Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Octave and Gnuplot Coming To Android

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the for-all-your-mobile-steam-cycle-efficiency-needs dept.

Android 84

New submitter MathIsTasty writes "Recently, it was announced on the Octave-maintainers list that a Kickstarter campaign has been launched to bring Matlab style numerical computations and graphing to Android via a 'more than' port of Octave and gnuplot. While I doubt it will be as successful as some recent games on Kickstarter, is this a reasonable way to fund free software development? Now, we just have to worry about people working on simulating solar irradiation while driving. Here is a good blog post about the project."

cancel ×

84 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

gnuplot? (0)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014049)

So my Droid will look like Texas Instruments calculator? Awesome

Re:gnuplot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014095)

There's already a TI emulator on the Android market. Just add a ROM.

... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014317)

Going for kickstarter is one thing

Asking for donation of at least $50,000.00 just to port free software onto Android is another

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (2)

progician (2451300) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014413)

What is exactly wrong with it? $50.000 isn't such a big money if you're living in the US or western Europe... Going with the arbitrary salary of $50.000pa for a programmer I don't think this too much to ask. The "free software" in my opinion should pay enough in itself so that the developers don't have to get employed by some random thickhead company but working for the public. Kickstarter, after all, is nothing else but a popular place for asking donations. Or am I missing something from your comment?

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018055)

Not big money? That's more than most of us make in a year, before taxes.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018233)

Not big money? That's more than most of us make in a year, before taxes.

According to the timeline on the kickstarter page, the project will run until "Fall 2013", so the equivalent pre-tax annual income would be more like $35,000. I'd say that's pretty cheap for an experienced developer.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014719)

If the resulting goods are free (as in speech), then with a large number of users, the cost for any single user on average will be negligible. The PyPy project, e.g., also collects money, and there are people who need it working, so why not?

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (2)

LtGordon (1421725) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014871)

They're effectively offering to port the software on commission. Not an ideal scenario, but the alternative is to wait around until someone with the experience and knowledge necessary is willing to do the work for free.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014921)

That's the best part about free software, some schmuck is always willing to do the work for free, so why ever pay. I'll never donate or pay for any free software, because the meaning of free means no payment necessary and any other definition is wrong.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#40015193)

Wow, your post got Thomas Jefferson spinning in his grave so fast that Japan is offering to buy him to replace their decommissioned nuclear reactors. Congrats, you saved Japan!

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40018833)

Of course you don't have to pay. You get to pay, if you want, and as a result more of the stuff you're willing to pay for gets made.

Take exactly this case; no one has ported it yet. If you want it ported, you can 1) port it, or 2) pay someone to. In this case, there's some coordination so you don't have to shoulder the entire burden yourself. If you want to be a free rider, fine.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (2, Insightful)

MasterAir (2640459) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014999)

The kickstarter says that the project will continue anyway, but successful kickstarter funding money will accelerate the progress, enabling the developer to focus the time necessary to get the project done quickly. I think it's neat, and while many people will say that they're after free (as in free beer) software, if enough people can donate a few $$ I think it's a noble goal, and I think free (as in speech) software is more important. I've pledged a few dollars, and hope it gets the funds needed.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (3, Insightful)

necro81 (917438) | more than 2 years ago | (#40015231)

Just because the disparate software is free doesn't mean getting them to work together requires zero work.

"I know guys: Octave runs natively in Linux, and Android is just Linux. This will be totally easy! In fact, I'll download the source files tonight, whip up a custom build script with one hand while downing a Mountain Dew with the other, and have it done tomorrow."

But as any Android developer will tell you, taking something that runs on a Linux desktop and getting it on Android - making it function properly, getting it to look good, and getting it to interface with the Android UI - it really hard, tedious work. Testing on all the different Android platforms out there alone could keep someone occupied for a year. Is it really so outlandish to ask for some money for the work? $50k will get you a quality software engineer for about half a year (salary + benefits + office overhead). It's not that much.

I may just donate for the hell of it - and I use iOS and Matlab on a daily basis.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40016743)

But as any Android developer will tell you, taking something that runs on a Linux desktop and getting it on Android - making it function properly, getting it to look good, and getting it to interface with the Android UI - it really hard, tedious work.

