Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Subdermal Magnets Allow You To Wear an IPod Like a Watch

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the throw-away-the-band dept.

Idle 228

Okian Warrior writes "Tattoo artist Jersey from Dynasty Tattoo (in New Jersey) implanted sub-dermal magnets in his arm to wear his iPod touch like a watch. From the article: '“Those magnets are actually called micro-dermal anchors, and in body piercing they are very common. The tops are actually just 5 millimetre magnetic tops,” he said. “I took the ends of magnets and actually adhered them to the back of the iPod, and that’s how they click into my skin.” He added: “I can go for a run and it won’t come off. I’ve already taken it to the gym and jogged with it on.”'"

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Apple announces (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994713)

New, even smaller, iPod. Users will need to buy new accessories, or new arms in this case.

Re:Apple announces (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994773)

I was thinking, "New, smaller, sub-dermal iPod! Just plug your headphones into your wrist!"

Re:Apple announces (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994803)

Alternatively, "New, same sized, sub-dermal iPod! It really fucking hurts!"

Re:Apple announces (4, Funny)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995093)

"Why is it called an eyePhone?"
- "Ehm, I'll explain after I install it."

Re:Apple announces (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995381)

*sigh*... kids. Sheesh. Surgery to replace a strap and buckle? Is this a stupid idea, or am I just getting too damned old? Yes, I want a wrist phone, but I don't want to undergo surgery to have one.

Re:Apple announces (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995579)

Sub-dermal implants like this are actually *fairly* easy to remove and replace. It'll probably hurt, and cause a bit of scarring... but if you check TFA and see the guys arm ... I don't think anyone would really notice

Or more likely, if they do release a new design for the iPod, he'll just rig up something on the iPod itself to match his current dock: i.e. crazy-glue a mounting system to the back of the new iPod.

Re:Apple announces (3, Informative)

plover (150551) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995599)

"Surgery"? Body modders are not surgeons. They may (or may not) follow best practices around hygiene, sterilization, air filtration, infection control, etc. Their pain management is limited to over the counter medications and topical treatments such as ice. What they have in common with surgeons is they both take knives to skin.

Re:Apple announces (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995663)

First you complain that they charge arms and legs
for their products. Then, when they finally start selling arms, you still complain! Leaaave Apple alone!! :)

Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (3, Interesting)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994723)

Seriously, there was a day and age when "magnets = bad" was the mantra. What kind of problems should this guy actually see with his gear, long term, subjecting it to strong magnetism? Will this mess with the memory in the device? Will this accelerate problems like tin whiskers?

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994749)

Magnets and magnetic media don't mix very well, but the iPod Nano doesn't use magnetic media so he should be alright.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (3, Insightful)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994817)

Fuck hemoglobin, I want to know how the implanted rare earth magnets might effect my iPod.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994769)

Tin whiskers grow in strong electric fields, not magnetic.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (4, Informative)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994827)

and i would bet that at 90ish angles to a strong electrical field there is almost always a strong Magnetic field.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (5, Funny)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994897)

Only if the fields are changing. RTFMAXWELLEQUATIONS.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994989)

Bet accepted.

Do you understand you are wrong? Sib post stated it clearly. Pay up sucker.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (3, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995213)

and i would bet that at 90ish angles to a strong electrical field there is almost always a strong Magnetic field.

You must be an official Star Trek script writer.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995455)

ex-Star Trek script writer maybe. Nobody has actually written anything approaching a script for Star Trek since DS9 went off the air.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

plover (150551) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995613)

His science knowledge is so bad that Rick Berman could have successfully used him... :-)

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995639)

Probably not, then he would have said that the strong magnetic caused a subspace anomaly that attracts interphasic lifeforms which make human cells devolve.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (3, Interesting)

erroneus (253617) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994833)

He will fall asleep with his iPod attached to his wrist and they'll have to cut something off eventually.

I think he would be better off with a velcro band with a magnet on it...

