Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

MIT Tetris Hack: Source Code Released

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the make-your-town-hall-much-more-entertaining dept.

Hardware Hacking 40

An anonymous reader writes "MIT's The Tech published an article with technical details behind the Tetris hack they did on the Green Building earlier this year. The article includes photographs of the LED modules, as well as a link to some of the source code used in the hack. The hackers have released some of the source code on GitHub, and are looking for people to contribute code that could run on the system."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Great job (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861729)

That was very cool. MIT should have it running in demo mode every night...

Re:Great job (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39866325)

I think that since it was an OPEN SOURCE CODE from the CHAOS COMPUTER CLUBs BLINKENLIGHTS PROJECT, that SOMEONE should give the majority of credit to THEM! http://blinkenlights.net/ [blinkenlights.net]

I will admit that the social manipulation and putting together custom hardware could be considered the hack by MIT, but let's give props where props are found.

Harware is more interesting (3, Interesting)

Ksevio (865461) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861747)

Making a game of Tetris is pretty simple. The cool part of this project is the wireless controlled LED bars they built and the design of those. I didn't see any specs for those, but that would be something interesting to see.

Hack hack hack? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39862479)

The article is rubbish, or at least its definition of "hack" is. What did they hack? The building? The led? The led drivers? The air? The power outlet? The aluminium bars? The occupants? The genator?

Note even "Windows" is not the correct answer IMHO.

Re:Hack hack hack? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39862589)

What did they hack? They hacked your very perception of what is possible, man.

Re:Hack hack hack? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39864599)

Since the tetris building has been done to death, it's not only not a hack but it's trite. My perception of what is possible (man) extends a lot further than this.

Re:Hack hack hack? (3, Informative)

arth1 (260657) | more than 2 years ago | (#39863251)

The article is rubbish, or at least its definition of "hack" is.

That's ignorance speaking. A "hack" is a MIT prank or tomfoolery, a tradition going back to the late 1800s.

What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861795)

'Earlier this year'? It was only 11 days ago...

Oh my god, some dudes released source code! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861805)

Please post on it on slashdot PLEAAASE

Just for the record guys, not /every/ piece of open source software deserves a story on slashdot, and this one in particular is one that doesn't serve many people a purpose. Hacks like these get made every week, and these guys at MIT didn't make anything particularly interesting.

Re:Oh my god, some dudes released source code! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39862311)

Not just that, they released "Some of the source code". It's not even everything....

I agree with the people who point out that the hardware is the more interesting part of this hack. Tetris clones aren't particularly hard to write.

Re:Oh my god, some dudes released source code! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39864675)

The point is that people could make stuff that would be compatible with the actual display. The tetris clone just seems like example code.

Re:Oh my god, some dudes released source code! (1)

flyneye (84093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39866345)

You mean they released the open source code from "project blinkenlights"? And of course they credited the CCC for writing it and should post their changes to it too. I'm sure they will. Just any second now. Cause that's how open source works, attribution and sharing code. Waiting...

Java and Tetris (-1, Flamebait)

FunkyELF (609131) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861833)

Aren't both of these protected by patents / copyright?

Google removed all Tetris clones from their market because of this.

MIT should have chose a better game and a better implementation language. Should have invented both from scratch.

Re:Java and Tetris (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861893)

Yeah and The Tetris Company is very litigious [gamasutra.com] .

Another open source falling block game (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862719)

I wonder why Quadrapassel [gnome.org] hasn't already been taken out of GNOME Games.

LOL scrubs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861875)

LOL these "hackers" used Java to do this? The quality of "hackers" at MIT must have seriously plummeted. That's a langauge for fry cooks and "business developers".

Re:LOL scrubs (3, Funny)

matrim99 (123693) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862109)

Seriously. Machine language input by punch cards or GTFO.

Re:LOL scrubs (2)

Hillgiant (916436) | more than 2 years ago | (#39866855)

If you are not manually flipping the switches yourself, you just aren't trying.

Re:LOL scrubs (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862115)

Re:LOL scrubs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39862301)

I wasn't referring to someone who breaks into computer systems, numbnuts. I know what the "hacker" meant. Using a fry cook language like Java is something a scrub would do not a "hacker". At least not the original MIT hackers that is. They'd have used LISP or assembly or C. Again, the quality of "hackers" at MIT must seriously be pathetic today when Java weenies are being seen as "hackers".

Re:LOL scrubs (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862391)

Okay, that's a relief. I thought as much. So how do you feel about Clojure [clojure.org] ?

Re:LOL scrubs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39862587)

If it works, who cares what it was written in?

Just sayin'

Re:LOL scrubs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39863053)

People who are actual hackers and not posers?

YAWN... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861887)

the original post wasn't interesting. the obligatory follow up isn't interesting either.

no one cares.

Not the first (4, Informative)

Anaerin (905998) | more than 2 years ago | (#39861901)

Blinkenlights [blinkenlights.net] did it first, and at higher resolution, and once they'd finished doing it in black and white, they went to Paris and did it again, in colour [blinkenlights.net] . Both systems had Tetris that was playable by phone, and would also display messages sent via SMS to the display. Oh, and both those projects were also open-source. The only interesting part of this is the wireless connectivity in the MIT system.

