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HP Shows Off Power Over Ethernet Thin Client

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the do-not-taunt-happy-thin-client dept.

HP 202

angry tapir writes "HP has unveiled an all-in-one thin client capable of being powered by an Ethernet cable. The t410 AiO supports the Type 1 Power over Ethernet (PoE) standard, which means it is capable of drawing its power from a network connection, although it can be powered by standard AC power. It uses an ARM-based processor and has an integrated 18.5-inch monitor, and it is capable of being used for virtual desktops through Windows RDP, VMware View and Citrix ICA."

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first post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954017)

asdf

Back, to the Future... (1)

rullywowr (1831632) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954031)

Pretty cool, but didn't we have this back in the 80's with the uber-futuristic concept of these things called Mainframes and Terminals?

"Marty, here's a $50 - go get yourself a Pepsi."

Re:Back, to the Future... (4, Insightful)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954053)

Have you seen a PoE terminal before? I think that was the point of this one...

Re:Back, to the Future... (1, Funny)

rullywowr (1831632) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954117)

Have you seen a PoE terminal before? I think that was the point of this one...

Does it use 1.21 Gigawatts?

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954187)

God I hope not... I don't think even my 22AWG Cat6a drops will be adequate...

(yes, I did get the reference)

You just need a high enough voltage (1)

bigtrike (904535) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954421)

How thick is the insulation on your 22AWG wires?

one plant did and then half of the power grid went (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39955157)

one plant did and then half of the power grid went down trying to reboot them all at the same time. Thanks India IT phone desk.

Re:Back, to the Future... (4, Funny)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955779)

What happens if you put a PoE device on each end of the cable? Free energy...?

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

noh8rz3 (2593935) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954781)

I don't understand what the point of this is. One wire is cool. But I would probably choose a por cable and wireless Internet before I chose poe but now power cable. Common sense.

Re:Back, to the Future... (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955147)

Not if you wanted to setup a call center with 400 desks you would not. That is what this is for.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955279)

If those 400 desks need a desk lamp? I'll use standard Thin clients and plug them into the outlet in that cube.

Now if all 400 desks do not have any power ran to them, this is a viable solution.

Re:Back, to the Future... (2)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955539)

Typical cube farm - think Wal-Mart filled with cubicals. Overhead lighting, nothing local. It would discourage people from the "I'll plug my phone in at work" mentality.

Perfect for the typical call center.

Re:Back, to the Future... (2)

bugs2squash (1132591) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955631)

It would be nice to have better options for LAN over standard power wiring. I know options exist but they've never seemed that attractive for one reason or another.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955701)

They don't. Those cost money, and generate heat that costs more money to get rid of. Their is overhead lighting. You should see the cost savings by firing anyone who brings in anything that plugs into the wall.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

hippo (107522) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955903)

Desk lamps! in a call centre? It's going to be hell with strip lighting. Still I'm sure they could bring their own USB powered LED light.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

noh8rz3 (2593935) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955311)

Wow autocorrect fail. Sent Fromm my iPad.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

Pewpdaddy (1364159) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954095)

Lets hope that the hardware is more inline with their commercial offerings. I won't even work on their consumer products much anymore.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

gregulator (756993) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954129)

I'd imagine there are not many consumers (or even pro-sumers) looking for a PoE Thin Client for there home office.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954299)

No, but there are plenty of us looking for a unit that doesn't have an integrated display, capable of being used as a frontend for MythTV or some other kind of video on demand home system. PoE isn't essential, but could be handy in environments where there's already a lot of other devices hogging available power where the display resides.

The designers of the Raspberry Pi system are strongly considering PoE in their next incarnation. Depending on its capabilities it might do what I need, even if I have to fashion an enclosure for it.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

Talian (746379) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954897)

You can't just plug these into "any" ethernet. They require specific switches that provide that capability, so I seriously doubt this will ever be aimed at home use.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955027)

You can't just plug these into "any" ethernet. They require specific switches that provide that capability, so I seriously doubt this will ever be aimed at home use.

They don't seem to have caught on, at all(more's the pity, everybody hates wall-warts); but you can get an otherwise wholly undistinguished 8-port switch that will support 50-60 watts worth of PoE devices(some on all 8 ports, with devices below maximum draw limits, some on only 4) for under $80...

Re:Back, to the Future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954767)

I can think of a lot of useful things for a PoE thin client. Especially once the technology improves where there can be a render server for video on the LAN that streams the frames to clients, so every computer doesn't need to have a high end video card.

