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Researchers Identify Genetic Systems Disrupted In Autistic Brain

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the plotting-the-most-complex-map dept.

Medicine 167

hessian sends this excerpt from Medical Xpress "Autism has a strong genetic basis, but so far efforts to identify the responsible genes have had mixed results. The reason for this is that autism is influenced by many different genes, and different genes are involved in different individuals, making it hard to find the common genetic ground between patients. Now, research conducted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has shown that despite this fact, the different genes involved in autism tend to be involved in specific processes in the brain. This can explain, on the one hand, similarities in the behavioral symptoms of different autistics, but also the large spectrum of behaviors observed in different autistic individuals."

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Hehe (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859153)

Your crack whore momma is so blown out from fucking nigger dicks that she's had to move up to donkeys.

Re: No No No.... (4, Funny)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859625)

...the article is dealing with a gene for Autism Spectrum Disorder, not Tourette Syndrome.

You're in the wrong discussion!

(Inspired by a Monty Python skit about an argument... "Oh, this is abuse!")

Re: No No No.... (1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860725)

You're in the wrong discussion!

No he isn't!

(Further inspired by a Monty Python skit about an argument... "Oh, this is abuse!")

inb4 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859173)

inb4vaccines

Firmware defective (0)

SpaceLifeForm (228190) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859229)

It will be difficult to work around the bugs.

Re:Firmware defective (2)

triffid_98 (899609) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859509)

In some cases I'd consider them bugs, in other cases they're arguably features. Who knows what the world would look like today if Nikola Tesla had been born normal.

Re:Firmware defective (2)

w.hamra1987 (1193987) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859693)

Indeed. Once you get used to it, you find it hard to believe that the rest of the world can't think like you. For the autistic (the high functioning ones), they find their minds highly logical, and can't understand how that is a "weird" thing. As far as I'm concerned it's an advantage one ought to be proud of.

Re:Firmware defective (5, Interesting)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859897)

My son is a high functioning Autism spectrum disorder child. He is 7 and has his feelings hurt quite genuinely and easily.
That is the hard part about being a parent of a child with this issue. His mom and I long ago decided it is not a disability, and not to treat it as such. You are very correct that he has an extremely ordered mindset, very logical and very strongly identified concept of right and wrong. The kicker is that his labels of right and wrong are very accurate, not just with the niavite of a 7 year old. The hardest part is helping him understand that the world is distinctively unfair. That right and wrong, while ideal logical statements often have substantial color to them that makes right wrong and wrong right enough to really make it difficult to just say "That's not right". One of his current passions (they seem to run in very deep streaks) is martial arts. The high focus / high structure seems to really work well for him.

I think he has a future that will be bright, as long as I can help steer his course in life towards something that resonates with him.

Since it sounds like you have experience in this environment, have you any sage advice for a parent that wants to do the right thing for his child?

-nB

Re:Firmware defective (0, Troll)

chill (34294) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860039)

Please tell me you take a dump BEFORE going to sleep...

(and "sudo make me a sandwich" needs to be in there close to the end).

Re:Firmware defective (5, Interesting)

elgeeko.com (2472782) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860371)

One of my closest friends is a high functioning Autistic. He's a wonderful human being and I cherish our friendship. He does have a high degree of social interaction problems and he was in his mid thirties before we could go out in public without him having an episode or creating a scene (he doesn't like people touching him or making eye contact).

I met him when we were in middle school and he was often a target of bullying. As we moved into high school the bullying started to become worse, but there were several of us who befriended him and it soon became known that to mess with him was to mess with us.

Today he lives on his own and has married a woman very similar to himself, he still can't manage his own finances and he does require some watching but he holds down a very nice job as a data analyst (his mind was made for abstract numbers) and lives a mostly normal life. The older he gets the better his social skills become, although he is definitely different.

Ironically I don't think there's a darn thing wrong with him, he's perfect just the way he is. Yes, he's different, but in so many wonderful ways.

You're right, your son is not disabled and you're doing the right thing by not treating him like he is. He might be different, but that doesn't mean he's disabled, it just means he's different.

Re:Firmware defective (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39860971)

I think we are witnessing evolution in progress, but whatever....

Re:Firmware defective (5, Interesting)

netsavior (627338) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861383)

Since it sounds like you have experience in this environment, have you any sage advice for a parent that wants to do the right thing for his child?

I am autistic and I grew up in special needs classes and went on to college and now work in a marginally social insurance analysis software development role for a big company. I have a wife, a bunch of kids, a full life.
The big piece of advice is: let him follow his passions, and they will change often, there really is no fighting it, and hey like me he might even end up using it for a nicely compensated occupation.

My second is, try to do your best to teach him how and why to lie. Anybody can say things that aren't true, but the little social lies everyone tells every day were the hardest thing I ever had to overcome. You described a highly black and white world, and largely I had the same thing. I had no idea why you would pretend to not to be disgusted by religious people, or why you wouldn't say things like "no thanks I don't eat food served by people who have dirty shirts and nervous fingernail habits." There is a very blurry line between tact and deceit and that took me a lot of bullying and a lot of painful trial and error to figure out, it is not typically intuative for an autistic person, because largely we would prefer to know the real reasons behind things, but non-autistic people prefer to be lied to in social situations.

Most of the lies I tell people in a social context are straight out of movie scripts, because I can never figure out how to word it correctly on my own. People seldom notice, and when they do they think I am making an "in" joke with them. It is a win-win.

Re:Firmware defective (3, Insightful)

w.hamra1987 (1193987) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861427)

It seems like you have the right idea of how to deal with him.

