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Graphene Helps a Robot Creep Like an Inchworm

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the whole-new-line-dance-in-the-making dept.

China 36

LilaG writes "To develop new materials for robotics, scientists have developed graphene-based actuators that convert electricity into motion. In robots, actuators act like muscles, driving the movement of mechanical arms and fins. Most actuator materials, such as ceramics and conductive polymers, respond slowly, require a lot of power, or provide very little force. To make speedy, strong actuators, Chinese researchers coated graphene paper with the polymer polydiacetylene. Graphene provides a highly conductive, flexible backing for the fragile polymer crystals, which deform in response to electrical current. The actuators can bend 200 times per second and generate more force than most current materials. Using a sheet of the material, the scientists built a simple inchworm robot that arches and relaxes to crawl forward."

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36 comments

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But... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830243)

Is it gonna get sucked up my bootysnap?

"Robot Creep"? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830255)

Dammit, Enough about Romney's personality already!

Re:"Robot Creep"? (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 2 years ago | (#39831127)

*golf clap*

All I see is (4, Interesting)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830267)

a CAD drawing and a bunch of ad's, I see nothing built unless someone wants to pony up 35 bucks for a PDF file?

Re:All I see is (3, Funny)

busyqth (2566075) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830373)

You expect to just download it and see the details for free?
It's a journal article, for crying out loud, not a first run, major studio, feature film!

Re:All I see is (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830733)

Since it's a journal article, they can try going to their local university library where they may be able to access it for free. It's not an option for everyone, but people who are interested and have a university library that offers free access to (e)journals should learn to get off their lazy asses to fulfill those interests.

Re:All I see is (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830797)

a CAD drawing and a bunch of ad's, I see nothing built unless someone wants to pony up 35 bucks for a PDF file?

I fucked your mother. It was a hotdog in a hallway but i would do it again!

Re:All I see is (1)

LilaG (2576095) | more than 2 years ago | (#39844413)

The news article should be free. The journal article is behind a paywall.

Start making condoms out of graphene (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830331)

Start making condoms out of graphene

I wonder if it works backwards (3, Interesting)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830337)

I wonder if moving the actuator produces (or modifies) a current. Might make an interesting nano-sized surface gauge.

Re:I wonder if it works backwards (5, Informative)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830387)

From the summary, it sounds like the graphene is just a substrate for run-of-the-mill piezoelectric crystals. If so, then yes, the process should be reversible.

Re:I wonder if it works backwards (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39832689)

Replying to my own post after dreaming up an even better use whilst dozing off: data input gloves.

We did something similar in 1999 (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830411)

It was a Project for my undergrad. We called it ANT5. We used nitinol as actuators, and build our small ant robot. I should test with the new material

Advantage (2)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830463)

Is there an advantage over conventional motors, other than it looking a bit more "bio"?

Re:Advantage (5, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39831307)

Conventional motors require elaborate gearing which occupies space, makes noise and increases maintainance requirements.

Re:Advantage (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#39832437)

they can also operate with more than a fraction of a gram loads

Re:Advantage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39833237)

short version is,theyre fing expensive

Polymer+carbon? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830533)

Is this that polycarbon stuff from Gibson's Sprawl trilogy?/

Re:Polymer+carbon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830599)

I was actually going to say 'The foundation for the myomer fibers in battletech?'.

How many more years until somebody can build a lifesize timberwolf (or any of the Robotech based mechs, assuming you can get licensing :D)

But can it... (1)

unts (754160) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830605)

Can it measure the marigolds?

Re:But can it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39831035)

Insovietrussia, a Beowulf cluster of graphene robot creeps measure YOU!

This is the future... (4, Interesting)

Spigot the Bear (2318678) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830689)

... of robotics and artificial limbs/hearts. No more of this servo/gear nonsense that creates slow, jerky movement. The future is artificial muscle, connected to artificial joints by artificial tendons. We are the templates of the future.

Re:This is the future... (3, Informative)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39832663)

This kind of shapeshifting only works on a small scale where you don't need much force. For big, strong robots you can use pneumatics/hydraulics for smooth movement.

is that like a condom ? (0)

issicus (2031176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39830729)

because I know they linch my piece , if you know what I mean.

The real question is.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830837)

Why don't robot creeps like inchworms in the first place?

Why not AFRICAN researchers? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39830975)

Why Chinese? Isn't it strange how AFRICANS never actually contribute anything to the world, yet most of the idiots on Slashdot will lie and say that they actually LIKE having millions of them in their previously all white countries...

Re:Why not AFRICAN researchers? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39831297)

Why Chinese? Isn't it strange how AFRICANS never actually contribute anything to the world, yet most of the idiots on Slashdot will lie and say that they actually LIKE having millions of them in their previously all white countries...

Money man, Asian, Europeans and others have money to do research.

Re:Why not AFRICAN researchers? (2)

sleiper (1772326) | more than 2 years ago | (#39831349)

Ignoring your obvious racist message, developing countries have better things to spend their resources other than an army of robot worms. But scientific research does take place in more relevant fields http://m.scidev.net/en/science-and-innovation-policy/r-d-in-africa/news/south-african-scientists-win-first-obasanjo-science-prize.html [scidev.net]

Re:Why not AFRICAN researchers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39832099)

Ignoring your obvious racist message

Except he's absolutely accurate.
I'm guessing you are the only white guy living in your city's black housing project? What you're not? Dude, that makes you a obvious spineless hypocrite.

I think the article you linked showed some Pakistani expats or somebody, not "Africans".

Re:Why not AFRICAN researchers? (1)

sleiper (1772326) | more than 2 years ago | (#39832541)

No I live in Scotland, where we don't give a hoot what colour skin you have. People just tend to get along when you stop blaming others for your problems.

Re:Why not AFRICAN researchers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39833177)

No I live in Scotland

Sorry to hear that.
Fact of the matter is, you won't be moving to Mogadishu anytime soon for it's great culture, security, and prosperity.
And say hello to your neighbors Obonbon and Mobiki for me.

Re:Why not AFRICAN researchers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39832935)

Oh.... I dunno. Maybe something to do with a few hundred years of colonialism? Now what do you suppose the world would be like if Egypt had been at its peak of power during the middle ages? Then again, maybe the fact that you can live by picking the fruit off trees in the tropics makes the urge to develop technology less strong. If that's true, then westerners who migrated into those areas should devolve eventually.

Inchworm robot? (2)

rollingcalf (605357) | more than 2 years ago | (#39831327)

Video or didn't happen.

I for one wish to (1)

bdwoolman (561635) | more than 2 years ago | (#39838191)

welcome our inchlord overworms.

misread that. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39839233)

Fruit flies like a banana.

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