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Researchers Push Implanted User Interfaces

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the well-if-it's-good-enough-for-cadavers dept.

Handhelds 84

MatthewVD writes "A new, user interface-enabled generation of electronics that you wear under your skin could be used for convenience, or even pleasure, rather than medical reasons. Scientists at Autodesk Research in Toronto have implanted electronics with user buttons, pressure sensors and LEDs under the skin of a cadaver's arm and wrapped in artificial skin. The electronics could buzz you when you have an appointment, carry memory cards with data, or connect you in a social network with others wearing electronics."

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Featuring On/Off button! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900517)

This sort of reminds me of the movie In Time

Re:Featuring On/Off button! (1, Interesting)

starworks5 (139327) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900531)

Here's to a cashless society!

http://www.infamouskidd.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/in-time-clock.jpg

Because freedom isn't free.

Re:Featuring Tolerance of Deviance! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900749)

I push a niggerdick in mah ass! And if u dont like that, ur racist AND afraid of gays. So there, mod this up!

Is it practical? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900523)

Isn't it better to have external gizmos? Electronic thingies tend to break, be obsolete, be hacked, be stolen.
All of the above get a lil' worse when the stuff is right inside you.
All of this without the orwellian aspects taken into account.

Re:Is it practical? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900583)

Instead of just getting mugged, you get dismembered!

Behold, the march of progress.

Re:Is it practical? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900827)

Instead of just getting mugged, you get dismembered!

Is it still niggers doin the mugging?

Chris Rock said it. He's black by the way and yes he said "niggers". So cry about racism to somebody who gives a fuck mmkay? If you dont like this quote from a black man maybe you are racist yourself and dont want him to have his opinion if u disagree with it. Rock talked about how they say that's just the media givin the impression blacks do most of the violent crime. He said muthafucka, when I go to my ATM tonight I'm not checkin behind my back for the media, I'm lookin out for niggers!

Re:Is it practical? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900591)

Yes, it needs a whole new philosophy for gadgets. Works first time; long-term value; doesn't break easily; doesn't need digging out and updating every couple of days. It's worth having some implanted gadgets just to get the electronics industry thinking like that.

Re:Is it practical? (4, Insightful)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900639)

On the one hand, what you say is absolutely correct. On the other hand, being a cyborg would be really, really cool...

Re:Is it practical? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900675)

On the one hand, what you say is absolutely correct. On the other hand, being a cyborg would be really, really cool...

Professor Warwick, is that you?

Re:Is it practical? (1)

alices ice (699932) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901393)

On the one hand, what you say is absolutely correct. On the other hand, being a cyborg would be really, really cool...

Professor Warwick, is that you?

is that the guy who swallowed a watch battery and thought he was lawnmower man?

Re:Is it practical? (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#39903883)

Until the alarm clock sewn into your arm won't shut off properly due to a software or hardware problem, and you have to throw your self across the room at the wall in hopes of getting any more sleep... :P

Re:Is it practical? (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900885)

Nanoprocessor tattoos are where it's at. Cyberpunk 2020 here we come! It may be a dystopian future but we'll have the coolest toys.

Re:Is it practical? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39902753)

I was going to explaine this to the doctors with my alledged implant but she already relised this and explained it. now i just hear voices, im suppost to believe its for data theft.

Is it safe? (1)

sowth (748135) | more than 2 years ago | (#39906367)

What are the potential health effects of having implants like these?

Here it cums... (5, Insightful)

shadesOG (2457562) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900543)

'electronics could buzz you when you have an appointment' I'm sure this will be used for only appointments.

Re:Here it cums... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900635)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teledildonics

Of course you're going to have to be pretty brave (or desperate) to have anything surgically implanted under the skin down there.

Re:Here it cums... (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 2 years ago | (#39904225)

'electronics could buzz you when you have an appointment' I'm sure this will be used for only appointments.

