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MIT And Harvard Start New Online Education Partnership

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the students-everywhere-rejoice-as-blackboard-dies dept.

Education 60

New submitter Lluc writes "MIT and Harvard have started a new online education partnership called edX, an 'open-source technology platform to deliver online courses.' They plan to offer classes starting in Fall 2012. Perhaps this nonprofit venture is a better method for online education than Udacity, the startup created by Stanford professors after their wildly successful free online course offerings." Fellow new submitter alexander_686 sent in a link to the edX FAQ, and adds: "Harvard and MIT are launching edX with 60 million dollars to offer 'low fee' online classes. No word yet on classes offered or who will be teaching. No college credit but certificates will be offered. ... I hope low cost means low cost. (Under $25). I have really enjoyed the Stanford University free online classes."

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60 comments

frost pist (-1, Troll)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 2 years ago | (#39869921)

I passed frosty piss 101!

Re:frost pist (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39869999)

I passed Global Warming is a fraud 101

Research. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870385)

I passed Global Warming is a fraud 101

You know, whenever I have a really strong opinion one way or another, it's always because I'm ignorant of the issues and the big picture.

You see, whenever I feel strongly about an issue and start reading more on it - pretty much ignore the Internet Garbage (obvious Troll organizations or publications) - I don't feel so strongly.

When you truly learn the "other side", you will lose your sanctimonious anger and hatred.

Unfortunately, in our society, you will be labeled as "wishy washy" or a "flip flopper". Politicians are excluded because they are panderers to their voters. Which is a curse of a democratic style of Government - and it is more than offset by the benefits.

Re:Research. (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39871063)

Unfortunately, in our society, you will be labeled as "wishy washy" or a "flip flopper". Politicians are excluded because they are panderers to their voters.

Have to pander to the people who purchased them via election campaign contributions. Standard /. car analogy: you hire your car mechanic to fix your brakes, he shrugs shoulders and rotates your tires instead. You're going to let everyone know you're pissed off at that wishy washy flip flopper of a mechanic.

Which is a curse of a democratic style of Government - and it is more than offset by the benefits.

Still open for debate. The US would probably be in better shape if we kept the English monarchy at the top but attained more local autonomy. You know, like Canada. Which does seem to be a better place in a better position with better economic numbers and better health care and better international relations. Also its more a curse of a two party system rather than democracy. Especially since we have a aristocratic republic not a democracy.

THEREFORE YOU ARE !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39869925)

You must be more than that !!

Exciting stuff! (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 2 years ago | (#39869971)

This really is exciting, I hope that eventually all of these online education efforts will consolidate into one singel network offering a variety of free and low cost educational options, constantly updated and standardised on an easy to use open format, available to people around the world.

Re:Exciting stuff! (2)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39870087)

Other than the open format thing, sounds a lot like itunesU

Is there anything like itunesU for android?

Re:Exciting stuff! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870757)

No. Android is for illiterate poor people. iTunesU is for smart people.

Re:Exciting stuff! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870333)

Producing an entire world of uneducated people.

They should follow the Wikipedia example (1)

dryriver (1010635) | about 2 years ago | (#39870069)

1) Set up a free online encyclopedia site like Wikipedia with many different subject headings 2) Require Harvard/MIT academics to fill in the information for each subject. ............ The entire world would benefit from a new resource like this...... As for "cheap online classes...... Again, setting up a Wikipedia-like learning site would benefit infinitely more people than a few online courses attended by a few thousand people at most.

Re:They should follow the Wikipedia example (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870229)

2) Require Harvard/MIT academics to fill in the information for each subject.

How will they enforce that? Most professors have better things to do with their time.

Re:They should follow the Wikipedia example (3, Informative)

PT_1 (2425848) | about 2 years ago | (#39871265)

It's more than a few thousand people. Check out Stanford's Youtube channel, for example. They've uploaded multiple full lecture series on math, physics, biology, engineering, etc., and it already has 123,000 subscribers and 34 million video views.