Sounds like a good reason not to use Android.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40017981)

It's true of any OS made to run on mobile phones and touchscreen-only devices with dynamically reorientating screens. The interface requires it. Android, iOS... er, other. Blackberry, winphone? All face the same issue.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018079)

Sounds like a great reason not to use such a phone. As far as I can tell, Maemo 5 hasn't been surpassed by anyone, and isn't going to be any time soon.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018683)

I do have to wonder what would be the use of Octave or Gnuplot on a mobile phone. None at all, that I can imagine. A tablet, maybe, as a teaching aid... but then, why not a netbook?

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018991)

You have a pretty poor imagination.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (2)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | more than 2 years ago | (#40021795)

I have quite a few useful little Octave scripts that would be neat to run on my phone. For instance RK4-integration of Newton's second law; just input the body forces, starting position and velocity, hit run, it calculates body trajectory in 2D or 3D as you wish. Or maybe you want to calculate the eigenvalues of some Hamiltonian you just thought up?

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40025767)

But why on your phone? Do you really have that much need to run physics calculations while traveling?

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40031701)

But why on your phone? Do you really have that much need to run physics calculations while traveling?

Wait, you don't?

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018339)

Asking for donation of at least $50,000.00 just to port free software onto Android is another

Did you read the list of deliverables near the top of the project page [kickstarter.com] ? I wouldn't agree to do that lot for $50,000. Then again, if anyone reckons it's outrageous, they could always set up a Kickstarter with the same deliverables and, say, a $5,000 goal. Or $500, $50, whatever you think is reasonable.

And, of course, the nice thing about Kickstarter is that it's voluntary. Nobody's forcing you and me to pay, even though we'll reap the benefits if it gets funded. If everyone agrees that it's a rip-off, it won't get funded, simple as that.

Re:... that cost at least $50,000 ? (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018429)

I am the developer. Please look at the deliverables to see what is being promised, please look at the FAQ to see how money will be spent. Think about support, bug fixes and feature requests and running a project like a professional project for a little while. This is not asking a lot. If this gets funded: 1) I will not be rich and 2) I will have a lot of work on my hands. I am doing this because I see it as valuable to others.

Too bad it wasn't SciPy (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014069)

I have been a long time Matlab, but have always been frustrated with licensing issues etc.
So I have tried replacing Matlab with Octave and SciLab a couple of times, but they both feels more cumbersome to use.
About a year ago, I tried Python with the modules Numpy and SciPy, and it just completely smokes the competitors. It is much more enjoyable to work with, so people should really give it a go, it if hard work to get used to something new, but with Python, you will not be disappointed. You can get some nice inspiration of what is possible in the 3rd party documentation SciPy-Lectures:

http://scipy-lectures.github.com/

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014201)

> but they both feels more cumbersome to use.

What exactly is more cumbersome to use on Octave (compared to Matlab) what isnt cumbersome in SciPy (compared to Matlab)?

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (2)

fph il quozientatore (971015) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014945)

Matlab > Octave: integrated editor with debugger and profiler; full compatibility with zillions of Matlab third-party libraries; faster.
Matlab < Octave: price and licensing; libreadline
Matlab > Python: lots of syntactic sugar (array slicing, matrix concatenation, 1-based indexing (if you are a mathematician that's the standard) --- in general, matrix stuff is much shorter to write in Matlab); hassle-free BLAS/LAPACK integration
Matlab < Python: price and licensing; Python is a real programming language (for instance, Matlab's OOP sucks); potential for speed improvements by compiling (MEX file are a compatibility hell, Cython is much better)

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (1)

gpig (244284) | more than 2 years ago | (#40015279)

Mostly agree, but NumPy arrays do have slicing (however much you may not like zero-indexed, exclusive-on-the-right indexing):


In [8]: a = np.array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]])

In [9]: a[0,:]
Out[9]: array([1, 2, 3])

In [10]: a[0:2,:]
Out[10]:
array([[1, 2, 3],
              [4, 5, 6]])

In [11]: a[0:2,0:2]
Out[11]:
array([[1, 2],
              [4, 5]])

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40015821)

Sorry, you didnt answer my question. What advantage over matlab does Python have that Octave doesnt have?

I didnt ask why

* Matlab > Octave
* Matlab < Octave
* Matlab > Python
* Matlab < Python

but why

* Octave < Python

as you suggested that it somehow is "cumbersome" in a way Python isnt.

The points Matlab > Python, also apply for Octave > Python, while the Matlab < Python dont apply for Octave < Python.

