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South Korea Plans Hashtag-Inspired Skyscraper

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the ampersand-estates dept.

Idle 117

cylonlover writes "The hashtag or "#" symbol has taken on a lot more use in recent years, especially with the rise of social media tools like Twitter, where it's used to highlight popular topics. So in a way, it's a fitting model for an apartment building designed to act as a self-contained neighborhood, which is exactly the idea behind the Cross # Towers planned for South Korea. Dutch architectural firm, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), is modeling the look of the proposed building after the familiar symbol, by placing two interlocking bridges between two skyscrapers, which will also support outdoor park areas to mimic the sort of spaces you'd normally find on the ground."

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I applied (4, Funny)

commlinx (1068272) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914403)

But apparently 140 other characters got in before me :/

Re:I applied (5, Funny)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914469)

In other news, a solitary hash symbol is now called a "hashtag"

Re:I applied (2)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914573)

Of course... with a word after them, they become "channels".

Re:I applied (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914649)

Indeed, and then people could use these "channels" to "chat" via some kind of... internet relay or something. I hope that isn't patented yet.

Re:I applied (2)

Barefoot Monkey (1657313) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914691)

That's what caught my attention from the summary as well. Referring to hashes as "hashtag symbols" is rather circular. What's next - hashtagsymboltag symbol?

Re:I applied (1)

FunkDup (995643) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915053)

"hashtag symbols" is rather circular

Curiously, "Hash Inspired Skyscraper" is also circular, and yet "The Hash Inspired Skyscraper" is anything but circular.

Re:I applied (1)

gparent (1242548) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915101)

Curiously, "Hash Inspired Skyscraper" is also circular, and yet "The Hash Inspired Skyscraper" is anything but circular.

Ever tried designing a building after taking hash? It never ends up circular...

Re:I applied (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915361)

It does if you're going for a cuboid shape.

Re:I applied (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914899)

That's better than "octothorpe" and some of it's other names [worldwidewords.org] .

Re:I applied (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916037)

Whatever happened to calling it the pound sign? Or is that just a telecom thing?

Re:I applied (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916455)

It's called a pound symbol because ASCII (And the character sets that once competed) didn't have a £ symbol. They were designed in the US, and with only seven bits to work with there was no room for symbols with little use in that country like accented characters and non-dollar currencies. So until the coming of unicode and other means of character encoding, typing a £ in the UK tended to break things - the only way to represent it was the upper-ascii character that not all software supported. The workaround was very simple: People used a # symbol in place of the £ and shouted curses about stupid selfish yanks.

To this day, when I am using MUCKs, I cannot send a £ symbol. The software, written long before unicode, simply drops the character as invalid.

Re:I applied (1)

lsamaha (2034456) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916933)

If you have it right, then Wikipedia has it wrong. "Historically, the pound name derives from a series of abbreviations for pound, the unit of weight." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_sign [wikipedia.org]

Re:I applied (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39917039)

The name does appear to predate the use as a substitute-£ by a long way, which I was not aware of, but aside from that everything I said about its use as a workaround for limited pre-unicode character sets is true.

Re:I applied (1)

jbengt (874751) | more than 2 years ago | (#39917635)

"#" was used as a symbol for pound (force and mass, but not money) before I ever heard of ASCII.
It has also been used as a symbol for "number" for as long as I can remember. (I can remember back to the '60s)
Those two are also the most popular names for "#" in my experience.

Re:I applied (1)

julesh (229690) | more than 2 years ago | (#39917803)

It's called a pound symbol because ASCII (And the character sets that once competed) didn't have a £ symbol. They were designed in the US, and with only seven bits to work with there was no room for symbols with little use in that country like accented characters and non-dollar currencies. So until the coming of unicode and other means of character encoding, typing a £ in the UK tended to break things - the only way to represent it was the upper-ascii character that not all software supported.

You seem to have it the wrong way round. The placement of £ at ASCII 35 in some early UK computer systems is, I am led to believe, based on a misreading of the ASCII standard based on the fact that it used the then already common (in the US) term "pound sign" to refer to the hash.