And a heart plug via Harkonen inc., when you're two minutes late.

skin response (4, Funny)

alphatel (1450715) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900555)

For a time...I was tempted by the offer. 0.68 seconds, to be exact. For an android, that is nearly an eternity.

Re:skin response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900809)

depends on the clockrate

Re:skin response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900881)

depends on the clockrate

It's asynchronous, you insensitive clod!

Re:skin response (2)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901577)

For an IPhone, though, it seems much shorter.

Incoming mail... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900589)

You've got a virus.

What about the future of copyrights? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900605)

What happens to copyrights when you can "record" what you see or hear via implants? Does this mean if you walk into a theater you cannot remember/record what you've just seen or heard?

Re:What about the future of copyrights? (2)

xOneca (1271886) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901339)

No implants will be done without DRM. Trust me.

Re:What about the future of copyrights? (1)

bratwiz (635601) | more than 2 years ago | (#39902099)

What happens to copyrights when you can "record" what you see or hear via implants? Does this mean if you walk into a theater you cannot remember/record what you've just seen or heard?

If you're talking about all the crap they show onscreen these days, I can't remember it anyway. Don't need electronics for that.

Servers? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900611)

Who owns the servers that these things connect to? Because that's who will own you.

Re:Servers? (1)

MrBrainport (1637275) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900757)

Mr. Hilter...i guess

Re:Servers? (1)

xOneca (1271886) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901381)

U.S. Robotics [wikipedia.org]

operation every two years (4, Insightful)

Ptur (866963) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900613)

Yay, looking forward to the operation every two years, to upgrade or repair.... seeing how long it takes for electronics to break these days, or how long hardware/software is supported by the manufacturer.

Re:operation every two years (1)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900643)

Theoretically you could implant only a wireless interface and the main module would stay outside, like in pacemakers.

Re:operation every two years (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900751)

That sounds great - I always wanted to be hacked!

Re:operation every two years (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901497)

That sounds great - I always wanted to be hacked!

Well, we can arrange that. Just wait while I fetch the axe ... ;-)

Re:operation every two years (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39909325)

You still have upgrade/replace those internal interfaces. :(

Vicious upgrade cycle (1)

GodInHell (258915) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901023)

takes on new meaning.

Re:operation every two years (1)

bratwiz (635601) | more than 2 years ago | (#39902113)

Yay, looking forward to the operation every two years, to upgrade or repair.... seeing how long it takes for electronics to break these days, or how long hardware/software is supported by the manufacturer.

Yeah, I can see it now-- Apple newest implantable "iPud"... complete with exploding battery....

Re:operation every two years (1)

urusan (1755332) | more than 2 years ago | (#39908337)

We'll just include that in your regular body maintenance, using stem cells to rejuvenate your body every two years as well. This will also serve to better heal any surgical wounds.

If we're really serious about cybernetics though, we should make it easy to remove and replace them whenever possible. For instance, a cybernetic eye could be designed so it can be popped out of the eye socket and replaced (though this should probably be done in a clean environment with medical supervision). Location-agnostic equipment like onboard computers could fit into a standard pod with external access (and you might even be able to replace some of that equipment yourself). Cybernetic limbs are already designed to be removed. etc. Anything we can do to avoid surgery or reduce the impact of surgery would be beneficial.

Re:operation every two years (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 2 years ago | (#39909243)

This is why I refuse to get an hearing aid implant. With external analog Oticon 380p (my third one of the same exact model since its release in the mid 1990s/90s), they last about five years and then I have to buy a new one. Hey, old stuff still works for my poor hearing. No lame implants. I can take it off easily too when I don't want to hear. Also, my head needs a rest without headband pressures. No need to worry about inside parts breaking inside of me.

Bluetooth Zombies? (4, Funny)

luckytroll (68214) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900615)

Neat technology, but the use of cadavers is a little disconcerting.

Now we will have to fight off bluetooth and WiFi enabled zombies in the coming apocalypse.

Luckily for us the Zombies will probably be content to use WEP and 2GHz. No worries!

