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Microsoft Invests $300 Million In Nook e-Readers

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the show-me-the-money dept.

Android 197

First time accepted submitter NGTechnoRobot writes "In a turn for the books the BBC reports that Microsoft has invested $300 million in Barnes and Noble's Nook e-reader. The new Nook reader will integrate with Microsoft's yet-to-be-released Windows 8 operating system. From the article: 'The deal could make Barnes and Noble's Nook e-book reader available to millions of new customers, integrating it with the Microsoft's new Windows 8 operating system. The as-yet unnamed new company will be 82.4% owned by Barnes and Noble, with Microsoft getting a 17.6% stake.' Guess the lawsuit's over, folks."

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197 comments

Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (-1, Troll)

simsd (2629109) | about 2 years ago | (#39845217)

Microsoft's strategy has always been thinking long term. Even the first Xbox - that first caused large loss - showed this, as they are now the market leader. This same goes for Bing, Nokia, Facebook, their mobile offerings and everything else they produce.

As for Nook e-reader and Android, I can't be but impressive how cleverly Microsoft has played it all. Essentially they have left all the development costs, problems etc. to Google, while themselves making already over 1 billion dollars a year from Android device sales, and with this recent Nook e-reader investment, they will have a large share in a company that produces one of the most popular Android tablet devices.

Microsoft also starts to control mobile market. They have their own OS, Windows Phone 7, that Nokia - the largest phone manufacturer on planet - will be exclusively using in their smart phones. On top of that Nokia will use Android on their lower end phones, which from Microsoft also collects a large share from.

Microsoft also owns large share of the most popular social network on the planet, Facebook. The one that Google is desperately trying to win (and miserably failing) with their own Google+ service. And the second largest cloud provider after Amazon is Microsoft's Azure, which is used by Apple.

I have to admit, Microsoft and Ballmer have been very clever. Very, very clever.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

leoplan2 (2064520) | about 2 years ago | (#39845247)

You lost me at "On top of that Nokia will use Android on their lower end phones", you liar

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845273)

Calm down, dude, calm down. It's just another generic post-as-soon-as-the-article-comes-up, high-ID Microsoft shill. You've got to expect that sort of thing.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845293)

Very true - I was about to ask "Steve is that you???" but your post and the post you replied to, beat me to the punch.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

the_B0fh (208483) | about 2 years ago | (#39845497)

But what does blathering on about nothing gains the shill?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845821)

But what does blathering on about nothing gains the shill?

Okay, for this explanation, first assume that Slashdot matters as much as it did ten years ago. I know, I know, that sounds like I'm horribly behind the times, but this IS Microsoft we're talking about, so it makes sense. The "horribly behind the times" part, that is.

Now, past that, assume that it's not just geeks and nerds that read this, it's also businessmen and managers and other "important decision makers". Yes, yes, again, same necessary sub-assumptions as before.

Then, remember that Slashdot's commenting mechanism is based on the first post appearing on top. And, most importantly, remember the key advertising term: "Above the fold". That is, the presumption by advertisers (generally with merit) that things higher up on a page or otherwise in a more prominent position will be remembered better, even subconsciously, by the readers. Plus, lump into that the presumption (again, generally with merit) that the first opinion people read shapes their initial feelings about a given subject.

See where I'm going with this? That's why we have the first post wankers, except that they're there more for the recognition than any marketing purposes. It's up to you to decide which is more damaging to sane conversation and discourse.

So, take all that and wrap it up in a bundle of generic marketing-speak. Put that Microsoft(r) name in their heads! Talk it up, too! And get it out NOW! Before the consumer blob has any chance to read anything else! And stay on point, damnit! Don't ever let the competition get recognized in your rant, unless it's in a bad light (re: the requisite dig at Google)! Slashdot gets traffic, so enough of that has to be made of high-paid executives and managers for Fortune 500 companies that we can convince them to use Microsoft(r) Windows(tm) brand operating system(tm) food product(tm), right? That logic worked back in the early 90s before the internet came out and Microsoft could buy advertising in any non-Apple-specific publication, it'll DAMN well work now, too!

So, that's it. Unravel the logic from the point of view of a company that can't mentally get out of the 90s, the last time they were unequivocally "winning". Or who willingly ignored the internet as a passing fad. Or whose primary high-paying customers are high-paid businesspeople. Then it'll all make sense. Well, it'll make sense why they think paying their shills to do this will mean profits later.

