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Yahoo CEO Wrongly Claimed To Have Degree In Computer Science

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the was-that-wrong? dept.

Education 363

jmcbain writes "Scott Thompson, Yahoo!'s CEO who was hired on January 4 of this year, was found to have lied about his CS degree from Stone Hill College. Investigation from an activist shareholder revealed that his degree was actually in accounting, and apparently Thompson had been going with this lie since the time he served as president of PayPal's payments unit."

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363 comments

I would've went with accounting (5, Funny)

outsider007 (115534) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885873)

Yahoo needs an accounting CEO more than a cs one lately.

Re:I would've went with accounting (4, Insightful)

slartibartfastatp (613727) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885999)

An accounting and liar CEO - that's gonna work.

Re:I would've went with accounting (4, Funny)

narcc (412956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886111)

That's the current standard, isn't it?

Re:I would've went with accounting (4, Funny)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886243)

Yea... an accountant. He already said that.

Re:I would've went with accounting (-1, Troll)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886251)

liar CEO

Isnt that an oxymoron?

Re:I would've went with accounting (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886257)

No, it's redundant.

Re:I would've went with accounting (2)

MiG82au (2594721) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886319)

Your usage couldn't be more wrong: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxymoron [wikipedia.org]

Re:I would've went with accounting (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886365)

actually, a lying accountant would be an oxymoron, as an accountant is usually known to be truthful, due to certifications taken to become an accountant. while he may not have actively passed his cpa certification etc, if you were to be an accountant, you wouldn't be a liar, as that isn't in the code of conduct, in the sense of the word. it's like an unfaithful lawyer, as a lawyer must be faithful to his client, else he would lose his own bar certification.

however, you calling it on usage, is saying that a shrimp couldn't be jumbo, because shrimp CAN be large, however, by the meaning of shrimp, an association with "jumbo" would be oxymoronic.

it's cool if i'm wrong, i'm knee deep in vodka, but hell, I'm pretty sure we all got his joke.

Re:I would've went with accounting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886399)

How many companies don't? Honestly now.

Doesn't that make him a better CEO? (5, Funny)

JoeMerchant (803320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885879)

Pathological disregard for others makes a more ruthless and efficient leader, isn't that what shareholders want?

Re:Doesn't that make him a better CEO? (2, Funny)

siddesu (698447) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885927)

Also, what is a computer scientist if not a bit and byte accountant? A virtual bean counter, so to speak. And considering the mess that is the tax law, the algorithms an accountant knows and uses may be more complex than anything Knuth can teach you.

Re:Doesn't that make him a better CEO? (3, Funny)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886073)

Yeah, but the only pattern he knows is producer-consumer.

Re:Doesn't that make him a better CEO? (3, Funny)

sg_oneill (159032) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886171)

Yeah, but the only pattern he knows is producer-consumer.

The problem for yahoo though, is that google is the singleton.

Re:Doesn't that make him a better CEO? (4, Insightful)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886175)

Well no really because of course that ruthless and efficient leader is all about ruthless and efficient salary, bonuses and of course golden parachute.

Ruthless and efficient thinking ie psychopathic thinking demands that those with the greatest resources make the most profitable victims, in this case it is the investors.

The pattern should be pretty obvious by now. Fudge the books to create the false illusion of high profits, ramp up salary and bonuses, make it look like you are doing something through acquisitions, mergers and, mass sackings. Make it all last as long as possible and try to avoid jail when you bail with your golden parachute just before the company goes belly up.

Modern CEO no qualifications required beyond excellence in PR=B$ (lies for profit).

Re:Doesn't that make him a better CEO? (1)

slasho81 (455509) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886363)

Sure, but if that's what they want, they also want someone who can get away with it.

In other words... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885885)

In other words, he's a really really good accountant.

So? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885889)

Was he able to do the job well? Does it REALLY matter? If he got away with it that long I say good for him, if his employers aren't smart enough or care enough to verify they weren't really that concerned about his credentials.

