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Anti-WiFi Wallpaper Available Next Year

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the orbital-mind-control-lasers dept.

Science 167

hypnosec writes with good news for folks who want to live in a Faraday cage. From the article: "A new type of wallpaper, which has been developed by scientists from the Institut Polytechnique Grenoble INP and the Centre Technique du Papier, will go on sale in 2013 after a Finnish firm Ahlstrom acquired the license. What looks like a bog-standard wallpaper roll actually contains silver particles that allows it to filter out up to three different frequencies simultaneously. It is not the first time that such a technology has surfaced. Back in 2004, BAE Systems was tasked by Ofcom to come up with a similar solution based on what was then called a stealth wallpaper. It used copper instead of silver and blocked Wi-Fi signals while letting GSM, 4G and emergency calls through. Back then, though, a square meter cost £500, whereas the Wi-Fi wallpaper devised by the French researchers should be priced reasonably, with costs matching those of a 'classic,' mid-range wallpaper according to M. Lemaître-Auger, from Grenoble INP."

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167 comments

it probably could be done also with paint (4, Insightful)

mapkinase (958129) | about 2 years ago | (#39943483)

Americans do not use wallpaper much.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#39943541)

Americans do not use wallpaper much.

But if they would just use tin foil instead of silver (really, how bourgeois) it would be a major hit.

At least here on Slashdot. Maybe ThinkGeek could sell it.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943669)

Americans do not use wallpaper much.

But if they would just use tin foil instead of silver (really, how bourgeois) it would be a major hit.

At least here on Slashdot. Maybe ThinkGeek could sell it.

Amateur!

I went to my whosale club store and bought a pallet of aluminum foil. I then "wall papered" my entire house with it. No fucking wi-fi security problems here! No siree. Although, I'm stuck using CAT 5e for my internal network, but the fact of the matter is that I BEAT THEM! Ahahahahahaha! No sum-bitch is going to break into MY wireless - wire-less network!

Yeah man, I'm 'S' - 'M' - 'A' - 'R' - 'T'.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (2)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | about 2 years ago | (#39943831)

In the US, you usually buy colored paint by choosing the color from a display of color cards and an operator taps in the code to machine which squirts the right ratio of dyes into a white base paint. Another machine then vibrates the can to mix it, while you get on with the rest of your shopping.

It wouldn't be hard to add a squirter of said silver particles to the machine. Pay a premium for a squirt of wifi blocker. Of course they couldn't patent this, because I just said it.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39944237)

They couldn't patent that, but they could patent a discount for not spraying in the silver bits.

Oh wait, they can't do that now either.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

Omegawar (1314051) | about 2 years ago | (#39944659)

There already is magnetic primer. It has little bits of iron in it so magnets will stick to a bare wall. Cover a whole wall in it and it blocks wifi pretty well.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#39944691)

I'd line the walls that face my street with foil if it didn't look so tacky and I could find EMF-proof curtains for the windows. Every time a car drives by I lose my TV signal (Shitty RCA tuner).

But wifi? Why paper your walls when you can just use encryption?

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

Narmi (161370) | about 2 years ago | (#39944767)

Why paper your walls when you can just use encryption?

To keep other Wifi signals out. It's a crowded spectrum.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

Gerzel (240421) | about 2 years ago | (#39944783)

Another layer of protection.

Security is all about adding layers of protection at reasonable costs.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

Nirvelli (851945) | about 2 years ago | (#39944895)

You can actually get EMF-blocking windows. I lived in an apartment building that was built to one of those new LEED Green Building standards, and it had special windows to block out heat from the Sun or something. Also concrete walls. TV reception was completely blocked, but as soon as you opened a window, channels came in perfectly clear.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943557)

Americans do not use wallpaper much.

Maybe that would change if they had a compelling reason to use it, you overgeneralizing son of a bitch!


