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Ubuntu Will Soon Ship On 5% of New PCs

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the and-they-say-gnu-on-the-desktop-will-never-happen dept.

Ubuntu 441

An anonymous reader writes with an excerpt from Phoronix: "Chris Kenyon, the VP of sales and business development for Canonical, just spoke this afternoon at the Ubuntu 12.10 Developer Summit about what Canonical does with OEMs and ODMs. He also tossed out some rather interesting numbers about the adoption of Ubuntu Linux. Namely, Ubuntu will ship on 5% of worldwide PC sales with a number of 18 million units annually."

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441 comments

This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (-1, Offtopic)

scourningparading (2633143) | about 2 years ago | (#39922371)

Disappear.
This Gamemakerlessness.
'This Gamemakerlessness.'
"This Gamemakerlessness."
This Gamemakerlessness.
This Gamemakerlessness.
This Gamemakerlessness.
This Gamemakerlessness.

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (-1, Offtopic)

bootyjones (2633935) | about 2 years ago | (#39922437)

Wow! Wow! Wow! Wow! Wow!
I can't even believe it.
Such a thing exists?
No.
Such a thing can't exist.
It's not possible.
It simply cannot be probable.
It cannot be probable that such a thing exists.
Such a thing!
No.
They don't exist.
It doesn't exist.

People who don't use Gamemaker don't exist! Such a thing cannot be probable! Gamemaker's the greatest! You'd have to be a total loser to not be using Gamemaker!

You shall return to Gamemakerdom!

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (-1, Offtopic)

Bucky24 (1943328) | about 2 years ago | (#39922465)

Disappear. This Gamemakerlessness. 'This Gamemakerlessness.' "This Gamemakerlessness." This Gamemakerlessness. This Gamemakerlessness. This Gamemakerlessness. This Gamemakerlessness.

Does anyone understand this? I've been gone from /. for about a week and I am very confused as to what these posts mean. Is this some strange meme I missed?

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (1, Informative)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#39922517)

I have no clue, though I , and everyone else here, knows, gamemaker sucks ass

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (0)

Bucky24 (1943328) | about 2 years ago | (#39922577)

I have no clue, though I , and everyone else here, knows, gamemaker sucks ass

I've found it helpful for rapid prototyping of an idea. But it's at best a teaching program (my college's game design program used it for the lower level classes), not really well suited to any serious game.

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (-1, Offtopic)

scourningparading (2633143) | about 2 years ago | (#39922607)

Oh, my! Such a thing...!

You must be an extremacy of Gamemakerlessness! How comical! How comical! You claim to be a True Programmer, but you're anything but as such never before! Gamemaker can do anything!

Wow! You'd better return to Gamemakerdom, or there will be dire consequences!

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (1, Funny)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#39922859)

"Gamemaker can do anything!"

fine go make me a full 3D space shooter MMORPG

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922921)

There is nothing that cannot be done with Gamemaker. Gamemaker's the best. Nothing is better than Gamemaker. Nothing is superior to Gamemaker.

There is not a single thing in this world that can even compare with Gamemaker's true ferocity.

You're nothin'. Return to Gamemakerdom you worthless piece of human garbage!

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923499)

I think you can get any one of those three at once. Nobody's done all three yet, and I think at that point there's more code than Game Maker junk in there.

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (2)

Randle_Revar (229304) | about 2 years ago | (#39923013)

Sounds like a bunch of 12-year-olds have invaded from 4chan or similar...

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (1)

kiwimate (458274) | about 2 years ago | (#39923073)

Sounds like a bunch of 12-year-olds have invaded from 4chan or similar...

So, in other words, same old Slashdot as always...

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (2)

dubbreak (623656) | about 2 years ago | (#39923329)

So, in other words, same old Slashdot as always...

Not at all. It's totally different now.

I pine for the return of hot grits and Natalie Portman. Those were the good old days.

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922521)

Please click on the flag in the lower right of parent comment and report abuse.

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (-1, Offtopic)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#39922615)

too bad no one gave you a straight razor to chew on as a toddler. For those who don't know,it is an atrocious game development system for a single vendor's platform only that panders to morons such as the parent poster.

Re:This Gamemakerlessness is an eyesore! (-1, Offtopic)

scourningparading (2633143) | about 2 years ago | (#39922665)

You're not a True Programmer like I am! You don't understand a single thing about puters!