Re:Not the first (1)

Bobfrankly1 (1043848) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862313)

It would appear that the MIT system was stealth installed, and arrangements were made afterwards to keep the system there. From the readings on the Blinkenlights site and the wikipedia entry, Blinkenlights had prior arrangements with the building management, although both teams are admittedly short on details in this respect. If I'm reading things right, that's a major difference and an interesting one at that.

Re:Not the first (1)

fondacio (835785) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862669)

I doesn't seem that anyone was claiming that MIT were the first, but as long as we're looking at prior art: the first Tetris-on-a-builiding was done by electrical engineering students in Delft, the Netherlands, all the way back in 1995, as you can see on this archived webpage [archive.org] . Futhermore, students at Brown University did it in 2000 (BBC article here [bbc.co.uk] ). Both prior projects, but not Blinkenlights, are mentioned in an article about the MIT project here [thecelebritycafe.com] . It seems to me that each of these projects has something the others didn't, so no need to be competive about it - it's all in good fun.

Re:Not the first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39867897)

Also in 2007, the local students did this in Tampere, Finland on the wall of a local student housing building.

http://www.ghacks.net/2007/12/09/mikontalo-lights-project/

Re:Not the first (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39863037)

Yeah, but they were foreigners and the MIT guys are Americans. Go America!

Re:Not the first (1)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 2 years ago | (#39863579)

MIT guys are Americans? 50% maybe. And many of them aren't guys.

I'd love to help, but.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39861905)

Sadly I don't quite meet the system requirements. Does anyone know where I can get a "Green Building", preferably a USB-powered one?

Re:I'd love to help, but.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39866901)

Sadly I don't quite meet the system requirements. Does anyone know where I can get a "Green Building", preferably a USB-powered one?

As well as a Green Building, you will also need lock picks (and some good lock pickers) to get into all the rooms, or perhaps the master keys that were reverse engineered in my day (1970's) still work. Pre-planning some social engineering to throw anyone off the track might be a good idea, in case you are caught installing things late at night. Some of the rooms might be alarmed, so you also have to figure out how to bypass them.

My point is that pulling off this hack took more than electronics & computer technology. There is an element of project management as well.

Any MIT residents out there? White Light question (2)

ediron2 (246908) | more than 2 years ago | (#39862903)

Every image or video I've seen on this hack has 2 rooms with lights on: White lights, right edge just below the midpoint, separated horizontally by 1 and vertically by 2.

Other rooms occasionally are illuminated, but **always** these two are on. I know this is esoteric, but what's up with that? Anything special about those rooms/windows?

Re:Any MIT residents out there? White Light questi (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 2 years ago | (#39920463)

They are in use. The white lights are the room lights.

"The âholy grailâ(TM) of hacks" ?? (1)

cachimaster (127194) | more than 2 years ago | (#39863183)

Haha I think the marketing department at MIT is out of control.
You are great guys, we already know. Take it easy with the press-release.

Where is the rest of the source code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39863987)

The source code posted only contains the basic display and game play code. Where is the interesting code to control the wireless and display?

Hacking? Really? (1)

Narmacil (1189367) | more than 2 years ago | (#39864305)

When are people going to realize that hacking is now a meaningless buzzword applied to anything that has thought put into it? I feel like this was a neat side project for a few electrical/software engineers, nothing was co-opted or done without permission, no hardware was repurposed, nothing was "hacked". They just got alot of commercial off the shelf stuff, put it together with a little know-how and did what engineers do every day. I know this was posted here because it's MIT, and everyone loves it to death when they do anything remotely tech related, but lighting up buildings with LED's has been going on forever, there's nothing particularly novel here other than their specific implementation, no advances in tech have been made.

Maybe I'm jaded...

Re:Hacking? Really? (1)

_Shad0w_ (127912) | more than 2 years ago | (#39864961)

Meh, most MIT side projects are hardly ground breaking, it doesn't stop them being interesting. The LED dance floor one group did was my favourite.

(Also, I quibble about the requirement "without permission". You can hack something with or without permission.)

replica oakleys (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39865747)

Today, replica oakleys [replica-oakleysstore.com] replica oakleys launch the fourth member of their Switchlock collection of interchangeable-lens eyewear with the introduction of a new Radarlock model, which will arrive in stores beginning this summer.
replica oakleys will offer Radarlock in both standard and XL fits with the latter option offering more lens coverage, particularly up top. The replica oakleys [replica-oakleysstore.com] differ only in the nose 654dtgfv piece but Oakley doesn't intend for the pieces to be user-swappable. As before, standard and Asian-fit nose pads will be available, too.

replica oakleys (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39865761)

Today, replica oakleys [replica-oakleysstore.com] replica oakleys launch the fourth member of their Switchlock collection of interchangeable-lens eyewear with the introduction of a new Radarlock model, which will arrive in stores beginning this summer.
replica oakleys will offer Radarlock in both standard and XL fits with the latter option offering more lens coverage, particularly up top. The replica oakleys [replica-oakleysstore.com] differ only in the nose 654dtgfv piece but Oakley doesn't intend for the pieces to be user-swappable. As before, standard and Asian-fit nose pads will be available, too.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?