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B&N Pulls Linux Format Magazine Over Feature On 'Hacking'

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the I-miss-borders dept.

Censorship 301

New accepted submitter super_rancid writes that issue 154 of the "UK-based Linux Format magazine was pulled from Barnes and Noble bookstores in the U.S. after featuring an article called 'Learn to Hack'. They used 'hack' in the populist security sense, rather than the traditional sense, and the feature — which they put online — was used to illustrate how poor your server's security is likely to be by breaking into it."

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301 comments

Good for them! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39878947)

That's because Linux is an OS used predominately by criminals to hack machines. I appluad Barnes and Noble for this responsible reaction.

Re:Good for them! (-1)

tqk (413719) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879183)

That's because Linux is an OS used predominately by criminals to hack machines.

(0) infidel /home/keeling_ dict predominately
No definitions found for "predominately"

On topic: Is it just me, or did the whole world get a lot more stupid on Monday? It's sure felt that way from here. What the hell is wrong with teaching people how to assess the security of their systems? That's Apple's job in this century?

If you grow up in a walled garden, you expect anyone who didn't to be a potential threat.

Re:Good for them! (5, Funny)

Theophany (2519296) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879227)

Using Apple is kind of like being one of the kids whose parents didn't tell them Santa or the Tooth Fairy wasn't real until they were 16.

Using Linux is kind of like being one of the kids whose parents were alcoholics but did their best, in between drunken rants about the futility of life.

I would finish this by saying using Windows is like being one of the kids whose uncle used to have special sleep over parties, but I'd definitely get modded flamebait. And I use Windows on my personal machines. And my uncle didn't touch me.

Re:Good for them! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879381)

Theo! There ya are boy! It's been awhile! Come give your Uncle some more sugar!

Re:Good for them! (3, Funny)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879459)

Using Linux is kind of like being one of the kids whose parents were alcoholics but did their best, in between drunken rants about the futility of life.

Well, MY distro has the parents on methadone. It's clearly superior.

Re:Good for them! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879663)

And my uncle didn't touch me.

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youre a cock sucking ass licking uncle fucker
your an uncle fucker yes its true.
nobody fucks uncles quite like you

Shut YOUR fucking fucking face uncle fucker
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Dont eat or sleep or mow the lawn
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(laughing)
( Whats Going on Here )
(more farting)
What Garbage
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Your an uncle fucker I must say!
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Suck My Balls!

Re:Good for them! (3, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879789)

WIndows is like being raised in Stepford.

Re:Good for them! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879411)

predominately | adverb
another term for predominantly.

Re:Good for them! (5, Interesting)

phrostie (121428) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879225)

since they still sell 2600 it'smore likely it has something do do with this:

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/12/04/30/1359214/microsoft-invests-300-million-in-nook-e-readers [slashdot.org]

big surprise

Re:Good for them! (5, Insightful)

TheGoodNamesWereGone (1844118) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879401)

TFA states it was pulled "after a complaint" (note singular). I have trouble believing this is the only reason. They pulled all of them from all of their stores in America? I have trouble believing that a single complaint was the only reason. "Never attribute to malice what can adequately be explained by stupidity," goes the quote, and I think it applies here. If M$ were the reason then they'd pull *all* Linux stuff. Likewise if they wanted to pull every example of "how to do bad things" off their shelves they'd have to take a LOT of books down.

Re:Good for them! (2)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879681)

TFA states it was pulled "after a complaint" (note singular).

Likely from a small town in Northwest Washington...

I have trouble believing this is the only reason. They pulled all of them from all of their stores in America? I have trouble believing that a single complaint was the only reason. "Never attribute to malice what can adequately be explained by stupidity," goes the quote, and I think it applies here.

True, but that's a whole lot of stupid going on...

Re:Good for them! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879413)

Why would it hve to do with that? They still carry other Linux mgazines in store.

Populist security sense? (3, Insightful)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879289)

They used 'hack' in the populist security sense

WTF is that?

To 99% of the world, a hacker is someone who steals your password, your money, puts kiddie porn on your computer and publishes all your email.

Like it or not, folks doing legitimate security assessments or building custom gadgets, etc. would do well to come up with term other than "Hacker".