Re:Bluetooth Zombies? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900959)

As long as you control the C&C the zombies will obey you.

Re:Bluetooth Zombies? (1)

xOneca (1271886) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901401)

Now we will have to fight off bluetooth and WiFi enabled zombies in the coming apocalypse.

Wait, not yet! I'm finishing a download!

Re:Bluetooth Zombies? (1)

flonker (526111) | more than 2 years ago | (#39902217)

This gives a whole new meaning to zombie process.

"Well, you see, it's not a dead process with an entry in the process table. It's more of a process running on a dead person who still has an entry in the process table."

A bit confused (2)

skipkent (1510) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900617)

I am confused now, depending on where they are implanted; could I use a Trojan to stop the spread of trojans?

"LIke" button? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900623)

So, does this mean I can get my own "Like" button now?

Re:"LIke" button? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900825)

No, nobody will like you.

Re:"LIke" button? (1)

Dekker3D (989692) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900903)

Personally, I'd say "like" buttons in various shapes and sizes come standard in the human body package. I'd dare bet that you've played with one of yours in the past week. Perhaps even the last 24 hours.

Steel Beach (sci-fi book) (2)

Green Salad (705185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900627)

I think a recall an 80's sci-fi book called Steel Beach by John Varley with this technology in it. What's interesting to me is that the main character was a journalist who was an early-adopter of tech and had refused to update his skin-deep tech for newer embedded technology, because he had mastered his tech and found the new interface annoying. I identified with the interface curmudgeon in him.

The end result (5, Interesting)

Grayhand (2610049) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900645)

How long until we are encouraged to get "subsidized" implants so we get helpful reminders about "special offers". Then one day I find myself getting offers of dick pills in my sleep by my subsidized implants. I find touch interfaces annoying enough so why on earth would I be implanted with a device that will be out of date in a year? Implants mean being tracked 24/7 and being at the mercy of those making the implants. Already there's talk of companies requiring implants to access facilities. The first time I saw some one had been implanted with a tracking chip I didn't say how wonderful I got the cold sweats. Most people are sheep which means I get swept along with what they'll accept. Great our new computer system at work requires implants so I either agree to it or I get fired or handed a broom. Can't happen? Flown on a plane lately? They practically require DNA. Everyone accepts it because it makes us "safer". Millions of people jump through hoops and give up rights without a shred of proof that it makes us safer and yet they accept it. Before the technology moves forward I want a law banning a requirement to have the implants for any reason. Fine if it's an option but as soon as ANYONE requires you to have it to have a job or access a bank account our freedom is long gone. People can say how cool all they want, the first time a chip in my arm vibrates to tell me I have a new spam e-mail is the moment I dig it out with a dull spoon.

Re:The end result (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900799)

1. /equip "head" foilhat
2. Flying doesn't "practically" require DNA samples. You obviously don't get out much and just go with what you read online.
3. You're paranoid. There is a medium of truth in your words, but you're overstating your opinion as fact.
4. Until YOUR employer requires you to be implanted with something, you have no reason to act like it's the end of days as it relates to your paycheck. There will always be demand for manual labor that pays well enough and if you can't get by with a so-so paycheck, you certainly don't deserve a nice one.
5. You're a "sheep," believe it or not. Jumping on the bandwagon and freaking out about things that haven't and may or may not happen. It's one thing to speculate and to react to current events, it's another thing to worry about something that isn't widespread enough to matter.

Re:The end result (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901939)

Modicum. Modicum of truth.

Even better (2)

warGod3 (198094) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900649)

Is the Orwellian aspect where we could have mandatory health care which requires sensors for 'health monitoring' reasons...

Reminds me of Ghost In The Shell... (1)

chronokitsune3233 (2170390) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900727)

Sure, the implants were actually highly advanced prosthetics, but the idea is still the same: the merging of electronic devices with human bodies. So...who's up for some cyborg action? ;P

I don't think they thought this through (4, Funny)

fish waffle (179067) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900761)

What a stupid idea. Who the hell wants to carry around a cadaver's arm just to use their electronics?