Re:So? (5, Insightful)

J Story (30227) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885963)

Was he able to do the job well? Does it REALLY matter? If he got away with it that long I say good for him, if his employers aren't smart enough or care enough to verify they weren't really that concerned about his credentials.

Maybe this is an indication that degrees are over-rated. Or to be charitable, that it isn't particularly important exactly what you learn.

Re:So? (4, Interesting)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885989)

Was he able to do the job well? Does it REALLY matter? If he got away with it that long I say good for him, if his employers aren't smart enough or care enough to verify they weren't really that concerned about his credentials.

Maybe this is an indication that degrees are over-rated. Or to be charitable, that it isn't particularly important exactly what you learn.

Perhaps. Though it's not obvious that a CS degree would contribute much to your skills as a CEO.

Re:So? (1)

solarissmoke (2470320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886031)

Meaning it is obvious that an accounting degree would contribute much to skills as a CEO?

Re:So? (2)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886337)

Yes, because it means you'd understand your firm's financial statements, which is more important for a CEO than understanding the code its programmers write.

Re:So? (4, Interesting)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886011)

Every time it comes up, lots of people (myself included) always say that you just need a degree, it doesn't matter what in. This just proves it... Not in the way I intended what I said the above, but still...

Re:So? (4, Insightful)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886071)

Depending on the job at hand, it's certainly true. One of the major things of having a degree is that it proves you have a certain learning capability, and self discipline to get it done. And after a few years, degrees count less and less, as actual job experience takes over.

Though especially the more technical fields where the actual background/scientific knowledge counts it's not "just any" degree that will land you such a job.

Besides, I'm used to employers taking a resume for granted, and not doing much of checking (as long as the whole thing makes sense). Yet for a CEO function I'd expect a bit more of background checks being done. A simple call to the university the person says to have graduated from would suffice to confirm he actually has that degree. Or not, in this case.

Re:So? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886113)

One of the major things of having a degree is that it proves you have a certain learning capability, and self discipline to get it done.

"Look! I can sit in a classroom and waste my money! Doesn't this automatically mean I'm good enough to do the job!?"

I've always found that attitude mysterious. Almost like proclaiming that someone should hire you because you dig large holes in the ground using a spoon (indicating that you're a very "motivated" individual).

Re:So? (1)

Lershac (240419) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886269)

more its an indication that one can learn what is necessary to accomplish a goal, interact with others (unlikely a sociopath), exhibit determination and patience, and learn somewhat independently.

A college degree signifies that you possess a basic group of skills that are found useful in most business. A specific degree indicates you can probably take a decent whack at accomplishing something in your field, and are prepared with the basic knowledge to learn how its really done out in the actual world.

It decreases the RISK to a company that they have made a bad hire, which is why its used as a criteria. Like it or not, by and large it works.

Re:So? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886273)

When you're badly ill, do you go to the guy who has a degree in treating illnessess? Why?

Re:So? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886229)

So he lied. If he can do the job well, then he shouldn't bother lying.

Re:So? (4, Interesting)

Mitreya (579078) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886301)

Was he able to do the job well? Does it REALLY matter? If he got away with it that long I say good for him, if his employers aren't smart enough or care enough

They are now saying (in TFA) that this does not diminish his wonderful abilities to lead the company. They are not firing him! Is Yahoo HR informed that a relevant degree is now optional when they filter resumes?
I am happy with either direction:
a) Fire him and apologize for oversight
b) Keep him and announce that Yahoo believes that degrees don't mean much

But you can't have it both ways.

firstly (5, Informative)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885891)

Now that everyone realizes he's not an IT guy, he'll probably ask for a raise.

Re:firstly (1)

crafty.munchkin (1220528) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886001)

... and get it.

Re:firstly (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886021)

Or go into law... I mean selling a lie that well, he would make a fantastic lawyer!