You are right, it's not a disability. The most important thing to consider, is getting him ready for the world outside. His interaction with society will never be as normal and easy as with the majority of people, but with proper training, and education, he can act like it is. People with autism lack empathy, and don't understand human emotions properly. It confuses them, and can put them in awkward positions as they rack their brain trying to guess what a non-autistic person would have done in similar circumstances. And this is the part to be focused on. Teaching them standard social behaviour. Autistic people love rules, love routine, and teaching them proper responses to common questions, proper behaviour to common incidents, will certainly make them much happier in life. If they dont know how to respond to something, they'll try and remember taught rules, then try to remember past experiences, maybe something they've seen in a movie, or read from a story, or happened with another family member.

For example, if one day, your son got married, and his wife bought him a bouquet of flowers. You shouldn't expect him to be as delighted as most men would be. But with proper training, he'll understand the gesture, he'll understand what she means by them, and will display the delight she's expecting, even though in reality, he really doesn't care about flowers at all. Eventually, he'll be capable of understanding most social interactions, understand expected responses, and cope with society, hiding his syndrome from everyone except those close to him.

All it takes is the basic understanding of what he has, and what *others* are like, and why he should try and cope.

Hope this helps you.

A check on the social facade (2)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859969)

In some cases I'd consider [autism symptoms] bugs, in other cases they're arguably features.

Someone on a board I hang out on told me that Asperger syndrome exists as a check on the social facade [wikipedia.org] to prevent it from diverging too far from honesty. Consider this article about how extroverts answer personality surveys [livescience.com] .

Autism (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859613)

Autism is a New World Order plot that is inflicted upon children though vaccines.

Re:Firmware defective (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859715)

Unless you believe in creationism, there are no "bugs" in an organism (just real bugs like fleas and bacteria). A bug is when you write a program and it doesn't behave like the programmer wanted it to behave.

If you are a creationist, how do you know that God didn't deliberately design some infants with autism?

Imperfection entered humankind through Adam (0)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860085)

If you are a creationist, how do you know that God didn't deliberately design some infants with autism?

Everything that God created in the six creative ages was "very good", without disability, according to Genesis 1. Imperfection entered humankind through Adam.

Re:Imperfection entered humankind through Adam (0)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860361)

Imperfection entered humankind through Eve.

FTFY. Cocks don't cause problems, vaginas do.

Re:Imperfection entered humankind through Adam (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860793)

That's true, but who are you or I to say that autism is a flaw or disability at all? I'd be willing to bet that Thor (inventor of the hammer) and prometheus (tamer of fire) were high functioning autistics.

And I don't know what version of the bible you're reading, but "without disability" isn't in the King James version. Are you reading that (very bad) edition that says "do not lie" rather than "thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor" (do not SLANDER)?

Oh, and imperfection isn't what the bible says Adam and Eve brought about, it was SIN.

Re:Imperfection entered humankind through Adam (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861483)

And I don't know what version of the bible you're reading

New World Translation, similar methodology to the English Standard Version.

but "without disability" isn't in the King James version.

It was a paraphrase; hence the lack of quote marks. I was expressing my own understanding of what it means when God, the very personification of perfection, calls something "very good". But the KJV does mention "without blemish" several times. Would not low-functioning autism be considered a "blemish" on man?

Are you reading that (very bad) edition that says "do not lie"

My Bible has "You must not testify falsely as a witness against your fellowman." (Exodus 20:16) Among these translations of the same verse [bible.cc] , are you referring to the "GOD'S WORD(R) Translation"?

Oh, and imperfection isn't what the bible says Adam and Eve brought about, it was SIN.

Same diff. Sin led to a population bottleneck in AM 1656 [pineight.com] , and this population bottleneck led to an even more thorough corruption of the genome.

Re:Imperfection entered humankind through Adam (1)

ozduo (2043408) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862103)

Don't you mean Eve. She was the first to be devious and women have been following her example ever since.

Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Trash (4, Interesting)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859243)

Hear that Andrew Wakefield, you murdering piece of trash! Real researchers are finding real causes for autism, and not making them up and compromising the health of tens of thousands of people to make a buck.

May you roast in hell, and in the meantime come down with some particular noisome and noxious kind of cancer that makes you smell like rotting flesh and cause unceasing and unbelievable agony.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859367)

I fucked your mom in her ass.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (-1, Troll)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860413)

I think you mistook my mom for your cross-dressing dad.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (3, Funny)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859429)

No, no, no.... See, the vaccines contain chemicals like dihydrogen monoxide that travel through the bloodstream up to the brain, where they interact with the homeopathic echoes of infancy still resonating in the neurons. These deadly chemicals then alter the genes to cause further infant behavior, as has been observed here. Since the child now has to fight against these infant tendencies, development is slowed in what we call "autism".

Totally makes sense, I swear...

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859495)

It is true that, if there were no dihydrogen monoxide in the brain, the child would not exhibit autism.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (1)

Gideon Wells (1412675) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859667)

You know it is also scientific fact that all people with mental disorders, terrorists and pedophiles have dihydrogen monoxide in their bodies. Surely we must think of the children's mental and physical healthy while punishing terrorists. Ban the stuff!

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859917)

Well played sir, well played.
-nB

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859539)

no no no really tell us how you feel about it... Meanwhile see this period ->.- I put the worlds smallest violin on it to play music while you bitch some more.

Or what I mean is this. You are wishing death on someone. Is it *really* worth that? Or are you just that big of jerk that death + death = justice?

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859637)

There is malice, then there is malice that causes the death of hundreds.

While I am personnaly againts the death penality, that guy is guilty beyond any shadows of a doubt. The facts are as follows:

1- He wanted to sell a "vaccine alternative"
2- He decided the best way to do that was if people were afraid of vaccines.
3- Profit

That was his plan, and because of it hundreds of kids are now dead.

