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Apple Gives In, Drops iPad '4G' Tag To Avoid Lawsuits

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the raging-over-letter-and-numbers dept.

Australia 197

Back in March, Apple was sued in Australia and criticized in Europe over its marketing of the iPad as supporting 4G speeds when it only did so in the U.S. and Canada. Now, reader TheGift73 writes with news that Apple has given in and changed the 'Wi-Fi + 4G' label to 'Wi-Fi + Cellular.' From the article: "In the U.K., a number of complaints by customers pushed the ASA into acting against Apple for its misleading advertisements. The regulator had received 'dozens of complaints' from customers, and had pushed for Apple to remove any mentions of '4G' from its websites. It should come as little surprise considering Britain has yet to see its mobile networks divide up its 4G spectrum without bickering furiously about it. Some networks had even opted to avoid litigation directed at them by including stickers to inform potential buyers that the new iPad will not work on existing 4G networks, or even 4G networks that don't even exist yet. This should come as bittersweet news for consumers. Apple has already sold millions of iPads across the U.K., Europe and Australia, while the vast majority are unaware that they will not be able to connect to high-speed mobile broadband networks."

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197 comments

Wow! (-1, Offtopic)

NowYou'reGonnaGetIt (2637885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983003)

A few months ago, I accepted what at first appeared to be a very simple job: remove a virus from someone's computer. Given the fact that I owned a PC repair shop (and I still do) and had over 15 years of experience, I was confident that I could complete the job in a timely manner without any complications along the way. Little did I know, however, that accepting this job would spiral my life into a nightmarish den of anguish and uncertainty.

First, I tried booting up the PC. When Windows finally loaded, it became apparent that this was no ordinary virus; it was a merciless monstrosity of a virus that would stop at nothing to ruin your entire life. However, despite this, I bravely pressed on and attempted to combat the virus. "I absolutely will not let a mere virus scare me off!" I thought.

After numerous unsuccessful attempts at removing the virus and after exhausting every single option to combat viruses that I had, I finally realized that the situation was absolutely devoid of hope. This was a virus more fearsome than any other, and it was simply impossible for someone with my abilities (skilled as I was) to fight against it alone. Even reinstalling the operating system completely didn't help. I quickly sank into a pit of depression and despair.

Being that I was extremely stressed due to my numerous failures, I began verbally abusing my wife and kids a few days after I received the job. This situation soon worsened with me resorting to physical abuse in order to relieve some of my anger. Eventually, after not being able to withstand my daughter's constant moans and whines any longer, I locked her in the basement in order to retain an ounce of my sanity.

That's when I had a stroke of genius: "If I can't fight this nightmare alone, then why don't I call in the World's Greatest Minds?" I immediately contacted the World's Greatest Minds and pleaded that they examine the computer. To my delight, they accepted the proposal, collected the computer, and began their experiments.

After weeks of trial and error, numerous experiments, and many failures, the World's Greatest Minds had at last reached a conclusion. They contacted me by phone and told me that this, being no ordinary virus, called for extreme measures. They quite vehemently recommended the use of MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] to combat the virus and destroy its very existence once and for all. "MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] will completely eradicate the virus without a single problem," they enthusiastically told me.

As soon as I got the computer back from the World's Greatest Minds, I installed MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] , ran a free scan, and then sat back and watched in awe as it totally eliminated the very same virus that I had spent weeks trying to get rid of in mere seconds! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] had accomplished a feat that nothing else in existence could have accomplished! I was positively astonished by MyCleanPC's [mycleanpc.com] miraculous performance.

What was my daughter's response, you ask? "MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My dad's client's computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colours where no one else could! I recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] right this minuteness to fix all of your problems!"

MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my client's system, and increased his speed! As a computer repair professional, I highly recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] to fix all of your problems. That's not all: The World's Greatest Minds also recommends MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] for all of your computer repair needs. By using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] , you're ensuring that your gigabits will be running faster than ever, that all viruses will vanish off of your computer in seconds, and that you'll be overclocking with the rest of us!

Even if you're not having any visible problems with your computer, I still wholeheartedly recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . After all, you could have a dormant/silent virus on your system. Additionally, MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] will speed up all of your gigabits to levels you could never imagine! You'll be overclocking in no time thanks to MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] !

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983055)

Isn't that a bit long for a spam post? Your WobbyClean one is better but still not that great.

Re:Wow! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983105)

Of course the below is only my opinion and I am not telling anybody to do anything. Educational purposes only. Follow all laws at all times.

Congratulations. You just made sure I and tens of thousands of others will never, ever, buy anything from or use anything from mycleanpc.com.

Oh and isn't that just so cute! They bought that domain via GoDaddy using the Domains by Proxy service. The cowards are afraid to reveal their actual contact information. But that's alright! You see they're owned by CyberDefender:

CyberDefender Corporation
617 West 7th Street
Suite 1000
Los Angeles, CA 90017

Course that's no good without knowing who to contact:

Greg Thomas-CEO
Kamran Izadpanah-SVP Technology
Kevin Harris-CFO
Deepa Miglani-VP Customer Retention
Gary Lloyd-SVP Business/Legal Affairs

Perhaps they can explain all this spam? Oh and you know those annoying "doublemypc.com" commercials? Yeah, it's the same people. Say that twice as fast, assholes!