The point of Python being a "real language" doesnt apply, the Matlab/Octave language is sufficient for the task at hand.

So, care to elaborate?

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (1)

grqb (410789) | more than 2 years ago | (#40016285)

I jumped from Matlab to Scipy/Numpy, skipped Octave, but I'm so happy with Scipy/Numpy that I wouldn't consider using Octave.

From a purely numerics point of view, I'm sure Octave has all the features that Scipy/Numpy has. Most of the benefits of Scipy/Numpy come from the Python programming language itself, which I have to assume is much more developed than Octave's language. Being able to write GUIs for your scientific apps using tkinter (or some other library) or reading/writing to excel formats directly or wrapping your code up using pyexe for distribution or interfacing your python code with the web or a database is just the start of the Python advantages (after a quick search I see that Octave can do some of these things, but I'm sure Octave doesn't have all the libraries that Python has).

IMHO, if scipy/numpy ever get working with PyPy, then this would truly be amazing.

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (1)

grqb (410789) | more than 2 years ago | (#40016319)

PS:

The point of Python being a "real language" doesnt apply...

Yes it does. It allows you to do something useful with your numerical codes. Maybe not needed for academia, but certainly for other industries.

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (2)

deego (587575) | more than 2 years ago | (#40015095)

As a happy 15+year plus octave user, let me say that a lot of that is a matter of what you are familiar with. I find matlab's 'integrated editor' and lack of *nix readline facilities absolutely unbearable, for example.

This 'cumbersome' is not too unlike the situation that a windows user will claim GNU/linux is cumbersome to use, whereas I find windows unbearable. Basically, a matter of familiarity; blaming octave for that is unfair, IMO.

 

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (2)

PhloppyPhallus (250291) | more than 2 years ago | (#40016839)

I've tried several times to migrate to Octave, but it's still just not good enough of a "MATLAB-clone" to really replace MATLAB for my purposes. I run MATLAB through EMACS matlab-mode, so I don't care about the editor or GUI.

What keeps me away from Octave is:
1) MATLAB is much faster at solving most problems.
2) Much of the capability available in Mathworks supported toolboxes is missing from Octave.
3) Handle graphics capabilities are now available in Octave, but lag far behind MATLAB. I don't write MATLAB GUIs, but many others do, and I sometimes need to run their code.

On the other hand, scientific computing support in Python is pretty good and rapidly improving. If I just wanted capability "like" MATLAB, I'd use Python. However, in most engineering R&D environments, MATLAB support is important for collaboration, and here is where Octave could be useful were it more comparable to MATLAB.

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (1)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018391)

However, in most engineering R&D environments, MATLAB support is important for collaboration, and here is where Octave could be useful were it more comparable to MATLAB.

Have you tried the recent-ish 3.6 release? I gather that it's made major improvements in Matlab compatibility. I'm interested because I'm going to be working on some Matlab stuff soon, and am wondering whether I could get away with porting it to Octave.

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (1)

rdnetto (955205) | more than 2 years ago | (#40062223)

1) MATLAB is much faster at solving most problems.

This is a pretty major issue of your working with non-trivial amounts of data (e.g. image processing). One of the main reasons for this is that the current version of Octave is only single-threaded; it can't take advantage of the extra cores that even modern phones have. Apparently multi-threading can be enabled by recompiling it, but that's a fairly large demand for the average user...

Re:Too bad it wasn't SciPy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40016379)

As a long time python with numpy and matplotlib user (~7 years), I can say that starting to use octave for prototyping machine learning problems was a relief compared to so much verbose numpy and matplotlib syntax.

What does it cost .... (1, Offtopic)

kotku (249450) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014079)

To get your kickstarter project slashvertised? Is this ethical?

Re:What does it cost .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014227)

To get your kickstarter project slashvertised? Is this ethical?

What makes you question whether it's ethical?

Re:What does it cost .... (1)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014333)

No comment on that, but this Kickstarter is quite interesting service. It seems to have been around for years, but has really got some wind lately.

Re:What does it cost .... (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40019145)

I am the developer. It costs $0. I suggested backers write slashdot about the project informing slashdot. Slashdot liked one of their submissions and ran with it. I don't understand why this would be unethical. All companies make press releases. This is kind of the same, but it was written by a backer/customer not even the developer.