In a business, it means a clued IT person can put clients out on desktops while keeping the terminal servers and routers locked up [1]. This way, an employee who decides to steal something might get the terminal, but they are not getting data, unless they snap photos of each screen.

At home, it is nice to have something to browse the Web that doesn't have fans or other moving parts that make noise, especially in bedroom areas.

[1]: With a decent VM cluster setup, RAID, and redundant cooling, once set up and in place, it wouldn't need that much maintaining, so keys to that room could be limited to just a few people.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

isopropanol (1936936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954243)

??? Do you think this is going to be marketed to home users? Norton Internet Security (trial edition), Yahoo toolbar, and Wildtangent Games all don't run on ARM.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

Pewpdaddy (1364159) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954391)

No, I'm just saying HP's history in hardware is shaky at best.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954485)

I've had some good experiences with their mid and high end servers, laserjets, thin clients and even their high-end business laptops. Their desktop/workstation PCs generally suck as much as their consumer grade equipment.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955335)

No apps run on the client, it just boots the os and then runs the apps on the server.

I suggest looking up what thin clients do and how they operate, you surely dont think they have an ARM version of office 2014.

Re:Back, to the Future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954253)

compare 400$ with raspberry py cost.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

rullywowr (1831632) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954825)

compare 400$ with raspberry py cost.

compare 400$ with raspberry pi cost.

There, fixed that for you.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954259)

didn't we have this back in the 80's with the uber-futuristic concept of these things called Mainframes and Terminals?

Actually, we had this back in the 60's. It's still a really good approach for some common business scenarios. Think about call centers, point of sale systems, and warehouse operations. Slashdot readers wouldn't want to use a thin client, but we aren't the market for these things.

Re:Back, to the Future... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954483)

No. The entire thing with this product is that it supports PoE, not that it is a thin client.
Saying that we had the same thing before would be like saying "Didn't we have that in the 1890's" when someone shows up with a flying car just because it's also a car.

What is neat here is that they have reduced the power consumption to less than 13W to be able to run it on PoE.

Removing the need to install power-cables in a class-room or similiar is pretty nice.

Re:Back, to the Future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954791)

Once again, an AC makes the most intelligent statement in a thread and what a surprise, the moderators ignore it.

Slashdot is so dead.The userbase is broken.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

Denogh (2024280) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954543)

Pretty cool, but didn't we have this back in the 80's with the uber-futuristic concept of these things called Mainframes and Terminals?

"Marty, here's a $50 - go get yourself a Pepsi."

Thin clients are all the rage these days. They work great with "The Cloud"

Re:Back, to the Future... (5, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955413)

And they eliminate 50% of your IT staff needs. no more dealing with workstations and idiot users, I can replace a failed thin client in 35 seconds and the user has no loss of data or any workflow interruption.

a general office is dumb to buy desktop PC's anymore. Thin clients for the sales, marketing, accounting, and general office, workstations for the people that actually use computers and you are done. Spend the money in the back office.

Re:Back, to the Future... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955651)

I was thinking the same thing, "ethernet", No wifi? No bluetooth? No USB? If not (no I didn't RTFA) this thing is a complete throwback except that it doesn't use a CRT.

But... (1)

Theophany (2519296) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954111)

...can it play Crysis?

Re:But... (1)

OliWarner (1529079) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954155)

Probably could play it over Onlive (et al).

How long... (1)

Ignacio (1465) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954135)

...until someone hacks one into a X terminal?

Re:How long... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954185)

Depends how long it finds to find a nerdy basement neck beard willing to waste the time needed I suppose.

Re:How long... (1)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954217)

I wouldn't be surprised if it can do X11 natively. I had an ancient HP Envizex i-series terminal that could, once it pulled its operating environment down off of an FTP server.

Re:How long... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955471)

Hp thin clients all do support X on their own, or at least historically. The last few were just X86 pc's that you netbooted what you wanted, so I was netbooting a linux to do remote X sessions.

Re:How long... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954229)

more important, how long until someone makes a wireless version of it?

Re:How long... (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954319)

more important, how long until someone makes a wireless version of it?

Powered over Wifi? Or maybe, using photovoltaic cells?

Re:How long... (1)

Adriax (746043) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954947)

Power beaming, like the satellite power station idea.
Too bad it will only work if your microwave is set to high and the door is left open.