In fact, the more I think about how blatantly backwards and behind all of this is, the more I have this faint feeling in the back of my head that maybe these shills are actually an altogether-too-clever mockery of Microsoft that happens to fall on the wrong side of Poe's Law...

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

simsd (2629109) | about 2 years ago | (#39845367)

You lost me at "On top of that Nokia will use Android on their lower end phones", you liar

It is based on Linux, anyway - https://linux.slashdot.org/story/11/10/01/172205/nokia-preps-linux-os-for-low-end-smartphones [slashdot.org]

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 2 years ago | (#39845719)

Few things (short of a corporate change of personality) would drive me back into the arms of Amazon after what they've done in recent years, but a Windows-based Nook would be one of them. Bad enough that they've sucked all the fun out by making the Nooks root-resistant.

Then again, just because Microsoft invested in the Nook doesn't actually mean that they have immediate plans for a switchover. If what I hear is correct, they're making more money off Android-based phones than Windows phones these days.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (4, Informative)

theheadlessrabbit (1022587) | about 2 years ago | (#39846127)

You lost me at "On top of that Nokia will use Android on their lower end phones"

What about the part where he says Nokia is the largest phone manufacturer? Wasn't there just an article posted less than a week ago about Samsung taking the top spot from Nokia?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845271)

The thing is, I don't want my e-reader to "integrate" with my PC. (I'm in the Kindle lock-in camp rather than the Nook lock-in camp, but that's not the point.) I want the device to be able to function completely independently. If I ever need to plug it into my computer at all, I consider that a usability failure. I feel the same way about my smartphone.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (2, Insightful)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#39845307)

I agree - it's been one of my big complaints about iProducts. My Android phone updates over the air, as does my Nook Color. If I plug them into a PC then I get an added bonus (easy file transfer mostly) but I could use either one heavily for years without ever needing to plug it into a PC and not really miss out on anything.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (5, Informative)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 2 years ago | (#39845339)

iPhones and iPads as of iOS5.x now update over the air, without any PC or Mac interaction required (they can even activate OTA these days as well).

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | about 2 years ago | (#39845467)

Even if Microsoft offerings simply match Apple, they will be doing everybody a huge favor by deflating Apple's profit margins. It amazes me how Apple's own customers cheer on their huge profits, seemingly oblivious to the fact it's coming from their own pockets. I have nothing against paying a premium if it's worth it to you and the best deal currently available, but getting the same or similar for less money in the future is what I call progress.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 2 years ago | (#39845681)

getting the same or similar for less money in the future is what I call progress.

The problem is, "same or similar" is *very* subjective in these sort of contexts.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845715)

We're also smart enough to invest in apple so we get some of that money back.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845827)

The jump is reasoning is that Apple customers by and large don't feel ripped off by Apple.

When you have a device that you bought at a price you consider fair, that you use every day, and have nothing bad to say about you don't get pissed off that the company that sold it to you is making loads of money.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39846045)

Similarly, when a person has a device that they bought at a price they consider expensive, they tend to post-facto justify the purchase, and not say anything bad about it.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (2)

gnasher719 (869701) | about 2 years ago | (#39845863)

I agree - it's been one of my big complaints about iProducts. My Android phone updates over the air, as does my Nook Color. If I plug them into a PC then I get an added bonus (easy file transfer mostly) but I could use either one heavily for years without ever needing to plug it into a PC and not really miss out on anything.

I'd miss out on my books being backed up and readable on my Mac, which is exactly what happens with eBooks bought on my iPad, either from Apple or from other sources as long as it is standard EPUB format.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#39846365)

I'd consider backups to be one of those extra features... and even then, most platforms offer some sort of over-the-air backup app. B&N stores all books purchased through them on their servers and any epub books you sideload can be backed up with any backup app.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

poetmatt (793785) | about 2 years ago | (#39845601)

I'd be happy to have the e-reader integrate with my PC if 1 specific thing happened:

the DRM was gone. At which point the e-reader functions the way we want and expect it to, aka the way the device is capable, not the way the device is limited to. That way I can back up books, copy purchased books to other devices, etc.

Is it that hard for people and companies such as Microsoft to figure this out in 2012?