People used a # symbol in place of the £ and shouted curses about stupid selfish yanks.

No, we actually had computers that couldn't manage to produce a # symbol, and printed £ instead. To this day, if you have an Epson-compatible printer (which many of the printers used in POS systems, for example, still are), you can send it ^[R3 to cause it to make this substitution.

To this day, when I am using MUCKs, I cannot send a £ symbol. The software, written long before unicode, simply drops the character as invalid.

You're lucky it's even that smart. I've worked with systems that will drop the *connection* if they encounter a character > 128.

Re:I applied (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 2 years ago | (#39920261)

Whatever happened to calling it the pound sign? Or is that just a telecom thing?

It's called "hash" in British English (and probably Australia, NZ, etc). I've never heard it called anything else here.

"Pound" might mean money or old-fashioned weight. "Pound sign" "pound key" will always mean £, since the weight is always written "lb".

And here it's always "Item No. 3" rather than "Item #3".

Re:I applied (4, Funny)

hey! (33014) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915395)

You just don't know how architects are indoctrinated^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H trained to think.

A building doesn't exist in isolation, it is part of a dialog with its environment, particularly other buildings. The building itself isn't a hash tag -- it's a hash sign; it *converts the buildings around it into hashtags*, thus calling attention to the fact that the implied statements of their architecture *are indeed statements*. This building is a postmodern sigil. Obviously the architect of this thing must be an a**hole. Who does he think he is, reifing the semiotic implicatures of other architects' work?

Re:I applied (1)

seringen (670743) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916521)

Well, it is Bjarke Ingels Group, and they are well known as one of the most ridiculous and craven of architecture firms. He's been pining to do a huge asian project forever. His brand of thinking-free post modernity shouldn't reflect too poorly on architects or postmodernity or anyone with half a clue. He's popular because he has some hilarious branding...

Re:I applied (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915803)

No comment?

Didn't mean to bash this conversation but it was a real perl of a joke right?

How long (3, Interesting)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914427)

How long before someone hacks it to play a giant game of tic-tac-toe?

Re:How long (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914599)

How long before Microsoft buys adjacent land to build a similarly-sized "C" tower?

Re:How long (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914887)

Ain't gonna happen.

Don't get me wrong. They'll try.
But all the Linux-users, who think they've got root-access to the building, will keep them away.

Re:How long (1)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914957)

Considering they can't tell the difference between the hash/number sign and sharp, I wouldn't want to come anywhere near that skyscraper.

Re:How long (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915041)

Huh? hash and sharp are the same symbol. In professional musical notation, the sharp is angled slightly differently, but on computers everyone uses the hash in its place, since they are nearly identical and there's no better symbol in the standard character sets.

Re:How long (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915307)

Unicode isn't a standard character set? Have we gone back to the 80s?

Re:How long (1)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916383)

Actually, Unicode became a widely implemented standard only in the first few years of this millennium. And while for most of the world the replacement is complete, there are a few shameless places that still use ancient charsets. Fix it, Microsoft and Slashdot!

"Dutch" as in "Danish"? (4, Informative)

phloe (264566) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914433)

BIG are danish... not like the cake (which is a lie anyways)

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914437)

This is the most exquisitely retarded thing I've heard in a long time.

Re:Wow (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914507)

This is the most exquisitely retarded thing I've heard in a long time.

It would utterly fail to surprise me if this 'hashtag inspired' thing is not so much the original plan(Hey guys! Let's substantially reduce the salable volume of the building, while making the engineering more complex and the construction potentially more expensive!) as a creative justification for design choices enforced by some mixture of local zoning requirements concerning density, light-blocking, or other building/city integration variables and the customer's desire to have a particular mixture of interior and windowed space to sell...