Re:Populist security sense? (4, Interesting)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879383)

they screwed up the meaning not us, why should we come up with a new term because they are computer illiterate.

Re:Populist security sense? (4, Informative)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879481)

Exactly!

I'm a CRACKER not a hacker. Get it right. (No just kidding..... but I should post that on news sites just to see what reaction I get.)

Re:Populist security sense? (5, Insightful)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879491)

You can't argue with market realities. You can be smart. rebrand yourselves and build that brand in a respectable manner, or you can be a stupid 10 year old and throw a tantrum and still be associated with spammers and thieves.

Your choice.

Re:Populist security sense? (5, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879533)

Ah, I see you're a Linux Kernel Developer. "I am technically correct, so I don't have to listen about usability."

Here's an example: swastika. Immediately, you're thinking of 40s era Europe, right?

The Germans used the swastika for 6 years. It's been around for THOUSANDS of years as a Sanskrit symbol, but you put up one little flag and point at it with your arm and suddenly YOU'RE the bad guy.

Sycodon is right, a new term has to be coined, and not hat colours.

Re:Populist security sense? (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879785)

Being self-righteous about it wont prevent people from misunderstanding you. You have two options:

* Deal with it
* Be snooty about it, and continue to wonder why people get the wrong idea when you say "hacker"

Re:Populist security sense? (1)

QuincyDurant (943157) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879453)

Agreed. Ninety-nine percent is a bit high, but my dictionary and others say that it means to break into a computer illegally. The AP Stylebook, which governs most media coverage, says the term "hacker" "has evolved to mean one who uses computer skills to unlawfully penetrate proprietary computer systems."

Since the meaning of "hack" has evolved, or at the very least is evolving into this negative sense, automated computer systems flag it.

Maybe the magazine can contact a live person. Or find a different word although I'm not sure what it would be.

Re:Populist security sense? (1)

Imrik (148191) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879505)

My interpretation is that they used 'hack' the same way you do rather than the traditional sense meaning something more like building custom gadgets.

Re:Populist security sense? (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879759)

Hacking riding a horse for pleasure

I'm going hacking = I am going horse riding

Depends on the context and who you are speaking to what it means ...

Re:Good for them! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879355)

Wow.. really!?! I thought hackers used Linux because they cared about Freedom....

Re:Good for them! (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879371)

Considering that their eBook reader runs a version of it...

Meanwhile... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39878949)

It wasn't pulled from the UK. We own you, Yanks!

Re:Meanwhile... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879021)

Remember what happened last time, Redcoat.

You lost big time until the french helped you out? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879303)

Or did you think that Mel Gibson film was a documentary?

Re:Meanwhile... (1)

Norwell Bob (982405) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879241)

I thought China was our majority debtor.

Re:Meanwhile... (2)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879551)

No, the major US creditor is internal US debt. China owns 7% of the total US debt, which is 30% of the foreign debt.

Streisand effect in 3, 2, 1! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39878953)

Odds are that Linux Format magazine is about to see an increase in circulation.

But... but... (4, Insightful)

klocwerk (48514) | more than 2 years ago | (#39878961)

Say what?
I used to pick up my copies of 2600 at a local B&N years ago...
Sad.

Re:But... but... (4, Insightful)

Yobgod Ababua (68687) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879095)

Yes, but they cleverly named them "Reference you don't understand or care about" rather than "Pop culture meme that doesn't mean what you think it should mean.

Name better, Try again.

Re:But... but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879341)

They still have them on the shelves. Not too long ago, they carried hackin9 magazine too. They have plenty of books on the subject as well. They even carry books on writing malware. But who am I to expect consistency and logic out of a corporation?

Pulled for false advertising (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39878967)

With a title like "Learn to Hack" you're expecting instructions about chopping up things like bodies, not about poor server security.

Re:Pulled for false advertising (4, Funny)

idontgno (624372) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879163)

I thought it was a golfing tutorial. That's why I passed it by.

Obligatory (2)

jabberw0k (62554) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879775)

Lizzie Borden to her Pa: "Papa, can I play outside?" Pa: "Go axe your mother."

And yet (5, Insightful)

Alranor (472986) | more than 2 years ago | (#39878971)

They'll happily stock martial arts magazines, full of special features about new and exciting ways to hurt people.