Re:How long... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954493)

Soon after ISA comes together.

Interest, Skill and Access

Re:How long... (4, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954571)

On HP's x86 thin client line, 'hacking' has historically been pretty trivial. They totally don't support doing this; but it's just a normal PC bios with a disk-on-chip as the default boot medium; but it won't blink if you ask it to PXE boot or boot from a USB device.

Also of note, their non-WinCE clients have, historically, run a badly butchered version of debian(and, unless they've finally decided to fix the problem, several years later, one that has amazingly trivial exploits to get to a root shell even in 'kiosk' mode, much less in admin mode). I don't know if they've played bootloader games with their ARM models or not; but unless they've tightened the hell out of their linux firmware I strongly suspect that at least the non-kiosk mode will still have a way to sneak into the guts of the stock image. Also, since they tend to support running a browser locally(either WinCE's delightful IE build, or a slightly elderly version of Firefox, I'm assuming that X11 is already set to go, for local use, in the stock firmware.

I'd give it "about as long as it takes for one to get on ebay". HP's prices for thin clients are...optimistic... given their hardware specs; but you can find them at pleasingly low prices once they get shuffled off to support-contract-expired corporate retirement land. They make decent little mini-PCs for the price.

Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954179)

Really in this day and age, why?

Re:Why? (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955071)

Maybe because in a large homogenous environment, small power savings can add up?

I am not sure on the relative efficiencies between PoE and a small switching power supply on every desk, but I imagine if the runs are not too long to the closet, that the PoE would be more efficient.

Not to mention, less cables for the users to get all confused & tangled with. Just plug it in & go...

Re:Why ? (1)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955635)

Not too mention that the POE switch in the closet has a battery backup and probably a generator meaning that during a power outage you can stay working!

Forget web browsing (3, Interesting)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954183)

Video replay (with sound) and flash apps have become such an integral part of the web that few people would be satisfied with a thin client running any of these protocols. The truism that Average Joes only run lightweight apps is no longer true.

Re:Forget web browsing (3, Insightful)

isopropanol (1936936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954335)

But for point of sale, front counter, and callcentre work it'll be just fine.

Re:Forget web browsing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954599)

Urm, are you aware that your web is client-server based and so will work just as well with this, assuming it supports the relevant standards.

Re:Forget web browsing (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954649)

It supports VMware View (PCoIP) and Citrix ICA.
Both of these natively support Flash/Video just fine (I'm playing a 720P Youtube Video in my VMware View session right now...)

Re:Forget web browsing (2)

tom17 (659054) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955135)

We are about to migrate to a VDI infrastructure. My team is scared, as the 'standard' terminals are the RDP-Only Wyse jobbies. But there is an option that we may get the PCoIP ones. I saw a demo and that is less scary.

How have you found it so far? Sounds like video is OK so that's a relief...

Re:Forget web browsing (1)

gmack (197796) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955735)

Some of the $30 - $50 Chinese thin clients are a lot more flexible than that. Your other option is XRDP.

Re:Forget web browsing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954795)

Which is why TCs are sold based on Simplicity, Security, Replacability, and Power Consumption. They're designed to do one thing really well, such as processing transactions at a grocery store self-checkout kiosk, or interact with a reservation web app at a hotel front desk, but not both. With a TC, you don't have to worry about someone gaining access to restricted network resources, inserting a flash drive and copying data, or downloading a worm while browsing the web. If something goes wrong with one, they can simply be swapped out with a new one without any special configuration. You just keep a master image that you write to the device's storage medium, and plug it in. You can also keep them turned on 24/7 and use less electricity than a standard CFL bulb. In fact, the vast majority don't even need a fan to cool them.

Re:Forget web browsing (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955559)

I do this all the time on my HP thin clients running from a linux server. you can run flash and java natively on the thin client. at least the X86 ones.

but in a corporate environment, that is not an issue, 1000bt streams the remote session quite nicely for windows playback.

Re:Forget web browsing (1)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955665)

Don't know about your impression of modern thin clients but the XenDesktop remote supports HDX and full screen flash video playback without a problem. I even hook up USB webcams to the thin clients for video conferencing.

Remember, this is basically just a machine that will remote desktop into a machine with much more horsepower behind it.

Power over Ethernet? (1)

InvisibleClergy (1430277) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954201)

I guess that it runs on Mana, if Ethernet can restore it to full power.