You don't generally deviate from building a big box covered in glass just because you are that enthusiastic about twitter or whatnot, you do it because you can't get away with putting up a big box covered in glass. The artistic side of architecture demands that there be an aesthetic 'concept' for the design, to go along with the renders and the scale model display; but it comes down to being an optimization problem in the face of local constraints...

Re:Wow (4, Informative)

Jeng (926980) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914973)

Yep, even mentioned in tfa.

Originally the designers wanted to build just two incredibly tall towers, but height restrictions forced them to get creative. They essentially lopped several floors off of their original specs and reused them as bridges, giving the whole structure a unique look that will stand out among the Seoul skyline.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915805)

You don't honestly believe the (dutch) habit of justifying absurd forms with superficial hyperrational sound bites do you?

Architects like BIG use the language of corporations and politicians to justify outrageous buildings. The arguments are only superficially rational and really an excuse to do wierd shapes. It relies on stupid and uncritical clients and politicians. Calling it creative is nonsense because it's just different, being different is easy as all you need to do is propose stuff noone else have and come up with a saleable rationale.

The success of companies like BIG comes from their uncritical engagement with our society. Their buildings are certainly appropriate symbols of our time as they reveal a complete lack of intelligence and serious thought. Witty sound bite architecture is what it is.

Re:Wow (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916211)

It depends on what you mean by 'believe'.

Do I believe in the conceptual verbiage? No. I view that as a part of the marketing effort that goes into getting one design adopted over another(and, possibly, an honest reflection of the designer's thought process, possibly not; it could be that their solution to a particular set of design constraints was, psychologically, inspired by the 'concept'. It could also be that an entirely different person rationalized the design after the fact. Hard to say and not terribly relevant.)

However, I do believe that this game of aesthetic and conceptual rationalization is, undeniably, part of the process by which architecture gets done. Designs have to be 'sold', both within an architecture firm to coworkers and bosses, and to customers in order to be built. Since the buildings that actually exist are the ones that were successfully pitched, it is very likely that most of the newer ones have this 'conceptual' package produced for them at some point, likely along with some nice little scale models of the area, high-quality prints of 3D rendering from a variety of angles, and similar.

BIG is danish, not dutch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914439)

Bjarne Ingels Group is based in Copenhagen, Denmark. http://big.dk

Zergs!! (2)

blackicye (760472) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914443)

This skyscraper will probably have a Protoss tower nearby, powering it.

A small note (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914451)

Just a small note, Bjarke Ingels Group is danish. Their rather well-designed website is big.dk, where I have spent quite some time playing with sorting their projects by various categories.

Re:A small note (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914665)

Their rather well-designed website is big.dk...

Only if by "well-designed", you mean a website that's consists of one page, where the lower 2/3 of that page seems to be random words in ALL CAPS thrown together without any order or meaning whatsoever.

A site that depends on Flash shouldn't be called "well-designed". EVER!

By the time it's built... (1)

coinreturn (617535) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914485)

The hashtag symbol will probably be passe by the time they finish the building.

Re:By the time it's built... (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915007)

Nonsense. And I said the same to everyone who protested my selection of avocado color-coordinated appliances.

Hashtag?! "Dutch"?! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914489)

What is wrong with you?

Yuo Fail ItK? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914533)

Welcome to the Octothorpe! (1)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914541)

Hmm, living in an octothorpe sounds like you might be looking for a fight. At least hashtag seems like you might get some down home cooking.

Dutch and Hash-Inspired . . . (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914547)

. . . sounds about right to me.

Especially, since the architectural firm is Danish. Hash sometimes does that to you.

It's also called an octothorpe (2)

QuietLagoon (813062) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914577)

The hashtag or "#" symbol is also called an octothorpe.

or the "pound" sign (2)

Comboman (895500) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914719)

I've always called it the "number sign", but most voice mail systems refer to it as the "pound key" for some reason.

Re:or the "pound" sign (1)

julesh (229690) | more than 2 years ago | (#39917893)

I've always called it the "number sign", but most voice mail systems refer to it as the "pound key" for some reason.

Except in the UK, where they tend to refer to it as "square". Which is perhaps even more bizarre.