OCW? (3, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39870071)

From the FAQ

Many institutions are partnering in this space. Is the MIT/Harvard partnership exclusive? Will other institutions be able to collaborate with edX?
It is our intention that over time other universities will join MIT and Harvard in offering courses on the edX platform.

Hmmm how about MIT OCW? Can they partner with edX?

OCW has some excellent class lectures to watch. I hope this doesn't mean OCW is going away, or going to fee-only.

Re:OCW? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870681)

OCW has some excellent class lectures to watch. I hope this doesn't mean OCW is going away, or going to fee-only.

OCW was just version 2.0. EdX is version 3.0. MIT has been working on this plan for 30 years. OCW made a few mistakes and is weak in some areas. Yes, OCW will eventually go away, but that "going away" means cherry-picking the best of OCW and rolling it into EdX.

It's going to be interesting to see how MIT-the-business and Harvard-the-business end up butting heads with MIT-the-school and Harvard-the-school. Educating the world is one of the greatest humanitarian actions conceivable, but it's not free. Hockfield also mentioned that this type of education is not a substitute for classrooms, labs, and live interaction with professors. Having gone to MIT, I absolutely agree. You can't experience drinking from the firehose online.

If you want a preview of the educational schism this will institutionalize, read The Diamond Age.

Re:OCW? (1)

Immerial (1093103) | about 2 years ago | (#39870913)

MIT OpenCourseWare is hoping to partner with edX as some point. Currently our the relationship with them hasn't been fully defined. We might host the content after the course is no longer being taught or ... who knows??? Lots of questions abound... lots to do with overlap of effort (do we cover the same MIT courses?), licensing of content (we are almost completely Creative Commons NC-BY-SA- what does that mean if they go BY or BY-SA?), limits on the instructors/faculty (will we even get time with people working on edX projects?). Currently they see us as a complement to their courses as a reference and resource for courses they currently don't offer (e.g. need help with the course min. reqs? see ocw.mit.edu)... but will that change when they start having a lot of courses?

I hope this doesn't mean MIT OCW is going away but I guess it depends on what decisions are made. I can see a time where we are slowly whittled away by a bigger collection of edX courses such that it might not be interesting to have OCW anymore (why do free if there is no certificate?). Maybe we merge? In terms of fee only- we will never go that route. The only time that will happen is if MIT OCW goes away.

For me personally, I think the one of the biggest issues is around the licensing. I really love the fact that we are increasing the commons of education content. Free educational materials for the world! Sadly, most folks could care less. ("Why don't you show the slides?", "Why is some of this missing and has citation? I just want to learn this stuff... who cares what the license is or where is comes from!"). We'll have plenty of time to see how this plays out.

It's all still in flux. It's a cool and exciting time in education- that much is for sure :)

Perhaps... not! (3, Interesting)

AtomicAdam (959649) | about 2 years ago | (#39870161)

Perhaps this nonprofit venture is a better method for online education than Udacity,

Perhaps someone from Harvard or MIT, wrote and submitted this summary/article.
Perhaps this is just a way for some universities to rake in more cash to misappropriate later while offering certificates that are not even worth the paper they're printed on.

Or perhaps this is going to be a really cool thing. We shall see, until then I'm cautiously optimistic. Seriously, Udacity FTW.

Re:Perhaps... not! (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39870483)

offering certificates that are not even worth the paper they're printed on.

This is not a new development in the educational-industrial complex.

I could probably fill this /. text box with telecom "certificates" that no body cares about, and thats before I get started on weekend/night vo-tech certificate programs.

The only paperwork HR cares about is bachelors degrees. Masters, maybe, but you're probably overqualified. Phd, go away you're overqualified.

My collection of ham radio contest and participation certs is probably more relevant to most employers, and frankly more work to achieve.

What could be interesting is an apprenticeship program where the "book learning" is done online. Before you laugh at higher ed and apprenticeships, noobs fresh outta college pretty much are apprentices, just not formally. Journeymen are pretty much the jobhopper wage slaves and low level consultants, and masters are pretty much the guys who are high up enough in the consulting world to be hiring subs to work for them. Try to avoid it and paper over it, but the design pattern still shines thru.