Re:And yet (2)

mykroft42 (831331) | more than 2 years ago | (#39878995)

Heck they even stock 2600 which is essentially a whole magazine of such articles.

Re:And yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879109)

Or a full complement of magazines dedicated to medical marijuana. I couldn't believe how many the last time I was there.

Re:And yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879167)

That's correct, they stock self-defense and physical exercise magazines. Those magazines don't talk about how to go out and find people to hurt.

This was an article that started out explicitly stating how it was going to teach you to "attack passwords" and "break encryption" and such. If you want to blame anyone, blame Anonymous for keeping computer security in the news and causing this kind of crackdown.

Re:And yet (1, Insightful)

bonch (38532) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879231)

Fair point, but the argument could also be made that the hacking article was a self-defense article. Maybe they gussied it up a bit to give it an edgy appeal, talking about how they'd teach you how to be a "hacker", but I'm sure the original motivation of the article was to teach about potential insecurities in your server. Then again, perhaps they share some of the blame for muddying up the point of the article by talking about teaching you how to crack server passwords.

The bigger question is--people still buy print magazines, and Linux magazines at that?

Re:And yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879197)

Just one more reason to avoid B&N.

Seriously, i get much better variety from the local used bookstore (Half Price Books) than the 'new content' that B&N is pushing. Insult to injury, the used bookstore has almost everything that B&N has anyways, short of Science and Engineering materials.

I compare B&N to Starbucks. People go to the 'Buck' for over priced coffee, and B&N for over-priced literature.

Re:And yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879433)

Just one more reason to avoid B&N.

Seriously, i get much better variety from the local used bookstore (Half Price Books) than the 'new content' that B&N is pushing...

Good for you. Except for the incredibly obvious part where you wouldn't have used books if it wasn't for the people who bought them new.

Re:And yet (1)

zerro (1820876) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879627)

do they not also sell many books and periodicals that have plenty of practical information about dark arts of finance, business, and legal domains?

Freedom of speech? (0)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39878977)

Which US Law that is violating our first Amendment rights that would require B & N to take it down...
Perhaps B & N is worried about something.

Read the 1st amendment first. (5, Informative)

ElmoGonzo (627753) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879037)

No it's not. If a government agency had tried to force them to take it down, that would have been a case of infringement. But as a private entity, B&N can decide what to carry in their product line.

Re:Read the 1st amendment first. (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879623)

I just subscribed to Linux Format.
NOT through B&N.
Keep-up the good work and soon you'll be like Circuit Sity.

Re:Freedom of speech is not the issue here (2)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879437)

Which US Law that is violating our first Amendment rights that would require B & N to take it down... Perhaps B & N is worried about something.

Though your grammar and sentence structure make it difficult be certain, it appears that you seem to think that the First Ammendment applies here. If so, you are very much mistaken. Stupid even. B&N can choose to sell, or not sell, anything they want

Re:Freedom of speech? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879565)

I love how stupid self-proclaimed "constitutional experts" are. Ron Paul voter, I assume.

Wtf? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39878979)

What's wrong with hacking? Just because one or two people may use hammer to hurt others, doesn't mean all shops should be banned from selling them.

I'm shocked, SHOCKED to hear there's gambling (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39878985)

Wait, a company has a virtual monopoly on brick and mortar book stores and suddenly doesn't feel any pressure to carry a product like this, since no one can go down the street and get it from a competitor? Get out of town....

2600 (1)

GryMor (88799) | more than 2 years ago | (#39878987)

That is really odd, as my local B&N was still carrying 2600 last time I was in, and there are similar articles in every issue.

Shut up! (2)

freeze128 (544774) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879725)

Quiet! B&N might catch on and stop selling 2600 as well!

US$300M effect? (2, Interesting)

jbernardo (1014507) | more than 2 years ago | (#39878991)

Could it be that the buyout of B&N by Microsoft has produced the first victim?

Or just a "unfortunate coincidence" that the magazine censured over a word is a Linux magazine?

Re:US$300M effect? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879651)

There was no buyout.

B&N spun off a subsidiary (which doesn't handle this sort of thing) and Microsoft took a minority stake in that subsidiary (so even the subsidiary was not bought out).

Which is in contrast how exactly to (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879043)

2600, the Hacker Quarterly, which it has carried for at least a decade?