# was used as an abbreviation of "pound" because, I believe, it is considered to vaguely resemble the letters "lb", which are a common abbreviation of "libra", which is Latin for "pounds".

Re:It's also called an octothorpe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915413)

Which makes hash-shaped building designed to act as a self-contained neighborhood... an octothorcology!

# is comments not twitter (0)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914587)

Who owns #? My theory is twitter does not.

Twitter is a world wide service for mobile phone owners.

World population is about 7 billion.

According to wikipedia: "In February 2010, there were 5.6 billion mobile phone subscribers, a number that is expected to grow." This seems bogus high... there are people in 1st world with both business and personal phones, of course, but that would imply there are people who have no food, no water, no shelter, no medical care, yet pay a monthly phone subscription fee. hmm.

So somewhere around 70% of the worlds population is theoretically a possible twitter user. Lets see how much of that 70% use twitter.

Most popular twitter account is lady gaga with 23 million.

So somewhere around a third of one percent of the worlds population follows lady gaga on twitter.
I'm REALLY unimpressed. The most important and influential web 2.0 company is used by ... practically no one. The emperor has no clothes!

I search google for "IT worker count worldwide" and the third hit to come up is wikipedia's "Discouraged worker" article, which says a lot and is a whole nother story.

Anyway what I'm trying to figure out is how 23 million compares to the number of worldwide programmers/sysadmins/unix users. I theorize that "we" as /. readers own the "#" not twitter. My theory is there are more people that type #!/bin/bash on a daily basis that send tweets on a daily basis. Daily basis is important... I technically have a twitter account, I sent about 2 tweets, subscribed to some morons and some PR agents fronting for some media people, watched for awhile, said WTF is this and never used it again. I would assume this is a rather large fraction of their "subscribers".

This has certain artistic implications for a # skyscraper. Like it needs a neckbeard, or suspenders, or a penguin themed radio antenna on top holding a wifi pringles can... Its not a twitter building because basically no one uses twitter, they're a rounding error.

I will give them credit that there are more twitter users than Intercal programmers using the # operator. Of course if you calculate the sum of the IQs of the two groups the ratio probably narrows a bit..

Re:# is comments not twitter (1)

dontclapthrowmoney (1534613) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914635)

I technically have a twitter account, I sent about 2 tweets, subscribed to some morons and some PR agents fronting for some media people, watched for awhile, said WTF is this and never used it again. I would assume this is a rather large fraction of their "subscribers".

You've just described my google+ experience so far.

Re:# is comments not twitter (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914829)

You've just described my google+ experience so far.

Ahh but see

I'm REALLY unimpressed. The most important and influential web 2.0 company is used by ... practically no one. The emperor has no clothes!

The situation is similar, yet the G+ gets endless trash talking about how irrelevant it is and twitter gets endless trash talking about how important and influential it is. That is the difference.

I've given up on figuring out a world wide IT/programmer counts. Best I could figure is github is well over a million users (not projects, but registered user count), we'll say that twitter is at most only 20 times more influential than github... however... there are a lot more programmers than github users.

I think I have enough circumstantial data that I can comfortably stand by my claim that there are more # using programmers than # using twits.

Re:# is comments not twitter (1)

dontclapthrowmoney (1534613) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915165)

I was under the impression that the hash tag is used by twits (tweeters? twitterers?) to tag other users in posts/tweets/whatever they are called.

So you might be right that there are more # using programmers than # using twits, on a "unique users" basis, but I think they have you beat on frequency. For every time a programmer using the # symbol once, there are probably 1000 twitter users using the # symbol in a post talking about Ashton Kucher's bowel movements, or something else equally discussion-worthy.

(I'm not exactly sure when a # symbol is used by someone on twitter, I've used twitter even less than G+. They are all tools to achieve specific outcomes, so far I haven't had a need that either one met.)

Re:# is comments not twitter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915525)

No, # is used to mark topics, @ is used to mark users. Thus a typical post on twitter might look like...