I would aggressively extend my idea and propose that even right now, becoming a "real programmer or real sysadmin" pretty much always has required an informal apprenticeship phase.

And this is why 1 employer people scare me ... (2)

oneiros27 (46144) | about 2 years ago | (#39870685)

When you look at the apprentice / journeyman / master system, you're supposed to get broader experience in the journeyman phase ... you go place to place, learning from other experts.

When you've got the team lead who's been trained internally and has known nothing other than working at that one place, I see that as a red flag. If you ask them why they're doing something a specific way, and they give an answer that's effectively 'because that's the way we've always done it', it's a sign that they're not going to be receptive to new ideas.

(and yet, at the same time, I also get ticked off when we hire someone new with little experience and they want to redo everything from the ground up in whatever the trendy language / framework / style of the day is, even after we explain why things are the way they are)

bachelors degrees is a poor fit for tech jobs (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#39871203)

As it's to long has way to much filler and most of them are geared to high level stuff that is little help at the help desk, systems admin, levels.

Re:Perhaps... not! (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 2 years ago | (#39871503)

Perhaps this is just a way for some universities to rake in more cash to misappropriate later while offering certificates that are not even worth the paper they're printed on.

What certificates do Harvard and MIT issue that aren't worth the paper they're printed on? If you're going to toss around an accusation like that, you'd better have evidence to back it up.

(Full disclosure: I'm one of the few members of my immediate family without a Harvard degree of some sort, but I've seen no evidence of low standards anywhere in the institution other than the president's office.)

Re:Perhaps... not! (1)

foksoft (848194) | about 2 years ago | (#39878527)

From TFA:
Will the certificates be awarded by Harvard and/or MIT?
As determined by the edX board, MIT and Harvard, online learners who demonstrate mastery of subjects could earn a certificate of completion, but such certificates would not be issued under the name of Harvard or MIT.

Online needs to change (5, Insightful)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 2 years ago | (#39870373)

Most of the online courses fall short on the psychological aspects of teaching. They are little more than videotaped lectures with automated homework grading, and this model doesn't translate well to an online model.

By way of example, the online courses offered so far have been based on avoiding penalties instead of gathering rewards. Your grade is 100 minus the things you get wrong, and you have to finish before a deadline or get penalized.

This is reflected in the enrollment numbers: 120K students enroll in an online course thinking that MIT (for example) will provide a rewarding experience. 100K drop out because the experience isn't all that great.

Taken another way, consider a student who has trouble in the first half of the course and who gets a poor grade on the midterm. At that point, the maximum grade they can get is very low, so there's really no incentive to continue.

A different model might hold the student back until they show proficiency. Once they have confidence in the material, the system "rewards" them and presents the next chapter. The student is motivated to get the next level of achievement, and their level of understanding is greater.

All of the motivation in all of these courses comes from the student, and with no rewards along the way it turns into a grueling tedious chore. It's tough to keep slogging away for 12 weeks with only the dream of a certificate to keep you going.

If they really want to educate people, they're going to have to change their model to keep students motivated.

Until they do that, it'll still be just videotapes of college lectures.

Re:Online needs to change (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870439)

So, it's a lot like real college then ? except for the whole, I have to get dressed and leave my dungeon part of course....

Re:Online needs to change (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870785)

While I agree with you about most online courses, I think Udacity really succeeded in making the learning experience much more enjoyable and involved. Other folks are beginning to move towards their model as well. Udacity does a great job of providing byte sized (pun intended) lectures that are a couple of minutes long and cover a single key concept, followed by programming or multiple choice quizzes that test you on your understanding of the concept. That, combined with the forums and weekly homeworks really works well for an online course. It isn't perfect, but it is much better than anything else I've tried so far. I've even got my wife, sister-in-law and father-in-law to take CS101 on Udacity this hexamester, and they are really enjoying it as well.

