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Rand Paul Has a Quick Fix For TSA: Pull the Plug

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the might-increase-their-efficacy dept.

Privacy 1051

suraj.sun quotes from Politico: "Rand Paul has a reform plan for the Transportation Security Administration: Scrap the whole thing. A personal message from Paul (R-Ky.) came atop emails this week from the Campaign for Liberty Vice President Matt Hawes, asking for readers to sign a petition in support of Paul's 'End the TSA' bill. A Paul spokeswoman said that legislation is being finalized next week. 'Every inch of our person has become fair game for government thugs posing as "security" as we travel around the country. Senator Rand Paul has a plan to do away with the TSA for good, but he needs our help,' reads the petition, which also asks signers to 'chip in a contribution to help C4L mobilize liberty activists across America to turn the heat up on Congress and end the TSA's abuse of our rights.' 'The American people shouldn't be subjected to harassment, groping, and other public humiliation simply to board an airplane. As you may have heard, I have some personal experience with this, and I've vowed to lead the charge to fight back,' Paul wrote at the top of a C4L fundraising pitch, according to blogs that received the email. 'Campaign for Liberty is leading the fight to pressure Congress to act now and restore our liberty. It's time to END the TSA and get the government's hands back to only stealing our wallets instead of groping toddlers and grandmothers.'"

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1051 comments

oh boy, demagoguery (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893433)

my favorite.

It's about damn time (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893435)

Sign me up. This security theater has got to stop.

Even a broken clock (2, Insightful)

Fwipp (1473271) | about 2 years ago | (#39893443)

...gets it right twice a day.

Re:Even a broken clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893551)

Yup. I can't stand the guy 99% of the time, but I have to give it to him here.

Re:Even a broken clock (-1, Troll)

wiedzmin (1269816) | about 2 years ago | (#39893637)

He's only saying what the sheeple want to hear...

Re:Even a broken clock (-1, Troll)

jhoegl (638955) | about 2 years ago | (#39893723)

No, he only has an issue with it because he finally got accosted like the rest of us.
"What... you dare treat me like normal people? I am a Senator! This outrage will not stand!".

Re:Even a broken clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893745)

I am not a fan of either of the Pauls, but no, he's saying it because he's a Libertarian and actually believes it. Surprisingly, I find myself in agreement with him. I cannot say that very often.

Re:Even a broken clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893557)

That's true only for analog clocks. A digital clock shows nothing.

Re:Even a broken clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893699)

That's true only for analog clocks. A digital clock shows nothing.

It's a stopped clock that's right twice a day (generally speaking, unless it's moving between time zones etc) not a broken clock, which might never be right or might be right at all sorts of odd times depending on the manner in which it's broken. A digital clock would seem more likely to be broken than to be stopped but if it were stopped then it would be right just as often as any other sort of clock.

Re:Even a broken clock (1)

Volante3192 (953645) | about 2 years ago | (#39893583)

Not a digital clock.

Re:Even a broken clock (0)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#39893599)

Ron Paul is too old to be digital.

Re:Even a broken clock (1)

spiffmastercow (1001386) | about 2 years ago | (#39893689)

Ron Paul is too old to be digital.

Ah, but this is his son, Rand Paul. Rand Paul is to Ron Paul as Bush II is to Bush I.

Re:Even a broken clock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893783)

It's Rand, not Ron saying it.

He does need our help (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893447)

Does anyone know how to commit someone to an institution that would provide him with the level of care he so obviously needs?

Yes! (2)

Mitreya (579078) | about 2 years ago | (#39893459)

I would love to.
But if anyone besides a small following was listening to Ron Paul, US might have repealed PATRIOT act and even bombed fewer countries with drones.

Re:Yes! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893635)

I don't listen to know it all jackoffs who publish racist hate literature.

Ron Paul is a homophobic, racist, 1%er through and through - and when he talks of "states rights", he really means "I want to own slaves".

Ever notice how it's the young, shallow types who follow him? The ones Lenin dubbed the "useful idiots"?