Example why brick and mortar bookstores dying (5, Insightful)

MSTCrow5429 (642744) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879069)

In an age where brick and mortar bookstores are no longer the most economic method to deliver printed matter, and where the needs and desires of consumers can be far more fully met online, needlessly exposing yourself to ridicule and consumer anger is not a good business strategy.

2600 Magazine? (1)

adenied (120700) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879073)

I used to go to Barnes and Noble to buy 2600 Magazine because it was the only place in town that carried it. This was in the Midwestern US in the mid-1990s. I guess times have changed (OK I know times have changed).

Re:2600 Magazine? (1)

sir lox elroy (735636) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879187)

Actually they still carry it.

Of Course they did! (0, Troll)

CajunArson (465943) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879081)

B&N simply cares about not allowing FUD to be sold in its stores! The banned article is obviously M$ sponsored FUD because it says that Linux boxes can be hacked, which all of us Slashdot users know is physically impossible because of the OSRGF (Open Source Reality Generation Field). I mean it's simple physics: somebody could read the Open Source code and find bugs. Multiple universes exist where all bugs are found. Therefore, all bugs are found, fixed, and patched automatically, making it impossible to hack Linux. Watch some more Star Trek and learn your physics people!

I applaud B&N for taking a stand against the spread of M$ sponsored FUD like this.

Graded: Incomplete (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879091)

They missed 2600. The b&st@rds.

When they pull that, I have -1 reasons to go to B&N. And since they bought my data from Borders and spammed me immediately, I've been a little peeved at them. Now I can explain to the wife how buying books at Amazon isn't hurting the local seller. The local seller is well capable of hurting itself.

Who still buys dead tree computer magazines? (0)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879099)

Yes. Really. I wouldn't want them if they were free. Waste of paper which I would have to haul off, not backlit, can't copy/paste or link to content, etc.

I'm certainly old enough to miss dead tree media. I don't, though I use junk snail mail to line the bottom of my bird cages.

Re:Who still buys dead tree computer magazines? (1)

LtGordon (1421725) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879285)

I wouldn't want them if they were free ... not backlit ...

Not to be rude, but what cave are you reading magazines in that doesn't have sufficient light to read a magazine?

Re:Who still buys dead tree computer magazines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879555)

Plenty of circumstances in modern life where a backlight is useful.

E.g. 1: Some long-haul city buses dim their interior lights at night, especially towards the front, which makes it hard to read printed material.

E.g. 2: You like to read in bed but your partner can't go to sleep with the bed-side lamp on.

Sure you could mess about with a pen light or a head-mounted light... if you lived in cave. But for us modern people, a backlit reader or pad is much more convenient.

Free advice... Try to live a little and gain a sense of perspective so you won't make yourself ridiculous trying to ridicule others, hm.

Re:Who still buys dead tree computer magazines? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879347)

I do. They accept a level of abuse which would kill every electronic device.

Left wing nuts! (0)

TokyoMoD (1425399) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879111)

what a load of BS!

Re:Left wing nuts! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879365)

"Left Wing"?!?

I don't know about that. This sounds pretty fascist to me which makes it Right-Wing-Law and Order-Republican type of bullshit.

The June Issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879123)

Just wait until they see the June issue... Headline: "Beat the CIA"

"populist security sense" (1)

bonch (38532) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879131)

Pulling the issue is stupid, but the article does start with "Hacking is the art of gaining access to a computer system that you’re not supposed to access" and "Attack servers, crack passwords, exploit services, beat encryption - everything you need to protect yourself from evil", so to claim that they used the term in any other sense than what most people assume the term means is a bit misleading.

1337 (2)

Sav1or (2600417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879147)

So how many different definitions of the word 'hacker' is there now, 1337? Seriously though, I'm sick and tired of all the mystery and ignorance surrounding the subject.

Way to go (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879149)

You just lost all of my future business. Linux Format is my favorite magazine, and I am disgusted that I ever bough anything from Barnes & Noble after they did something like this. Goodbye B&N, hello Amazon!

Next issue: Rooting the Nook? (1)

tekrat (242117) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879165)

I suggest Linux Format Magazine picks up the pace. They should feature a "hacking" article EVERY ISSUE.