Wow! Every fiber of your being is exerting dangerously high magnitudes of Gamemakerlessness! If you're a True Programmer, how do you explain that!?

You can't. Because you're nothin'. You're absolutely nothing.

You need to use Gamemaker. True Professionals and Programmers use Gamemaker.

Return to Gamemakerdom! Return to Gamemakerdom! Return to Gamemakerdom!

Finally (5, Interesting)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 2 years ago | (#39922385)

All i can say is "about time". It's nice to see this happening just before the UEFI change-over as well to help ensure than Microsoft doesn't lock out other OS options, or at least there's a token commercial opposition. I'm not a fan of Canonical's Unity desktop, but I know some people are, and it definitely looks (and acts) better than 'Metro''. Overall, Canonical's timing could have been a bit better, but it could have been worse. Just before the change-over to a questionable version of Windows, and after a couple of fairly major OS X scares is a decent time to get some advertising in place.

Re:Finally (5, Informative)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#39922773)

It's nice to see this happening just before the UEFI change-over as well to help ensure than Microsoft doesn't lock out other OS options,

Why so worried about this? Microsoft's own hardware certification [microsoft.com] process requires this is not the case on x86 systems. Page 116:

MANDATORY: On non-ARM systems, the platform MUST implement the ability for a physically present user to select between two Secure Boot modes in firmware setup: "Custom" and "Standard". Custom Mode allows for more flexibility as specified in the following:

a) It shall be possible for a physically present user to use the Custom Mode firmware setup option to modify the contents of the Secure Boot signature databases and the PK.
b) If the user ends up deleting the PK then, upon exiting the Custom Mode firmware setup, the system will be operating in Setup Mode with Secure Boot turned off.
c) The firmware setup shall indicate if Secure Boot is turned on, and if it is operated in Standard or Custom Mode. The firmware setup must provide an option to return from Custom to Standard Mode which restores the factory defaults.

Re:Finally (2, Insightful)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 2 years ago | (#39922945)

What I would prefer is that the key be provided so i could sign any other OS.

Re:Finally (5, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#39923083)

Providing the signing key that's used for Windows would completely defeat the purpose of secure boot as anti-malware tool, since any malware could then be signed with it and work out of the box.

Instead, the way it works is that you generate your own key, sign your bootloader with that, and add it to the signature database - this was covered by this item in GP's post:

It shall be possible for a physically present user to use the Custom Mode firmware setup option to modify the contents of the Secure Boot signature databases and the PK.

Re:Finally (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923285)

What about ARM systems?

Re:Finally (3, Interesting)

Pav (4298) | about 2 years ago | (#39922869)

So the users that reject the "rock" get to find the "hard place"? This isn't the way to differentiate yourself.

Some time ago I made the mistake of recommending Ubuntu to some friends wanting to ditch Vista on their laptop, but this was right before the window-controls debacle. I give them credit for persisting until Unity, but last time I saw them they'd gone back to Vista (and will probably buy a Win7 laptop before 8 comes out). I guess Vista actually looks good after experences like these - "Ubuntu? Wrong way, go back!"

Re:Finally (1)

mspohr (589790) | about 2 years ago | (#39923283)

Just replaced Vista with Ubuntu for my Mom. Works great. She loves it.

Re:Finally (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923489)

Yeah your Mom loves it.

The best part... (5, Informative)

TWX (665546) | about 2 years ago | (#39922387)

...isn't that a preconfigured OS is installed on the computer. It's that a computer is sold with all of its hardware functional in Linux, so when one buys one of these, one can wipe the vanilla install off, if one chooses, and install one's own favorite distribution and know everything will work.

The other obvious benefit is no Microsoft tax. Even if Ubuntu gets some money, as opposed to the OS being truly fiscally free, at least that money goes to an entity that has a vested interest in improving Linux.

Re:The best part... (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 2 years ago | (#39922451)

I've actually had very good luck with Ubuntu functionality. The only thing that caused me any real trouble was a RALink wireless card, and it was eventually well supported in later releases. This is across about 10 laptops, mainly quite low-end. I may have just been lucky, but everything but that card worked right out of the box. For a couple of things, there was some tweaking that could be done afterwards (proprietary graphics drivers, etc), but stuff did work to an acceptable level.