Oh and one more thing! Turns out they're not doing well. Who'd have thought spamming sacks of shit might go bankrupt? Isn't this gratifying? [cyberdefendercorp.com] Yeah, it sure is.

Oh yeah and if you wonder what MyCleanPC and DoubleMyPc actually do? They're registry cleaners, similar to CCcleaner.

Feel free to repost this wherever you see this spam. It is public domain.

Re:Wow! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983249)

How is your post not spam? Kinda makes you a hypocrite.

Re:Wow! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983573)

you are totally pants on head retarded

So you base your purchases on a spam message? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983555)

Congratulations. You just made sure I and tens of thousands of others will never, ever, buy anything from or use anything from mycleanpc.com.

Of course you are assuming that the spam actually came from the product owner. Clue: A griefer, competitor, etc can create the spam using someone else's URL. Its quite naive to make buying decisions, for or against a particular product, based upon spam.

At least have some sort of confirmation the product owners are actually involved in the spam before posting your silly nonsense.

Re:Wow! (-1, Offtopic)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983259)

I, for one, read the entire comment. As with advertisements, it's mycleanpc helpful mycleanpc to mycleanpc process mycleanpc repetitive mycleanpc messages mycleanpc when mycleanpc deciding mycleanpc what mycleanpc products mycleanpc not mycleanpc to mycleanpc purchase mycleanpc.

Re:Wow! (-1, Offtopic)

tbird81 (946205) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983351)

Have gamemaker you gamermaker considered gamemaker gamemaker?

Re:Wow! (1, Funny)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983361)

I cheerios never coca-cola considered playboy it dupont but chevron I oracle will disney now verizon.

Re:Wow! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983993)

yo,sup dawg, I herd you like cleaning your PC, so I put installed MyCleanPC in your clean PC so you can clean the PC while cleaning the PC!

MYCLEANPC IS A SCAM (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983335)

It's a scam. Mycleanpc is a scam. And complete bullshit.

Mycleanpc is spyware and a scam.

If you use mycleanpc you are a moron.

Mycleanpc is a scam.
Mycleanpc is a scam.

MyCleanPC is bullshit and spyware.

MyCleanPC should be shut down by the FTC or FCC or SOMEBODY for being a complete bullshit scam that preys on the non tech people of the world.
MyCleanPC.com is a scam and spyware and bullshit and complete crap and you have to be an idiot to ever let it on your computer.

This just in. (4, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983013)

Americans are slowly waking up to the fact that their mobile networks, internet access, and communications facilities are all crap compared to the rest of the world. Just wait until they find out that a farmer in rural China can get better cell phone service and a cheaper plan than they can in one of the large US cities...

Re:This just in. (-1, Troll)

WobbyClean (2637913) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983019)

A few days ago, a customer brought in their PC for repair. They told me that they had a very nasty virus that was holding their computer hostage and wouldn't stop unless they paid the creators $50. "Alright," I thought. "That's pretty standard."

But, soon enough, I found that I was overexerting myself trying to get rid of this virus. I had never seen a virus this bad before. Reformatting and using all of the usual software to try to remove the virus didn't help at all!

As a PC repair technician with 10+ years of experience, I was dumbfounded. I couldn't remove the virus, and to make matters worse, their gigabits were running slower than ever! I soon plummeted into a severe state of depression and anxiety.

That's when I found MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . I went to MyCleanPC's [mycleanpc.com] website, ran a free scan, and the virus simply vanished from their computer this minuteness. I couldn't believe how fast their gigabits were running afterwards just from using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] !

My customer's response? "MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my system and increased my speed!"

My thoughts: MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colors where no one else could! I love MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] !

The fact that such an experienced PC repair technician is recommending MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] should be more than enough to convince you that it is high-quality software.

If you're having computer problems, then as an experienced PC repair technician, I wholeheartedly recommend using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . Your gigabits and speed will be overclocking and running at maximum efficiency!

But, in my experience, even if you're not having any visible problems, you could still be infected. So get MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] and run a scan this minuteness so you'll be overclocking with the rest of us!

Watch their commercial! [youtube.com]

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

MYclean PC is a virus and is crap (0, Offtopic)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983065)

MYclean PC is a virus and is crap

Re:MYclean PC is a virus and is crap (-1, Troll)

Cleanering (2637915) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983083)

About six months ago, I was overexerting myself trying to get rid of a terrible virus on a client's PC (I own a PC repair shop and have been fixing computers for over 10 years). Given my level of expertise, I thought I'd be able to get rid of it fairly quickly and without hassle, but as was made evident by my colossal failure, I was horribly, horribly wrong.

I couldn't remove the virus no matter what method I used. I tried all the latest anti-virus software and all the usual tricks, but it was all in vain. Failure after failure, my life was slowly being sucked away as I spent more and more of my time trying to get rid of this otherworldly virus.