You have it backwards (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#39845951)

Microsoft expects you to keep shoveling money into their coffers; DRM is a way to ensure that you function as Microsoft expects you to, i.e. in a way that enriches them. The fact that you own your device does not mean that you are free to do what you want with it; you are only free to do things that will help Microsoft compete with other companies, who all have roughly the same attitude about their customers.

What, did you think that because desktops and laptops gave you freedom, the hackers had won? Times have changed, and all those hackers who got rich giving people their freedom from IBM and AT&T have come to realize that freedom is not profitable.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

awshidahak (1282256) | about 2 years ago | (#39846355)

I'd be happy to have the e-reader integrate with my PC if 1 specific thing happened:

the DRM was gone.

It may be slightly harder to find one without DRM, but I've got a pretty good solution that's working out for me. Get a B&N Nook and install CM7 on it (not the simplest process in the world, but it's not too hard with a good tutorial [xda-developers.com]. Then, install FBReader on it (available from Google Play Store, or F-Droid) and get your drm-free books.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845751)

But it will be great! It could synchronize with Zune, just like WinPhone 7!
You were going to have Zune running anyway, so it's no big deal, right?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

suprcvic (684521) | about 2 years ago | (#39845933)

So choose not to use that feature. Based on the lack of info in the article, there's nothing to say that you'll *have* to integrate with the PC.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#39846205)

The thing is, I don't want my e-reader to "integrate" with my PC. (I'm in the Kindle lock-in camp rather than the Nook lock-in camp, but that's not the point.) I want the device to be able to function completely independently. If I ever need to plug it into my computer at all, I consider that a usability failure. I feel the same way about my smartphone.

I disagree for one reason - BACKUPS.

Right now, it's easy to backup an iOS device - ignoring iCloud, you plug your iDevice into your Mac/Windows PC and iTunes backs it up. It copies over apps you may have bought (thus ensuring that even if Apple removes them or they otherwise disappear, you always can reinstall - viz. that tricorder app).

Sure my contacts and such can be synced, but it's as good a backup as say, RAID is. One false flip of the finger and boom, that contact can disappear and be promptly synced everywhere. (Alas, with everything going cloud and sync, this will destroy backups as well).

Of course, you could argue about backing up to a local SD card or other storage media, but then you lose the device, you lose the backup (oops).

It's also one of my biggest frustrations with Android - until recently there wasn't a really good way to do it without rooting (ICS has a special "adb backup" and "adb restore" hidden option). I want to wipe one of my Androids and the thought of having to back it up makes me pause (Google's restore leaves something to be desired, especially w.r.t. free apps).

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

Jumperalex (185007) | about 2 years ago | (#39846319)

I agree on the lack of need for PC integration, but lets not paint Kindle lock-in and Nook lock-in in the same light. At least with the Nook you are able to buy an ebook from any ePub retailer. There are many besides B&N. With Kindle you have no such luxuary.

We'll ignore the need to plug into your PC to get non-B&N ePub ebooks ... the point is you CAN do it and it is fairly easy really and is only a failure of B&N at least wanting to make it one small bit easier to buy from them than their competitors. The fact that plugging your Kindle into your PC gets you nothing, is the failure!!!

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (2)

0123456 (636235) | about 2 years ago | (#39846387)

I agree on the lack of need for PC integration, but lets not paint Kindle lock-in and Nook lock-in in the same light. At least with the Nook you are able to buy an ebook from any ePub retailer. There are many besides B&N. With Kindle you have no such luxuary.

Why do people keep repeating this? With a Kindle you can buy an e-book from any mobi retailer, and you can convert any epub that doesn't use DRM... but you generally don't have to since almost all ebooks are available direct from Amazon whereas only a fraction are available from B&N.

The only thing tying anyone to a Kindle is publisher-installed DRM on the e-book files that prevents them from moving books to their Kindle from other retailers or from their Kindle to a different e-reader.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845295)

Shilltastic! A longish post submitted the same minute as the original article isn't at all suspicious.

Same goes for Bing, you say? Isn't that the same business they tried to sell to Facebook, but they didn't want it?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (-1, Flamebait)

znrt (2424692) | about 2 years ago | (#39845311)

Microsoft's strategy has always been thinking long term. Even the first Xbox - that first caused large loss - showed this, as they are now the market leader. This same goes for Bing, Nokia, Facebook, their mobile offerings and everything else they produce.

microsoft strategy has never had anything to do with long term vision. that's why EVERY ms product line apart from 2 (win "os", and xbox live) has miserably failed to date.