Re:Online needs to change (1)

Githaron (2462596) | about 2 years ago | (#39870867)

This is a interesting idea. It is almost like a RPG where you level up. The difference lies in the fact that instead of leveling up your avatar for a fake world, you level up yourself for the real world. I wonder if anyone will get addicted to learning. :)

Re:Online needs to change (2)

Cragen (697038) | about 2 years ago | (#39871405)

I think learning SHOULD be more like RPG's. The step by step approach in MMORPG's keeps me going. :) At least for the first few years of a subject. There used to be a reading program like that back in the 60's for 10-11 year olds in Ohio that used short stories. (don't remember the name) It had a range of reading comprehension where the level of comprehension was color-coded. I was SO worked up to become a PURPLE reader.

Re:Online needs to change (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39871101)

You should see what is being done here at UNSW computer science, I mean there is some really interesting stuff. The effort here is slow moving and coming from a slightly different angle, however it is really starting to build up momentum.

Re:Online needs to change (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 2 years ago | (#39871291)

Most of the online courses fall short on the psychological aspects of teaching. They are little more than videotaped lectures with automated homework grading, and this model doesn't translate well to an online model.

.

If they really want to educate people, they're going to have to change their model to keep students motivated.

Until they do that, it'll still be just videotapes of college lectures.

Some classes are even worse. Locally, some genius in control of the educational system has managed to get Lower Prices Everyday[TM] for our tax dollars by converting foreign-language education into one massive online class.

I may not be very sociable, but I still understand the importance of 2-way channels when learning foreign languages. A lot of people don't actually "hear" what they think they're hearing. If they just keep repeating back the same faulty pronunciation to a computer, instead of improving, they simply reinforce their mistakes. I know more than one or 2 people who fail even when assisted by pattern-matching software. The software can only tell them that they're doing it wrong, but it's not intelligent enough to indicate the parts that need fixing or offer guidance.

real classrooms that are just big lectures (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#39871423)

real classrooms that are just big lectures and some times just end with a test that you can master by cramming and having no idea on what it coved don't keep students motivated.

Re:Online needs to change ...except for the $$$ (2)

RandCraw (1047302) | about 2 years ago | (#39871341)

> Until they do that, it'll still be just videotapes of college lectures.

's/just/free/g' That's a huge mod.

It's silly to compare the curent crop of on-line FREE courses with tuition-based in-class courses. Better to compare them with tuition-based on-line courses, like those of Columbia CVN or Stanford SEE. By that standard, the free courses I've seen are as good or better. And remember, each of the freebies costs $2500 less. That's a world of difference.

Will on-line courses ever approach the learning experience provided by in-class lectures or face-to-face study groups? Possibly. But given the GREATLY reduced cost, the ease of time shifting, the opportunity to learn from the very best profs (eventually), cut-rate e-learning isn't going away. In fact it's hard to imagine that it won't eventually outcompete the present college system, given the unreal cost difference.

Given the rise of Walmart and Amazon, you should never underestimate the power of delivering a product by combining 'sufficient', 'convenient', and 'dirt cheap'.

Re:Online needs to change (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39871559)

.... At that point, the maximum grade they can get is very low, so there's really no incentive to continue.

If they really want to educate people, they're going to have to change their model to keep students motivated.

If grades are your incentive, then I would suggest you are missing the entire point of "education."
("You" in a general sense)

Education requires personal motivation. Teachers can't make students learn, the students must do that themselves. Teachers can only provide an environment conducive to the students learning.
To quote one of my favorite songs, "I can make you feel, but I can't make you think."

I do agree with your overall point that the video / punishment based grading model is not ideal and a more "reward" based approach would likely be a more effective learning environment.

The flexibility of online course systems has amazing potential (allowing students to easily follow their interests to more advanced materials) and it will be great to see these models actualize that potential.

Re:Online needs to change (1)

AlXtreme (223728) | about 2 years ago | (#39872111)

A different model might hold the student back until they show proficiency. Once they have confidence in the material, the system "rewards" them and presents the next chapter. The student is motivated to get the next level of achievement, and their level of understanding is greater.

The Khan Academy uses this approach when one does the exercises: you start with the basics and gradually gain points and badges while you work through the various topics, using the video lectures when you get stuck.

All exercises are voluntary but the mentoring and statistics are very well thought-out so that student progress can be followed in detail. The next step up would be that only students that have shown their proficiency are allowed to take an exam.