For serious though, this is pretty cool, although I wonder how this standard holds up when under load.

Re:Power over Ethernet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954475)

I have always thought about the feasibility of trickle charging devices over PoE. I could see a *fat* thin client that has a battery.
The device constantly trickle charges, when operational it uses the battery.. like a laptop.
As long as you can get 8-10 hours of battery life for 9-5 work, I could see the advantages of a trickle charged *fat* thin client.
The size/weight of the battery is a moot issue, as it is thin client, *not* a laptop.

Combined with a solar panel on the back of a monitor as an additional charging source it could be a nice way to power low powered machines.

Plenty of great uses for this (2)

jimmyswimmy (749153) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954207)

Receptionists, POS terminals, all kinds of good uses. This is the way I set up my computers at home - good desktop, cheap laptop with RDP. I could use one. Unfortunately no idea of the price. At $200 these will sell like crazy. At $400, may as well just get a big netbook. Knowing HP, they'll sell at $450.

Re:Plenty of great uses for this (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954347)

I knew you were a receptionist!

Re:Plenty of great uses for this (1)

bytestorm (1296659) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954423)

According to this article [itpro.co.uk] HP wants 430 USD for it. Good guess.

Lower cost of maintenance (1)

bigtrike (904535) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954463)

They might have a lower overall cost. Although since they're purely a thin client and not just web terminals, you might still need a bunch of far more expensive server hardware to support them.

Re:Plenty of great uses for this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954561)

There are many cases where running a low-voltage data drop is much more cost effective than running high voltage lines, I think there are many customers who would think $450 is very cost effective. The first use-case that comes to mind is patient rooms in hospitals.

Re:Plenty of great uses for this (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954675)

The no-screen ARM thin client HP already sells is ~$200(HP t5335z list price, I assume that the rep would cut you a deal if you buy a bunch).

Based on monitor prices, I'm assuming at least another $100 for the version with a monitor. Quite possibly $400 for a monitor that keeps within PoE energy use limits and reduces cables and loose bits to wander off....

Yawn (5, Funny)

Bazman (4849) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954209)

Wake me up when it can do power over wireless ethernet.

Re:Yawn (1)

f8l_0e (775982) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954669)

The Tesla is strong in this one.

The Takeaway (3, Insightful)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954275)

The takeaway from the article:

... which drops to 10/100 when using PoE, thereby making it only marginally useful for very thin applications.

Re:The Takeaway (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954381)

I also wonder how much power the 4 USB ports can deliver. Presumably the keyboard and mouse occupy 2 ports. What would happen if you attached a USB-powered hard drive?

Re:The Takeaway (4, Informative)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954429)

If it's a thin client doing RDP or such the speed to the thin client is negligible. I use RDP clients over 2mbit internet connections nearly everyday and it works fine - even with the increased latency. Keep in mind all the file access and disk I/O is taking place on the RDP server, not the thin client. The only data going to and from the thin client is information about how to render the video output. You could even use Photoshop effectively through this.

Re:The Takeaway (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954907)

I did RDP over dialup, though you did need to drop the color depth down to 256 to keep things reasonable and that was Windows 2000 RDP, RDP 6.1 is probably more efficient since I'm sure they've integrated more stuff from ICA by now =)

Re:The Takeaway (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954465)

How so?

Gigabit ethernet is overkill for a thin client running business software like a spreadsheet or a word processor, no? These are business machines, and not designed for employees to slack off and watch 720p video streams.

Re:The Takeaway (1)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955817)

We do Autocad with similar equipment and 100meg is more than plenty for those 3d drawings. Gigabit is overkill for anything outside the server room and the Macs that can't go virtual in the office. How I wish they would go off and die.

Re:The Takeaway (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954529)

I would be very impressed if you can regularly saturate a 100 mbit port with just an RDP connection.

Re:The Takeaway (1)

Joehonkie (665142) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954595)

This clients need considerably less that 100 mbits at the client end of the connection. I have deployed a ton of them and the bandwidth used is usually around 10-20mb or 25-50 mb if you are doing extensive multimedia support (like upstream audio). The backend connections between the switches will obviously need to be more, but they won't e PoE connections, either.

Re:The Takeaway (2)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954697)

The takeaway from the article: ... which drops to 10/100 when using PoE, thereby making it only marginally useful for very thin applications.