Re:The best part... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922529)

what the fuck hardware are you running? or are you just stuck in the 90's

Re:The best part... (2)

RandomAdam (1837998) | about 2 years ago | (#39922691)

I had the same problem with a RA link WiFi card, worked perfectly when I installed Mint 12 but the equivalent Ubuntu didn't??? I thought this strange since mint is based on ubuntu...I managed to manually compile the driver in ubuntu but switched to mint because 3 times after updates it nuked my WiFi.

This was all on my 2011 netbook....so no not 90's hardware

Re:The best part... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923257)

Probably has to do with non-free software dependencies. We need to get away from this.

http://www.thinkpenguin.com/

Only company which is selling freedom friendly hardware as far as I'm concerned. Everybody else just sells crippled hardware that may or may not work with future/other distributions.

If the free software guys can't support it you are reliant on the manufacturer... and we all know how bad companies are at support. Three years from now they discontinue that support and now nothing works.

Re:The best part... (4, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | about 2 years ago | (#39922975)

what the fuck hardware are you running? or are you just stuck in the 90's

I am sorry to say while Linux has improved its hardware support, I find that it runs into those wierdest gaps in its support. A video driver that refuses to detect native resolution, or leaves pixel droppings. A wifi card that does WEP but not WPA. Things like that. Most people do not find a PC that will meet Linux compatibility. But get a PC that works, then later try Linux, only to find those little glitches that makes it feel cheap. It is usually the driver and hardware companies not being forthcoming. But still it doesn't work right people won't like it. Insulting people who report hardware problems helps no one. If you want a world where Linux is common on the desktop you are going to get your head out of the blind zealotry, admit your OS of choose isn't perfect and help fix it.

Re:The best part... (4, Insightful)

causality (777677) | about 2 years ago | (#39923475)

what the fuck hardware are you running? or are you just stuck in the 90's

I am sorry to say while Linux has improved its hardware support, I find that it runs into those wierdest gaps in its support. A video driver that refuses to detect native resolution, or leaves pixel droppings. A wifi card that does WEP but not WPA. Things like that. Most people do not find a PC that will meet Linux compatibility. But get a PC that works, then later try Linux, only to find those little glitches that makes it feel cheap. It is usually the driver and hardware companies not being forthcoming. But still it doesn't work right people won't like it. Insulting people who report hardware problems helps no one. If you want a world where Linux is common on the desktop you are going to get your head out of the blind zealotry, admit your OS of choose isn't perfect and help fix it.

This is one of those "I'm sorry if the correct way of doing things offends you" type of situations. If you don't like surprise problems (neither do I), the way to do it is to match the hardware to the operating system. Not the other way around. With modern Linux distributions this is downright easy, but this is general to any OS.

If you're not willing to do that, your best bet is to buy a system that already has Linux pre-installed, as another poster has mentioned. That way you know the hardware is compatible. That's also general to any OS.

Those are the two correct ways to do this without a (with Linux usually small) risk of preventable compatibility problems. They are not exclusive to Linux. If you don't know how to do these things, you can at least recognize that you're out of your element and ask someone who does. That's the prudent thing to do when you're about to invest a non-trivial sum of cash or time in something you don't really understand. That could be cars, computers, financial securities, whatever -- the principle is the same.

None of this requires technical expertise because that can be supplied before a rash decision is made. I don't know what it is about computers but people seem to shut down whatever common sense they possess, even when they demonstrate it elsewhere. I can see why they're tempted to blame the computer, because then it's "not their fault" and they avoid (i.e. run from) admitting to themselves how little sense they used, but that doesn't solve anything. It's just a weak excuse.

So, you suggest helping to fix the OS. That would be fixing what isn't broken. This form is a common one: suggesting a technical solution to a non-technical problem. That can be tempting sometimes. It's unfortunately misguided because it's entangled with effects while failing to address causes.

The OS can add support for more hardware but that doesn't mean that blindly buying hardware, later throwing an OS on it, and praying that it works is good decision-making. It's still the impatient, error-prone way to do things. More hardware support only means that the (usually small) risk of compatibility problems with this particular OS gets a bit smaller. That's why anyone who has problems here and complains instead of accepting the lesson is whining.

Truth explaining what their mistake was is in a non-malicious way would be the help they need. Afterwards you can try giving them the help they want, by supplying the driver(s) they lack or by finding some kind of workaround. That's if you really care and are not just trying to get rid of them with a quick-fix.