Too bad his other ideas are bad (3, Insightful)

Nimey (114278) | about 2 years ago | (#39893463)

Can we get a non-extremist pol who thinks TSA is a bad idea and has the power to do something about it?

Sad Day (4, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#39893483)

It's a sad day indeed when common sense is considered "extreme".

Re:Sad Day (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893509)

Today isn't that day, however.

Re:Sad Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893513)

Not all of his ideas can be considered 'common sense'... Some of them are pretty out there.

Re:Sad Day (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#39893527)

Many of his ideas aren't common sense. Yes, he has a few decent ideas but there's more chaff than wheat in the mix.

Re:Sad Day (2, Interesting)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39893649)

Nice FUD.

I've been listening to Rand since 2009 (when he first announced his intention to run). His ideas are more "calm" than those of his father. I have yet to hear any Rand position that I would object to.

Re:Sad Day (4, Insightful)

GodInHell (258915) | about 2 years ago | (#39893763)

He thinks the Civil Rights Act was federal overreach -- because the Fed has no business telling private enterprise that they must serve black people.

Still think that way?

Re:Sad Day (1)

coinreturn (617535) | about 2 years ago | (#39893627)

It's a sad day indeed when common sense is considered "extreme".

I think the OP's point was that using phrases like "Every inch of our person has become fair games for government thugs" is an extremist way of making a point. You are not going to be taken seriously with such vitriolic rhetoric. State your case without hyperbole and maybe someone will listen.

Re:Sad Day (4, Insightful)

davester666 (731373) | about 2 years ago | (#39893709)

What's extreme about this? Every external inch of you is scanned by the TSA. And once al-Qaeda deploys their 'ass-bomber', the TSA will be obliged to anal-probe everyone...

Re:Sad Day (0)

Mike Buddha (10734) | about 2 years ago | (#39893683)

"Common sense" is a phrase meaning "something that doesn't need to be backed up with facts". I'm glad that "common sense" is considered "extreme" or even a bit whacko.

Re:Too bad his other ideas are bad (1)

Xiver (13712) | about 2 years ago | (#39893511)

Do tell; what, do you think, are his extreme positions?

Re:Too bad his other ideas are bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893631)

I agree, these comments are unfounded.
Please enlighten us to your pile of chaff.

Re:Too bad his other ideas are bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893657)

shiny-metal-based currency, abolishing the FDA, DoE, repealing the 14th Amendment, etc.

Mainstream politicians (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#39893521)

Unfortunately, the political mainstream in America does not give two hoots about civil rights, except when it comes to protecting the rights of corporations and wealthy Americans. We have gotten the point where the bill of rights is "extremist."

Re:Too bad his other ideas are bad (3, Insightful)

PaulBu (473180) | about 2 years ago | (#39893697)

"Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice, and moderation in the pursuit of justice is not a virtue" (Cicero, used by Barry Goldwater in his '64 acceptance speech).

Again, which of his positions do you find extreme? Protecting the Bill of Rights? Not bombing random countries willy-nilly? Supporting Internet freedom?

Or are you conditioned to have a knee-jerk reaction that any pol with an (R) next to his name is too extreme?

Paul B.

Re:Too bad his other ideas are bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893787)

Or are you conditioned to have a knee-jerk reaction that any pol with an (R) next to his name is too extreme?

I thought that was a "D" - at any rate the Pauls really should have an "L", as that's where they come from.

Political reality (5, Interesting)

sjbe (173966) | about 2 years ago | (#39893777)

Can we get a non-extremist pol who thinks TSA is a bad idea and has the power to do something about it?

No. Next question.

Seriously, the TSA is going to have to do something horrendous to get reformed. (I mean like killing babies horrendous, not their usual baseline horrendous) Otherwise any politician who tries to change it will be accused of coddling terrorists. Sad but that's the political reality we live in.

Booyah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893465)

Finally, a Republican I can get behind. Well, for one thing at least.