300 million bucks for a shitty reader on a shitty platform ... this makes zuckerberg's 1b buy of instagram look sound. good luck. and of course, welcome to the bubble.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845383)

Errr... unless you are lazily lumping everything that isn't Xbox into 'win "os"':

- Internet Explorer could hardly be called a miserable failure (it was a cross-platform product until Apple no longer needed it). It may not be good, but it did not fail
- Outlook is a failed product?
- Office generally, a failed product?
- Sharepoint, a failed product?

For those of us who are older:

- MS-DOS was a failed product?
- Microsoft BASIC?
- Visual BASIC?
- Word (before office)?
- Visual C, Visual C++?

Don't talk nonsense.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (-1, Troll)

the_B0fh (208483) | about 2 years ago | (#39845625)

Depending on what you mean by fail. By the way, since you are older, you do realize IE was *BOUGHT*, and so was a bunch of others right? And sharepoint is a fucking piece of shit. Office was and still is a bloated piece of crap.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1, Insightful)

jd2112 (1535857) | about 2 years ago | (#39846113)

Sharepoint is enormously successful and even as a free product generates huge amounts of money for Microsoft by requiring Windows Server and SQL Server licenses to run on, but more importantly it's a huge tarpit that locks you into Windows, SQL Server, Office, and Exchange upgrade treadmill forever.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (2, Interesting)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39845733)

To date Microsoft has only been successful because it rode on the coat-tails of the already very successful International Business Machines and their PC platform. Everything you listed was because IBM was the "safe choice" for managers. Away from the PC world Microsoft has experienced few successes. (In fact I can't think of any.)

If it had been Atari-DOS that was sold to IBM in 1981, then we'd be talking about the Atari monopoly and Atari Explorer instead of the MS monopoly or IE. In this alternate reality Microsoft would be no bigger or important than any other programming corporation. (They might even have failed and disappeared.)

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39846179)

Maybe they weren't market failures, but some of these are most definitely technical/engineering failures.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39846537)

I wish Sharepoint was a failed product. Now rather than using a real wiki, we're forced to use Sharepoint wiki.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (2, Insightful)

simsd (2629109) | about 2 years ago | (#39845419)

that's why EVERY ms product line apart from 2 (win "os", and xbox live) has miserably failed to date.

Yes, because MS Office, Visual Studio, games like Flight Simulator, Halo, Age of Empires etc are miserable failures. And that's just off the top of my head. Hell, even Microsoft's mouses and keyboards have always been held to high standard.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845591)

MS bought Halo, they didn't create it. It was going to be an Apple game originally.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845739)

Yes and Apple bought the core of OSX, PA Semi to do chip design, and and uncountable score of other companies for most of their succesful products, including the basis of the iPod.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | about 2 years ago | (#39845611)

You do realize Halo was originally a Macintosh exclusive game until Microsoft waved bundles of money under Bungie's owners right?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845755)

Did you stroke your neckbeard when you wrote that retarded post?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845331)

Samsung is now the largest mobile manufacture, not Nokia.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (5, Interesting)

ysth (1368415) | about 2 years ago | (#39845389)

Nice to know we're important enough to get our very own paid MS hacks ready to pounce on this story.

You left off the part where they've bought their way out of a lawsuit that may have taken out their backroom-bullying Android licensing business (not to mention the DoJ investigation B&N was pushing for).

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

simsd (2629109) | about 2 years ago | (#39845451)

(not to mention the DoJ investigation B&N was pushing for).

Aren't you being a little naive not to think about the possibility that this was only done by B&N to push a better offer from Microsoft?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (3, Insightful)

ysth (1368415) | about 2 years ago | (#39845849)

Perhaps you didn't read the vitriol in some of B&N's reports.

They made it very clear that they viewed Microsoft's approach as nothing more or less than brigandry.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39846167)

Aren't you being a little naive not to think about the possibility that this was only done by B&N to push a better offer from Microsoft?

ooohhhh, shill me baby, shill me harder, keep going, don't stop

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845453)

What you describe as "very clever" I would call "making up for incompetence and low quality products by throwing massive amounts of money at products until they stick".