Re:The best part... (2)

kiwimate (458274) | about 2 years ago | (#39922623)

a computer is sold with all of its hardware functional in Linux

That is compelling to me. One of the biggest impediments to me running Linux (as someone who no longer really cares about building my own systems) is the impression I get that putting Linux on a system is a game of chance, especially when it comes to sound, or networking, or multiple monitors. If I know I can buy a system that's pre-loaded, guaranteed to work with all components, and supported, then a significant barrier has just been removed.

Re:The best part... (4, Informative)

elashish14 (1302231) | about 2 years ago | (#39922841)

There are quite a few computer vendors that offer Linux options at purchase... Google around. Here's a list, for example: http://linuxpreloaded.com/ [linuxpreloaded.com] . I'm sure that a few of them ship internationally too. I suppose the main drawback is that the price is still steeper cause of shipping, but that's life....

Re:The best part... (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 2 years ago | (#39923051)

Okay, serious question: does anyone sell a full-sized Linux laptop (or even a Windows laptop that is known to play well with Linux) with a centered trackpad? Every once in a while I think about getting off the Apple treadmill and buying a commodity PC laptop to run Linux on, and what keeps stopping me is the fact that damn near every PC laptop larger than a netbook has a trackpad shifted way the hell over to the left. I've tried using a few of these machines and they just seem like a bad case of RSI waiting to happen. It may seem like a trivial concern, but if your entire right arm from shoulder to wrist is on fire after an hour of work, this is a real problem.

Re:The best part... (2)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 2 years ago | (#39923249)

https://www.system76.com/laptops/ [system76.com] both those have centered trackpads. The x220 (which I have) runs archlinux fine (save for having to add 1 line to rc.local.shutdown if you use laptop-mode-tools), but the x220 does have a windows tax.

Re:The best part... (1)

Jozza The Wick (1805012) | about 2 years ago | (#39923339)

Yep, I'm actually posting this from a Systen76 'Pangolin Performance' laptop. Highly recommended, good customer support (via a System 76 section on the 'Official' Ubuntu forums). Bought it with 8.04 installed, have since upgraded to 10.04.

Re:The best part... (1)

reasterling (1942300) | about 2 years ago | (#39922633)

It's that a computer is sold with all of its hardware functional in Linux

You should be careful. I used to assume that this was true; however, when I bought my dell mini10 with ubuntu preinstalled a couple years ago it had some propriatary video junk that still barely works, and lacks 3D hardware suport. Look up Intel poulsbo.

Re:The best part... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923185)

Couldn't that argument be made for Windows? If it comes preinstalled with Windows then you should be able to wipe it, reinstall anew, and have everything work? Of course that's not the case: you frequently have to hit up the manufacturer's website for assorted drivers (especially for wireless devices).

So has anything been said about what the manufacturers will do to the computer beyond the initial setup? Can they install anything beyond free/open source software? Tweak package managers? Stick you with proprietary drivers? Yeah, knowing you'll get compatible hardware is great - it's certainly a step up from the current situation - but what all do you have to deal with for that convenience?

Re:The best part... (2)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 2 years ago | (#39923301)

Ya... be careful with that "all of its hardware functional in Linux" thing. OEMs are often not so good about that. You can get a computer with Linux on it and discover it is rather a disaster. Sometimes it is hardware that flat out doesn't work but more often it is shit that is flaky or doesn't support all the features of the hardware. It "works" and that is all they'll guarantee. Particularly when it is shit like 3D support they'll have some weak-ass excuse as to why software-only Mesa support is what they consider "support".

It is not nearly as easy as buying a system for Windows (and hell even then sometimes the hardware doesn't work right). Have to do your homework first.

What happens if I don't want to pay the Ubuntu tax (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922403)

Can I get my money back if I install another better operating system such as Windows 7?

Re:What happens if I don't want to pay the Ubuntu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922423)

Can I get my money back if I install another better operating system such as Windows 7?

No, just a buy a pc with windows 7 preinstalled.

Re:What happens if I don't want to pay the Ubuntu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922817)

Can I get my money back if I install another better operating system such as Windows 7?

No, just a buy a pc with windows 7 preinstalled.

But no one sells PCs with windows any more.

[Disclaimer "forward looking statements"]

Re:What happens if I don't want to pay the Ubuntu (0)

soundscape (962537) | about 2 years ago | (#39923207)

Can I get my money back if I install another better operating system such as Windows 7?

I see what you did there.