Hey at least I didn't mention Gamemaker. Until just now for descriptive purposes I mean.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943645)

Hope the paint is expensive... poor people in the hood generally run open WiFi!! :D

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943839)

they used to. Lots of wallpaper in the 40's-70's. a bear to change though, so the paint is more popular now that its dirt cheap and people feel the need to throw money willy nilly at their home decor. of course, then you get houses like mine, where some lazy bastard painted over the wallpaper 10-20 years ago, and everyone did the same after. Now, when there's a little water infiltration during an addition, the moisture makes the 50-year old adhesive start to let go and I need to rip down someone else's old wallpaper in half the house. bastards.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#39944047)

I chuckled when they commented that it would "be priced at a modest premium vs classic mid-range wallpaper". Actual decorator mid-range wallpaper (nothing like the shit you will find at big box stores) is anywhere from $2 to $25 per *square foot*. That means a tiny 10x10 room can be anywhere from $640 to $8,000 to do the whole thing. This is why Americans generally eschew wallpaper (at least full-room designs) in favor of a nice coat of paint (about $50 for the whole room and you might have some left over.)

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (2)

jklovanc (1603149) | about 2 years ago | (#39944463)

That is true if you don't want to use your cell phone either. The pattern is designed to filter frequencies used by WiFi but not those used by cell phones. You can not do that with paint.

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (3, Informative)

Goedendag (2618275) | about 2 years ago | (#39945175)

Neither will this magic snake oil paper filter only wifi signals. The frequency (actually wavelength) of signals that can penetrate (or exit) a faraday cage are determined by the size of the holes in the cage. Holes will let wavelengts through that are shorter than the hole's size. Or to put it in another way: everthing up from the lowest frequency that can fit through the hole will pass the holes. Wifi happens to use a higher frequency (shorter wavelength) than GSM (and most mobile phone frequencies). If a GSM signal fits the hole, a wifi signal will have enough room left. Oh, and those holes don't know the difference between regular and emergency calls...

Re:it probably could be done also with paint (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39944657)

How do you know that? Do you have some citation for this, or did you fabricate it because it sounds good to you?

could this decrease interference in high-rises? (5, Interesting)

Trepidity (597) | about 2 years ago | (#39943505)

If I put some of this wallpaper on the walls between me and neighbors in an apartment building (and maybe even something similar on floors/ceilings), could this plausibly increase signal quality by reducing interference from the 50 (!) other access points I currently see within range?

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#39943573)

That's kind of the entire point.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

Trepidity (597) | about 2 years ago | (#39943593)

From the article it sounds like they were advertising it as a way to keep your signals from getting out, as a kind of physical security barrier--- not as a way of keeping others' signals from coming in. But perhaps it's true that they'll end up marketing it that way as well.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943637)

I'm guessing most of the market is for the crazies that cry that Wifi is giving them headaches.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (5, Funny)

swanzilla (1458281) | about 2 years ago | (#39943723)

Goodbye tin foil hat; hello stylish wallpaper hat.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943867)

You mean like this one [sugstyle.com] ?

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

berashith (222128) | about 2 years ago | (#39944099)

it is a shame that the windows will have to be covered also.

I have aluminum siding on much of my house. I am going to ground it when I get home to see if my neighbors routers suddenly stop showing up.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (2)

Psychofreak (17440) | about 2 years ago | (#39944861)

Some probably will, but I expect your siding is already well grounded.

I had aluminum siding on my old house, it was grounded in several spots (plumbing for garden hose spigots, electrical inlet and meter, AC unit, grounding spike, probably at a few other points too), and phones, pagers, etc did not work well inside. It was kinda nice most of the time. My wireless was very low strength, but usable, on the front porch in front of the picture window, and as expected very strong inside.

Phil

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39945539)

it is a shame that the windows will have to be covered also.

I installed aluminum screens on my house. They blocked (reflected really) WiFi. I had a directional antenna and my neighbor's WiFi was significantly stronger through the walls than the windows

I have aluminum siding on much of my house. I am going to ground it when I get home to see if my neighbors routers suddenly stop showing up.

Grounding huge metal sheets will make no difference at these short wavelengths. Think about the size of the waves and the speed of light. By the time any energy makes it to the ground and back your radio wave will have osculated dozens of times. Metal reflects radio waves, grounded or otherwise.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 2 years ago | (#39943607)

So long as your devices are not near windows. If so, a special window tinting will be required.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (3, Funny)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about 2 years ago | (#39943677)

ooo Tinfoil curtains! I'll make a killing, or rather my wife will when she sees them.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39944731)

Insulating windows [wikipedia.org] are already often coated with a very thin (transparent) layer of metal or metal oxide to reduce the emissivity. This coat also decreases radio transmissivity quite a lot.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39943627)

Talk to your local RF/microwave EE about waveguides and cutoff freqs and operating way the heck above cutoff. You won't like what you'll hear.