Anyway, the words "really" "bad" and "idea" come to mind here.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (2)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994879)

Subdermal magnets are pretty weak compared to the magnets you'd find in, e.g., a hard disk head. Speaking from experience, they certainly aren't strong to wipe a credit card, so I double they'd be a threat to any practical device.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994891)

Causes necrosis in the tissue when compressed that way, other than that, not much affect. Small magnets for body modification work well, but holding something the mass of an ipod shuffle is a bad idea.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (3, Informative)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995049)

The problem isn't the magnet.

The problem is that the skin compressed between two magnets will eventually die and rot away from the compression and he will have a hole in his arm.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (4, Informative)

acedotcom (998378) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995357)

except thats not how these implants work. the actual magnets sit just above the skin like external mounts so the only tension on the skin is from the bases of the implants.

the real problem having to get new implants to support next years model.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (2, Informative)

tom17 (659054) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995433)

Actually, the magnets are not *under* his skin. They stick out through holes in his skin.

What a bad bad idea.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995583)

So these aren't really subdermal implants then. More like transdermal or transepidermal.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (3, Insightful)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995471)

Maybe, if it's worn constantly, and only if the compression is high enough to prevent blood flow. Using sufficiently weak magnets would probably be no more restrictive to circulation than wearing a standard watch. And absent a serious opiate habit, pain would probably cause most people to remove a device long before there was real damage.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (5, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995249)

If I were in a betting mood, I'd imagine that the largest risk would be implant degradation. Rare earth magnets, in their raw or thin-layer-of-nickel-plate forms, are not biocompatible or stable under implant conditions. If the protective coating(the firmer flavors of silicone elastomer seem to be popular; but I'm sure that there are others) is breached he'll have to get out the potato peeler and dig out a nasty lump of putrifying magnet corrosion products. Hardly fatal; but neither fun nor scar-free.

It didn't take too long for that to happen to the 'magnet in fingertip for 6th sense' guy, and I wouldn't be terribly optimistic here.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995573)

Stainless steel [amazon.com] seems like the obvious choice.

Re:Magnets?! How to they %#^&^@# work? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995255)

Seriously, there was a day and age when "magnets = bad" was the mantra. What kind of problems should this guy actually see with his gear, long term, subjecting it to strong magnetism?

Not sure, but if you want to make such a person seriously cross at you, approach him from behind with a strong neodymium magnet. That would cause him trouble.

NMR? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995687)

If he needs an NMR, he would also be out of luck. Either that or surgery to remove the inplants.

Douche (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994725)

Get a life loser. I hope your arm falls off.

Magnets in your body? That's nice. (4, Insightful)

maweki (999634) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994739)

It is nice but I rather be augmented sensewise than fashionwise by these magnets. I'd love one in my fingertip that induces a current whenever I am very near alternating current. Would give us the ability to feel electric energy or magnetic fields in general.
Regarding the iPod: Actually, my pocket works very good, Thank you!

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (4, Interesting)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994791)

fingertip magents would be a very BAD idea.

the way it works is you have current whenever you have motion in a magnetic field so you would have all sorts of problems

(besides all you would need really is a small coil not a magnet)

(for details look up Right Hand Rule (electronics) in Wikipedia)

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994905)

A ring made with a coil and an LED connected to it would sense alternating magnetic fields and make an interesting fashion accessory.

BTW The only part the magnet would stick to on an ipod Nano is the hinge of that belt clip. Even with HDD rare earth magnets, I found that the attraction force is very weak not something I would trust. So this person has 2 extra magnets that does nothing and a piss poor job of securing the ipod.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995019)

I took the ends of magnets and actually adhered them to the back of the iPod

He has magnets in his skin, and other magnets on the iPod.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (3)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994923)

Speaking as a guy with magnets in his fingertips, you're wrong. They're nowhere near strong enough to cause trouble.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995051)

go on; some details please!

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995203)

See other posts I've made here. I went to a body modification guy who does these, it was a quick procedure, basically healed in a week. Once the swelling went down, I was able to feel more stuff. The things I feel most often are electric ranges, microwaves, security scanners at stores, and wall warts.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995505)

As another guy with fingertip magnets (one in each ring finger) I second this!