In fact, I'm thinking about going into publishing a HACKING magazine right now. With Blackjack and Hookers....

2600 magazine rules that niche, but maybe with something like "HACKING" right on the cover, they'd give me lots of free publicity by pulling it.

BTW: How is it that they carry MAKE magazine? Technically, that's hacking as well...

Re:Next issue: Rooting the Nook? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879343)

Forget the hacking. And the blackjack.

They prefer that customers buy (3, Interesting)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879175)

less dangerous reading material [barnesandnoble.com] that has hurt no one.

Re:They prefer that customers buy (4, Funny)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879179)

Crap. I just violated Godwin's Law, didn't I?

Re:They prefer that customers buy (3, Funny)

saveferrousoxide (2566033) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879395)

Actually, no. Quite the opposite. You lent further proof to it. :)

Beat the CIA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879193)

Think it is actually because the cover says "Beat the CIA" rather than learn to hack... well at least it does in the UK!
the tag line is "keep everyone out with our ultimate privacy guide"... I imagine thats the reason why, not a little tutorial. Governments don't like being reminded...

Dear Barnes and Noble (5, Insightful)

SecurityGuy (217807) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879201)

Stop being stupid.

I cut my teeth on articles about "hacking". I've used "hacking" tools going back to the one that got Dan Farmer fired, and before. My interest in security was sparked by downloading an exploit for the Solaris eject command. Download, compile, omg! Root prompt!

The catch? I did all those things on boxes I was paid to secure. I've never broken into anyone's systems but my own, and I have legitimate rights to do that. Information is information. It's not "good" or "bad". I have a bookshelf full of books, mostly bought in your stores, that could teach you how to "hack" or how to secure systems and networks. Guess what I've been paid to do for going on 20 years?

Did they not learn..... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879209)

From the 2600 lawsuit? a few years ago B&N was refusing to carry them in the stores, and 2600 sued them, or at least threatened to and they put them back.

How to hack an hamburger: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879239)

[censored]

This deserves a big WTF??? (1)

Angrywhiteshoes (2440876) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879259)

They sell 2600, I know because I buy it there.

Re:This deserves a big WTF??? (2)

Angrywhiteshoes (2440876) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879495)

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/d2600-magazine-2600-magazine/1108150347?ean=2940013699236 [barnesandnoble.com]

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/hacking?store=ALLPRODUCTS&keyword=hacking [barnesandnoble.com]

Man, I don't get it, there must be more to it than just "omg, they are legionz PULL ALL THE THINGS!!!!!"

I don't have a subscription to Linux magazine... (1)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879265)

...but I am going to get one now.

Unacceptable... a bookseller doesn't have the right to assert opinion in this manor.

B&N could have destroyed Apple (4, Informative)

tekrat (242117) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879295)

If, in the 70's they pulled Esquire Magazine for carrying the article "Secrets of the Little Blue Box", an article that described phone phreaking.

This inspired Steve Jobs to convince friend Woz to design and build Blue boxes, which eventually lead to the founding of Apple... now the biggest company in the world...

Apple started from hacker/phreaker roots, and inspired by an article published in a magazine. Just imagine the damage they've done to the future by pulling this Magazine.

Hypocrisy (2)

Petron (1771156) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879301)

You can't buy Linux Format because of an article about hacking (which is legal), but you can buy your copy of High Times (full of articles about something illegal under federal law)...

A Great Magazine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879315)

I used to write for them. Wonderful folks and a great magazine.

cracking not hacking (0)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879325)

- hacker == good guy; hobbyist; enginner or technician
- cracker == bad guy; thief; like a safecracker

We need to teach the reporters and press the difference between these two words, so they start using "crack" or "cracker" for someone up to no good rather than demeaning us enginners, technicians, and hobbyists.

Re:cracking not hacking (0)

Scarred Intellect (1648867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879529)

They've already won. The usage of the word has changed, the language evolved.

Hackers are bad, nefarious people. Accept it, it's a lost cause.

Re:cracking not hacking (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879629)

So, please tell me exactly when we started to differentiate that way. I would dearly love to know this, and I've never been able to figure out exactly where it came from.

In the mid 80's, it was hacker for both. To me 'cracker' is a term which started in the late 90s or so long after plenty of us were already using the word hacker to describe both of those.