I was jst abt 2 mk tht jk, @SillyPoopHead, nao i hv nthing clevr 2 say!! #fml #stolenjokes #whitepeopleproblems #freekevin #hashtagsaregreat

Re:# is comments not twitter (1)

julesh (229690) | more than 2 years ago | (#39917917)

Not a twitter user either, but from what I've seen # identifies a topic keywork, @ identifies another user.

Twitter just stole the character from IRC, anyway. I suggest everyone who used the Internet before about 1996 gets together and demands it back.

sharp (1)

Augmento (725540) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914589)

in korea, they call this the sharp symbol. so, sharp just sounds like a cool name for apartment complexes. there are several complexes all over the country built by posco (i think) with the # symbol on them.

further, many complexes, like the daewoo trump complex i lived in had an elevated playground and fitness center. so, while this is a kind of neat variation. it is hardly news.

OFF TOPIC: How do you mod up or down? (0, Offtopic)

postofreason (1305523) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914597)

I have done a Google search ("how to" OR "how do you" OR "how do I") ("mod up" OR "mod down") on slashdot and searched on the page, but I can't figure out how to do it. I am signed in. TIA,

Re:OFF TOPIC: How do you mod up or down? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914667)

If you have mod points, there's a drop-down box on each post, where for instance some people may look at your post and select "-1 offtopic".

Beyond that, relax - if you don't have mod points, don't worry about it. I find them distracting anyway when I'd rather just read and occasionally post, when I have them it changes the experience negatively. I'd prefer to be able to opt out of moderation but haven't found a way of doing so.

Re:OFF TOPIC: How do you mod up or down? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914731)

I'd prefer to be able to opt out of moderation but haven't found a way of doing so.

Yes, you have. Just keep posting as an AC.

Re:OFF TOPIC: How do you mod up or down? (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914993)

Here is a link to the FAQ, it should answer that as well as other questions you might have.

http://slashdot.org/faq [slashdot.org]

Re:OFF TOPIC: How do you mod up or down? (1)

postofreason (1305523) | more than 2 years ago | (#39918583)

Many thanks.

Update me when they build the @ (1)

retroworks (652802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914613)

LOL, The semicolon, apostrophe and exclamation point pose special challenges

Re:Update me when they build the @ (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915077)

Those are all easy, as long as you're ok with viewing them from above.

Re:Update me when they build the @ (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915857)

They could do them all in a row and it'd look like the city was swearing at you. #;'!@%

Back in my day... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914627)

Back in my day hashtags had to do with IRC!

Re:Back in my day... (2)

stderr_dk (902007) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914781)

Back in my day hashtags had to do with IRC!

You must be new here.

# clearly has to do with the C preprocessor.

Or it indicates that you're logged in as root.

Or that you're about to start a nice game of Tic-Tac-Toe to stop the game of Global Thermonuclear War on the WOPR.

Or all of the above...

Re:Back in my day... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914843)

Sure, but the hashtag wasn't used in "communications" purpose in those examples.

The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (5, Funny)

Comboman (895500) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914655)

This is just the latest in a long line of punctuation-inspired architecture:

^ Pyramids

/ Leaning Tower of Pisa

~ Guggenheim Museum

|| World Trade Center

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (1)

thomas8166 (1244688) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915335)

Then I'd really want to see one inspired by ':'...antigravity isn't easy :)

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (1)

Pope (17780) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915497)

World Trade Center towers, as viewed from above :)

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (1)

damien_kane (519267) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915623)

Then I'd really want to see one inspired by ':'...antigravity isn't easy :)

That problem can be solved much easier than a working antigravity solution (which would most likely require considerable amounts of power to maintain a 1G acceleration away from the planet, while maintaining slightly higher than surface rotational acceleration)

They could simply connect the upper and lower portions of the building via a set of poles in the 4th dimension.

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915345)

* many 19th century prisons and forts. Before they had video cameras, an asterisk-like prison layout made it possible for guards in the center to see all the cell blocks.