Reminds me of Disney (5, Insightful)

Grayhand (2610049) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885893)

"Investigation from an activist shareholder revealed that his degree was actually in accounting" Back when I worked for Disney we called Eisner that guy from accounting, it's actually a Berke Breathed quote we borrowed. It's amazing how many of these supposed CEOs are glorified accountants. Kind of explains the whole lack of imagination in big business.

Re:Reminds me of Disney (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886039)

It's amazing how many of these supposed CEOs are glorified accountants.

In our takeover-squeeze-discard corporate culture, it's the auditors [google.com] that thrive.

Re:Reminds me of Disney (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886333)

When I was starting college, I had narrowed my choices down to either computer science or accountancy. I chose computer science.

I chose... poorly.

Minor in CS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885897)

Or focus? People (and employers) are more interested in how well a cv sells than how accurate it is.

Isn't this considered professional fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885905)

or something like that? Kind of how most business graduates consider themselves "competent managers"?

PayPal's Payments Unit... (0, Flamebait)

cosm (1072588) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885911)

...would be like the Nazi's Synagogue Construction Unit.

I don't think this is surprising news.

Uni fail (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885913)

pffft - Who cares what he has - University degrees are worthless anyway

They only exist to perpetuate the privatised education "revolution".
They are only used in interviews to weed out the undesirables - but anyone who has done hiring knows, A university degree does not guarantee intelligence, or even an understanding of the candidate's chosen field.

Re:Uni fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885943)

LOL, you dropped out of university.

Re:Uni fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886153)

LOL, YOU wasted 40k on a piece of paper.

I've NEVER been to uni...

Re:Uni fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886417)

Me neither, and I had a 20 year IT career without it. I was a Sybase Database Administrator with 8 years experience when a contract ended in 2008 (bad time to enter the job market.) Been mostly out of work ever since; I apply, and typically they do not respond at all. The few interviews I have had, they all said, "you were great, we loved you, and we went with someone else." One recruiter told me point-blank that it was because I don't have a degree listed on my resume; he told me that most people aren't even going to consider it. That sounds ridiculous but it does match my experience that the vast majority of companies I apply to never even contact me for an interview. By 2009, the very fact of the employment gap was also being used against me. I will probably never work in that field again.

So I used to think like you do, that degrees were worthless. Now I am not so sure.

Re:Uni fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886029)

this is true, the company my brother works for prefers college over uni, the uni students they do hire apparently have no real understanding of what to do or why they spent the last 4 years or so in school, and in some cases so bent on the fact that what they know is right, even when its not, that they are in a lot of cases harder to work with, they also demand more money right out of the box.

Activist Shareholder? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885921)

I think you mean dick...

One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (4, Insightful)

caywen (942955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885933)

If you can get to the top ranks of a tech company without a CS degree, it's almost like a big FU to all of us that do hold CS degrees. I've always was kind of awed by people I work with that understand everything I do about technology and even CS concepts but don't have a degree. It's humbling and enlightening. Despite being 10x harder, a BSCS is kind of treated like a liberal arts degree these days. It's something to be personally proud of, but it seems to hold no real weight on ones resume. At least, that's how it seems.

So, IMO that makes it an even bigger red flag when someone claims to have such a degree when they don't. It speaks to me of true cluelessness.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

CryptDemon (1772622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885981)

I dunno about you, but my CS degree got me over 50k a year graduating. Hardly think your average liberal arts major is making even half that.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885995)

Because of the degree or because of your skills? Difficult to know.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (2)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886091)

Because of the degree or because of your skills?

Most likely both, and the later being (to a great degree) a function of the former. Skills do not occur in a vacuum but in a educational context (be it ad hoc or academic).

Difficult to know.

No. It is not.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886221)

No. It is not.

Really? So he knows whether or not he would've got this or another job (with similar pay) if he didn't have a college degree?

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886163)

LOL, I was getting paid that straight out of high school on a level 1 support job.