I wish him the worst

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859987)

For what it's worth, if you have a friend or family member say they don't want to vaccinate their kids remind them of the following math:

If you count *all* children with autism where anybody made any claim that it was the fault of a vaccine...
And you count all children that have a medical reason for the vaccine hurting them (egg allergy, severe adverse reaction, etc.)...
And you count *all* children that were made very ill (beyond the normal fever, but not bad enough to be in the above category)...

If you take all those kids in one pool, and count them against the number of children that died young every year from the diseases vaccines prevent, you will find that even accepting the pseudoscience as truth, it is *still* better to vaccinate your kids from a numbers game. I forget the exact numbers, but IIRC it was like 3:1 deaths to everything else as a ratio.
I converted one of my family members with this argument. True they were still reluctant, but laying out the numbers you can't counter that, especially when you count the pseudoscience numbers in favor of the pseudoscience, and the vaccines still win.

I'd love to see Randal do an XKCD chart on this...
-nB

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (0)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860957)

And then you remember that out of every 66 boys born today, one of them will become affected by some form of autism....

so those of you who are pregnant or have a wife/girlfriend/family member who is pregnant, ONE OUT OF SIXTY-SIX! If you like those odds, go for it and take no precautions, do the vaccinations. I for one would love to do it over, would love to have skipped the vaccines at least for a few more years. But to watch your 'normal' child who just learned to say 'butterfly' revert downwards and now his biggest recognizable word is 'Mum', you've got to think back to 'what could i have done'. maybe if we had put off the vaccines for a couple years....

Not saying it IS the vaccines, but as a father of an autistic boy, i sometimes think.
Those who are about to have a child... 1 in 66. 1 in 66. 1 in 66. Do you like the odds? Do you punk?

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (2)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861753)

It isn't the vaccines, and not vaccinating puts not only your own child at risk, but other children as well as herd immunity breaks down.

This has been dealt it. Wakefield was a fraud, and if things worked as they ought to, he'd be rotting in prison. There was no link between MMR and autism. Never was. Never ever ever ever was. You might as well not feed your child milk, because guess what, I'm sure you could make some correlation between milk and autism.

Let it be repeated into your dull, stupid, worthless brain. Correlation does not imply causation.

But I'm all for you denying your child vaccinations. By the same token I think it should be against the law for you to put them in public school, in any publicly funded daycare, that they should have to wear full environmental suits when around other children until all the parents of those children have signed a waiver.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (-1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861851)

Wow! You sure are a bitter person! Are you woken up at 4:30 a.m. because your autistic child won't go back to sleep? Do you have to spend $6.00 on a gluten free loaf of bread? Does it hurt when you remember what your son WAS like and wonder if he will ever be 'normal'? If so, i can see why you are so bitter.

If not, FUCK OFF!

WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES! Then maybe you can go all righteous on my ass. Put your venom away like i do with mine, and give someone a bloody, freaking hug! (That is if you have someone to hug... probably not with your hatred.)

Go beat up on an old lady now. Take her purse for good measure.
And have a nice day!

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (1)

Rasperin (1034758) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861327)

3:1 seems rather high, I'd like to see the true facts, I couldn't figure it being higher than 500:1 and that's just a guess. The reason I say this is that any kid that is afflicted by an effect of vaccines hits national media, get's huge coverage, etc and that only seems to happen once or twice a year. Hep C (a vaccine given to kids) afflicts millions of Americans and thousands die daily from it. Then we have cervical cancer vaccine for girls, the standard vaccines, etc etc etc.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861367)

1- He wanted to sell a "vaccine alternative"
2- He decided the best way to do that was if people were afraid of vaccines.
3- Profit

Not quite correct. He didn't want to sell a vaccine alternative, he wanted to sell an alternative vaccine. He had a stake in a company that made a measles vaccine and wanted to defame the MMR vaccine in favor of that.

Obviously, things did not go according to plan.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (-1, Troll)

ChipMonk (711367) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859659)

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (2)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860697)

What does that link go to, goatse? I can think of no other reason to use bit.ly at slashdot. This ain't twitter. I'm not clicking any damned links that I don't know where they lead to.

Be glad I'm not moderating today, shortened URLs in comments get an automatic "troll" from me, simply because there's no rational reason except trolling to use one.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (-1, Troll)

ChipMonk (711367) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860799)

Boo fucking hoo. Then don't click it, and forever wonder what's there.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859677)

But the media are also to blame for thoroughly scapegoating him - he wasn't alone, but from all the coverage, you definitely get the impression that he was...

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860427)

Wakefield was the scam artists. Yes, lawyers, TV show hosts, celebrities and a whole host of incredibly fucking stupid people helped him, but at the end of the day it was his scam.

Re:Hear That Wakefield, You Murdering Piece Of Tra (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39860189)

May he die of something that would have otherwise been treatable if he had gotten a vaccine.

Something to ponder (4, Interesting)

Terwin (412356) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859457)

Considering that low levels of autism-like symptoms seem to be prevalent in engineering disciplines, is this something that could be used to turn your dreamy/artistic/social child into more of a nerd/engineer type?

Also, I wonder what sort of reaction there would be if instead of autism, this paper was dealing with a potential to detect/fix some more politically sensitive group such as the GLBT community

Re:Something to ponder (-1, Flamebait)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859525)

They only seem prevalent because of the vast amount of social retards who self-diagnose themselves as having Aspergers rather than taking the blame themselves.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

Sprinkels (41102) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859759)

In what way is their 'social retardedness' their own fault? Does it matter they have Aspergers or not? What's the difference of a person having Aspergers and a person showing the symptoms of Aspergers? How can you tell the difference?

Re:Something to ponder (0)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860509)

Because they refuse to accept that the problem and the solution lies with them instead and not a "disease." I'm not talking about real aspergers, just the socially inept douche nozzles that try to hide behind a self diagnosis of it.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

jimbolauski (882977) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860669)

Because they refuse to accept that the problem and the solution lies with them instead and not a "disease." I'm not talking about real aspergers, just the socially inept douche nozzles that try to hide behind a self diagnosis of it.