I almost guarantee you'll be constructing an efficient waveguide system in the lower VHF region, maybe UHF in hallways, depends on design. My open plan bachelor pad probably would have made a decent 20 meter ham band waveguide, but my little dorm room in college would have been more like 6M waveguide. Anyway this is probably going to increase noise levels. Even worse, because its cutoff is so low, you're going to multimode like hell and probably not be able to receive anything, even strong local signals. So an extra 20 dB of noise in the SNR plus massive multipath? no thanks..

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#39943737)

Since probably most people here have no idea what multimode is:

Think echoes or reverberation, but for radio waves.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

beanpoppa (1305757) | about 2 years ago | (#39943909)

Actually, multimode was about the only thing that I DID understand from the post.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

tibit (1762298) | about 2 years ago | (#39944129)

In other words: a conductive shield is a solution with serious side effects. An absorbing (dissipative) wallpaper would be much better. Perhaps a little bit of bulk conductivity but not too much would do the trick? No, this [davidkiyokawa.com] isn't what I had in mind, why, thank you.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#39945225)

On the other hand, all that interference will presumably make it even better when your objective is to stop people using wireless devices in the shielded room. Like for example discouraging device use in a movie theatre.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | about 2 years ago | (#39943655)

If I put some of this wallpaper on the walls between me and neighbors in an apartment building (and maybe even something similar on floors/ceilings), could this plausibly increase signal quality by reducing interference from the 50 (!) other access points I currently see within range?

It will also improve your own network by limiting interference between the APs you have in each room.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

phoenix_rizzen (256998) | about 2 years ago | (#39943907)

Bah! Just modify the firmware on your access point to boost the transmit power and drown out all the other APs! If you do it right, you won't be able to see any other APs. And you may even be able to warm food on it, to boot. :)

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

Jeremi (14640) | about 2 years ago | (#39944465)

Bah! Just modify the firmware on your access point to boost the transmit power and drown out all the other APs! If you do it right, you won't be able to see any other APs. And you may even be able to warm food on it, to boot. :)

Alas, the neighbors have already done that trick. Now I get Moire patterns on my retinas whenever I enter the kitchen.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

jkflying (2190798) | about 2 years ago | (#39944577)

Unfortunately that only boosts transmissions. My laptop, phone and ebook aren't going to magically boost along with the router...

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#39944053)

EM-blocking wallpaper would also block radio and TV reception. Or maybe just the UHF band. (Then again maybe I'm the only one who still uses that old technology, and most people don't care.)

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

Trepidity (597) | about 2 years ago | (#39944989)

It sounds like this one is frequency-specific, so it would only block wifi frequencies. But I suppose it depends on just how narrow the blocked band is.

Re:could this decrease interference in high-rises? (1)

aslagle (441969) | about 2 years ago | (#39945325)

It's not old - most OTA HD signals are over UHF, at least in the US.

Powerline Adapters in Apt Building? (1)

CrashNBrn (1143981) | about 2 years ago | (#39944467)

Why not just use a non-wireless router and a couple powerline adapters [tigerdirect.com] in an apartment building. It might be slightly more expensive, but if you only need to hook up a couple computers it would likely be worth it. You'd also have the option of putting in a wireless repeater/range extender in a given room for guests et al.

Great for neighbors networks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943525)

The security aspect aside, this would be great to reduce the problem of your neighbors Wi-Fi and other wireless devices limiting the performance of your own network. It would be nice if it just came as an under-layer though.

Mistranslation in summary (1)

srussia (884021) | about 2 years ago | (#39943545)

The French "classique" should be translated as "traditional".

Re:Mistranslation in summary (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943609)

Fuck you, I'm an American goddammit. Every foreign word that vaguely resembles an English word translates to that English word. You goddamn foreigners just use your own damn words wrong.