I've never bought this distinction, because it sounds arbitrary, and completely doesn't agree with the usage that was widespread at the time.

Someone came along after we'd been using 'hacker' and demanded we start using cracker, and people since then have been saying "oooh, it's cracker, not hacker" ever since.

So, in my experience and opinion, it's a totally bullshit distinction that everyone gets all butt hurt about, but which happened after the term hacker was already widely used for both. I can just never dig up a reference to when the usage started to shift.

Re:cracking not hacking (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879705)

Well.
You're wrong.
Watch some old C64 Demos from pirate groups, or opening crawls from pirated games. "Cracker" and "cracking" is a term that has been around for a long, long time. Pre-1985. Example: "(c) This game cracked by Phreakers. L8mers go home."

No big deal (2)

Klync (152475) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879379)

That's okay, I'll just head down the street to buy a copy from .... Oh, wait .... I know! I'll just go online and order it off .... Oh, shoot. Hmm, where did all the competition go? Oh well, I guess I'll just read whatever B&N or Amazon recommend for me..... Aaah, Excel For Dummies. Excellent.

Re:No big deal (2)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879545)

That's okay, I'll just head down the street to buy a copy from .... Oh, wait .... I know! I'll just go online and order it off .... Oh, shoot. Hmm, where did all the competition go?

Where it inevitably goes in anything approaching the mythical free and open market - into a steadily decreasing pool of competitors until there is, effectively, no competition. Now shut up and consume from the holy capitalist system like a good citizen.

But they seel this book? (4, Insightful)

hduff (570443) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879429)

Scarne on Cards
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/scarne-on-cards-john-scarn/1104279175?ean=9780451167651 [barnesandnoble.com]

Teaches you how to cheat at card games.

Originally produced for the US Army during WW2, it was designed to reveal methods of cheating so a soldier could tell when he was being cheated, just like the Linux Format article.

Understanding bad people is not the same as being a bad person; ignorance is neither power nor protection.

Barnescrosoft! (0)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879469)

With important new partnership, Microsoft open a new front on malware distributors, by curbing proliferation of the fundamental skills needed to write software! Windows has never been more secure!

Hmmm ... (2)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879507)

They used 'hack' in the populist security sense, rather than the traditional sense

Where does everybody get the sense that back in the day we didn't use the word for both of those things?

In 1988, a hack was used to describe a clever tweak of something to do something new, social engineering, and security intrusions. And, as far as I know, had been used in those ways for some time.

I've simply never gotten this whole "it's crack not hack" stuff, because it feels like we're changing after the fact how the word was actually used in practice. But when I was in highschool in the mid 80s, hacker was the only word we used -- 'cracker' came later.

Re:Hmmm ... (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879727)

I agree, the cracker vs. hacker debate is pointless. In my book, a hacker is somebody who figures out how to do stuff, not based on what was intended, but rather what is possible. It may be for good or ill, which is a subjective matter in the eye of the beholder.

Re:Hmmm ... (1)

Sperbels (1008585) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879781)

But when I was in highschool in the mid 80s, hacker was the only word we used -- 'cracker' came later.

When I was in jr high and high school (mid 80's to early 90's)...and I BBSed a lot...a hacker was someone who gained unauthorized access to a computer. Cracking was used to describe people who circumvented copy protection.

So does this mean they are policing content? (2)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 2 years ago | (#39879571)

If so, does that mean they are responsible for the content of the other 499 magazines + 20000 books in their store?

By the way, did any store ban The New Republic when they published a possibly pedophilic article [firstthings.com] 17 years ago? Or the National Review when they continued to publish what may be seen as racist articles into this decade? I don't know if they did, just wondering.

Calling B.S. on this one... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879573)

This sounds like it is just a publicity stunt. B&N carries all kinds of magazines on "Hacking," specifically 2600 Magazine. For what it's worth, my local B&N stores carry very few copies of Linux Format magazine every month and usually sell out mid-month. Also, this is still on the shelf as of today, not "pulled."

Buckaroo Bonsai vs The Marijuana Plants (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39879717)

Buckaroo Bonsai vs The Marijuana Plants - Saving the truth source, exposing who fibs or the chaos cabal's cave?

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