So a person who is socially awkward but does not have aspergers, self diagnoses themselves so they don't feel as bad about their ineptitude, how awful. Looks like the douche nozzle is pointing back at you.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861027)

Not so much so they don't have to feel bad, but just to absolve themselves of the responsibility of improving themselves. I never said anything about feeling bad. I was talking about personal responsibility.

Re:Something to ponder (2)

BenoitRen (998927) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861389)

I think you underestimate the problem that self-diagnosis is. There are so many people who claim to have Asperger's Syndrome today that 1) the numbers seem worse than they're already are and 2) those who claim to have it are often not taken seriously.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860151)

So what hope is there for people who have been professionally diagnosed with Asperger-type high-functioning autism to improve relationships with (for example) their employers despite their disability?

Re:Something to ponder (1)

jimbolauski (882977) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859587)

Considering that low levels of autism-like symptoms seem to be prevalent in engineering disciplines, is this something that could be used to turn your dreamy/artistic/social child into more of a nerd/engineer type?

Also, I wonder what sort of reaction there would be if instead of autism, this paper was dealing with a potential to detect/fix some more politically sensitive group such as the GLBT community

People with severe gayness can still function in the world, autism not so much, some can not even talk, they simply communicate through pointing and grunting.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

w.hamra1987 (1193987) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859733)

... and hacking your electronics into oblivion when provoked.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

Medievalist (16032) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860019)

I wonder what sort of reaction there would be if instead of autism, this paper was dealing with a potential to detect/fix some more politically sensitive group such as the GLBT community

People with severe gayness can still function in the world, autism not so much, some can not even talk, they simply communicate through pointing and grunting.

OK, but if you can point and grunt, you fit the profile of the typical GUI user, right?

The command line (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860167)

some [people with low-functioning autism] can not even talk, they simply communicate through pointing and grunting.

So in other words, neurotypicality is like the command line and low-functioning autism is like a GUI. Or what do I misunderstand?

Re:Something to ponder (2)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859617)

So your saying that instead of the research being about a disability that millions of parents fear and hundreds of thousands of children are diagnosed with, the research would be about who someone is sexually attracted to? I'd call it a waste of money, but not much beyond that; I don't understand why researching the normal ranges of human sexuality would be interesting. It would be like spending hundreds of millions of dollars to identify what genes cause red hair.

Besides, I think you'd find the ultra-conservative "homosexuality is a choice" crowd more upset with the research than the liberal "homosexuality is innate" crowd, given that they identified genetic, not environmental factors that affect the rate of autism.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

kubernet3s (1954672) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859801)

I believe the parent is alluding to the fact that there are members of the autistic community who campaign for its classification as a condition, rather than a pathology. I actually support several implications of this claim, but my views are not important: what is important is that no one should go shooting off their mouth about how they should "cure" someone who has no wish to be cured. Not that I object to the aims of this study, it's just something to keep in mind while we look for ways to prevent this "horrible disease."

Re:Something to ponder (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859951)

I believe the parent is alluding to the fact that there are members of the autistic community who campaign for its classification as a condition, rather than a pathology. I actually support several implications of this claim, but my views are not important: what is important is that no one should go shooting off their mouth about how they should "cure" someone who has no wish to be cured.

Not that I object to the aims of this study, it's just something to keep in mind while we look for ways to prevent this "horrible disease."

My daughter is autistic and to any parent that thinks it's special and thinks it's what makes their kid, their kid, "fuck you!". Seriously, I'd cure it in a second, just like most people would make their teenage daughter magically "un-pregnant" if they could wave a wand and make it like it had never happened.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

Guignol (159087) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860715)

Yep, I have two out of three (there should have been four) kids with autistic "features"
This is hell
In fact I gave up and knowingly turned away to alcohol, waiting for some other kind of (less) painful death

No, fuck YOU (1, Interesting)

shiftless (410350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860833)

My daughter is autistic and to any parent that thinks it's special and thinks it's what makes their kid, their kid, "fuck you!"

This condition IS a huge part of what makes me special, bro. I will make billions of dollars in my lifetime thanks to this condition. Yes it has given me challenges, but you know what, I have benefited from learning to overcome them.

Your ignorance and stupidity is disgusting and revolting. Look in the mirror. Animals like you are driven by your fear, not facts and reason. You are so busy stampeding towards a "cure" for "autism" (who can say with certainty what the fuck autism even IS, anyway?) to fix your OWN problems (YOUR daughter and HER condition), that you would gladly, willingly, happily, ignorantly run right over and fuck over others like me in the process.

If it were up to stupid assholes like yourself, people like me would be identified at 3 years old as "autistic", then immediately put on prescription meds to "cure" us. Whole generations of minds would be fucked over and ruined thanks to the ignorance and just plain inability to think of normal simpletons with their average intelligence and average stupidity.

So as a person who is autistic, and fucking proud of it....let me the one to say: No, Anonymous Asshole.....Fuck YOU.

Re:No, fuck YOU (0)

Tharkkun (2605613) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861609)

My daughter is autistic and to any parent that thinks it's special and thinks it's what makes their kid, their kid, "fuck you!"

This condition IS a huge part of what makes me special, bro. I will make billions of dollars in my lifetime thanks to this condition. Yes it has given me challenges, but you know what, I have benefited from learning to overcome them.

Your ignorance and stupidity is disgusting and revolting. Look in the mirror. Animals like you are driven by your fear, not facts and reason. You are so busy stampeding towards a "cure" for "autism" (who can say with certainty what the fuck autism even IS, anyway?) to fix your OWN problems (YOUR daughter and HER condition), that you would gladly, willingly, happily, ignorantly run right over and fuck over others like me in the process.