Petition link (5, Informative)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#39893467)

Since all the submitter could be bothered to do was pump up Politico page views, here's the link to the > petition> [chooseliberty.org].

Re:Petition link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893531)

Can I write-in a presidential candidate instead? =)
We need more than two options.

ulterior motive (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893469)

I presume his bill will have a rider that ends the rest of the federal government also.

If I can not sex assault you..... (4, Interesting)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39893489)

The government only has the powers given to it by the People of this land. If I can not touch your breast or crotch, neither can the government.

BTW there's already a law that allows airports to remove TSA from their buildings. So far I've only heard of one airport that considered evicting them. (And the government responded by saying that airport would be removed as a travel destination, if it followed through.)

Government is not eloquence or reason: It is force and intimidation. See the medical marijuana users who, even though they followed California law, were arrested anyway by U.S. police violating the 9th and 10th amendments.

Re:If I can not sex assault you..... (3, Insightful)

LDAPMAN (930041) | about 2 years ago | (#39893731)

By that logic because I can't imprison you or execute you the government can't either. Because I can't tax you, the government can't tax you...

Thats starting to sound good to me..

Some people seem to forget... (-1, Troll)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 2 years ago | (#39893495)

... that air travel is a privilege, not a right. Furthermore, you are utilizing a private industry when you travel by air. If you don't like the TSA, you can travel a different way. The TSA has no jurisdiction over you in a private car, and for that matter they don't have jurisdiction over you when you are using a private airport.

You are welcomed to opt not to travel by air.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (5, Insightful)

Art Challenor (2621733) | about 2 years ago | (#39893553)

I think you missed the point.
If I set up an organization to grope people in libraries people have the option not to use the library, but that doesn't make my groping legal.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893569)

What does that have to do with anything? If something is broke, it's broke. Scrap it.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893571)

http://www.tsa.gov/what_we_do/tsnm/highway/index.shtm

Re:Some people seem to forget... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893573)

The TSA has no jurisdiction over you in a private car

Yet.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (3, Interesting)

suutar (1860506) | about 2 years ago | (#39893585)

The TSA has no jurisdiction over you in a private car, and for that matter they don't have jurisdiction over you when you are using a private airport.

Yet. (Though remember their parent DHS claims jurisdiction and the right to search anyone freely at any point within 100 miles of the US border, which covers 90ish percent of the population, if I recall right.)

Re:Some people seem to forget... (3, Informative)

Bugler412 (2610815) | about 2 years ago | (#39893591)

So then, what is your response to the TSA "Tiger Teams" setting up roadblocks and checkpoints on the highways then?

Re:Some people seem to forget... (5, Informative)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#39893607)

that air travel is a privilege, not a right

Oh, that is why we bailed out the airlines a few years back? You know, to ensure that people have the "privilege?"

The TSA has no jurisdiction over you in a private car

You do realize that the reason they cannot just demand that you open your car for an inspection is the same fourth amendment that should make nude scans and pat-downs unconstitutional, right? Your rights are not supposed to disappear just because you are in an airport.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (1)

z4ce (67861) | about 2 years ago | (#39893639)

Actually.. yes they do have jurisdiction over you on the "public roadways." Google TSA VIPR. Its basically the most Orwellian government agency imaginable.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893641)

What about the tsa vipr program?

Re:Some people seem to forget... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893643)

Some people seem to forget that the federal government does not have the authority to search citizens without probable cause. However, private corporations can refuse to service those who do not consent to a search and be subject to civil and criminal claims for abuse.

How do we "opt-out" of the TSA VIPR teams?