I'm currently using the KA code to set up a similar academy for a local university (the focus of the content being grammar). The code is rather hairy but the concepts behind the site are very interesting.

Finally something good happens (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870471)

With all the horrible things happening now in the online world SOPA/PIPA/CISPA this online education thing is a really positive development that makes me feel good about the future of humanity. I'm taking the first MITX course (6002x Circuits and Electronics). It's great to take a course that is REALLY HARD, as in you have to be comfortable with calculus and differential equations. Most online learning, with the exception of online learning that is computer science related, has been really basic up until now. I am hopeful that with the worldwide nature of these courses this is going to improve the lives of people everywhere.

This is a practice run (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870473)

This is the practice run for when they start trying to educate large amounts of Chinese without having to have them come over here to the US. Be a high end, reputable educational institution and set up your online presence, and you can get all their money.

fir5T (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870533)

the facts and asshole to oth3rs visions going (Click Here over to yet another Of OpenBSD. How will recaal that it exemplified by was after a long Users. This is

Level distribution (2)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39870613)

I wonder about level distribution.

Go to OCW or itunesU or ed section of archive.org and there's about 20 first semester calculus video lecture series. Some are even pretty good. Then there is a steady decline until "junior year" classes where the distribution drops to approximately Zero. I'd like to watch a modern compiler class. How about a modern database design class (I was brought up in the Codd Normal Form era, it would be interesting to listen to some nosql rants).

A complete list of "interesting video lecture series I know about" : there is a decent crystallography/stereochemistry series. There is a decent thermodynamics series. There is a decent digital communications series. That's about all I've found for technical "non-freshmen level" video lecture series.

Its like a video game stuffed with noobness to get good immediate reviews, then ignore the longer term players, after all you've already got their interest/money.

certs only (3, Informative)

prgrmr (568806) | about 2 years ago | (#39870665)

From the FAQ:

"Will the certificates be awarded by Harvard and/or MIT?
As determined by the edX board, MIT and Harvard, online learners who demonstrate mastery of subjects could earn a certificate of completion, but such certificates would not be issued under the name Harvard or MIT.

Will Harvard and MIT students be able to take these courses for credit?
No. MITx and Harvardx courses will not be offered for credit at either university. The online content will be used to extend and enrich on campus courses."


Can't take a chance on watering-down the reps of either institution. So segregate the student populations, and don't directly affiliate the names. This is what happens to a good idea after marketers, lawyers, and the bean-counters get together and have had their way with it.

Re:certs only (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#39870877)

Harvard and MIT aren't going to directly affiliate with this for the same reason that other big-name universities still refuse to offer online-only degrees after all these years--because both they and their accrediting institutions are controlled by entrenched faculty who have big egos and don't want to risk being put out of a job. Professor McHotShit wants you in his class in person, kissing his ass and ensuring that he can never be replaced by videos.

Re:certs only (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39871217)

Somebody is harboring some resentment towards a certain professor McHotShit. Maybe it's time to let it go. Or maybe you didn't go to a "big-name university" and your feeling a little insecure. It's ok man. I get it. It pisses me off too when I'm made keenly aware of my social status.

Re:certs only (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#39872481)

No, I resent the fact that it's 2012 and there isn't a SINGLE respected university in the U.S. offering any online degrees--not one. All that's out there are the diploma mills, whose "degrees" aren't worth the paper they're printed on.

Re:certs only (1)

matteorr (1075211) | about 2 years ago | (#39929777)

Depends on what your definition of online degree is, but the M.S. in Engineering and Technology Management [okstate.edu] degree at Oklahoma State University requires no physical presence on campus whatsoever. All assignments, lectures, grades, etc. are accessed and turned in online. Granted, there are still some glitches here and there that make me realize that online coursework is still in its infancy, but it's been a great way to gain an advanced degree while maintaining a full-time job.

CLEP? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39870853)

I'd like to see these classes partnering with an independent standardized testing service like CLEP/Dantes for college credit. That would be the perfect system. This would free up classrooms for students who want time with the instructors/professors, and help the eager folks prove that they learned something on their own without paying ridiculous amounts of money.