Few years later, performing third level support sitting on just under 90k no Uni degree.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

msauve (701917) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886017)

" I've always was kind of awed by people I work with that understand everything I do about technology and even CS concepts but don't have a degree. "

Let me guess. You majored in CS because there wasn't an English requirement.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (3, Interesting)

xQx (5744) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886089)

I did an MBA rather than a CS degree because an MBA doesn't have a math requirement.

true story.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886135)

MBA is also the easiest postbac related degree on earth.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886147)

This is my favorite post of the day.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

caywen (942955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886413)

Lucky guess.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (3, Insightful)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886019)

If you can get to the top ranks of a tech company without a CS degree, it's almost like a big FU to all of us that do hold CS degrees.

Not really. It has long been known that there's a glass ceiling for *any* technical skill (programmer, chemist, etc.), and that the only way to rise above a certain level is to switch to management.

If you want to rise to the top, any degree that gets your foot in the door will suffice. Then switch to management as soon as you can.

Study CS if you want to do technical stuff instead of climb the company ladder.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (2)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886195)

This is true of any technical ability. You can only increase your productivity so much as an individual. At some point you have to be able to direct/motivate/drive multiple people to accomplish higher productivity. Even the best widget maker in the factory can't produce as many widgets as we well run team of people producing widgets.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (4, Funny)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886303)

>> If you want to rise to the top

The cream floats to the top...but so do dead fish.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (3, Insightful)

mortonda (5175) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886411)

Not really. It has long been known that there's a glass ceiling for *any* technical skill (programmer, chemist, etc.), and that the only way to rise above a certain level is to switch to management.

If you can't do it, teach. If you can't teach, get into management. If you can't manage, run for office. :D

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886145)

    Good, then I gave a big FU to those of you who hold CS degrees. Over the last 15 years, a few titles I've held have been "Sr. SysAdmin", "Director of IT", and "Chief Information Officer".

    Honestly, you can't claim that a piece of paper makes you any better or worse than another candidate. When I've hired or authorized hiring, the primary qualification is "Can this candidate do the job better than the other candidates, within the constraints of the position?" The constraints being salary and other incentives.

    I've known some people who the only thing they have to show is their degree. I've known others who have actually learned the desired field, and can do it well. I've also seen many people who have great degrees who struggle in very low positions.

    As for the piece of paper being worthless, many are. To show this, I purchased a very official looking Doctorate, which had contacts that would confirm the fact that I earned the degree, and many people who tried to research it couldn't find anything to say it was just a worthless piece of paper. I won't ever claim that I actually earned the degree. I use it as an example of how you cannot trust user provided credentials without verification.

    If you are a candidate interviewing with me or any of my subordinates, you had better show that you have the skills required to accomplish the tasks in the position. Saying little more than "I have a degree in this, hire me!" will only get you an invitation to leave the premises.

    If you are hired, and you continually voice your opinion that you are better than your superiors who don't have degrees, you will find yourself dismissed for insubordination. Expect that anywhere.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886197)

dude -- you get a CS degree in FOUR YEARS. After that, you go to work for ten to twenty years. After a short time the first four years aren't that important.

The fact that Scott is a liar and let people think he had degrees that he did not earn is a real sign of his character and how he behaves when he thinks nobody is looking.

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (1)

myowntrueself (607117) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886237)

I have an Arts degree majored in computer science. What happened was that I started off with philosophy, got hooked on logic and ended up studying things like the mathematical foundations of computer science, algorithmic information theory etc. I was kind of shocked when I realised I had enough credits from the computer science papers to qualify for my degree... I'd been worried that I hadn't enough philosophy papers.

Turns out you can get an Arts degree majored in a Science subject. Who'd have thunk it?

So am I an artistic scientist or a scientific artist?

Re:One should be proud *not* to have a CS degree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886347)

So am I an artistic scientist or a scientific artist?

Just give me the fries I ordered, please.