Content? (5, Informative)

clinko (232501) | about 2 years ago | (#39922441)

This is the whole article without side-notes, Braced comments and not in the summary:

- Eight to ten million units shipped last year world-wide.
- Canonical will be opening their first Beijing office this year.
- Last year Ubuntu shipped on 7.5 billion dollars worth of hardware.

Re:Content? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923115)

What's interesting is that the article says that 5% is a doubling of current numbers.

So the article claims that 2.5% of PCs ship with Ubuntu on them.

Very Sad (0, Flamebait)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#39922457)

5% of PCs will have Unity installed on them, I'd rather use the Windows UI than that vile abortion

Re:Very Sad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922509)

why do you hate freedom? keep your terrorist antics to yourself.

Re:Very Sad (2, Interesting)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#39922589)

Unity takes away a user's freedom. Why do Unity and GNOME3 developers hate their users so much?

Re:Very Sad (5, Insightful)

Tarlus (1000874) | about 2 years ago | (#39922697)

Yes, it is a shame that Ubuntu users are locked into Unity with absolutely no way around it.

Oh, wait...

Re:Very Sad (4, Interesting)

westlake (615356) | about 2 years ago | (#39923425)

Yes, it is a shame that Ubuntu users are locked into Unity with absolutely no way around it.
Oh, wait...

Ubuntu's primary appeal is to users who will never willingly stray far from the default UI --- even assuming that they are aware of the alternatives.

Re:Very Sad (0)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#39923453)

This is so like the rhetoric when American's got pissed with France for not following the unjustified war, and decided to change the name of french fried to "freedom fries."

Yeah, why do those Frenchies hate our freedom? Lets change the name of Linux to Freedomix! That'll show them!

Re:Very Sad (4, Insightful)

Seven_Six_Two (1045228) | about 2 years ago | (#39922525)

How is that sad? Would you rather use Windows than Linux with Gnome Shell? KDE? XFCE? LXDE? IceWM? OpenBox? If so, well, there's the other 95% that you're welcome to buy! I am happy with Unity, and even happier that I don't have to use it if I don't want to. I hope you're happy with Metro. Good Riddance, and please stop whining about not liking something that you don't have to use.

Re:Very Sad (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#39922585)

Most people will not know how to change the desktop manager. They'll be stuck with a piece of shit UI that is a hindrance to productivity and workflow. I am also sad that you have no discernment in the matters of UI.

Re:Very Sad (4, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#39922627)

Most people wouldn't know a desktop manager if it came up and bit them in the ass. They would not have any idea that they could be more or less productive. It's not on their radar..

Re:Very Sad (3, Interesting)

Seven_Six_Two (1045228) | about 2 years ago | (#39922715)

They surely won't! But the difference is people can be shown how to do something that is possible, whereas Metro users will have a choice of Metro or...um...Metro. Don't like it? Too bad. As for your condemnation of the UI, it's kind of egocentric to think that your workflow is the same as everyone else's. What's really important to me is that I can get the things done that I need to do, and I do them using Unity. I'm sorry for you that not everyone wants to stick with your Windows 3.1 era idea of UI perfection, but that's just the way it is. Can you tell me the specific UI blunders that Unity has done wrong? I'm assuming that you are a UI professional, with credentials that you're willing to share, right?

Re:Very Sad (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#39923103)

hey surely won't! But the difference is people can be shown how to do something that is possible, whereas Metro users will have a choice of Metro or...um...Metro.

It's Metro or classic Win7-style desktop (sans Start button), actually.

And you can still use a different shell, same as always - so e.g. Blackbox for Windows still works on Win8 if desired.

Re:Very Sad (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#39923429)

Most people will not know how to change the desktop manager. They'll be stuck with a piece of shit UI that is a hindrance to productivity and workflow. I am also sad that you have no discernment in the matters of UI.

Here's the irony. After 20 years Linux has finally got a GUI that's been well designed. And all the freetards on Slashdot are so conservative, they hate it.

Re:Very Sad (1)

cupantae (1304123) | about 2 years ago | (#39922601)

Do you buy your car based on the chassis rather than the internals?
Changing the DE/WM is extremely easy. Anyone could do it.

Re:Very Sad (2)

Jaktar (975138) | about 2 years ago | (#39923243)

Do you buy your car based on the chassis rather than the internals? Changing the DE/WM is extremely easy. Anyone could do it.

Is this the same "anyone" that sends responses back to phishing email and can't figure out how to setup wifi? Yep...this is going to end well.