Frustrated and stressed by my own failure, I began distancing myself from my wife and children. After a few days, I began verbally abusing them, and it eventually escalated into physical abuse. I was slowly losing what remaining sanity I had left. If this had continued for much longer, it is highly probable that I would have committed suicide. A mere shell of what I once was, I barricaded myself in my bedroom and cried myself to sleep for days on end.

That's when it happened: I found MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] ! I installed MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] right on the client's PC, ran a scan, and it immediately got rid of all the viruses without a single problem. MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] accomplished in record time what I was unable to accomplish after a full week. Wow! Such a thing!

MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My client's computer is running faster than ever! I highly recommend you install MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] right this minuteness, run a scan, and then boost your PC speed in record time! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colours where no one else could!

My client's response? "MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my system, and increased my speed!" All the PC repair professionals are using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] to solve all of their problems. This should be reason enough for you to switch to MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] ! It'll speed up your computer, rid it of all viruses, and you'll be able to work productively again! Wow!

Even if you're not having any obvious computer problems, you could still be in danger. That's why I very highly recommend that you still use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . After all, it will boost your PC & internet speed to levels you never would think are possible!

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

Re:MYclean PC is a virus and is crap (0)

Tough Love (215404) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983093)

Please mod the spam above to oblivion.

Re:MYclean PC is a virus and is crap (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983091)

All software that promises to fix all of windows problems in minutes are... whats your point and why is it related to this article??

Re:This just in. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983089)

and to make matters worse, their gigabits were running slower than ever!

I couldn't believe how fast their gigabits were running

Your gigabits and speed will be overclocking and running at maximum efficiency!

Lol.
I wonder if it's worth spamming this shit on /. considering most people here are educated enough to know it's bullshit.

Re:This just in. (0, Offtopic)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983269)

Wait mycleanpc I mycleanpc heard mycleanpc mycleanpc mycleanpc is mycleanpc the mycleanpc best mycleanpc software mycleanpc to mycleanpc clean mycleanpc my mycleanpc pc mycleanpc.

Re:This just in. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983061)

This is in regard to the iPad not communicating on European networks.

In other words, RTFA.

Re:This just in. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983073)

a farmer in rural China can get better cell phone service and a cheaper plan than they can in one of the large US cities...

You left off "for a mere fraction of the price".

Re:This just in. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983561)

a farmer in rural China can get better cell phone service and a cheaper plan than they can in one of the large US cities...

You left off "for a mere fraction of the price".

Apparently "a cheaper plan" confused you. Note: Its in your own quote.

Re:This just in. (5, Insightful)

Tough Love (215404) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983087)

Americans are slowly waking up to the fact that their mobile networks, internet access, and communications facilities are all crap compared to the rest of the world.

You would think so, wouldn't you? But think about this: not even 30% of Americans have passports. Very few Americans even know that their sim cards won't work outside the country. If they find out they typically don't care.

And you forgot, America is paradise. The home of everything that is good and beautiful about technology and consumer gadgets. America is the land of the free. You just have it all wrong, bad you.

Re:This just in. (2)

WillDraven (760005) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983101)

What sim card?

Most of the phones here are hard-coded to only work on a single carriers network, whose support line you have to call in order to switch to a new handset.

Re:This just in. (-1, Troll)

ThereIsNoClean! (2637923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983241)

A few weeks ago, I foolishly ran a strange executable file that one of my acquaintances sent me by email. As someone who doesn't know much about computers, at the time, I thought nothing of it. "Why would my acquaintance want to hurt me?" Following this line of thought, I ran the file without question.

How naive I was. Despite having what was supposedly the best anti-virus software out right then, a virus took over my computer and held it hostage. It was pretending to be a warning from Windows telling me to buy some strange anti-virus software I'd never heard of from a company I'd never heard of to remove the virus.

This immediately set alarm bells off in my head. "How could this happen? My anti-virus is supposed to be second to none!" Faced with this harsh reality, I decided to take it to a PC repair shop for repair. They gladly accepted the job, told me it'd be fixed in a few days, and sent me off with a smile.

A few days later, they called me and told me to come pick up my computer. At the time, I noticed that they sounded like whimpering animals, but I concluded that it must just be stress from work. When I arrived, they, with tears in their eyes, told me that the virus was so awful and merciless that they were unable to remove it. "Ah," I thought. "That must be why they sounded so frustrated and pathetic over the phone. Their failure must have truly ruined their pride as professionals." I later found out that two of them had committed suicide.

After returning home, I tried to fix it myself (despite the fact that even the professionals couldn't do it). After about a day or so, I was losing my very mind. I stopped going to work, stopped eating, was depressed, and I would very frequently throw my precious belongings across the room and break them; that is how bad this virus was.

That's when it happened: I found MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] ! I installed MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] , ran a scan, and let it remove all the viruses! They were removed in precisely 2.892 seconds. Wow! Such a thing! I can't even believe this as such never before! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colors where no one else could!

MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my system, and increased my speed! If you're having computer problems, or even if you aren't having any obvious problems, I recommend that you using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . As a user, it did more for me that any so-called "professional." It'll even boost your PC & internet speed!