Remember kids, lying is wrong... (2)

gman003 (1693318) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885935)

Unless, of course, you're a politician [slashdot.org] , CEO [slashdot.org] or other Important Person. Then you can pretty much get away with it with little more than a slap on the wrist and a tsk-tsk from the media.

shit ? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885957)

Re:shit ? (1)

able1234au (995975) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886305)

That link should be blocked by slashdot and people who post it are lame.

Ironically (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885967)

A quick Google search would have exposed his charade a long time ago.

Re:Ironically (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886233)

I think a Yahoo search would have been even more ironical...

And he still has a job? (5, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885971)

If he were labor, HR would have sent security to escort him out of the building before this even got to press.

That must be one hell of a golden parachute he's packing.

Re:And he still has a job? (2)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886035)

Actually, fraud may invalidate that parachute.

Re:And he still has a job? (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886069)

CEOs can afford their own lawyers.

Re:And he still has a job? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886059)

I think he should make good on it and get a CS degree to keep his job.

Re:And he still has a job? (1)

tomhath (637240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886105)

Nah. It happens all the time. If HR catches it during the interview process the applicant is done, but once in the door it's a non issue.

Re:And he still has a job? (3, Insightful)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886159)

    Falsifying credentials at hire time are usually grounds for immediate termination, regardless of how long you have worked for a company.

    I wonder what their history of termination for this kind of issue have been.

Of course... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885979)

He'll still get a golden parachute.

Many people do this, here's another one : (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39885991)

Peter Ransome, one of the principals at Active Data Services in Durham NC used to lie
and claim he had an MBA when he did not.

I went to school with the asshole, and lying was something he did a lot, but he certainly
never got an MBA.

CEO's (0)

QuietLagoon (813062) | more than 2 years ago | (#39885993)

Why do CEO's in this country think they are above everyone else, demanding excessive compensation and feel they can prevaricate with impunity when it suits their purposes?

Re:CEO's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886037)

And why wouldn't they?

Re:CEO's (5, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886047)

Why do CEO's in this country think they are above everyone else, demanding excessive compensation and feel they can prevaricate with impunity when it suits their purposes?

Because people continue to give them excessive compensation, and they keep getting away with the lies... In other words, they believe that because it is true.

Re:CEO's (3, Interesting)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886167)

Actually, the CEO of one company is on the board for another company whose CEO is on their board. There is a site called theyrule tht tracks these connections to demonstrate the complex collusion/extortion going on among corporate leadership and their siphoning of wealth from the small guys that actually invest in their businesses. Decades ago, those milions went to the owners (stockholders), but as the coup has entrenched, the excess has become standardized and regularly increased.

Re:CEO's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886065)

Because they can, and the more they act like that the more money they make. This appears to be the natural state of capitalism. Which is why strict government regulation is needed if we are going to advance as a society.

Re:CEO's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886095)

Because they are and they can.

Now, if you had asked whether they merited that status with hard work or intelligence, the answer might be different. People at the top are a grab bag of characters. Some are ruthless; psychopathic, even. The ratio of executive psychopaths is significantly greater than in the general population. (Interesting read: The Sociopath Next Door.) Some are hard working or intelligent. Others are average and lucked out. Still others made it to the top through nepotism or other connections.

Regardless, CEOs are held in esteem by most people, especially politicians. Why, I have no idea other than because people look up to rich and powerful people. The free market works not because CEOs are better than politicians or bureaucrats, but because of pricing phenomena.

Stock prices (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886005)

It will be interesting what this does to stock prices with regards to investors confidence in grads vs. non-grads who have done well.

Yahoo! should now be the employer of choice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886009)

For those looking for work in the IT field who have less than stellar backgrounds.

Look here. Make up some stuff, put it on your resume and apply to Yahoo. Obviously they don't check, and if you're found out after you're hired they won't even mind! In fact, they'll make excuses for you.

Re:Yahoo! should now be the employer of choice (1)

rhizome (115711) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886289)

Nah, it's only the lower classes who get such checkups, sometimes middle-class'ers. Sandwich makers get drug tested, bus drivers get FBI background checks, it totally makes sense in a certain light.