If it were up to stupid assholes like yourself, people like me would be identified at 3 years old as "autistic", then immediately put on prescription meds to "cure" us. Whole generations of minds would be fucked over and ruined thanks to the ignorance and just plain inability to think of normal simpletons with their average intelligence and average stupidity.

So as a person who is autistic, and fucking proud of it....let me the one to say: No, Anonymous Asshole.....Fuck YOU.

You obviously have a very mild case of autism. In fact you're probably not even counted in the numbers based on what you describe yourself as. When you meet a 3 year old who suddenly stops talking and hasn't spoken a word in over 2 years come back to us and say it's a quirk that doesn't need to be resolved. Just because you have a quirky social disorder than many of us here doesn't mean Autism shouldn't be cured.

Re:No, fuck YOU (3, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861755)

You're not going to make a billion dollars, slow the fuck down.

Also, genius, it's a spectrum disorder. Ranging from people who might have it, or are just using it as an excuse to be a dick, like you, to people who can not funtion.

You falsely link intelligent with autism. IF someone made it so you were comfortable around people, you would still be just as smart as you atr. Not nearly as smart as you think you are, but that's the case now, so no change.

Parents of Kids that rock back in forth all day, drool on themselves and can't communicate would probably love to cure the disorder.

Re:No, fuck YOU (1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862129)

Wish i had mod points... modding you up with a nod and a thanks.

Re:Something to ponder (2)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860027)

Have you ever met someone with real, severe autism. Not "I'm so quirky and antisocial, I think I has aspergers" but the debilitating flavor that basically means they will never be able to live on their own, never be able to form any but the most rudimentary relationships (and even then only with those dedicated to their care), and never be able to have real back and forth communication with another human being?

Perhaps there are sections of the Autism spectrum disorder that are just part of the normal human variation, but there are certainly sections of that are serious and life destroying disabilities that any parent in the world would treat in a heartbeat.

Re:Something to ponder (3, Interesting)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860183)

A friend of mine has a son with this level of autism. He is 15 years old, cannot speak, and can only communicate via words typed on a laptop. She cried when he "said" his first words at the age of 11 after months of type therapy, which was "want ice cream" ... cried not only in happiness, because due to the expense of his care, she did not have any ice cream to give him as a reward. High functioning autism may be quirky, but low functioning autism is devastating AND horrifically expensive to deal with.

Re:Something to ponder (2)

triffid_98 (899609) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861493)

High functioning autism may be quirky, but low functioning autism is devastating AND horrifically expensive to deal with.

Which makes it unconscionable to me that private insurance tries so hard not to cover it. Oh in my state it is technically mandated, but since the therapists are all out of network you're paying at least 50% out of pocket, assuming you've already met your yearly deductible and they can't exclude you due to 'lifetime coverage limits'.

Like congenital deafness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861671)

There are also members of the deaf community who get P.O.d when doctors suggest that congenital deafness in an infant or child is a pathology to be treated. E.g. with cochlear implants.

That means exactly boo when it comes to deciding whether cures should be developed for congenital deafness and the same applies to developing cures or treatments for high functioning autistics (as Aspergers is now classed per the new DSM). And someone who actually has Aspergers would be less likely to buy in to the moral relativism behind such claims than an Evangelical. Sadly, lying to ourself is the last kind of lying we give up.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860431)

Besides, I think you'd find the ultra-conservative "homosexuality is a choice" crowd more upset with the research than the liberal "homosexuality is innate" crowd.

Ultra-conservatives may be different where you come from, but in my country they're spilt between the camps of "homosexuality is ungodly and needs to be burned out" and "homosexuality is a disease that needs to be cured". To them saying it's a choice is like admitting it's normal, like the choice between chocolate or strawberry.

BTW, nothing against gays mind you.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

jimbolauski (882977) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860785)

Besides, I think you'd find the ultra-conservative "homosexuality is a choice" crowd more upset with the research than the liberal "homosexuality is innate" crowd.

Ultra-conservatives may be different where you come from, but in my country they're spilt between the camps of "homosexuality is ungodly and needs to be burned out" and "homosexuality is a disease that needs to be cured". To them saying it's a choice is like admitting it's normal, like the choice between chocolate or strawberry. BTW, nothing against gays mind you.

You forgot the more prevalent third group, they don't give a shit what you do just stay out of their wallet.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

jimbolauski (882977) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860705)

So your saying that instead of the research being about a disability that millions of parents fear and hundreds of thousands of children are diagnosed with, the research would be about who someone is sexually attracted to? I'd call it a waste of money, but not much beyond that; I don't understand why researching the normal ranges of human sexuality would be interesting.

Do you find porn interesting?

Re:Something to ponder (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861479)

No, he seems to be asking what would people be saying if this research detected the homosexuality was a genetic expression. ONe that could potentially be changed.

It's a good question. He isn't saying where any money should be spent.

You're being overly touchy.

Re:Something to ponder (5, Interesting)

mjwx (966435) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859959)

Considering that low levels of autism-like symptoms seem to be prevalent in engineering disciplines, is this something that could be used to turn your dreamy/artistic/social child into more of a nerd/engineer type?

Oh fuck off.

Being an engineer/nerd does not make you autistic.

Fuck off

Sorry, but that makes me feel better, I'm not posting as AC and the troll mods be dammed, I'm both a network engineer and diagnosed as having aspergers, on the very mild end of the autistic spectrum of disorders. Most people who post this have no fucking idea what it means to have an autistic disorder. I'm good at my job but talking to people, even people I know well is difficult. Yep, I can interrogate a thousand databases, connect VPN's the world over, figure out connectivity problems from a few clues but fucked if I can make small talk. This would also explain why I'm attracted to women who cant speak English properly (read: Asian) because they have more patience for my broken speech.