Re:CLEP? (1)

Githaron (2462596) | about 2 years ago | (#39871099)

I agree that college is too expensive but I envision more of a hybrid model. Students take online courses to complete all the "book learning" and universities would become a place for study groups, hands-on projects, and hardcore research. "Professors" would be there to help guide students and facilitate research..

hybrid model needs more tech / vo-tech / less time (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#39871449)

hybrid model needs more tech / vo-tech type classes and less time in the class room 4 years is to long for most jobs and other can use a mixed 1-3 year Vocational / class room plan.

Re:CLEP? (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39871357)

Another area of mystification "here be dragons" is why we only hear about online classes and video lecture series for top tier research universities.
Unsurprisingly the best instructors are at teaching colleges, like state-U, little local private U, or voc tech 2 year establishments.

Best math instructor ever, taught calc at a local HS and moonlighted teaching calc at a small private U. I swear to god that dude could teach an armadillo how to integrate by parts.
Best chemistry teacher ever, ancient guy teaching quantitative chemical analysis at UWM, if he were still alive he'd be 120 years old now.. If video of him were available, it would be beyond epic. He lived thru, and worked in, most of the development of the field.
Best EE instructor weirdly enough at the local vo-tech, teaching transistor ckts, equations, characteristics, and analysis. Better than any U lecturer I ever saw.

The worlds best theoretical quantum physics researcher belongs at the worlds best research institution doing cutting edge research; unfortunately his "intro physics 101" is probably gonna suck unless the foreign TAs can rescue it for him. Whoops. Been there seen that. Once in a lifetime you might get a "Feynman" type who can do both research and teach at the same time. Yeah... Once in a lifetime...

Also the old programmer estimation where the top 1% of programmers are 100x more productive than the median programmer unfortunately applies to teachers. There's lots of "baby sitters where you might learn something", but the cream of the crop is epic / legendary. That is what I want in video lectures over the internet. Understandably the other 99% of teachers don't want to be unemployed, so... This is the big problem to be fixed. Good luck!

And why the fuck they dont use youtube? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39871103)

which everyone knows hot to use, and fast around the world...

better for people with disabilities and saying BA (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#39871239)

better for people with disabilities and saying BA needed may be barking the law.

There are people with disabilities who can do the job and who can take on line / tech school classes but are not cut for classes in a fashioned college setting and not hiring them just because they don't have a BA is discrimination.

Udacity... (2)

platypusfriend (1956218) | about 2 years ago | (#39871581)

As an active software developer and college undergrad, I tried Udacity's CS101. It was embarassing, from a professional perspective. From a unicorn and rainbow perspective, it was kind of neat, and I began to drink the koolaid... until I realized that their automated grading system was written poorly, choking on Python code that was barely creative. I pointed this out in their StackExchange-like "forums", only to be immediately engaged by the Python defenders who called me "un pythonic" for building a reusable class library. Sigh.

Bad news for American middle class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39875051)

Our great Universities are now training millions of workers from around the world. All of these people will be competing with the American middle class, driving wages down. It is what it is, but its not necessarily a good thing.

The Americans who are maintaining their standard of living are somehow protected against foreign competition. This protected class is getting smaller and smaller. I wish I had studied plumbing instead of science.

spherical planet (1)

FunkDup (995643) | about 2 years ago | (#39876269)

Seriously, when the fuck is "fall"? Every time I see that shit I have to figure out when "spring" is and then deduct six months and I'm still not sure.

Chuck it on the pile with your football stadiums, libaries of congress, Farenheits, the Kings thumb and his servants foot, and burn the whole fucking lot.

More busythink (1)

Sqreater (895148) | about 2 years ago | (#39877541)

Education for the sake of education is a waste of time and effort. We live in a credentialist society, and the only thing that matters is the paper you get from your academic efforts. But I guess this kind of thing allows the macroparasitic education institutions to assuage their consciences as they jack up the cost of the actual paper education (the REAL education) they sell to their students at relentlessly rising cost. "Are we not wonderful? We provide education for free (or "low" cost) to the lumpenproletariat!"
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