And then be replaced with pirated Windows 7 (2)

outsider007 (115534) | about 2 years ago | (#39922461)

When they're brought home.

Re:And then be replaced with pirated Windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922543)

That's strange, over here usually is Windows 7 which is replaced with (pirated? well, torrented) Ubuntu when it is brought home.

Re:And then be replaced with pirated Windows 7 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922799)

That's strange, over here usually is Windows 7 which is replaced with (pirated? well, torrented) Ubuntu when it is brought home.

Yes i'm sure that is common practice over there in your mom's basement.

Re:And then be replaced with pirated Windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923035)

Are you kidding? There are no Ubuntus in basements! They go only from Slackware up.

Re:And then be replaced with pirated Windows 7 (1)

cupantae (1304123) | about 2 years ago | (#39922565)

Mentioned in TFA. I think it depends on where it's bought, though. If 5% of computers were sold with Ubuntu in most European countries, for example, I doubt a huge portion of those buyers would have the balls to install pirated Windows on top. The price difference just wouldn't be enough to encourage it.

And I would argue that lack of ability or will to install an OS is one of the main reasons Linux isn't more widespread on the desktop.

Re:And then be replaced with pirated Windows 7 (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 2 years ago | (#39922877)

Why bother? The cost of Windows to a hardware vendor is negligible. Add in what they can earn from crapping up a PC with shovelware and they actually get paid for putting Windows on a machine.

If you think you are actually saving money with that approach then you are just stupid.

Although with Windows users that kind of comes with the territory.

As the largest vendor we see no Chinese demand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922545)

It is interesting to see where companies like Canonical claim / imply there is the most demand because we just aren't seeing it and we are the largest vendor of Linux hardware by far. We see no real demand from China. The biggest demand we see is from the United States, Australia, Canada, and Europe. We also see some demand from India, South Africa, Japan, and South America. Canonical is doing it wrong... and it is no surprise to hear that the Chinese user base is wipeing it.

I see this tagged 'riiiight', but... (2)

Omnifarious (11933) | about 2 years ago | (#39922549)

This is actually totally believable. I have encountered more random people running Ubuntu than anything else. Random non-geek people. Seriously. In fact, I've never encountered non-geek people running any other distribution.

It isn't a huge number, but it's not insignificant. 5% is very believable.

Re:I see this tagged 'riiiight', but... (1)

overbaud (964858) | about 2 years ago | (#39922699)

The power of Sheldon Copper. Seriously I wonder how many non geeks watching Big Bang googled Ubuntu after it got a mention on the show.

Re:I see this tagged 'riiiight', but... (2)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 2 years ago | (#39923017)

I've had quite a number of friends and cow-orkers convert and most prefer it to Windows. I make sure to show them the alternate desktop managers though, and most seem to prefer Gnome 2 or Gnome-shell over Unity. I think there are a couple that run Mint as well. After using Linux for a month or so the consensus seems to be that it is actually easier to use than Windows. They're both about the same for the really simple stuff, but anything beyond that in Windows had been getting more difficult to do with each version of Windows.

Now if only we could get better support from commercial software developers ... although with the prevalence of web based applications, that's getting less and less important. Valve releasing Steam for Linux will be a big step forward for what remains.

Re:I see this tagged 'riiiight', but... (1)

maugle (1369813) | about 2 years ago | (#39923145)

PC gaming seems to be on the decline, so rather than Steam, I'd say the biggest obstacles to widespread Ubuntu (and Linux in general) usage are the lack of iTunes and Netflix streaming.

I cant wait for the future (0)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#39922553)

I will have the choice of Windows with a shitty ass tablet/phone UI or Linux with a shitty ass tablet/phone UI

THANK GOD!

Re:I cant wait for the future (1, Informative)

couchslug (175151) | about 2 years ago | (#39922683)

You can, and many of us do, run a variety of UIs on the same machine and load whatever we like.

Try that with Windows and let us know how it works out.

Re:I cant wait for the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922879)

even in 8 you can turn off metro, and turn off areo, and just use explorer, thats 3 options right there with a simple point > click freetard

Re:I cant wait for the future (0)

Seven_Six_Two (1045228) | about 2 years ago | (#39922983)

Yeah, well with Unity, I can change my wallpaper, enable wobbly windows, and move the window decoration buttons to the other corner with a simple point > click wintard

Re:I cant wait for the future (1)

Seven_Six_Two (1045228) | about 2 years ago | (#39923049)

Alright, maybe that last comment was unnecessary, since it was already established above that most users aren't even going to realize that it's possible to change the UI. Or care...