Re:Mistranslation in summary (-1, Offtopic)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#39943751)

Please ignore this ignorant shitstain. These fools give the rest of us a bad name.

Re:Mistranslation in summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943825)

Sarcasm Detector failed again, eh?

Re:Mistranslation in summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943893)

It is clear (to me) that the AC parent post is satirical. Your comment, less subtlely, makes the same point as the post you're responding to.

Can it block EMP too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943595)

Because if it can I am going to wallpaper my server room with it...

I will be the only one after the apocalypse with working computers yee haw!

Re:Can it block EMP too? (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#39943649)

Ungrounded Faraday cage aka antenna just makes it worse. Just close the steel rack door and you'll be all good.

welcome to this product (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943601)

welcome to this product I say.

properties around mobile carrier antenna at our place goes for 1/5th of the cost because people thinking of health reasons.

if one call block those waves or signals entirely with scientifically proven technique, it will increase the price point.

Re:welcome to this product (1)

jkflying (2190798) | about 2 years ago | (#39944627)

1. Buy cheap house near antenna
2. Wallpaper
3. Sell 'antenna proof' house for full antenna-free value (AKA ???)
4. Profit!!!

no greater evil than wallpaper (4, Informative)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#39943657)

being from europe my mom made my dad put it up on the walls. if you want to change it you have a hellish experience ahead of removing the old wallpaper

i will never use wall paper

Re:no greater evil than wallpaper (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#39943771)

Clearly you're not a redneck.

I've helped tear out a wall that had at least 20 layers of wallpaper on it...

Re:no greater evil than wallpaper (3, Insightful)

azalin (67640) | about 2 years ago | (#39944071)

If it's properly applied (like using wallpaper glue and primer instead of say paper glue) just put on some remover (or even water) and the whole line pulls right of. A six year old with a ladder could probably do it. If you apply the wrong glue though, have fun.

Oh well thank god. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943667)

For a second, I was expecting to read that it blocked all sorts of frequencies.
It only does a group of frequencies. So TV, phones and other stuff will be fine.

God forbid if it was and people started putting up large EM blocking wallpapers, blackholes everywhere preventing people from getting any signal. (I also think it is illegal in many countries to do such a thing, especially in a city)

This should be fantastic for getting rid of interference in busy areas like apartments.

Just a shame I hate wallpaper and find it such a stupid waste of paper most of the time. But this is legit good use for it. (more so if it can get slapped in to any generic wallpaper)

Old Tech is New Tech (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943671)

They had paint that did this in 1998, still sell it today. It used for allowing magnets to stick to a painted wall.

My steel desk drawer doesn't stop wifi... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943685)

I can put my wifi router in a closed steel desk drawer (I use a flat ethernet cable, so it closes as mush as any other drawer) and the offices on either side of me can see the router just fine. I doubt that a room is going to be sealed up better than my desk drawer.

Re:My steel desk drawer doesn't stop wifi... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943853)

I can put my wifi router in a closed steel desk drawer (I use a flat ethernet cable, so it closes as mush as any other drawer) and the offices on either side of me can see the router just fine. I doubt that a room is going to be sealed up better than my desk drawer.

Is your desk drawer grounded? A Faraday cage has to be grounded. It can't be an EM sink if the energy has nowhere to go.

By "grounded" I mean electrically connected to a metal spike embedded in the ground (like your computer's casing).

how about passive cell-phone-blocking tech? (3, Interesting)

davidwr (791652) | about 2 years ago | (#39943731)

Churches and theaters would love it, because the FCC can't say "you can't do that" without a serious court challenge.

They still wouldn't do it probably (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 2 years ago | (#39945169)

Because of lawsuits. So person goes to theatre, it blocks cell signals. they have a heart attack, try to dial 911, it doesn't go through, they die. Now arguments aside as to if that would have saved his life, there is still likely a lawsuit. He tried to call for help, couldn't because of the evil, bad, naughty, etc, etc theatre and he died of the poor dear, nwo give us $50 million dollars.

Can't see it happening on account of that.