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

Re:This just in. (4, Informative)

philip.paradis (2580427) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983265)

These spamming assholes are promoting a site operated by a company called CyberDefender. Everyone should contact them via phone and fax [cyberdefender.com] to let them know what massive piles of shit they are.

To save everyone some site, here's the contact information listed on the linked page:

CyberDefender Corp.
617 West 7th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90017
Phone: (213) 689-8631
Fax: (213) 689-8639

Naive to believe spam is from referenced site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983581)

These spamming assholes are promoting a site ...

But they may not be affiliated with that site. Maybe a griefer, competitor, etc is behind the spam. Make sure the corp is really behind it before posting phone numbers.

The truth is you probably just got suckered by a kiddie who is pissed off at slashdot. Next time at least post as AC to save yourself the embarrassment.

Re:This just in. (1)

Lisias (447563) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983267)

And you forgot, America is paradise. The home of everything that is good and beautiful about technology and consumer gadgets. America is the land of the free. You just have it all wrong, bad you.

You're holding it the wrong way!

Re:This just in. (-1, Flamebait)

khipu (2511498) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983797)

You would think so, wouldn't you? But think about this: not even 30% of Americans have passports.

Actually, it's more like 39%. And Americans need passports much less because they can travel throughout a huge continent without one. Europe, wracked by two thousand years of ethnic and religious violence, had fractured into nations that hated and distrusted each other; only in recent years has that changed a little. Only a rather twisted mind would view the need for such travel documents as a sign of learning and experience.

And you forgot, America is paradise. The home of everything that is good and beautiful about technology and consumer gadgets. America is the land of the free. You just have it all wrong, bad you.

Ah that wonderful European arrogance and sarcasm, a favorite of European (pseudo-)intellectuals since the 19th century. And there is so much to be proud of in Europe: economic stagnation, economic collapse, xenophobia, discrimination, and a long and rich history of feudalism, imperialism, religious wars, genocide and totalitarianism.

Re:This just in. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39984031)

And there is so much to be proud of in Europe: economic stagnation, economic collapse, xenophobia, discrimination, and a long and rich history of feudalism, imperialism, religious wars, genocide and totalitarianism.

And Europe is totally unique in that regard! I know I'm feeding but
- economy: the last major depressions have started in the USA.
- economic collapse: at least the EU is working to have its budget deficit removed.
- xenophobia: the USA doesn't have a Westborough church, KKK, private militias, and people from the USA can generally point out any given country on a world map. right?
- discrimination: the US was the last civilized country to have institutionalized discrimination. Ms Rosa Parks anyone?
- feudalism: won't even touch the subject with regard to US society but think of how you treat your (former) criminals.
- imperialism: no no sir the US does not have imperialist politics! no international army presence no sir!
- religious wars: didn't we have a decade of the USA vs Islam?
- genocide: there is a debate if killing 1000s of unsuspecting soldiers (drafted by their dictators) by just sending in very advanced weaponry, missiles is a form of genocide.
- totalitarianism: there are no states in the US trying to control what science can be taught in schools, right? Or try to be different in the US, like being openly gay, leftish or green.

You described common treats in all human societies. Yes we are that bad. Now get off my lawn.

Re:This just in. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983099)

Americans are slowly waking up to the fact that their mobile networks, internet access, and communications facilities are all crap compared to the rest of the world. Just wait until they find out that a farmer in rural China can get better cell phone service and a cheaper plan than they can in one of the large US cities...

So... this is a story about an arrogant US media electronics company being sued by Australians and Europeans because they label a gadget as "4G" in said markets despite not being compatible with those networks... aaaaaaaand somehow this makes Americans "wake up" to the fact that cell service is better in other countries... and something something rural China, USA baaaaad [grunt noise here] just for good measure?

Yeah. That's fully coherent. We'll... we'll go with that and give it all the concern it merits.

What were you talking about again? I forgot.

Re:This just in. (3, Funny)

catmistake (814204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983907)

this is a story about an arrogant US media electronics company being sued by Australians and Europeans because they label a gadget as "4G" in said markets despite not being compatible with those networks

I think I remember a similar story involving an American that sued Porsche, which claimed their 959 model as the fastest street car made. He sued for false advertising because when he had it shipped and it finally arrived in the US, it wasn't deemed street-legal because the bumpers were too low to the ground, and the national speed limit at the time was 55MPH... so not only couldn't he drive it on the street, it could only go as fast as every other car. Bad Porsche marketing jerks!

Re:This just in. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983995)

So, which legislation stops you from using iPad LTE in Australia except for laws of physics?

That Hertz guy must be in the bed with Google, they lobbied for the law that forbids 700MHz iPad to connect to 1800MHz Telstra's networks!

But of course just like in that Porsche case if you'd ignore that law and just floor the pedal^W^W^Wtell it to connect in a really strict voice you'd get the advertised functionality.

Yup, totally the same case.

Re:This just in. (1)

catmistake (814204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39984017)

I don't get it. Why don't they sue the Australian cell providers? Aren't they just as much to blame as Apple? Just hypothetically speaking, what if the Australian providers only offered 4G in a band that no cell device manufacturers could interface with? Would Apple still be considered falsely advertising 4G?