In the case of Bing and Windows Phone it seems they'll have to continue to by "very clever" and keep pumping money into them. It's just lucky they have a couple of monopolies to fund their cleverness.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

future assassin (639396) | about 2 years ago | (#39845917)

You forgot to mention the MS predatory business tactics. MS is to the rest of the world like all of the other tables are to the iPod (I'm an Apple hater). Seems to me all they do is sit there wait for the next big thing and try to copy it, 99% of the time it fails so then they go in a invest into said company/business as they can't compete.

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

Grayhand (2610049) | about 2 years ago | (#39845945)

I'm not seeing the "Clever" you keep repeating. They've been so clever that Apple blasted past them and left the company in the dust due in large part to a lack of innovation at Microsoft. The Zune was a miserable failure and very late to the game. Nook isn't the top eBook reader Kindle is especially with the Fire selling strong in the low side of the reader market. Nook's future is uncertain because it's still heavily tied to B&N and their future is seriously in doubt. To me it sounds like an other Microsoft, late to the game with a product that may not be able to compete. They weren't playing it safe they sat on their hands until it got obvious eBook readers were going to be huge so they didn't have time to develop a product so they bought into the Nook since it was the only one they could buy a stake in. I'm missing the "Clever" in all this?

Re:Very Clever Long-Term Business Planning (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39846065)

>>>Even the first Xbox - that first caused large loss - showed this, as they are now the market leader.

Since when is 2nd place == leader?

>>>Microsoft also starts to control mobile market

Since when is a distant 2nd place == control? I feel like your post was written by MS marketing.

Error in the Summary (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845249)

Now even the summary doesn't RTFA. It's $300 = £185m, not $300 = £300.

Re:Error in the Summary (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845297)

LOL sampzenpus, not only is your information completely wrong, but you couldn't even get your title to match your summary.

Typical of slashdot these days. I'm outta here, if I want this level of "news" I can watch Fox or browse the Chan forums.

Re:Error in the Summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845301)

All of those amounts were supposed to have "m" after them. Oh well.

Re:Error in the Summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845721)

It's $300 = £185m

I didn't know that the UK had a massive inflation. ;-)

AC Did It All For The Nook-e (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845265)

I won't lie, that I can't deny

I did it all for the nook-e

Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845277)

Amazon has Kindle on Kindles and everything else, Apple has iBooks on Apple devices (did they release an OSX version yet), and now B&N/MS will have Nook on Microsoft devices and other platforms.

Re:Makes sense (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#39845329)

Except you can already get Nook for PC/Android/etc. The only market they don't have an app/program for that I would like to see is Linux and web-based.

Re:Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845373)

The difference is that this will come pre-installed, and potentially act as a gateway to ebooks. You or I may have a preference, but a lot of users will just be looking for how to get books.

DRM on Text Books? (3, Interesting)

alexander_686 (957440) | about 2 years ago | (#39845381)

The item that I find interesting, and we are not talking about, is that Microsoft is taking an ownership position in their college bookstore operations. Now, why is MSFT doing that? I mean, yes, selling overpriced sweatshirts to the student's parents is amazing profitable - but it's not exactly in MSFT core line.

Why do I think that MSFT is trying to sneak into the online book selling business via text books? And why am I thinking about more DRM / lock down on text books?

Re:DRM on Text Books? (4, Interesting)

edremy (36408) | about 2 years ago | (#39845903)

The *really* interesting bit? The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is pouring money into Open Textbook projects [insidehighered.com].

This makes sense in my opinion- the total cost for writing a series of 100 and 200 level texts to cover pretty much the entire curriculum is peanuts for something the size of the Gates Foundation, but it could really have a massive impact on the costs of education- check out how much books are vs. tuition at many community colleges.

And now the Nook will die (3, Insightful)

rastoboy29 (807168) | about 2 years ago | (#39845429)

Isn't it de rigeur that anything Microsoft invests in heavily, especially outside it's core competence, fails?

Re:And now the Nook will die (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845505)

Facebook?

Apple?

MSNBC?

Re:And now the Nook will die (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845533)

You mean like Apple?

Re:And now the Nook will die (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39845559)

Read my thoughts.
Amazon's Kindle uses linux. I'll stick with that. I just wish they'd use a faster processor than 500 megahertz, because web surfing is painfully slow (especially facebook).

Re:And now the Nook will die (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39845595)

>> facebook

That's not a real book, you know?