It also might not be entirely without merit. If someone is having a problem first I have to notice in the theatre, and I dunno about you but I'm always doing my best to ignore the audience and focus on the screen. Then if I do notice, number one thing I'll do is try to get my phone out to call for help. If it doesn't work I have to decide between staying to administer CPR/first aid, running to try and find an employee that has access to a phone (payphones are gone these days), or running all the way out of the building which can be pretty damn large for most modern theatres and not let you back in just on a lark (to get information on the person's status).

I realize they could contain it more narrowly than that, just to the actual screen and seats area, but then I am not going to be walking looking at my phone to try and see when it comes alive, I have to make a decision and act fast and I don't know where the dead zone ends. For that matter I don't even know why my phone can't get signal.

Wallpaper? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943797)

From what I've seen so far, wallpaper is out of style (and a pain in the ass to remove!). Why not just use similar techniques with drywall instead? It would be more costly in the short-run, but nothing would change visually, and would still give freedom from a stylistic point of view.

This will not help those who claim to be allergic (1)

Kenja (541830) | about 2 years ago | (#39943813)

This will not help those who claim to be allergic to WiFi signals since their problem is psychosomatic.

Re:This will not help those who claim to be allerg (1)

azalin (67640) | about 2 years ago | (#39944175)

As long as you tell them convincingly it works, it might actually help. If the allergy is in your mind the cure is also there.

Re:This will not help those who claim to be allerg (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about 2 years ago | (#39944323)

That's not true.

These people -- whether they have a physical pathway that is known to medical science or not -- have a reaction to electromagnetic waves. This product blocks out those frequencies that they claim sensitivity to. If they feel better having bought the product, then what's the harm? You're not engaging in fraud, you are selling a product that blocks what they don't want in their house.

Re:This will not help those who claim to be allerg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39945135)

I've got a homeopathic bottle of water I'd like to sell you.

Re:This will not help those who claim to be allerg (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 2 years ago | (#39945337)

These people -- whether they have a physical pathway that is known to medical science or not -- have a reaction to electromagnetic waves.

No. These people are having a reaction to something, and are blaming electromagnetic waves.

This is an important distinction. We must separate the effect from the claimed cause.

If the problem is truly psychosomatic and the thing they're reacting to is in their own heads, then in theory if you take away their chosen bugbear (and they are aware of it) they should feel better. But then again they may not, and will just say the Wifi wallpaper doesn't work or it's one of the many frequencies the wallpaper doesn't block that is causing their problem. It's not like saying "logically, your symptoms cannot be caused by the cause you claim" is a magical way to make psychosomatic illness go away.

If the problem is not psychosomatic (and I fully believe this is the case for at least some of them), then something is affecting their health which is almost certainly not EM radiation, and so it will continue to cause them problems if you block the EM.

However, once again they are likely to continue to blame the EM. If they weren't predisposed to blame EM then they'd be looking at other, more likely causes for their problems already.

In neither case is the solution to the problem to indulge their misbegotten notions in order to turn a profit. It's either treating the psychosomatic illness with medicine and therapy, or trying to figure out the actual environmental or biological cause for their problem.

Don't do what they do, and get so fixated on a specific cause that we assume that the alleged but highly unlikely cause and the effect are a package deal. It's detrimental to their own quest for health because nobody can get past the idea that it must be caused by Wifi.

Re:This will not help those who claim to be allerg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39944511)

Surely the opposite will be true, if the *think* they're safe from these evil frequencies, then they will feel better.

Re:This will not help those who claim to be allerg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39945149)

People who start stating their message as the subject need to be executed. Their children too. Especially when they repeat it again in the message body.

Great! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943833)

So finally Sheldon *CAN* stop Penny from mooching of his Wifi?

Warning to PC and smart phone users!!! (5, Funny)

BenJeremy (181303) | about 2 years ago | (#39943835)

I used this wallpaper on my desktop, and now my wifi no longer works.

Took me a while to figure it out, but I've since switched back to my old wallpaper, and everything is fine now.

Re:Warning to PC and smart phone users!!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943929)

I used this wallpaper on my desktop, and now my wifi no longer works.

Took me a while to figure it out, but I've since switched back to my old wallpaper, and everything is fine now.