Re:Some people seem to forget... (3, Insightful)

mcelrath (8027) | about 2 years ago | (#39893667)

That is a stupid and ridiculous statement. This is the 21st century, and air travel is the most common form of transportation for nearly all people is by air, to exercise their constitutional right to petition the government. Burying your head in the sand and pretending that horse and buggy is still an option is simply stupid. The government must change with the times, and these times predominantly use air travel.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (5, Informative)

prestonmichaelh (773400) | about 2 years ago | (#39893675)

If you don't like the TSA, you can travel a different way

Sure, as long as you also don't want to travel by car [youtube.com] or train [aol.com] or subways or ferries [cleveland.com]

I guess that still leaves by foot (as long as you don't go in a subway tunnel) and maybe horse. I guess we really shouldn't complain.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893715)

"The TSA has no jurisdiction over you in a private car.."
"You are welcomed to opt not to travel by air."

Or train, bus, or car.

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/dec/20/nation/la-na-terror-checkpoints-20111220
http://www.tsa.gov/what_we_do/tsnm/highway/index.shtm
http://autos.aol.com/article/tsa-screening-drivers-in-tennessee/

Re:Some people seem to forget... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893795)

The TSA absolutely has jurisdiction over you in a private car, and are already setting up checkpoints along highways.

You are welcomed to drive your private car on your network of private roads that you will build yourself.

Oh, and freedom of travel is absolutely a right.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893807)

Actually, the TSA considers its jurisdiction to include freight rail, highway and motor carrier, port and intermodal, mass transit, pipeline security, air cargo, commercial aviation and general aviation. This comes straight from their website. Indeed, they've already started sweeps at train/subway stations and ferry terminals. When a service becomes ubiquitous and a part of normal, productive life, fair access becomes more than a privilege. This is especially so when the services involved are gradually becoming all-inclusive. Ultimately, we decide what is privilege and what is right based on how we'd like society to run. Laws are passed by officials that we elect and we can even amend the constitution if we agree on powers to be limited or extended beyond the present status.

Re:Some people seem to forget... (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39893815)

>>>privilege

Not according to the Supreme Court which has, in more cases than I can list here, asserted time and time again that freedom to travel is ONLY restricted when crossing an international border (and then you can be subject to a warrantless search).

People have always had a Right to travel, whether it is by foot, wheeled vehicle, horse, ship, or plane. Just as you have a right granted by nature to open your mouth and speak. It is YOUR body and you may use that body however you desire (except not to harm others). Including thinking, speaking, eating, working, or traveling.

Well I guess Rand goes back on the no-fly-list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893503)

Like a lot journalists and other malcontents

ahhha (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893507)

Groping i can tolerate, but i have to draw the line at fisting.

Every problem looks like a nail (-1, Flamebait)

Bo'Bob'O (95398) | about 2 years ago | (#39893517)

I'm usually not one to complain about article selection, even political ones, but his one is just silly. Ron Paul's solution for -everything- is to just pull the plug.

Re:Every problem looks like a nail (2)

mattack2 (1165421) | about 2 years ago | (#39893567)

Learn to read -- this is not by Ron Paul.

Re:Every problem looks like a nail (1, Informative)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#39893705)

True, it's RAND Paul, but he seems to be following in his father's footsteps - do something dramatic, but totally unfeasible (shut down the TSA).

Now, if he had just suggested that we take all the TSA staff and make them dress up like actors in 'Pirates of the Penzance' or something, then we could have some real Security Theater. I could fly with that....

Re:Every problem looks like a nail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893577)

^ Didn't read entry.

Re:Every problem looks like a nail (-1, Flamebait)

coinreturn (617535) | about 2 years ago | (#39893651)

I'm usually not one to complain about article selection, even political ones, but his one is just silly. Ron Paul's solution for -everything- is to just pull the plug.

The solution to Paul is to pull his plug (both Rand and Ron).

Same security, twice as much $ (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893529)

So, is he suggesting we go back to the way it was? Private companies that had different policies throughout the country? Or is Xe or some security contractor going to re-hire all of these gate screeners and then charge the government or airlines twice as much?

The TSA isn't the problem with the governments finances. And they have done a great job in the past 11 years.

He should be for pushing the cost onto airline tickets or setting up the TSA like the USPS.