So I can do complex maths in my head but going to a restaurant makes me scared, when I go to a fast food joint like McD's or Nando's I order the same fucking thing every time, why? Because I fucking practised how to say it. I hate talking to strangers and that's not because I hate strangers, I've got nothing against people I don't know but it's hard for me to talk to them. It takes a great deal of effort to talk to people and I'm considered a success case because I can hold down a fucking client facing job. I can talk to people, but I'd rather not because of the fear factor, it takes a good amount of will power to start conversations with suppliers and clients even though when it's over I don't understand what made it hard in the first place. I can do it, but as I said I'd rather use other means of communication like email.

I know the GP meant no harm but I'm a little bit incensed over the notion that you can just "turn" and autistic person into an engineer because it doesn't work like that.

Re:Something to ponder (0)

rock_climbing_guy (630276) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860299)

Thanks for sharing your story.

You said something about Asian women. Personally, I believe that they are the most beautiful women in the world.

A while back, I hatched a plan to attend graduate school in Hawaii because there are so many Asian women living there.

Unfortunately, that didn't turn out well for me because not only are Asian women there by and large native-born Americans who grew up speaking English, but the local people there have insular social attitudes in general.

A friend of mine suggested to me that a foreign-born Asian girlfriend/wife might be more suitable for me for the reasons you described.

I actually met my (Asian) wife the year after I moved away from Hawaii.

Thanks for giving a great response to the OP and sharing your story with us.

Re:Something to ponder (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39860797)

You are awkward and shy, yet you hold down a job in a technical profession. You are an introvert - you don't have a disorder, nor are you particularly special in any way. There are literally millions of people who can do what you do. There are millions of people smarter than you. Some of those people will also be richer, more outgoing, and better looking than you too. In fact, some will be superior to you in every measurable way. There's nothing wrong with you, except for a need to harden the fuck up.

Re:Something to ponder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861401)

As a programmer, and a father of a child who is diagnosed (by an actual neurologist) on the spectrum (mild to moderate), I think I have some experience in this area. First off, there's a lot of people that display "Autistic tendencies". Just like out of all the sensory issues, everyone usually has at least one. For this reason it's not like other diseases where if you display some tendencies you can self-diagnose. It's quite a process to determine whether someone is on the spectrum or not. Personally I display quite a few tendencies that are on the spectrum, but I don't call myself autistic. I call myself an introvert who does better with bits than with people :)

Regarding the other parent's sentiments, in our case what it took was acceptance from us to let our daughter know that she was different, but that's ok. We were lucky enough to get a diagnosis early, and were very opposed to medications (even though they were pushed at us a lot). In the end after years of behavior, speech, and occupational therapies we have learned that most of the struggle wasn't in our daughter, but in us. It was our job as her parent to learn things that were her triggers, and deal with them. The hard part is learning which thing you as a parent should deal with, and which things she needs to learn to deal with.

A good example of this is scheduling. Most people advocate a rigorous schedule for children on the spectrum. While this does seem to help the child cope with things some, it really seems to prove to worsen things in the end. We specifically give her notice whenever something is going to change, and reassure her that it will be ok after the change. For her to cope, she needs as much information as we can give her without setting the boundaries ourselves. After four years of this, we can easily say "let's go shopping today," and she's ok with that. When she was on a schedule, any deviation was a nightmare followed by a breakdown.

As far as the question of would I change her? I fought myself with that question for years. I think it depends on the individual situation for each person on the spectrum. The question has to be, does the child feel that they should be changed, or will changing the child improve their life overall. I think that's a very personal question to all of us. Personally, I wouldn't change her for anything. She has struggles sometimes, but who doesn't? Again, every situation is different.

Re:Something to ponder (1, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861457)

Yes, social skill and analysis skill are different. Your point?

"ust "turn" and autistic person into an engineer because it doesn't work like that."
How do you know?
I mean, no one else does, so , please, clue me in n your discovery. I assume you will be in next years Nobel list.

And you post reads like some who has assburgers instead of aspergers.

Re:Something to ponder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39862161)

It sounds like you're describing social anxiety more than any kind of autism, or maybe a very mild form that I share. My situation was fixable; Yours may be as well.

I had difficulties similar to yours, and failed to go to college due to my inability to deal with anyone other than a very few close friends, but medication (60mg Celexa daily) fixed me a decade ago, and I've been completely fine since.

I now have conversations with random people wherever I go, and can't help but be outgoing. It just plain feels good to be around people, rather than draining me like it used to whenever I had to laboriously simulate normal human interaction.

Don't just live with the limitations your brain hands you when there may be chemical patches for the underlying problem available.

Re:Something to ponder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39860123)

Really, this is the way you're going to go with this?

Autism might be a crippling disorder, but it makes people who they are so let's keep it going?

If you start saying you "prevent person X from becoming person X by removing this genetic trait before birth", how are you any different than pro-life folks who believe the fetus is a person at conception and that abortion "kills person X before birth"?

Unless you're pro-choice and/or believe the fetus/unborn isn't a person. In which case, alright there's no cognitive dissonance.

Re:Something to ponder (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861031)

Also, I wonder what sort of reaction there would be if instead of autism, this paper was dealing with a potential to detect/fix some more politically sensitive group such as the GLBT community

Not sure how that matters. We couldn't do anything about the genes. Gene therapy never really got off the ground. We can't reprogram DNA. Even if we could in the next few years, we STILL probably couldn't do anything about autism. The structure of the brain isn't completely plastic, it's likely that the disease will maintain itself even absent the genetics that made it autistic in the first place.

So would a "politically sensitive" community like GLB get upset if someone looked into the genetic causes? Maybe, until someone explained to them that no one was trying to "fix" them. If they're sensitive, it's undoubtedly due to discrimination, hatred, and misguided religious attempts to "cure" them with abuse.