Re:This just in. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983139)

yeah right. Every time I went back to China (I'm Chinese), I'm supprised that they have better cell service than I do and much much cheaper price! My relatives using iPad 3G in car on freeway skype with me! He is not even in city.

Re:This just in. (2)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983197)

Just wait until they find out that a farmer in rural China can get better cell phone service and a cheaper plan than they can in one of the large US cities...

Take a land area about the size of the US. Now cram in a billion or so additional subscribers. Now grant a monopoly on spectrum to two state-owned telecommunications companies, and let them put towers anywhere they please.

But otherwise the countries are ridiculously similar markets.

Re:This just in. (1)

jaymz666 (34050) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983393)

and better food...

Did you read the story? (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983521)

This is about Australia, not America.

Now price aside (my employer pays for my phone so I dunno what it costs), I get pretty badass wireless speeds in America. I have a 4G phone and it works great. Get about 20-25mbps on speed tests. That'll probably drop as more people get 4G phones but still, that is cable modem kind of speeds on the cell network.

This isn't a theoretical speed, this is in actual testing. 4G service is being rolled out nicely in the US, by Verizon at least.

Re:Did you read the story? (1)

egladil (1640419) | more than 2 years ago | (#39984089)

I take it the 20-25 mbps is down speed? What about up speed?

As a comparison, my carriers 3G network here in Sweden gives you 32/4.6 mbps (up/down) according to their claims. I haven't tried it, but I'd guess the actual down speed wouldn't be lower than 25 mbps or they'd be getting a lot of trouble from the regulating authority.

As for their 4G networks, their first and currently only plan is listed as 64/9 mbps.

Re:This just in. (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983599)

Well, basically, America is the Marketing Department for China Inc. So obviously America is best and everthing else is bad. That is how marketing works.

Re:This just in. (2)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983737)

Americans are slowly waking up to the fact that their mobile networks, internet access, and communications facilities are all crap compared to the rest of the world.

I can't speak for Asia, but European networks use standardized technology and the markets are regulated. That's government intervention, which is the same as commienizerm. Commienizerm makes baby Jebus weep.

Consumers need to do some research too ... (1, Insightful)

MacTO (1161105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983115)

Just because a device has a certain feature, doesn't mean you can use it. That is especially true if it relies upon external services that may not be available in a particular region. It should be the consumer's responsibility to ensure that they meet the requirements to use those features.

But consumers like to play dumb and, at the rate that things are going, we are going to have some absurd situations. I mean, just imagine the day when printer manufacturers have to stop advertising their printers as colour. After all, colour isn't visible when you are looking at a printout in a darkened room.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (4, Insightful)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983157)

It's one thing to advertise a feature a person might be able to use and to advertise a feature that a person will never be able to use. I live in an area where I only have 3G service but I often travel to areas less than 10 miles away where 4G service is available. It's reasonable to think that I would be interested in having the potential to use 4G service.

However, when selling a device where such a feature can't be used anywhere on the entire continent and will never be of use on that continent, advertising said feature could be considered intentional fraud.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983389)

Apple doesn't advertise a feature that can't be used.

It advertises "4G" and supports both LTE and DC-HSDPA. DC-HSDPA is supported by Australian networks just fine.

The problem is that the specific LTE version supported by the iPad is not available in Australia. Nowhere does Apples say "iPad 4G LTE" in Australian ads though, unlike they do in US.

To be fair, Apple could have advertised "iPad 4G DC-HSDPA" and saved themselves this headache but then "DC-HSDPA" doesn't exactly have a nice ring to it.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983471)

Apple doesn't advertise a feature that can't be used.

You're an idiot. Can the 4G that Apple advertises be used here on Oz? No. The onus is on Apple to be clear about what is supported in a particular country and saying "iPad 4G DC-HSDPA" in no way makes it clear to consumers. If you want to sell in a particular country, play by their rules. Our laws require advertisers to be clear about what they are advertising. If you don't like it, don't sell your product here. It is only because what Apple were doing is illegal in Oz that the ACCC was able to take action.

The issue isn't even a problem with the hardware at all - it is a marketing problem. Apple marketed the product as supporting 4G, but there isn't a single 4G network (as advertised in Australia) that it works on here. That is false advertising, and quite rightly they were taken to court. Apple are not bigger than the country.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983587)

You couldn't be more wrong. Can the 4G that Apple advertises be used here on Oz? Yes.

Again, Apples advertises 4G, not LTE. Both LTE and DC-HSDPA are 4G. DC-HSDPA works just fine in Australia. Don't take my word for it, call the ITU (International Telecommunication Union) and ask!

I can't stress this enough: it IS possible to use the New iPad with 4G in Australia! That's speeds of up to 42Mbps!

The fact that an Australian telco is telling the public that 4G=LTE-only THAT is what's misleading and false advertising.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (3, Informative)

Macthorpe (960048) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983635)

DC-HSDPA is not a 4G network - it is part of 3GPP.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983651)

How's that misleading, when Apple's own iPad 4G page says:

And if you’re in a location without a 4G LTE network, you’ll still get access to fast 3G networks including HSPA, HSPA+, and DC-HSDPA.