The Campaign for Liberty Platform (5, Informative)

Grond (15515) | about 2 years ago | (#39893533)

Bear in mind that the Campaign for Liberty is about a lot more than opposing the TSA [campaignforliberty.com], some of which some people may not find all that palatable (e.g. free market fundamentalism, scrapping the Federal Reserve, dismantling most of the federal government, withdrawing from most international organizations).

Re:The Campaign for Liberty Platform (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893595)

...and how are those things bad?

Re:The Campaign for Liberty Platform (1)

Grond (15515) | about 2 years ago | (#39893717)

I'm not taking a position for or against them, but it is evident that quite a few people disagree with those positions yet also oppose the TSA and its tactics. The summary does not make it clear the Campaign for Liberty has a much broader mission than dismantling the TSA, and I wanted to correct that omission.

Re:The Campaign for Liberty Platform (2)

thejynxed (831517) | about 2 years ago | (#39893669)

To be fair, the Federal Reserve deserves to be scrapped as much, if not more than, the TSA. It's members blatantly hold US currency hostage and sleep openly with Goldman Sachs.

bah (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893541)

What will ron paul think of next.

Crazy, but honest. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893555)

Too bad we don't have any real conservatives in the GOP anymore. Real conservatives keep the liberals honest.

Under the bush administration Homeland security was created, Literally the largest and most expensive Government bureaucracy ever created. Literally the biggest of the big government created by people that scream they're all about small government in the same breath.

Vote for him then (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893563)

If the stupid people of the US would vote for Ron!! Instead voting for Romney!

Re:Vote for him then (1)

NouberNou (1105915) | about 2 years ago | (#39893775)

They would just be recommitting their dedication to stupidity. I'd take Romney over Paul any day and I am about as far left as you can get (with out swinging back around again to libertarianism...).

Paul is working on other bills... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893579)

From TFA: "...Paul is working on “multiple” TSA bills, including one to privatize the service..."

Which does not quite sound like pulling the plug, but switching outlets. This is more in line with my understanding of his general ideology.

And this is news? (5, Insightful)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 2 years ago | (#39893611)

The Pauls have a quick fix for everything, and it's usually some form of "pull the plug".

  • The Federal Reserve Bank's complex and lacks oversight? End the Fed!
  • Income tax is hard to understand? No more income taxes!
  • Mathematical models aren't perfect for predicting reality? Use psychology!
  • We've made a mess of another country, and cleanup's expensive? Exit Afghanistan!
  • Social Security commitments breaking your perfect budget? Opt out!
  • People think you're a crackpot who doesn't understand the modern world enough to support your campaign through traditional channels? Fly a blimp!

Ron Paul 2012: because quick fixes haven't screwed up the world enough already.

Re:And this is news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893785)

keep towing that line mr. status quo

TSA does something very important (4, Insightful)

Karmashock (2415832) | about 2 years ago | (#39893653)

Well... for politicians. The problem they have is that if another terrorist attack gets through they don't want to be held accountable for it. So the TSA was created and the security was made as annoying as possible without actually making it so annoying that the TSA is scrapped. It's a balancing act.

Anyway, if there is another attack they can point at the TSA and say " do you want it to be any more annoying then that?!" And if they've made it annoying enough everyone will agree it is almost unbearably annoying.

So they'll say "well, you chose not to make it any more annoying so that's on the American people and not your entirely blameless elected official."

And thus they can't be held accountable for anything that could go wrong.

If you scrap the TSA and there is another attack, they'll get blamed for it. That's not acceptable.

If they put in a better system that isn't annoying but is much more effective and there is an attack they could still get blamed even if they gave us a really good system. Why? Because unless it's really annoying someone somewhere will blame the system.

So here we are... and in a lot of ways it's all our faults.

I'm personally going through the pat down process every single time I travel. If more people were like me, the TSA would have disbanded about ten seconds after it stopped because logistically they can't pat everyone down.

Many people have messaged me in the past on this very site to tell me that they shouldn't have to go through that process and so they go through the scanner instead. That's fine. You're making it easy for them and it is because of people like you that the TSA gets away with it.