(and not for nothing, but transgendered individuals, the "t" in that acronym you just used, they do fix that with surgery.)

Nonsense (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859575)

Autism is not genetic, it is acquired due to vaccination. Please keep your hands off the precious bodily fluids!

Re:Nonsense (4, Funny)

Sprinkels (41102) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859819)

+---------+
| Sarcasm |
+----+----+
     |
     |

But can they CURE it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859577)

[NT]

Why highlight this paper? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859839)

While the effort put into the analysis in this paper is admirable, it sort of fades into the background of the glut of "we took existing data sets and made a network -- here's the picture" sort of systems biology papers that are being cranked out right now. I'm just wondering, of all the rigorous [cell.com] and higher-impact [nature.com] autism genetics [nature.com] research [nature.com] being done right now, why did this one in particular warrant a slashdot blurb? This certainly isn't the first (or even most compelling) research to uncover convergent biological processes in the autistic brain.

Re:Why highlight this paper? (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861065)

Step one, someone has to submit the story.

Did you submit those stories?

How long before the next name change? (1)

uigrad_2000 (398500) | more than 2 years ago | (#39859863)

The first attempt to make the syndrome seem not-so-bad was the labeling of "simple". When you called someone "simple", others knew what you meant, but it was clear you were sympathetic to their state. That changed dramatically over the course of a decade or two, as "simple" took extremely negative connotations.

The next derivation of the term was "dumb". By calling someone this, you avoided the idea of "low intelligence" all together. In fact, you were saying they were quite smart, but just weak with verbal skills. I suppose this is closest to how we use "Asberger Syndrome" today. Of course, time did not honor this PC term well, and it quickly came to mean the exact opposite.

Next was "slow". Unfortunately this term didn't sound scientific enough, so a new term, "retarded" was quickly invented to take its place. Sure, those with Latin language background knew what it meant, but to the general public, it was a new term. So, it was the accepted term for quite a while, but like all those before it, its time was limited. PSA's are shown on TV today to completely end the use [disabilityscoop.com] of this term that was once promoted by the medical community.

Autism is now usually argued as something separate from all those terms above, however the lack of medical diagnosis of retardation has caused significant confusion [city-data.com] among parents today. Although it is more narrowly defined by the medical community than previous terms, I predict that it, like all the others, will eventually became used as a taunt, and suddenly be regarded as a slur.

I don't know if this progression is necessarily a bad thing. Medical diagnoses are getting better, and the fact that we keep changing terms to keep everyone happy shows sensitivity that previous generations may not have had.

But, the down side is that the term is used for just about everything. The current conditions labeled as Autism covers far too much for studies such as the one in this headline to ever be successful. There is almost no chance that a single cause of autism would ever cover more than about 5% of the cases.

Re:How long before the next name change? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39859981)

You forgot about Dr. Mencia's term, "dee-de-dee".

Re:How long before the next name change? (1)

spiffmastercow (1001386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860217)

Well, they've shown a strong convergence in the symptoms that we're calling "autism" that are distinct, though are often found along with mental retardation. Autism often occurs alongside mental retardation, but not always, and an autistic person may have an overall IQ between vegetable and super genius. It's a specific deficit in communication and social intelligence, as opposed to a general intelligence classification.

Re:How long before the next name change? (0)

AnonyMouseCowWard (2542464) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860593)

I was going to mod people but instead found this post, and it's... incensing, to say the least.

There's a good reason why autism or Asperger's are dissociated from being "slow", "retarded", etc. Let me clue you in: it's not the same fucking thing.

Have you actually talked to "highly-functioning" autistic people? It has nothing to do with being slow. It's not their brain power that's in question. It just happens that there are things that they can't do, and although there are common themes between them, autistic people are very different from each other as well.

Now, I will agree that some autistic people have trouble learning, and might never fit in a normal classroom or be able to work in a social environment, but that's not because they're stupid. It's not about their intelligence, even if from an external point of view it might look very similar. For that matter, how do you call lightly autistic (aka, Asperger's syndrome) people that can function in society, but just happen to not like fur, eat sandwiches by the corners, hate phones and can't catch a ball? They have "limitations", but they're not stupid. I call "being stupid" the person that says "sir, you moved the x from the left to the right side of the equation but you made a mistake, you copied the + into a - sign!" stupid.

Re:How long before the next name change? (1)

uigrad_2000 (398500) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861563)

Now, I will agree that some autistic people ...

The whole point I was making is that the term is now used too broadly, and you seem to be confirming this. The term "autism", when I first heard it, was narrowly defined. The current HFA [wikipedia.org] classification of autism was all that was originally covered by the original use of "autism", but already the term has been broadened to cover far more than that. It will continue to change meaning, even if the medical community would prefer that it doesn't. Eventually (and regrettably), it will (in common usage) mean any kind of stupidity. For example, just last week, I heard a woman say "I was being autistic the other day and left my purse at home..."

Broad terms are dangerous to use, because you end up grouping people with others that they don't deserve being grouped with. That's clearly what set you off. Not all the broad terms I listed in my first post are equivalent, but, they do have something in common. They were all created as ways to refer to people with disabilities in a way that would not be demeaning. In turn, they've all changed to mean something much different than they originally meant. If you disagree with that statement, please explain.

I will stand by my point that the term "autism" will continue to morph. People already use it [justrage.com] in derogatory ways. I have no doubt that 30 years from now, it will be rare for a patient to be diagnosed with "autism", because it will have negative connotations. At that time we can have this same discussion again. You can say that "xxxxx (term of the future) is a specific term for ___ ty ___ ___, and is completely different than people who are just plain autistic."

Well, on the plus side (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39860109)

It makes them excellent drivers XD

Extreme News Flash! (2)

spads (1095039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39860385)

"Autism has a strong genetic basis, but so far efforts to identify the responsible genes have had mixed results. The reason for this is that autism is influenced by many different genes, and different genes are involved in different individuals, making it hard to find the common genetic ground between patients."