Re:I don't think they thought this through (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900941)

What a stupid idea. Who the hell wants to carry around a cadaver's arm just to use their electronics?

It's the opposite of hands free!

Re:I don't think they thought this through (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901165)

What a stupid idea. Who the hell wants to carry around a cadaver's arm just to use their electronics?

Not only that, it seems that they want you to wear the cadaver's arm under your skin! Talk about stretch marks. Let's hope that this is just the 1st generation of the technology, just like 8" floppies were some time ago.

Jess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900763)

Thank you for sharng..
  www.sexyjess.net

Just fantastic (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39900805)

I mean what could possibly go wrong?

could buzz when you have an appointment ... (3, Insightful)

hey! (33014) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900877)

I once had a boss who had raging and untreated ADHD. Opening up my calendar in the morning felt like emotional abuse. The last straw was when we got new phones with a walkie-talkie feature. I couldn't get twenty consecutive minutes to myself to get anything done without being interrupted by the damn ba-beep and having to respond to whatever popped into his head.

I can imagine a few useful applications of implanted technology, like keeping all your medical records handy. But even those are only acceptable if you have a simple and fool-proof way of stopping someone from activating them when you didn't want them too. The ease of getting away from a gadget is a pretty important feature, but it's one we take for granted because up until now we *haven't* implanted gadgets in our body. We're understandably more focused on making stuff easier to carry than on getting rid of it. The desire to implant technology because of the current inconvenience of carrying devices around is like a guy who is five feet tall wishing he was twelve feet tall. If his wish were granted pretty soon he'd see the advantages of being only five feet tall.

The only really killer app for a technology like this is enslaving people. Justice Louis Brandeis, in his landmark paper on a legal right to privacy, defined it as:

The right to be left alone—the most comprehensive of rights, and the right most valued by a free people.

Re:could buzz when you have an appointment ... (1)

PuZZleDucK (2478702) | more than 2 years ago | (#39912957)

So... I take it your not going to install the mute/sleep/shutdown options? I will be.

Aditionally, I take my phone(s) to work every day. In the last year I've forgotten it(or them) maybe twice. Both times it has annoyed me all day. the other 363.25 days I don't recall regretting bringing it once. Maybe it's just me.

Johnny Mnemonic? (2)

FridayBob (619244) | more than 2 years ago | (#39900991)

So, when is Johnny Mnemonic going to run into trouble at the airport?

WTF Scientists??? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39901003)

Who called these clowns 'scientists'? Seriously, what scientific is about stuffing buttons and other crap into a cadaver? Real scientists, who believe in validity of their research, experiment on themselves.

zombieware (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39901019)

Just one word explains everything .... Borg.

You have got to be kidding (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39901021)

How long before we see late night commercials informing us that our implants now qualify us as a class to sue the manufacturer (because of cancer, leakage causing poisoning, injury or death)?

All the arguments pro and con for this class of devices have already been explored in science fiction. Here are some of the con arguments:

Just because you can do a thing does not mean you should do such a thing. Where are our ethics and morality; how about common sense? - oh yeah, they went out the window with political correctness.

Why anyone would want to be Borg is ridiculous. Creating an invisible social network with such devices would be a way to discriminate (and therefore plot) against those who don't have a particular designation (mark of the beast comes to mind here).

Imagine the abuse of stimulation of the adrenal gland by such a device or the pleasure centers of the brain - the addictions and mental disorders that could result (Trekkers know that story line). Ultimately such a device in the wrong hands could reward "correct thinking" and punish those who do not conform.

The pro arguments include creating a better human machine (augmenting our abilities) and allowing the "good" amongst us to control and therefore "cure" the "bad" amongst us (see the "correct" thinking bit, above).