If you don't like the TSA then get a pat down or stfu.

Ron Paul can't do anything about it. The man has no power. He has one isolated seat in congress. Who votes with him in a block? No one. He's all by himself out there. So whatever you think of his politics, he's not really an effective response to anything. He won't be president and he's isn't even a relevant force in the house.

If you care about the TSA's abuse of the common traveler... never walk through the scanner. Always take the pat down alternative. If enough of us do it. We win.

Re:TSA does something very important (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 2 years ago | (#39893771)

I would think the scanner would be less invasive, since nothing else physically touches your body

Do not send money to the "Campaign for Liberty" (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893655)

Although ending the TSA is an admirable goal, please do not send money to this group.

This group also has goals / ideas which are not as logical as the removal of the TSA.

Push your own congress critter to move forward on this, and work on legal petitions, not these fake online ones.

Can't tell if trolling or stupid (1, Flamebait)

jfengel (409917) | about 2 years ago | (#39893661)

There's a saying that everybody has a plan that is simple, easy, and wrong.

Nearly everybody thinks that at least some kind of security measures are necessary for airplanes. Israel's security system is highly regarded, for example, and many people think we should switch to that. Maybe we should, but it's still going to be "The Agency that handles Security for Transportation" implementing it. You can shuffle the deck chairs and rearrange the acronyms, but it's still going to fall to the government to handle security on a national-scale operation like airplanes.

"End the TSA" has a nice populist ring, and Paul gets to glom onto it, knowing that there's absolutely zero danger of actually passing it. You don't get to just end the TSA; you replace it with something else. Pretending it's what you want is either political showmanship, counting on everybody else to find political cover for when they ignore your bill (which is never getting out of committee), or it's complete and utter ignorance of how government works.

For most politicians, I'd say it's the former. In Rand Paul's case, it could be either.

Re:Can't tell if trolling or stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893773)

Airports and airlines were perfectly capable of running their own security in the 90s. Is there any reason why they couldn't do so today? Do you have any proof that the TSA is more effective than the 90's model?

Airlines have the perfect incentive to run good security. Terrorism --> Less people fly. Too much security --> less people fly. Let airlines balance it. They will do a better job than the government.

Re:Can't tell if trolling or stupid (4, Interesting)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#39893811)

Nearly everybody thinks that at least some kind of security measures are necessary for airplanes.

Yes, and we had some kind of security measures for decades before 9/11. Let's go back to that. The only security measures we need to take to address the problems that lead to 9/11 are 1) locking the cockpit door, and 2) tell passengers to fight back against hijackers. That's it.

The TSA has already killed more people than Al Qaeda has, by encouraging them to drive instead of fly. Why shouldn't they be treated as anything other than terrorists?

Huh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893691)

"Think of the children" being used to restore liberties? What is going on here?

not going to happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39893737)

The legislators probably "don't care" about risk to human life, but airplanes are very expensive, thus security checks are here to stay.

TSA freaked out over a roll of raffle tickets (3, Informative)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 2 years ago | (#39893821)

They searched my back once they saw it on the radar. Poor dude manning the XRays when my bag went through couldn't figure it out, and the chick who searched my bag was like "Ohhhhh!" once she realized what it was. She still had to wipe it down with something (for what, I don't know) and after they reran my bag, they seemed rather embarrassed about the whole thing.

MEH (2, Informative)

snarfies (115214) | about 2 years ago | (#39893825)

I signed the petition (once I FOUND it, thanks Slashdot for not actually linking to the thing). I was then immediately hit with a "GIVE MONEYS PL0X" page. It really didn't feel right.

If I do give moneys, I'll also be supporting the campaign to repeal Obamacare (the petition for which I am intentionally not linking to), so no thanks.

Which? (1)

jimmerz28 (1928616) | about 2 years ago | (#39893827)

How am I supposed to know which one of the two buckets I fall into when I start agreeing with Republicans?

This two party system is so confusing sometimes.

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