JFYI, it wasn't your wifi that no longer works ;^)

Re:Warning to PC and smart phone users!!! (1)

azalin (67640) | about 2 years ago | (#39944205)

very nice. I will have to use this on the next guy who comes with "I have problems with my wifi".

Re:Warning to PC and smart phone users!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39944965)

When I had originally read the title to the story, I had thought it was wall paper for my PC's desktop too! I was curious as to what one had to do with the other!

Just use grounded aluminum foil! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943863)

Aluminum foil works well! I've tested it. You can test for yourself. get a shoebox, line it with aluminum foil, ground the aluminum foil to a water pipe, stick your phone in the box. Call your phone!

It will go to voice mail.

Can be anti-wife too. (1)

gstrickler (920733) | about 2 years ago | (#39943903)

Just make it ugly enough, and it can be effective at reducing your chances of getting married.

Re:Can be anti-wife too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39944807)

That would make it worth its weight in gold!

I installed WiFi Wall Paper too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39943939)

It's called WPA2-AES....

Already available now. (3, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#39943987)

Paint your wall with magnetic paint, wallpaper over it.

http://www.amazon.com/Rustoleum-223081-Rust-Oleum-Magnetic-Primer/dp/B000PU1D3I [amazon.com]

Paint your walls with two coats of this primer, and paint into the electrical boxes to where you can ground it. I used under wallpaper speaker wire that is just a stick thin copper foil, I ran a 3" strip out the electrical box connected to the ground, painted over it.

Wifi and cellular coverage in that room is completely lost when the door is closed (which is also painted) and I have aluminum storm windows and aluminum screens on the windows.

Made a huge difference to RF interference to my ham shack. the number of "birdies" from crap in the home went down to nothing so I could pull in signals that were closer to the noise floor a lot easier.

Re:Already available now. (1)

ve3oat (884827) | about 2 years ago | (#39945251)

Made a huge difference to RF interference to my ham shack. the number of "birdies" from crap in the home went down to nothing so I could pull in signals that were closer to the noise floor a lot easier.

Sounds like either all the sources of the birdies are in that now-shielded room or all of your ham antennas are in that room.

Just embed particles in drywall panels. (1)

Picass0 (147474) | about 2 years ago | (#39944027)

Most businesses when re-doing floorspace are going to move a few walls around. If they embed the silver particles in the drywall the business owner has the option of painting or wallpapering.

Block everything, install repeaters (2)

petes_PoV (912422) | about 2 years ago | (#39944029)

Rather than "tune" the wallpaper to block or allow certain frequency bands, surely it's simpler to block the whole lot and then install hardware inside the screened room to retransmit the sorts of signals (not just their frequencies) that you wish to allow.

That way, as technology changes, you can easily reconfigure the system to accommodate new requirements.

I'd guess that's what most people do anyway - since this wallpaper has taken so ong to be developed.

Certified by TFH Institute (2)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 2 years ago | (#39944107)

The anti-WiFi wall paper will be the second product to be certified by the Tin Foil Hatter's Institute. The first one to earn the esteemed and much sought after certification was Reynolds kitchen aluminum wrap.

Aluminum foil.. (1)

Paracelcus (151056) | about 2 years ago | (#39944267)

The wide, heavy duty stuff, contact cement, conductive tape on joints, grounded at two points per unbroken plane. then cover with regular wall paper.

Lighting? (1)

ninjackn (1424235) | about 2 years ago | (#39944567)

So if a house has this copper particle wallpaper (or paint) does that mean the house is more of a hazard in a lightning storm?

Brick (2)

Caerdwyn (829058) | about 2 years ago | (#39944689)

Silver wallpaper? Cool! It will go with the 5000-dollar brick I put on top of my stereo amplifier to screen out cosmic rays.

How long do you think it will be before Monster gets into the wallpaper market and starts suing anyone who uses the term "wallpaper" in their domain names?

The Darkest hour - (1)

dindi (78034) | about 2 years ago | (#39945189)

What comes in mind is the apartment form The Darkest Hour movie :

http://collider.com/wp-content/uploads/Sergeis-Faraday-Cage-The-Darkest-Hour-concept-art.jpg

Yeah, the movie wasn't great, but it was different enough from the usual space-monster-crap to be interesting. And the Faraday-cage apartment rocked :)

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