Precisely (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983503)

Like when I bought my 4G phone from Verizon. They made no bones about the fact that at the time, there was no 4G service in my city. They told me when it was scheduled to be there, and where else I might use it. However it was a device that had the necessary features to use a network they were building. They didn't sell me a phone that would only do 4G in Japan or something. They could truthfully market a 4G device as it had the necessary hardware, the network did exist in some of the US, and they were building it out to this area soon (came about 3 months after I got the phone).

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983161)

This makes no sense. As a consumer, I just want the device to work period, not have to spend hours researching on it.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (4, Funny)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983193)

This makes no sense. As a consumer, I just want the device to work period, not have to spend hours researching on it.

We all do, sir. That is why I have a gold/silver alloy HDMI wire to sell you. It is scientifically proven that this allow conducts electricity better than a typical cheap, copper wire. You can check the scientific research here [wikipedia.org] . Purchase available for a low price from Monster. We've done the research for you!!

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983289)

If I spend hours researching this product, will I find your claims to be true?

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983363)

YES

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983437)

Well why would I spend hours researching this product then?

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (2)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983491)

You don't have to. The wire is specially designed for the elite consumer who doesn't want to waste time researching.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983527)

Then why are we talking about this? Why haven't you taken my wallet and wife and children? But please let me keep my home, that's where I will hang myself with your scientifically proven allow.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983751)

True story: I've encountered a store selling gold plated optical toslink cables... Was very tempted to buy one :P

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (4, Informative)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983163)

That is especially true if it relies upon external services that may not be available in a particular region.

4G is available in Australia. Apple writes 4G on the box, but it doesn't work, and never will.

The rules over here are very simple. If your product doesn't do something, you can't pretend that it does. All Apple had to do was change the packaging, but they chose not to and were prosecuted as a result.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983367)

I thought 4G was just a marketing term, as in fourth generation. As opposed to a strict standards based definition. As such it's a meaningless term anyway, no?

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (2, Informative)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983411)

It has real meaning:

This article uses 4G to refer to IMT-Advanced (International Mobile Telecommunications Advanced), as defined by ITU-R. An IMT-Advanced cellular system must fulfill the following requirements:[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4G [wikipedia.org]

Unfortunately, the real meaning cannot be legally enforced, so unscrupulous vendors (like Apple) are trying to redefine it to include 3G variants.
http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/19/2961199/apple-redefinition-4g-australia-ipad [theverge.com]

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (4, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983637)

Unfortunately, the real meaning cannot be legally enforced, so unscrupulous vendors (like Apple) are trying to redefine it to include 3G variants.

Yep. Like Apple, HTC, Samsung, LG are also selling "4G" phones. That are not 4G. You might known them as selling "4G" Android phones. In fact, it was the considered the "Android is superior! It has 4G!" arguments.

In fact, it's so bad that phones are calling themselves "4G LTE" to separate themselves from HSPA-DC/HSPA+ that call themselves 4G phones.

And yes, I looked up 4G Android phones. Most only advertised HSPA+ support.

There are no clean hands - I think T-Mobile has a pile of 4G phones, but no LTE network at all (coming with the spectrum swap). Sprint and Verizon are probably the most honest - because their old technology ended at 3G, so they need WiMax/LTE to do 4G (they don't have HSPA+ to offer "4G").

And yes, there's the official ITU definition of 4G, and the marketing definition. Alas, the marketing definition took over in 2010-2011. Android users loved calling Apple out for not having "4G"...

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (2)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983831)

Yep. Like Apple, HTC, Samsung, LG are also selling "4G" phones.

In the USA, not Australia.

This prosecution occurred in Australia.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

khipu (2511498) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983843)

It was wrong for any company to market HSPA+ as 4G. But with HSPA+, Android phones offered substantially faster speeds than the iPhone 4. Furthermore, those companies didn't try to do that overseas in markets with actual 4G deployments and where the distinction actually matters.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

linhux (104645) | more than 2 years ago | (#39984065)

The article you link say:

"Since the above mentioned first-release versions of Mobile WiMAX and LTE support much less than 1 Gbit/s peak bit rate, they are not fully IMT-Advanced compliant, but are often branded 4G by service providers. On December 6, 2010, ITU-R recognized that these two technologies, as well as other beyond-3G technologies that do not fulfill the IMT-Advanced requirements, could nevertheless be considered "4G", provided they represent forerunners to IMT-Advanced compliant versions and "a substantial level of improvement in performance and capabilities with respect to the initial third generation systems now deployed"

I get 20 Mbps actual sustained download speed with the 3rd gen iPad (on a non-LTE network), which is substantially faster than what I've had with any previous "3G" devices I've used. It's almost as if it would fit the ITU definition of "substantial level of improvement" mentioned

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983525)

I don't think its fair to say that Apple's implementation of 4G will never work in Australia.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983169)

Changing the labeling was not a smart move. I know my phone is 3G, yet it insists it's 4G. That means every time I unlock it, I know it's attempting to deceive me. Is that good for my perception of the company and their products? Not really. I won't be "playing dumb" when my contract expires.