Magnetic fields cause the tiny magnets to align to the field. You can feel the magnet inside the finger being attracted or repelled. In the case of alternating current, you have an oscillating electromagnetic field which causes the magnet to vibrate. There's no current being induced; you don't get shocked. If you want to try it without the implant, superglue a tiny rare earth magnet to your skin and go hunt some strong oscillating EM fields (AC adapters, some electric motors.) It's definitely a cool human augmentation, and kind of a comic book superpower. Sort of.

In the case of the article, he's got subdermal anchors with magnets attached to the part that sticks out of the skin. I've been wondering if one could get the same magnetic sensory ability from this arrangement, feeling the vibrating magnet. You could switch it for different magnets, and the shaft sticking out of the skin would give the magnet more leverage in most alignments.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (4, Informative)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994795)

Have fun getting an MRI.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (2)

kimvette (919543) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995403)

Or any kind of surgery (including oral or nasal) where the anesthesiologist will flat-out refuse to admit you until the microdermals are gone, leaving behind scars.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995437)

Seriously? Any chance of a link with some more info on that?

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

kimvette (919543) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995537)

No links - Just dealt with having a microdermal removed back in February when I had my nose done. The anesthesiologists required that all piercings be removed. :-(

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

J'raxis (248192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995519)

What is the reason for this? The fact that it's metal, the fact that it's implanted, or ...?

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (2)

J'raxis (248192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995497)

No different than someone with a bone fracture with metal pins in it...

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

mj1856 (589031) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995515)

Or explaining that to the TSA on your next trip to grandmas house.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (5, Interesting)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994801)

It's pretty sweet. I've got one in my right thumb and index finger. I feel a buzz whenever there's a strong enough alternating field nearby, and a tug whenever I pass my hand near strong static magnets. I'll be walking down the street and feel sensors to detect the presence of cars, and I can feel the brakes in subway cars. Nothing particularly practical, but I figure I may get a couple of seconds warning before the shockwave if I ever feel an EMP.

In terms of strength, I can basically pick up staples. Anything heavier falls off. Other magnets I can drag around on the table pretty easily, though it's uncomfortable to have them actually contact my fingers.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

uigrad_2000 (398500) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995033)

That is pretty awesome, but I still have to ask:

Why?

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995153)

Because it was there:Mountains::Because it was awesome:Subdermal mangets

I like having senses other people don't. It doesn't give me any practical advantage, but it's neat.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (2)

GungaDan (195739) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995365)

Why? "Subdermal mangets"

Say no more, Dr. Freud, wink wink. Enjoy the man-getting!

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995187)

A couple of seconds of warning before an EMP: isn't that sufficient reason to mutilate your fingers?

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (1)

J'raxis (248192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995631)

Sounds like a pretty good counter-surveillance technology, being able to know when you're in the presence of hidden metal / RFID / security strip detectors without carrying any overt detector-detectors.

Now I'm wondering if something like this can be used to detect EM like radar or millimeter waves, or if not, what could?

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (2)

scyph (153674) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995139)

How long was it from having them implanted to being able to feel the buzz? I had two done at the beginning of April: right ring finger and back of the hand. I'm yet to feel anything 'accidental' (if I hold a magnet nearby, they go nuts; I can pick up staples too).

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (4, Interesting)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995277)

A week or two. Turn on a microwave--that should do it. Or go into a bookstore--you'll feel the scanners at the door.

I live in NYC, where there are all kinds of things hidden behind walls and under the sidewalk. Maybe you're just in an area deficient in weirdness?

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (2)

scyph (153674) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995463)

Turn on a microwave--that should do it

Yep, that worked. And now I recognise the feeling (from using my laptop and a few other things): what I was just putting down to sensitivity in my finger due to it being implanted (cut, lift, implant) is actually the magnet vibrating. Awesome! Thanks :)

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (0)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994863)

Attach wire to belt. Attach alligator clips to ends of wires. Attach clips to scrotum near testicles (labia if female). Voila you have a new sense like a shark. Enjoy the tour of power plant generator floor.