With an outside impartial party to identify the "good" and the "bad" then the results would be just as problematic as the social-political spectrum is in the media and government today. Would the "bad" liberals want to be controlled by the "good" conservatives? Or, would the "bad" conservatives... you get the idea. There would be no such thing as an impartial party to identify the good and the bad... scifi plots tell us that even a computer used for this purpose would have the biases of the makers (programmers) built in. Since an all-knowing deity is not available for the task, then having a single person or an oversight committee supply such logic of appropriate use would be an inappropriate action in the opinions of at least half the population as well.

If this comes to human use, I weep for what is left of our humanity.

Re:You have got to be kidding (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901639)

Just because you can do a thing does not mean you should do such a thing.

That's not a con argument, but an argument for thinking about the consequences first. The result of this thinking may be either way.

Could be very useful (1)

binkzz (779594) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901053)

Carrying out chips could be very useful, but it's also very scary and dangerous. What if we're forced by law to have these things inserted? We could be tracked and monitored continuously in the name of safety from terrorism. Though part of me knows chipping is inevitable: It is too powerful to resist for governments and large corporations.

" . . . and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed. And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: and that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name." -- Revelation 13:15-17

Mark of the Beast: Legal Definition (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39901259)

The "Mark of the Beast" is any device , contrivance or means:

1. mandated by one or more organization(s)
2. whether having the monopoly on violence or not
3. that permanently marks or is implanted in a human body
4 for the purposes of continuing a lifestyle where previously was not required
5. by reason originating from or contaminated by the political decision of any such organization(s)
6. with death as the resulting penalty for the rejection thereof.

However, believing in such matters would be grounds for ostracism. This audience by far is composed by individuals whose occupations, worldview and lives are predicated on rejection of the sources from which the above concept originated.

Fiction becomes fact? (1)

jbwolfe (241413) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901067)

If you haven't read it yet, time to get a free edition of Cory Doctorow's book [wikipedia.org] foretelling exactly what we're talking about here- not so much for originality as for an interesting account of what it would be like to digitally and physically transcend mortality.

So... (1)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901459)

"Scientists at Autodesk Research in Toronto have implanted electronics with user buttons, pressure sensors and LEDs under the skin of a cadaver's arm and wrapped in artificial skin." Which means instead of a small, compact electronic appliance we'll have to lug around a fucking bulky, heavy, rotting corpse? Great.

Shit.

Prior art (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901523)

Microsoft has been getting under my skin since 1975.

The right to copy. (1)

SlashDread (38969) | more than 2 years ago | (#39901691)

If my brain can instantly re-play sound and video, on demand, from implants, that might be a very cool thing to enhance my hearing aid.

I wonder what it would do to the "right to copy".

Control, Stallman,EU style law versus US style law (1)

golodh (893453) | more than 2 years ago | (#39902399)

I hope that people, especially in the US, take the opportunity to actually think this through. But I'm not very optimistic.

With this sort of gadgets, the issue of control becomes even more important than for external gadgets like phones, ipads, net-enabled dishwashers and other appliances.

The reason is that you can't really remove the stuff, it knows where you are and who you are, you can't easily control what it tells the world about you, and you can't easily ignore the inputs it provides. In other words, it provides a very direct window into your physical presence that you may or may not have control over. You can be very certain however that you won't be able to control it with your mind. It will transfer data and commands using radio waves.

Now the question is: will this gadget do what you want, or will it do what somebody else wants. Like e.g. Apple, Google, or Microsoft? Since the gadget will communicate using radio waves (which you can't perceive unless with a special piece of equipment) people outside your body will actually be in as good a position to control the device as you are. If not better.

The essence of how this device will act, depends on its programming. Now, do you see companies falling over each other to make that device Open Source? No? Well, then the device will be closed-source, and your level of control has just taken a backseat to that of whoever built and programmed (or services) the thing.