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915467)

+1 GOD AMONGST MEN

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915933)

And don't forget:
H - Petronas Towers
A - Eiffel Tower
x - Eiffel Tower as viewed from above
O - Colosseum
i - Big ben
() - 30 St Mary Axe

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916511)

O Fang Yuan Building

± Most churches.

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916609)

Man, I'd hate to see the building inspired by the &.

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39918687)

I'm fairly certain that the Winchester Mansion looked like that at some point. At least on the inside.

Re:The latest punctuation-inspired architecture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39917811)

__ Post 9/11 WTC

What they're not telling you... (1)

SailorSpork (1080153) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914701)

...is that it's the first in a series of buildings to be built over the next 20 years. The next 4 are inspires by the letters ""L", "U", "L", and "Z".

Utter hash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39914841)

Hopefully they don't make a complete hash of it.

Bad news for neighbors (4, Funny)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914945)

All other buildings on the street will be disabled when this is finished...

Pound symbol (0)

AbrasiveCat (999190) | more than 2 years ago | (#39914999)

Folks, This should be in the United States! It is the symbol of the overweight American.

Safety first!!! (1)

Breakable (1323131) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915027)

Kids playing 200m above the ground - groundbreaking idea... In other news: admins like to delete anything critical on their blog.

Not Creative (2)

jimmerz28 (1928616) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915035)

"Originally the designers wanted to build just two incredibly tall towers, but height restrictions forced them to get creative."

So originally it was boring as hell. It's sad that "designers" have to be forced to be creative.

Re:Not Creative (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916535)

Plain old towers are as close to optimal as you're going to get in terms of useable space per land area and useable space per unit cost. It's also a very extensively tested method safety-wise, and doesn't require overhangs. Why build anything else if you don't have to?

Re:Not Creative (1)

jimmerz28 (1928616) | more than 2 years ago | (#39917023)

Because I'd like to have a city which inspires and innovates, not one made of toothpicks that bores and tires.

Re:Not Creative (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39918843)

Get the fuck out of the city, then -- cities are about cramming people close together, not about inspiring and innovating. Try a hippy weed-farm commune...

This article got me wondering.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915043)

... could a person's name legally be punctuation? Like, %, !, or @?

Re:This article got me wondering.... (1)

rbenson (903023) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915433)

Prince had his name changed to a symbol that wasn't even punctuation, or pronounceable.
So... I would say that yes, it is legally possible.

Re:This article got me wondering.... (1)

Pope (17780) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915545)

Freur beat him too it.

# Means Channel ! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915115)

'#' Means "Channel" to me. Always has, always will. I am of an age where that's what I learned and lived, and that means I am now too old to be able to change!

What about ./ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39915227)

When are they going to build one with slashdot's trademanrk? - ./

Re:What about ./ (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915735)

Already been built, in Pisa.

Re:What about ./ (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#39918717)

Just get somebody chubby to stand on the left side of Pisa.

"hashtag" symbol? Really? (3, Interesting)

flimflammer (956759) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915319)

Since when is the symbol called "hashtag"?

Improvement over MVRDV's "Twin Towers" (1)

Arakageeta (671142) | more than 2 years ago | (#39915645)

I suppose this is an improvement over a design from another Dutch firm for residential towers in South Korea: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2072308/MVRDV-architects-reveal-plans-South-Korean-buildings-look-eerily-like-Twin-Towers-exploding.html [dailymail.co.uk]

open spaces on 40th floor (1)

hackertourist (2202674) | more than 2 years ago | (#39916425)

The open spaces they mention seem a bad idea to me. At that altitude the wind is much stronger than on the ground. Even in good weather, you'd be sitting in a gale up there.

jobs on line (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39916485)

like Elaine answered I cant believe that a stay at home mom able to get paid $4071 in one month on the computer. did you see this site makecash16.com

Perl City (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#39918675)

When they finish the ASCII set, it will be called Perl City.

Lisp City has a lot of nested bridges.

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