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995107)

It is nice but I rather be augmented sensewise than fashionwise by these magnets.

And that right there is why you will never be part of the good, glorious, and right collective that is the almighty Apple. Please refrain from any further attempts to step out of your inferior social status, unclean one.

Blessed be the dogcow and the righteous Saint Jobs,
iHuman #42203942-11

Re:Magnets in your body? That's nice. (4, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995137)

Ah this old idea that pops up on /. every month or so.

This is where I relate that you can get ALMOST the same experience temporarily with stretchy gloves and little magnets in the fingertips. Obviously buy gloves with fabric fingers just a little longer than your fingers. In the frozen north, in season, this is not much of a challenge... Florida /.ers are probably all like, gloves, what are those?

It is fun for at least a couple hours. Try touching the body of a big motor or old fashioned xfrmr power supply. Variable speed AC/DC "universal" motors were not as much fun as I expected. Waving in front of a CRT screen is entertaining.

You want gloves thick/strong enough to not tear, but not so thick as to lose sensation.

GOOG for "magnetic wedding ring" and you'll find lots of crackpot "magnets cured mah arthritis" pure BS, but this is probably the ultimate in non-invasive experimentation. Unlike the Magnet-in-glove thing, I've not tried magnetic wedding rings.

The biggest problem with "magnets/hands" is what happens when it inevitably cracks. Sharp little ceramic shards pinching slashed up tissue. So don't go giving steel plates a "high five".

Lessons from the cochlear implant community (1)

awtbfb (586638) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995649)

Magnets are used to keep the internal and external antennas [wikipedia.org] aligned for cochlear implants. CIs have been around for a while, so the community has learned some important lessons. First, you need to plan for magnet removal in the event of an emergency MRI. Most CI users don't get MRIs but sometimes there is a critical need. Therefore, newer implant models allow a qualified doctor to make a small incision, pop the magnet out without damaging the implant, and then put everything back after the MRI. This is extremely rare for obvious reasons.

Second, the magnet in the external component is usually tailored to the individual. The need for different strengths is due to magnet depth, hair, etc. There are several strength levels (e.g., high, medium, low) and you want one that will hold the coil tight, but not so tight that it leads to skin damage.

Medical issues (1)

James_Duncan8181 (588316) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994747)

Any doctors around to comment on possible blood flow issues due to a build-up of metals in the veins behind that intense a magnetic field?

Re:Medical issues (2)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994853)

The magnets that they use are coated pretty well. Mine are actually flat little magnets that are used in magnetic stirrers in chemistry labs. They're made to be as inert as possible.

In the first generation, the guy who did them coated them with silicone that would rub off. It would cause the skin around the magnet to blacken once that happened. Once I found out that they fixed that problem, I jumped on it.

Of course, if I ever need an MRI, I'll need them taken out.

Re:Medical issues (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995059)

Also it appears the ones used in TFA are actually inert transdermal anchors with magnetic caps - in this case there's no reason to embed the actual magnets, whereas I'm assuming you got them for the whole 'extra sense' thing?

Re:Medical issues (1)

Damion (13279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995221)

Ayup. My superpower might not be anything to write home about, but it's what I've got!

Re:Medical issues (3, Informative)

scyph (153674) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995111)

Of course, if I ever need an MRI, I'll need them taken out.

Not necessarily:
From: http://www.stevehaworth.com/wordpress/index.php/welcome-from-steve-haworth/magnetic-faq [stevehaworth.com]
'However, we now know of a few people who have the magnets have gone through MRIs and this did not happen. One person reported that the magnet just vibrated very strongly. Another person reported that the techs shielded his hand, as they would with someone who had shrapnel or other implants.'

Re:Medical issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995219)

RE: MRI, they can be covered with a shield. Though I don't have one myself, (yet) I've done lot's of reading. Iirc, someone has actually gotten an MRI without shielding their magnetic implant and suffered no ill effects, but don't take my word on that.

