39826531)

I'd prefer that only a relatively small part of my phone's price were used to finance the people's republic of china. Better yet, not at all (too bad that's no longer possible).

Call me paranoid, xenophobic, fascist or whatever, but I do not trust them.

Also, past experience with carrier-branded phones made by them has been pretty bad, so it's not just paranoia.

Re:Huawei? (1)

Brian Feldman (350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39828065)

China would have to work VERY hard to make me trust them less than I trust the USA, my friend.

Re:Huawei? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39826737)

Huawei is a company to watch out for. Many US companies that bought their products regret it and there have been Slashdot stories about the events. I'd suggest formatting that thing as soon as you get it and installing your OS directly from Google if you can.

Re:Huawei? (1)

RodBee (2607323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827725)

Samsung may make nice displays but they focus more on a diaspora of handsets rather than making exceptional ones.

I believe you meant "plethora", but I'm not really sure.

Walmart (2)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 2 years ago | (#39827095)

Walmart StraightTalk uses Samsung phones. Walmart was one of the the first to offer unlimited talk and text without a contract for a decent price. A direct result was the sale of a huge number of Samsung phones.

"Biggest handset manufacturer" (1)

djh2400 (1362925) | more than 2 years ago | (#39829233)

Puh-leez. Why should we care about who manufactures the biggest handsets?

Apple can beat them easily (1)

sco08y (615665) | more than 2 years ago | (#39829393)

Apple just needs to make the iPad into a phone and they will easily be the biggest handset manufacturer.

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