Marginally useful at 100MB? Uh, since this is a terminal primarily designed to run thin applications (RDP, Citrix) which were developed and can be optimized to run over dial-up, I'm failing to see your point here. Even negotiating at 10MB I doubt you would see an impact in an RDP session.

Re:The Takeaway (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954755)

The really high-end thin client setups might be affected(never mind the ones that demand point-to-point dedicated fiber and are basically remote KVMs with USB support); but I've never seen an RDP, ICA, or X11 thin client environment that assumed GBe all the way to the terminal...

Pure latency considerations will make it detectable that you aren't sitting at the computer; but thin client protocols are designed to be usable even over boring residential internet connections, 10/100 is comparative luxury.

Late to the game (1, Informative)

Kohenkatz (1166461) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954327)

HP (and the OP) seem to think that they have something revolutionary here. Actually, this has been around for over five years already: http://www.chippc.com/thin-clients/jack-pc/ [chippc.com]

Re:Late to the game (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954415)

... except the JackPC doesn't power the monitor. HP's new thin client does.

What this means is that a thin client can be connected and powered using a single cable. Why bother with a thin client that is PoE if you still had to power a monitor?

I say "Bravo" to HP for the achievement.

How well does it run LTSP? (1)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954355)

How well does it run LTSP? If it does that well, then there are good markets for it in schools.

Re:How well does it run LTSP? (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954659)

If it boots via PXE, or the equivalent, it might be fairly easy to support (for someone in the know). Provided, of course, hardware drivers exist but TI is usually fairly encouraging of free software, e.g. beagleboard.

Re:How well does it run LTSP? (1)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955847)

HPs current thin clients work well with LTSP so I have no reason to think these won't.

I've never sat at a desk with e-net and no outlet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954461)

This product just seems silly. I've never sat at a desk in my life that has a network port and no power source nearby.
I guess this would be useful in new cube build outs but even then I've never seen one without a plug strip.
There could also be some power savings across many terminals over a dc plug.. but that seems minimal.

Didn't we do this before? (1)

DeeEff (2370332) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954503)

Mind you back them we called them Ethernet killers, and boy was the light show good.

Why? (1)

heezer7 (708308) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954635)

If it has to be plugged into a ethernet jack, who cares if it also has a power cable. Solving a problem that does not exist.

Re:Why? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955607)

Because you don't have to pay for cubicles with power in them? Because you can save a ton on electrical costs? This could easily save more than the cost of the endpoints if you open a new call center.

These are real problems, that you clearly lack the experience to understand.

Re:Why? (1)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955877)

Except then you only need one UPS to backup the switch. Sorry, but this problem does exist. Especially for someone like me who had to go from show to show setting up temporary offices for over 100 people. These things would cut my setup time in half as I don't have to run near as much power everywhere.

Wireless? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954661)

Does it support wifi connection?

Awesome! (2)

twmcneil (942300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954811)

This will be really great for all those places where there is an ethernet cable but no electrical power available. Just think of the possibilities!

Uh, no. I can't think of any either.

Re:Awesome! (1)

costas (38724) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955871)

PoE means a single UPS to keep all the thin clients alive during power outages. Think call centers in countries with spotty power grids...

OH!! NO!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39954831)

Sunrays again, no!!!

Solution in Need of a Problem (1)

JonnyO (119156) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954847)

I'm not sure what the benefit of this is? The benefits for making a stand-alone device such as a telephone PoE-capable are obvious. But if a device is not stand-alone and requires other powered devices to function, then what are you really accomplishing? A thin client requires a display to be usable, and a display requires a local power source. If HP really wants to solve a problem for thin client users (I have hundreds of the little buggars) then they'll drop the price. There's zero reason these things should cost as much as they do. I'm curious to see how well a Raspberry Pi can function as one.

Re:Solution in Need of a Problem (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955297)

This has a display built in.

What about the peripherals? (0)

watermark (913726) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954893)

How is this useful when we need power for the peripherals anyway? Monitor?

Re:What about the peripherals? (1)

watermark (913726) | more than 2 years ago | (#39954921)

I need a delete button

Power isn't so rare (1)

hey (83763) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955137)

Most offices, POS, warehouses, etc are already going to have power outlets already. You know... to run other stuff.

Raspberry Pi (0)

larppaxyz (1333319) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955357)

I didn't read article, summary or even comments, but i would like to know how well Raspberry Pi would work as thin client?

Needs to be PoWiFi (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 2 years ago | (#39955767)

Just sayin :p

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