Re:Medical issues (1)

Ashenkase (2008188) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995425)

Of course, if I ever need an MRI, I'll need them taken out.

Don't worry, the MRI will remove them for you in one quick pulling motion.

Re:Medical issues (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995247)

+1 this. I was thinking the same thing. Like an oil drain plug that collects iron filings, I would think a subdermal magnet might collect iron from hemoglobin over the years.

Re:Medical issues (3, Informative)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995407)

Wrong. The iron in hemoglobin is not magnetic.

Re:Medical issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995635)

If that was true, an MRI would rip the blood from your veins. Fortunately, the metals in your blood are not directly magnetic.

Re:Medical issues (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995387)

The iron in your blood is not magnetic.

If anything, this would be a GOOD thing. You should not have any free flowing heavy metals in your blood. If you do, your kidneys are probably about to explode.

amateurs (5, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994757)

i do that with my macbook, on my chest

"nice rack" they point and laugh

yeah, it is a nice rack server, over WiMAX, neanderthals

FTFY: (3, Insightful)

DarkIye (875062) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994771)

"Subdermal Magnets Allow An Unusual Man To Wear an IPod Like a Watch"

Re:FTFY: (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994901)

in body piercing they are very common

Given that the guy's a NJ tattoo artist, he probably associates with a culture that does consider the anchors normal and usual, and the added ability to hold devices turn something rather ordinary into an extra capability. While it's an iPod for a tattoo artist today, it could be an Android tablet for doctors tomorrow, a network monitor for IT staff, or sheet music for a piccolo player...

Re:FTFY: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995475)

What's wrong with duct tape? Lots of duct tape.

Re:FTFY: (2)

ari_j (90255) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994911)

My concern is more with the "like a watch" comparison. Who here affixes his watch to his body with subdermal magnets?

Re:FTFY: (2)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994999)

Looking at the article, I was actually thinking this would be a lot cooler with a nice watch face than an iPod. Having it just sitting there without a strap seems like a subtle but kind of interesting way to modify a fairly standard accessory.

Re:FTFY: (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995087)

Srsly. A clear watch case with lots of exposed gears, (or maybe a red laser beam mounted next to my right eye) would look WAY cooler than a dumb old iPod.

Re:FTFY: (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995335)

You mean there are other ways to wear a watch?!

Dangerous in an MRI (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994825)

If he needed to have an MRI, the magnets would probably fly out of his skin.

cancer me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994859)

I'm fairly sure this will not have any ill effects on your skin

Until they make the entire case out of glass (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39994875)

Rumors of the "Liquidmetal" all glass housing for iphone 5 have been around for over a month. The polished aluminum back plate's days are numbered. It will be most cost effective to eventually use the glass case designs on all iPod/Phone models. If it's as strong as claimed (several times stronger than steel) it may even replace the aluminum the uni-body fabrication process.

Re:Until they make the entire case out of glass (2)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995007)

An all glass laptop sounds cool, and from a design POV I can see Apple doing it. I think the determining factor will be performance of iPhone 5's case and cost of materials over time. Aluminum is cheap and can be recycled. I don't know how cost effective it will be to melt down and recycle liquidmetal.

The liquidmetal process would probably involve a pouring or injection molds, where the laptop unibody fabrication is a milling process. Not that Apple hasn't retooled factories before.

Re:Until they make the entire case out of glass (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995553)

I'm curious, what does this have to do with the article?

Or do you think that Aluminium is magnetic?

Stuck (1)

Chemisor (97276) | more than 2 years ago | (#39994921)

This is a nice way to get stuck to a light pole when it isn't freezing or you're too squeamish to lick it.

Doing this is not smart (1)

jijacob (943393) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995001)

Obviously this guy won't see this comment, but it is not recommended that you leave anything of weight (especially other magnets) attached to subdermal magnets embedded under the skin. It prevents blood flow to the skin being pinched between the magnets, which can kill the skin and cause the body to reject the magnets or create a nasty infection. Similar to that buckyballs incident where a girl swallowed a couple and it really screwed her intestines up.