If that doesn't sound serious to you yet, consider where the money leads. What will make companies that build such stuff more money: giving users who wear this stuff full control, or keeping full control and selling bits and parts of that to whoever pays most (users, commercial entities, security firms, employers, advertising agencies, and all levels of government, from federal agencies to city administrations). My guess is the latter. If only because use of these gadgets as security badges will hinge on the wearer *not* having full control over it.

It doesn't take much imagination to understand that such gadgets present enormous opportunities for abuse.

I believe that this level of integration calls for new legislation. For example privacy and control being enshrined in human rights laws (as the EU are likely to adopt) and/or the constitution. Plain unadorned US law (with its emphasis on protection of whoever can make money off something) I feel is a recipe for abuse with this stuff.

Already Being Done. Behavior Modification. Secret. (1)

FShima (2581323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39902701)

This is already being done covertly under the modern MKULTRA programs [karlaturner.org] as a way to behavior modify people with neurotechnological mind control [youtube.com] .

Re:Already Being Done. Behavior Modification. Secr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39908429)

Yes because what crazy person says is totally believable.

Deus Ex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39902985)

Pretty much shows anyone why this is a BAD idea.

I commented and they just keep sensoring me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39904321)

I commented saying that "doctors at a hospital told me they implanted a brain implant in my head and that I did'ent bother tell them that external devices where better because she already realized it and acknowledged it. it was there for data theft. now i hear voices", i think they just made me schizophrenic. possibly both, but everyone reinforces that its just mental illness and no one couased it.

Oh, the possibilities (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39904441)

How long before women realize they can implant a cell phone vibrator motor capsule in their nether regions and trigger it with a cell phone app so that everytime their SO calls, bzzzzz.. that's a hell of a ringtone. On the downside, they might not want to answer the phone and let it keep ringing.

FOSS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39905547)

This is where FOSS becomes really, really important. I, for one, will never stick a proprietary device under my skin.

666 (1)

surd1618 (1878068) | more than 2 years ago | (#39906315)

My fundie parents showed me a movie, long ago, concerning the biblical rapture and tribulation. This horrible cheasy film from the 70's called A Thief In the Night [youtube.com] , got me to think that when people started wanting to put a computer chip in me, that it would be the Mark of the Beast.

So now I wonder, do large numbers of Christians believe that? Or more generally, would religion present a major hindrance to implementing any system that only used implants?

Re:666 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39906555)

I'd say it depends entirely upon the type of religion in question. Perhaps something akin to Warhammer 40K's Adeptus Mechanicus (or Sin of a solar empires Advent faction and their technologically enabled group mind) might form or some--current or new--sects of Buddhism may be either neutral toward or pro for it.

No imagination. (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39906919)

The electronics could buzz you when you have an appointment, carry memory cards with data, or connect you in a social network with others wearing electronics.

Is that really the best they could come up with? An alarm clock, a PDF file, or a Like/Share button. Gosh I bet it will also help you save recipes.

obsolete fairly quick? (1)

demonrob (1001871) | more than 2 years ago | (#39912093)

"user buttons, pressure sensors and LEDs " Why would you want to interface this way? This will obsolete very quickly. Its direct brain interfacing you need. This is when it gets truly useful.

This reminds me of a joke... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39916077)

This joke is from a time before bluetooth, and maybe even before cell phones:

A man is at a bar, talking into his hand. After a few minutes he stops, and a second man, who is sitting next to him, asks, "why were you talking into your hand?" To which the first man replies, "oh, I have a phone implanted into my hand." After discussing this wonder of modern technology, the first man excuses himself and heads into the restroom. A couple minutes go by and the second man decides that he needs to use the restroom. He walks in and sees the first man bent over, with his hands against the wall, his pants around his ankles, and a roll of toilet paper shoved in his rectum. The second man yells, "what happened to you?! Were you robbed?!" To which the first man replies, "oh no, I'm just waiting for a fax."

Outdated Humanware (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39947921)

If you didnt feel old enough and outdated by younger models - you will now. My embedded CRT monitor is on the blink.

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