Perhaps, alternately to considering a more complex/obfuscated genetic basis, we should again consider a NON-genetic basis?

How about the experiment everyone conveniently chooses to forget, the occurrence of autism in only one genetic twin (sharing identical genes, gestation environments, etc.).

Re:Extreme News Flash! (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861341)

A) Identical twins does not mean 100% identical genes
B) Identical Genes don'e mean identical expression.

I notice how conveniently you choose to ignore the fact that you don't really know anything about genes or genetic twin.
.

Re:Extreme News Flash! (1)

spads (1095039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861553)

Oh, we're talking about random MUTATIONS (ie. some other basis of non-identical genetic twin genes?) able to counteract this (purported) complex genetically coded condition IN ALL OF ITS MAJOR ATTRIBUTES???

Oh, and, to my knowledge, identical gestation environments theoretically equates to identical expression, NO, or do all of these (purportedly multiple) genes involved in this expression, simultaneously (in concert) decide whether to express themsleves or not?

If the preceding is not essentially the case with genetically identical twins, how is it that they even end up resembling each other consistently in the vast majority of the cases? Is it just that we can dispense with (the law of) genetic resemblance for this one special case?

Re:Extreme News Flash! (1)

shiftless (410350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861531)

How about it? Clearly their genes were not actually identical (do you think our sequencing abilities today are perfect?), OR there is more complexity in the genetic mechanics than you and every other short sighted scientist knows or believes (not just likely--TRUE.)

I am autistic (Central Auditory Processing Disorder, with autism), and I am quite certain in my case it's inherited.

Re:Extreme News Flash! (1)

spads (1095039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861779)

Or consider this - the genes they were looking at had nothing in the world to do with it. Problem solved! ;)

On what basis do you believe it/yours to be inherited?

I do not feel that I could definitively know the cause of this complex condition, but I feel some affinity with it (and aversion to its contemporary medical analysis). My favorite thing that I read was the (initially (in the US) lionized and ultimately demonized) Bruno Bettelheim's Empty Fortress. He was an early one to point out the genetic twins point, something which has somewhat amazingly been able to be glossed over by all the test-tube monkeys. Basically, I am concerned that, perhaps the primary political entity, parents, have been able to dismiss this, a virtual Emperor's New Clothes type scenario/campaign. Extreme as it sounds, I myself would not dismiss this out of hand. Finally, I am not at all about assigning any kind of blame, just getting to the truth of the matter.

You can't have (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39860695)

A genetic epidemic, it just doesn't work that way. And the thousands of kids recovered from the spectrum did not suddenly have their genetics modified.

tro7l (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861069)

numberWs continue

The irony of the first steps into modern eugenics (1)

landofcleve (1959610) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861413)

Being done by Jews. After the pseudo-science perpetrated on their ancestors by the Nazis.

Autism is a PSYCHOLOGICAL disorder (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861439)

"Autism has a strong genetic basis, but so far efforts to identify the responsible genes have had mixed results."

Yes, probably because it DOESN'T have a "strong genetic basis", whatever that's supposed to mean. Do they mean "It isn't genetic, but we want to keep on pretending it is, so we can get research money, and bring out drugs which dope kids and make lots of money out of it."

Read Clara Claiborne Park's book 'The Siege', in which she unknowingly reveals HOW she made her own daughter become 'autistic':

From 'The Siege' by Clara Claiborne Park, p.108:
"I need not explain to modern readers that for our generation of
parents force was not the method of choice. To impose one's will on a
normal child by force is distasteful enough (though at times, as our
generation of parents at length found out, quick force is less
damaging to all concerned than indulgence or elaborate moral suasion).
To use force on an abrnomal child seems too brutal to contemplate. I
do not know whether I could have contemplated it, and I'm not sure I
could have done it. By good luck I did not have to. It happened that
the major work of disciplining Elly was done before we knew there was
anything the matter.
Until she was twenty-two months old, after all, we thought Elly a
normal, though increasingly obtuse and stubborn child. She responded
to no prohibitions or commands; when she was doing something
anti-social it was almost impossible to get her to stop. She simply
paid no attention to what we did or said. Amused at first, I would
become irritated, then infuriated at behavior which looked in every
way like wilful disobedience. Why would she go on drenching the floor
with bathwater when again and again I asked her not to? The other
children hadn't been like that, even when they were smaller. Why
wouldn't this one listen to her mother?
I grew more angry than I have ever been with a child- so angry that I
cannot recall it without shame. In my anger, I slapped my little
girl's naked flesh again and again, until I could see the redness on
her skin and she was screaming with pain and shock. I screamed myself.
"No, no, no, NO!" I don't know how often I did this- three or four
occasions, perhaps, no more. Then it was no longer necessary. Elly
understood nothing else, but she understood "no, no". I rarely had
even to slap her hand, never to hit her hard. I did not have to
scream. The words were enough."

"In my anger, I slapped my little
girl's naked flesh again and again, until I could see the redness on
her skin and she was screaming with pain and shock."

And THAT is how she ruined her daughter's life, and then came up with the myth of 'autism' to exonerate herself of her crime.

But hey, this is Slashdot, and Slashdotters are immature sociopaths who can't feel the suffering of others, so why am I wasting my breath? Let's keep pretending it's a 'genetic' 'disease', rather than trying to investigate the FAR MORE LIKELY cause: child abuse.

Gee... do you think if I assaulted somebody every time they tried to speak to me, they would soon give up trying to talk in my presence, and be too afraid to do so? You don't say...

He's not heavy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861969)

He's my brother! the grad student who did this research that is. Kudos bro!

(I apologize for the lack of real content here, I'm just so excited for my brother)

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