Re:Doing this is not smart (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995079)

If you look at TFA, they seem to be inert transdermal anchors with magnetic caps, so there shouldn't be any risk of pinching the tissue between them.

Re:Doing this is not smart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995157)

What he's talking about is leaving something attached to them, like the iPod. It pinches the skin in between the embedded magnets and what you're attaching to them.

Re:Doing this is not smart (4, Informative)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995251)

The anchors themselves are transdermal (through the skin), not subdermal (entirely under the skin) as the headline states. The magnetic caps sit on top of the steel which is protruding outside the skin, and the iPod then sits on them.

Re:Doing this is not smart (1)

jijacob (943393) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995197)

I realized I was incorrect after I submitted. The summary was misleading.

Re:Doing this is not smart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995411)

It's actually transdermal i.e., sticking out of the skin.

You know... (3, Informative)

nine-times (778537) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995117)

You know what else would allow you to wear an iPod like a watch? A watchband [iwatchz.com] .

Title is wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995271)

This is a transdermal implant.

Allows You To Wear an IPod Like a Watch? (3, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995305)

Funny, all the watches I've seen have a strap that goes around your wrist to hold the watch on, which is not a bad idea if you think about it.

.

If I'm having something implanted, it should at least do some interesting sensing - blood cell count, oxidation, glucose level, or at least my pulse.

That, or covert I/O with an Internet-connected cognitive prosthesis.

Not new (4, Interesting)

evil_aaronm (671521) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995307)

I've had a magnet stuck to my head for about 15 years. It's called a cochlear implant. There's a metal plate embedded in my skull, but a moderately heavy-duty magnet holds the inductor coil in place. As far as I can tell, I haven't had any problems with this.

Overkill (2)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995329)

It's also possible to achieve the same effect without humiliating your own body by using a strap.

What a square (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995391)

Geez, dude, go against the flow! What a way to be mainstream, buy the most produced MP3 player in the world. Some people just have to conform I guess. Me, I like to be different!

Hmmmm .... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995435)

It's kind cool, and if you're that far into the whole body piercing thing, go ahead.

But I've already seen commercial products which basically give you a watch strap to attach to the exact same iPod. Google for "ipod watch" and you'll find them.

So, me, I'd stick with the solution which doesn't involve embedding something in my arm for a product which is likely to change over time or get replaced. Especially since I own more than one watch.

Still, it is kind of cool from a certain perspective.

Health Issues? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39995659)

I have to wonder how safe it is to fix a sizable magnetic field to a part of your body, It could cause some health issues like higher iron content in the tissues surrounding the implanted magnet. Large magnetic fields in everyday life don't have deleterious effects because they are low intensity and/or momentary/varied exposures.

Bad idea (1)

Solandri (704621) | more than 2 years ago | (#39995681)

And not just because it'll kill the skin. I tried mounting my phone in my car using magnets, to use it as a GPS. The problem with magnets is that their field strength decreases with distance. So when I went over a bump which jostled the phone, the greater the jostle, the less force the magnets exerted to holding the phone in place. With each bump, the phone drifted further off the magnets, the retaining force decreased, making the phone less and less secure. Eventually after lots of bumps and jiggles, the phone fell off. It wasn't a matter of if, it was a matter of when unless I reached over to reposition the phone every few minutes. (It also screwed up the compass, but I knew that going in.)

In contrast, with something that retains physically like velcro, as the distance between the phone and velcro increases, the retaining force also increases up until the point where the velcro detaches. It makes for a much more secure connection. That's what I'm using now - a strip of velcro stuck to the back of the phone's case. The better magnetic phone holders I've seen recess the magnet inside a plastic mount. That way the metal plate it latches onto is physically prevented from sliding around and drifting off the magnet. Not an option for something you're mounting in your body.

Just because magnets are cool doesn't mean they're better. Use a strap.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?