"Wrongly claimed.." (5, Funny)

3Cats (113616) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886023)

I asked my son if he broke the neighbor's window, he "wrongly claimed" that he didn't.

My boss asked me if I was coming in to work today and I "wrongly claimed" I was ill.

"Sweetheart, I am not "wrongly claiming" when I told you I never slept with your sister. It was an "inadvertent error" ..I *LIKE* this !

bunch of yahoos (2)

tomhath (637240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886079)

I always felt that Yahoo [wikipedia.org] was an odd name for a company.

Swift describes them as, filthy and with unpleasant habits, resembling human beings far too closely for the liking of protagonist Lemuel Gulliver

Don't sugar coat it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886083)

He didn't "wrongly claim". He lied.

"wrongly claimed"??? (5, Insightful)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886161)

Oh fer crissake...

The man lied. Nothing more to it than that

"wrongly claimed"... give me a break.

Uh Oh (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886287)

Major Uh Oh!

Thompson has claimed this for more than a decade!
And the Yahoo Board Member who managed the vetting also has an "anomaly" in regards to "scholastic achievement", perhaps not now least of which is a question of corporate achievement.

So, the investigation now moves swiftly to the other Yahoo Board members and the operating officers: what are their anomalous scholastic and corporate achievements!

'Fed eyes' are upon Yahoo.

PS

IRS accountants spot an 'anomaly', and report to FCC and DoJ.

Lordy O' Lordy (LOL).

Anybody else find this ironic? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886313)

Yahoo positions itself as the "Business Intelligence, Data Analytics company." The idea is that companies need to pay close attention to the sea of data in front of it because there are facts hidden in there which can have material effects on the company's future revenues, earnings, and even viability.

Their CEO got his position by lying on his resume about his degree to land a top position at PayPal, then used that background to get hired at Yahoo. That reflects not only on his technical qualifications, which admittedly could change over time, but on his character and integrity, which *does not*. Evidently the board and/or HR dept at neither company even bothered to pick up the phone to call the college, or if they did, they were easily pacified by a slick explanation by the candidate ("their system probably only has room to store one degree, but I did get two").

And now the company is saying that this kind of thing doesn't matter? Maybe only data which can be generated by sophisticated learning algorithms or computing clusters is worth acting upon.

Next time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886323)

Perhaps Yahoo! should have googled Scott Thomson's name. Oh, wait...

Shocked (3, Funny)

frovingslosh (582462) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886357)

Someone who worked at PayPay lied? I'm shocked!

Too late to complain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886367)

He lied to get a job, didn't get caught. It was so long ago that he first lied that it has no effect on his current competancy. His track records as a CEO far exceed his initial education.

Competant people often have to fake credentials to get decent jobs. Good managers recognize that an employee who has shown competency is worth more then the sum of his credentials.

Fire Him (5, Insightful)

JStyle (833234) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886373)

I say fire him immediately. Having someone at the top who egregiously lied for so long sets the tone for the whole company. That's not how you want to do business, so that's not who you want as your leader.

what was that thud? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886385)

It was the sound of the class action lawsuit by everyone who was ever fired by Yahoo! for falsifying credentials when applying for work there. If the CEO does it, and gets to keep his job....

Cringely (2)

craw (6958) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886395)

This brings back memories of the controversy with regard to Cringely (pen name) having a Ph.D. from Stanford. Some of us old-timers might remember that this is a topic of great discussion here.

so what? (0)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886403)

It's just Yahoo; nobody gives a fuck about them anymore.

Headline is gracious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886415)

The headline makes it sound like he was mistaken. It's fraud.

No, it's fraud. Thanks for cheapening my already grossly overpriced education.

FINISH HIM !!!!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39886419)

That's all I have to say.

Glad I don't have a degree in Computer Science (1)

dittbub (2425592) | more than 2 years ago | (#39886429)

Does this mean degrees in computer science are worthless?
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