Works great actually (5, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 2 years ago | (#39923397)

If you want to mess with your UI on Windows, there's all kinds of stuff to do it. MS has some limited tools and customizations but they really aren't in to that thing. The biggest purveyor of such things is probably Stardock. They have a massive set of tools to customize the looks of Windows in all kinds of ways, including very radical changes. They've been doing it for years and so are quite good at it. You can buy a whole suit of stuff or get produces one by one to customize what you like.

Also you can simple replace explorer as the shell. Windows doesn't mandate its use, it is just what is included, what is default. Another popular one is BB4Win, which is a windows manager inspired by Blackbox (different codebase though). It sees use on systems where people want somethign different, but also sometimes on Windows PE boot systems to keep memory usage down since it is less heavy hitting than explorer.

So in the future, perhaps less snark if you've not actually tried what you speak of. That Windows doesn't ship with 5 window managers, 20 media players, and so on does not mean that it only supports one thing. It is quite extensible, it just have a very well defined and enriched standard set of tools.

Linux is nothing but a kernel, all the rest is up to the person who decides to package it up, as such there are no mandated standards, just ad hoc ones and often many of them. It is a minimal OS definition, the rest is up for grabs.

Windows is an enriched OS definition. It includes a whole lot of stuff with it. It does not exclude you from adding your own, it just mandates that it comes with a bunch of things. Explorer, IE, WDM, DirectX, RDP, etc, etc are all part of the definition that is "Windows". It comes with all of it, however it is not less modular for it. You can add BB4Win, Firefox, ASIO, OpenGL, VNC and so on and they will all work fine, you can use them in addition to or in place of their various included components.

Re:I cant wait for the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922753)

I imagine an ass tablet UI would have really big buttons.

Re:I cant wait for the future (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39922989)

sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop

Wow, that sure was hard.

Re:I cant wait for the future (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 2 years ago | (#39923267)

that is scary to most users because they afraid of terminals. so for them click ubuntu software centre type kubuntu into the search box click install. enter your password wait for it to finish logout log back in under kde.

and i used to wonder how a command prompt was more powerful tiil i started using now i do all of the time i hope people keep Linux installed but most will probably wipe it, mind you i love linux but it scares people and vm's scare people almost as much.

Re:I cant wait for the future (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923197)

Or you can just shut your whiny linsux/winblows hole and use the best OS that exists: OS X.

Think different.
Think BETTER.
Think !APPLE!

My first thought was answered in the article (2)

GrandCow (229565) | about 2 years ago | (#39922815)

Side Note #2: Kenyon didn't comment on what percentage of these Ubuntu-loaded PC sales still have users where they run Ubuntu, or namely the actual Ubuntu user count globally. The OEM/ODM count also obviously doesn't count those that install Ubuntu manually or obtain Ubuntu installations via other means. On the down side, when I talk with OEMs and others about Linux pre-loads, I commonly here a "significant percentage" of these Linux pre-loaded systems usually get wiped by their customers and replaced with pirated copies of Windows -- especially in the Asian markets, where customers are just going after the Linux PCs due to the lower sales cost.

On one hand I'm glad that there are other choices, but I wonder what the actual number of purchases just to wipe and install the latest pirated version of Windows is.

Re:My first thought was answered in the article (4, Insightful)

mspohr (589790) | about 2 years ago | (#39923323)

I wonder how many systems shipped with Windows get wiped and Linux installed.
I know I've done about twenty.

Place Holders for Pirated Windows Install (3, Insightful)

mdgreene (2633951) | about 2 years ago | (#39922913)

Good for the author (Michael Larabel) for highlighting the issue being seen in the Asian markets where these machines are being wiped and installed with pirated Windows as soon as they arrive at the customer. I am willing to bet as many as 4.9% of these PCs are wiped for Windows by the customer.

Re:Place Holders for Pirated Windows Install (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923095)

So what? The piracy of Windows is Microsoft's problem. This "issue" is only an "issue" for Microsoft.
Hardware vendors charging me for Windows that I don't want in order to subsidize Microsoft's losses is shitty (read: anti-trust) business.