Re:And now the Nook will die (0)

poetmatt (793785) | about 2 years ago | (#39845619)

embrace extend extinguish? Where are we at again? Oh yeah, Extend.

Maybe one day people will learn about history and stay the hell away from MS.

Re:And now the Nook will die (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39846139)

No we're still at the embrace part.

Next Microsoft will release their own Nook-compatible with "extended" features which B&N nooks can't do, because the features will be patented.

Eventually people will buy MS because it can do text-to-speech and live facebook chat with integrated Interet Explorer/Bing (which B&N nooks can't do)..... and that will lead to B&N nooks being extinguished.

EEE.

Re:And now the Nook will die (0)

the_B0fh (208483) | about 2 years ago | (#39845673)

No, it's anything that Microsoft forces that shitting marketing "we must make it all look and feel like windows" that causes it to fail.

B&N Lawsuit (4, Interesting)

c++0xFF (1758032) | about 2 years ago | (#39845643)

Wait ... I thought Microsoft was suing B&N over the Nook Color.

Now, I realize that we're not talking about the Nook Color in this deal specifically, but this deal smells funny to me anyway.

Re:B&N Lawsuit (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | about 2 years ago | (#39845747)

Yeah this is likely about settling the lawsuits. There is no money to be made suing B&N over patents. There is no money to be made suing Microsoft over anti-trust.

Re:B&N Lawsuit (4, Interesting)

whoever57 (658626) | about 2 years ago | (#39846027)

This deal is about preventing MS's patents being invalidated in court, thus freeing all future Android vendors from paying Microsoft a patent royalty.

Remeber Lindows? Microsoft paid $20M to make that lawsuit go away before it could have invalidated the "Windows" trademark.

Re:B&N Lawsuit (2)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#39846291)

From the press release [microsoft.com]:

Barnes & Noble and Microsoft have settled their patent litigation, and moving forward, Barnes & Noble and Newco will have a royalty-bearing license under Microsoft’s patents for its NOOK eReader and Tablet products.

B&N were the only ones calling MS's bluff (5, Interesting)

blind biker (1066130) | about 2 years ago | (#39845763)

MS just buried the only lawsuit that could have blown a hole the size of Manhattan in their anti-Android patent portfolio.

No mention in the story (4, Insightful)

jbernardo (1014507) | about 2 years ago | (#39845777)

Strange, no mention that probably the main reason MSFT is paying $300M to B&N is to buy their way out of the "android patent extortion" law suite that B&N seemed close to winning. And probably B&N will also stop asking the DOJ to investigate the patent extortion and MSFT will keep extorting money from android device manufacturers in exchange of not taking them to court...

Re:No mention in the story (1)

sjwest (948274) | about 2 years ago | (#39845989)

Groklaw's view is the one i am waiting to read. Lets hope b&n's management are a lot more smarter than Novell management where when dealing with Microsoft.

oxymoron (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | about 2 years ago | (#39846589)

Smart management. If they were smart they couldn't become managers. The world is being nibbled to death by stupid PHCs (Pointy haried CxO) pronounced fuk, apologies to Scott Adams for vulgarising his acronym)

MS tax? (1)

synapse7 (1075571) | about 2 years ago | (#39845779)

Roughly a year ago B&N was fighting MS on android licensing fees [techcrunch.com], now MS is investing in them?

Re:MS tax? (2)

DragonWriter (970822) | about 2 years ago | (#39846317)

Roughly a year ago B&N was fighting MS on android licensing fees, now MS is investing in them?

MS is buying a 17.6% stake in the exact piece of B&N that it was suing (the Android-based reader/tablet business.)

Given that B&N's strategy to counter the MS "pay us to use Android" lawsuit was to challenge the validity of the Microsoft patents that were used in the lawsuit, it looks a lot like a $300 million payment from MS to B&N to stop challenging MS's patents, in order that the patents won't be struck down in court.

Textbooks on the Nook (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | about 2 years ago | (#39845783)

Regardless of why this agreement came about it is a good sign that B&N is filling the Textbook gap on the Nook. Currently their eTextbooks only work on the PC or Mac. They don't work on the Nook at all. So more money getting that fixed is a smart move.