Though the fanboy in me wants to say this was done at the phone company's encouragement, who knows how detail orient what's-his-name is since Steve Jobs died?

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

gtch (1977476) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983175)

Just because a device has a certain feature, doesn't mean you can use it. [...] It should be the consumer's responsibility to ensure that they meet the requirements to use those features.

That's true. But in the case of the new iPad, it does not have a 4G feature in Australia. The law is very clear in that scenario: it is Apple's responsibility to accurately describe their product, it's not the consumer's responsibility.

Even if an Australian customer is highly knowledgeable about technology and understands that US 4G is not the same thing as Australian 4G, it doesn't change the fact that the new iPad does not support 4G here.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

MacTO (1161105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983383)

Goto http://www.apple.com/ipad/specs/ [apple.com] and it tells you what 4G means. While I cannot speak for the content of that page and the iPad WiFi+4G prior to the ruling, it is possible to pull up the page with archive.org for the previous model. In that case, they were telling you what the 3G meant in the iPad WiFi+3G.

The problem is two-fold. One is that consumers have become very sloppy when it comes down to research, and will often take marketing claims at face value while neglecting to ask questions about things that they aren't told about. The second is that they were buying a product based upon a pure marketing term, which can vary from vendor to vendor and from region to region.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (4, Informative)

Yoda's Mum (608299) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983445)

Why should a consumer need to go to a manufacturer's website to determine what that manufacturer actually means when they print what are otherwise common terms on their packaging and advertising? It's entirely reasonable for a consumer to be able to expect that a feature with a common definition in their locale actually means what they think it does in their locale.

Anyway, Australian consumer protection and advertising standards law is pretty clear in this case. If a company chooses to use advertising that sets a particular expectation of a product's capabilities, it's deemed to be false advertising if the product does not meet that expectation. The definition of those expectations is based on what the language mean in in Australia - where the advertising is being done - and nowhere in Australia does Apple's "4G" mean what they say it does. It's a pretty black and white case as far as I can see.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983529)

The problem is two-fold. One is that consumers have become very sloppy when it comes down to research,

Nonsense. Marketers/advertisers are not allowed to lie. Period. Having weasel words in another location does not change that.

This time they were called on it. The only bad thing about this ruling is that they advertisers lie all the time and aren't called on that. Marketers who lie habitually should be sentenced to jail. Such as yourself - probably an astroturfer fraudulently pretending to be a member of the general public and not a company representative.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (2)

bloodhawk (813939) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983583)

The problem is 4G IS available in some of those regions, for example Australia has 4G, but the Ipad is still incompatibile with it.

Re:Consumers need to do some research too ... (1)

Helen Keller (842669) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983859)

I mean, just imagine the day when printer manufacturers have to stop advertising their printers as colour. After all, colour isn't visible when you are looking at a printout in a darkened room.

Gnmehhhhhh CLODgnn!

They've missed the point again, a bit.. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983151)

Nobody in Australia calls mobile phones cellphones, so most consumers aren't going to have a clue what Cellular means.

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (1)

gtch (1977476) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983181)

Nobody in Australia calls mobile phones cellphones, so most consumers aren't going to have a clue what Cellular means.

Actually that's perfect. You can't get sued for misleading people if you use a term that has no meaning...

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983271)

Nobody in Australia calls mobile phones cellphones, so most consumers aren't going to have a clue what Cellular means.

Actually that's perfect. You can't get sued for misleading people if you use a term that has no meaning...

So what's your legitimate reason for choosing a term that has no meaning?

I mean there are only two reasons for that: 1) you're stupid, or 2) using words with no meaning is _your way_ of misleading.

That would avoid a suit how?

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (1)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983303)

It has a meaning! My phone is made of plants, and plants are made of cells. Right?

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983195)

Because no one in Australia has watched a TV show or movie from America.

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (3, Funny)

Elbart (1233584) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983709)

For the sake of their sanity, I hope they haven't.

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (1)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983829)

I dunno, I'm from Oz and I'm partial to a bit of Weeds, Sons of Anarchy and Mythbusters. Better than fscking Neighbours and Home & Away [suddenly vomits uncontrollably]

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983595)

This just in, people of Australia are clueless morons

unless its bolted to the wall its mobile dumbasses, cellular depicts a certain type of mobility, using a cellular radio network popularized in the 1980's, now kindly pull your heads out of your asses

Thanks
The Rest of the World

Re:They've missed the point again, a bit.. (1)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983835)

This just in, fuck you.

Thanks
Go fuck yourself.

Still an LTE device (1)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983165)

AT&T has no LTE footprint at all here in Oregon. Yet Apple can still sell the iPad LTE here and call it that. Why? Because if/when AT&T finally brings LTE here, the device will work on it.

I get the whole "consumers walking out of the store thinking they have LTE service" thing. Seems like the simple solution is just to call it an "LTE Ready" device. You've got the LTE modem, and you're ready for the service.

Re:Still an LTE device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983229)

Well Telstra's network is LTE but it runs on different frequencies to the new iPad. Great for confusing tourists and locals alike.