Re:Place Holders for Pirated Windows Install (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923235)

I wonder if that balances out all the computers I have paid for (I tally about 10 between me and my wife since 1995) that have had unused Windows licenses included where it was just wiped for Linux.

I'm glad to hear it (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 2 years ago | (#39923075)

While I have issues running the 12.04 distribution, most people don't seem to have any problem. From what I've seen of it, the UI has been substantially cleaned up and a lot of configurability has been implemented. From a performance standpoint, I saw up to a 30% improvement in the runtimes of some key utilities I tested over the course of a weekend compared to 10.04.1, with absolutely no investment in hardware upgrades what so ever.

I didn't do enough testing before nuking the partition to determine if the improvements carried over to other key software I use (suggesting kernel-level and library implementation improvements) or application-specific.

But it's the initial LTS release -- it's not surprising third-party products don't run on it until around the .1 release anyhow. Third-party products I tried to install all had issues with installation, configuration, or startup. Nothing I actually need that wasn't baked into the distro would work except Oracle's Java 7 implementation.

Hopefully the updated version of Fedora/KDE 16 fares better when I have time to try installing the third party products. Hardware replacement is not an option at this time, and that's the last distro I'm even going to try to install with.

As happy as I've been with 10.04.1, I may have to switch back to Windows 7 just to keep this hardware useful. It's long in the tooth, but it works, so I'm loathe to just toss it once 10.04.1 support expires.

Best of luck, but I don't see a major impact (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39923117)

I've been living in Thailand for 5 years now. Here, when you buy a new PC through a retail store, their brochures will list them as coming with either A) Linpus Linux (a distro I'd never heard of, even as a person fairly interested in Linux) or B) FreeDOS. This is to avoid the "Microsoft Tax", and includes PCs from manufacturers that are popular in the US: HP, Sony, Compaq, Acer, Samsung, Gateway etc.

Once you pick out the hardware that you want, the retail store will then usually "try" to talk you into getting a legitimate Windows license with it. Say one word of resistance -- "nah" -- and they will immediately fall back to installing their in-house new-PC image with a pirated/activated Windows 7, Office, etc. along with random bits of crapware. I've known very few people that actually got talked into getting a legit Windows install, and several of those people actually discovered later that the shop put on a pirated copy anyway (but happily let them pay extra for the 'legit' Windows).

When I buy a new PC, I always just tell the shop to leave the drive bare and I will handle the software myself. I instruct my friends (Western or Thai) to do the same. Usually the PC will arrive with Linpus or FreeDOS active as shown in the brochure, but sometimes the shop will have already imaged the machine. In either case, I will do a fresh format and Windows 7 install with activator, plus whatever other software is desired. When the shop handles it, you'll always get bloatware and stuff you didn't ask for, and frequently their fresh install images even have a virus or malware straight out of the gate. I've probably done the initial install on 50+ PCs over the course of 5 years.

I guess my point is that while this may seem like a big step forward for Canonical/Ubuntu/Linux/OSS, remember that it will be mitigated because said 5% of PCs will probably mostly be ending up in places like Thailand, where 99% of them will be overwritten with a pirated copy of Windows before the end user ever gets their hands on the machine.

i bet what they dont mention is (5, Interesting)

FudRucker (866063) | about 2 years ago | (#39923139)

ubuntu is only pre-installed on low end PCs in places like Brazil & Mexico, China and other places where the cost of the PC is whittled down so bare-bones low that even OEM MS_Windows installs are cost prohibitive, but you can count on pirated copies being printed up on CDr sold out of disposable alleyway shacks

I Like Unity (5, Interesting)

conner_bw (120497) | about 2 years ago | (#39923313)

I've been an OS X user since 2003. A Ubuntu 10.04 LTS for a few months, and a 12.04 LTS user since April 27th.

I use Linux at work on desktop. I decided to upgrade. I like it. 10.04 is terrible in retrospect.

Seriously, in 12.04 you put your left hand on the super key, read the pop up, force yourself to learn a few shortcuts and in a couple of hours it feels like OSX but slightly less idiotic.

Sure, there are glitches and annoyances, but my next computer after ~10 of Mac is a Linux box.

Someone is doing something right.

Cool.... (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 2 years ago | (#39923459)

... now where's the epidemic Linux virus that people are predicting will spontaneously appear once Linux starts making headway?

Oh, that's right... most people who use Linux actually know a thing or two about computer administration and aren't liable to remain vulnerable to exploits when patches exist.

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