For the OS and Business Model Changes... (1)

Volvogga (867092) | about 2 years ago | (#39845809)

I got the Nook e-reader over the Kindle due to the wider range of format support and B&N making the device rather open to me putting books I have from other stores on the device if I so choose. The ability to root and put some nicer designed apps onto the thing due to the Android OS was a very nice bonus, but not my main reason for buying.

The OS change won't bother me from an "I like android" point of view so long as it works well. I am not liking the idea of monochrome live-tiles on the e-ink display, however. I don't see that working well at all. I'm hoping that the heavy shift in power towards B&N will allow some sanity to prevail and they will just use Win8 on the color tablet models, and not on the e-ink models.

The format support is my next concern. Microsoft doesn't have the best DRM track record, and I would hate to see the nook become a complete walled garden platform similar to the Kindle. Again, I'm hoping those that come from B&N have enough power to keep the Nook being the reader of choice for those of us that don't want a Kindle.

Re:For the OS and Business Model Changes... (1)

Volvogga (867092) | about 2 years ago | (#39845949)

Err... ok, upon further reading, I misread the BBC article. A USA Today article states that the devices will most likely still run android and that B&N will make a nook e-reader Metro application to run on Windows 8, that will probably be default installed and have a high placement on the application list. There is nothing about running the Windows 8 ARM version on future Nook devices. My mistake!

you mean like how they got XP onto the OLPC XO? (1)

Locutus (9039) | about 2 years ago | (#39845929)

So Microsoft claims they're going to work to help a Linux/Android based tablet? Does anybody believe this or is it April 1st again?

Does anyone remember how Microsoft claimed they were working to help the OLPC group and was working with them on getting Windows XP running on the XO? They put 1 or 2 people on the job( seriously, they'd assigned 12 people just to one article author in the past ) and it got nowhere but to screw up the focus of the project and create lots of unrest within the org.

Microsoft does not _do_ anything but Windows and _never_ has. I see this as 100% a scam to terminate the Nook product line since they have shown nothing to prove otherwise. Talk is cheap and they've not done anything to show they are a product company as opposed to a Windows company.

And I thought B&N was smarter than this.

LoB

Knew we picked the dark horse, but crap.... (1)

smchris (464899) | about 2 years ago | (#39845961)

Zune, Nokia, now the death of Barnes & Noble. It's a shame. We liked the Nook.

Re:Knew we picked the dark horse, but crap.... (2)

Junta (36770) | about 2 years ago | (#39846099)

Summary is misleading. It suggests the Nook devices will somehow relate to windows. However, the only concrete thing thusfar is that B&N will bother to make an app for windows phone and windows tablets whereas before they weren't going to bother. MS basically paid 300 million dollars to have their platform not be excluded from the nook market share. Basically, MS sees a chicken and egg problem (no users without apps, no app support without users) by throwing money at software vendors.

The timing is interesting though. As BBC noted, B&N stock soared and suggested a link between the MS deal and this, but there is also a large hedge-fund activity going on at the same time.

Microsoft and their sleazy tatctics (1)

andydread (758754) | about 2 years ago | (#39845993)

So the only way for microsoft to get its OS onto tablets and phones is to sue manufacturers into a "deal" and when they refuse and fight back then just pay them a lot of money to use Windows instead of a competitors O/S. Guess I won't be recommending any Windows nook to anyone when that comes out.

Watch This... (1)

dacullen (1666965) | about 2 years ago | (#39846091)

Watch Microsoft duplicate ^h^h^h^h^h^h^h^h innovate a walled garden based around a mobile operating systems, tablets, phones, apps and DRM infested content, including textbooks

But is the Nook OS changing? (1)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | about 2 years ago | (#39846147)

I am a Mac/Linux user and I'm pretty darn happy with Nook's Android OS right now. I am guessing that the future Nooks are going to run some bastardized version of Windows? That would be my guess since it's "integrating with Windows 8". If so this is my last Nook.

Bring on the Kobo (1)

metrometro (1092237) | about 2 years ago | (#39846189)

I'm done with lock in. I'll wait for the books, buy from DRM free publishers (Hi Baen! Hi TOR!), or read Jane Austin. Meanwhile, piracy. The hardware exists (the Kobo Touch is delightful), and open will win because it's a better f'ing product.

And yes, I am bitter that I have $100+ in books locked away on a broken Kindle and a broken Nook that I can't legally transfer to the device of my choice. (Learn from my fail: eInk screens require a case with a rigid screen protector. The screen's a creampuff.)

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