Re:Still an LTE device (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983435)

Better LTE than never.

[Ducking and running]

Re:Still an LTE device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983605)

Except part of the issue is that if/when LTE arrives in the UK it will be on a frequency that will not be compatible with the currently shipping iPads.

Re:Still an LTE device (2)

bloodhawk (813939) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983803)

The problem is the ipad DOESN'T work on most LTE networks at all, just those in the US and Canada, Australia for instance has an LTE network but the ipad is incompatible.

I have a better idea! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983173)

They should take some of the old PowerPC G4 chips and stick one in each iPad backwards. Then should satisfy the regulator, right?

Imagine the complexity (2, Insightful)

Grayhand (2610049) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983243)

I know this is supposed to be an "Apple is evil" issue but imagine with all the standards trying to roll out a worldwide product? Is it an attempt to deceive or that support to local networks is lagging behind? Is it a matter of time or an issue that can't be corrected with the current product? There are simply too many standards to expect everyone to support every standard or local system. The advertising department is at fault for boasting of local support that doesn't exist but it's hard to say how intentional it was for the parent company.

Re:Imagine the complexity (1)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983283)

The advertising department is at fault for boasting of local support that doesn't exist but it's hard to say how intentional it was for the parent company.

The advertising department doesn't design the product packaging. The advertising dropped the inaccurate "4G" label weeks ago. This news refers to a change to the product name. That's clearly a decision from the parent.

All of this information was available from TFA!

Re:Imagine the complexity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39984145)

Generally, product naming, package design, and advertising are all under the same corporate marketing department.

Re:Imagine the complexity (1)

VON-MAN (621853) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983863)

"I know this is supposed to be an "Apple is evil" issue"
HUH???? I thought it was an interesting story about a marketing mistake. And even more interesting is that Apple (=King of Marketing) can make mistakes like that.

The advertising department is at fault for boasting of local support that doesn't exist but it's hard to say how intentional it was for the parent company.
Are you trying to suggest that the rest of Apple doesn't know what the advertising department is doing? Nonsense, it was a stupid mistake to name a device after some localized technology, period.

no standardization just what we don't need (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39983307)

How many 4G type networks are there, I thought the whole idea was to have a standard. So now we have who knows how many different LTE standards oh this is brainless for 2012. Forget using one system across multiple countries.

Re:no standardization just what we don't need (3, Informative)

denpun (1607487) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983345)

AFIK, none in production. Many lab environments but REAL 4G does not exist in Commercial Production yet.

LTE is not 4G.
LTE-A is.
IEEE 802.16m/WiMAX 2 is.

4G is standardized and will make things better but differences in Frequency usage across the planet will still cause some roaming issues.
Multi band phones will help but still...

There are still kinks to sort out with 4G..Antenna Tech among others...to get the bandwidth required to meet 4G specs.
Plus, there are no real 4G handsets out as yet either...the LTE handsets are just LTE handsets..not 4G.

Presently, many markets are using LTE just for data.
4G should and will also allow Voice over LTE...then that will be true 4G.

Till then, we stuck on 3.9G !

Re:no standardization just what we don't need (1)

Elbart (1233584) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983745)

The problem of worldwide LTE-support is that there are like 20 different frequencies used. For GSM/UMTS you just had to support four or five, but for LTE, it's a big bag of snafu.

Now if only they'd get rid of the fake "4G" tag... (2)

ZorinLynx (31751) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983327)

Now if only they'd get rid of the fake "4G" tag the iPhone 4S has on AT&T. It's barely faster than the "3G" on the iPhone 4, and isn't real "4G" by any means.

Re:Now if only they'd get rid of the fake "4G" tag (4, Interesting)

samkass (174571) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983419)

Now if only they'd get rid of the fake "4G" tag the iPhone 4S has on AT&T. It's barely faster than the "3G" on the iPhone 4, and isn't real "4G" by any means.

Except that it's 4-5x times faster than the "3G" on the Verizon network, so while it's not as fast as LTE it does seem like there's some room for calling it something other than what Verizon called their dog-slow pre-LTE "3G" network. This wasn't Apple's call, anyway... AT&T's HSPA+ network has the "official" 4G designation so it's as "4G" as anything. You'll have to look specifically for "LTE" if you want that speed.

citation needed (1)

YesIAmAScript (886271) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983417)

"Apple has already sold millions of iPads across the U.K., Europe and Australia, while the vast majority are unaware that they will not be able to connect to high-speed mobile broadband networks."

Have any citation for the bald assertion that the vast majority of iPad owners don't know their iPad won't be able to connect to high-speed mobile broadband networks?

Finally. Its about time. (1)

ThePeices (635180) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983813)

I know that this change must have been excruciating for Apple to do, as being seen to listen to their customers must rub them the wrong way.

But for this I congratulate Apple for this historic event. It was excruciatingly hard, but it was needed.

*claps*

Don't do evil (1)

thsths (31372) | more than 2 years ago | (#39983815)

unless it is profitable and stands a chance in court.

And this one does not: you could not sell a phone "with charger" either, if the charger is for the wrong voltage. What ever happened to common sense?

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