Octave Clone for Android already there (4, Informative)

asnelt (1837090) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014087)

There is already Addi: http://code.google.com/p/addi/ [google.com]

Re:Octave Clone for Android already there (1)

asnelt (1837090) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014105)

Oh, well. It's actually the same. Never mind...

Re:Octave Clone for Android already there (2, Interesting)

anomaly256 (1243020) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014693)

Been using octave and gnuplot on my droid3 for a while now. yay for debian chroot and a native X server now

Re:Octave Clone for Android already there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40018901)

ditto on my webos chroot.

Re:Octave Clone for Android already there (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40017265)

Yes, I am the developer, and Addi is not a complete thought. I want to make it SO much better...hence the kickstarter campaign. Corbin

Re:Octave Clone for Android already there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40024549)

Hilarious.
"Why do this? There's already Addi"
"Yeah... I made Addi."

Re:Octave Clone for Android already there (1)

przemekklosowski (448666) | more than 2 years ago | (#40037505)

True, and it's written by the same guy, Corbin Champion. Addi is a subset of matlab (or octave) written in Java.

Re:Octave Clone for Android already there (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40046821)

Addi now has the octave interpreter built in (missing some stuff and needs more testing, but basically there). You enable it by going to Settings->Preferences->Enable experiment interpreter. This is the work (along with gnuplot) that I want to finish, so it will be much more useful to others.

Enjoy Kickstarter while it lasts, people. (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014239)

Now is the happy time for Kickstarter. Good people are getting money for good projects. However, I can see about a million ways that the system can be abused. It hasn't started to happen in a serious way...yet. It certainly will as Kickstarter becomes more famous and the bad guys catch wind of what's going on. Enjoy it while it lasts, everyone.

Re:Enjoy Kickstarter while it lasts, people. (1)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014343)

I have also pondered if they have ways to protect against scams.

Gimme an R! (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014243)

R (www.r-project.org) is my elixir

Re:Gimme an R! (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014327)

I heard of a story of an intern who wrote one awesome analytical software for one of the major (multi-billion) web company using R

Dunno if that story is true or not

Re:Gimme an R! (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014375)

It wasn't me... :(

Too bad, I guess ;)

Re:Gimme an R! (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014423)

Well ... it could be you, if you become an intern, again :/

R-men, brother (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014805)

(I guess that only makes sense when spoken with a British, rather than American, accent)

Re:Gimme an R! (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40016763)

How much RAM is in your Android tablet?

What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014269)

I'm teaching hi school math (in Denmark), and I hate forcing (or trying to force) my students into buying TI calculators at monopoly prices.

What's the best calc for android that would do the following:
* Enter mathematical expressions (showing the full expression) and evaluating them
* Making scatterplots
* Plotting graphs, and fitting functions to data points (linear, power law and exponential required)
* Preferably plotting histograms, sum curves etc.
Best if the program is free, without too many frills, and above all, extremely user friendly.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

nicolastheadept (930317) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014383)

MathScript is pretty damn good https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.funmath.mathscript [google.com] don't know if it can do everything you list, but it can do a lot (and theoretically you could program anything you want in python). There's also a free trial version which has all the features (I think), but nags after a while https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.funmath.mathscriptlite [google.com]

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014465)

> What's the best calc for android

Why does the software have to be on android?

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

progician (2451300) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014747)

I'm just guessing but probably you can get a cheap android device to every kids hand, while it would be a bit more tedious to do the same with iOS devices :). But if you know some cool tablet which could run application straight from the linux world and have an optimised GUI for touch screen (perhaps gnome), that would be the perfect solution, or course.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014783)

The best Android math app IMHO is MathStudio http://www.mathstudio.net/ Not free though.

I use Calculator++ a lot...this is free https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.solovyev.android.calculator&hl=en Has many (but not all) of the features you mention

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40015777)

Wolfram Alpha is free on the web. They also have an app for about 15 Danish crowns, I have not test the app but it has good reviews.

They are working on Ipython notebook for mobile, maybe ready later this year.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40016249)

I didn't need a graphing calculator until university, and even then we could have gotten by without it. We had no problems graphing things by hand. If you absolutely have a need for students to do more complicated plotting, then take them to one of the school computer labs.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | more than 2 years ago | (#40021983)

This is funny. Here in Norway, we all had to get graphing calculators in high school, but in university we're not allowed anything more advanced than a scientific calculator (+-*/, sine, cosine, etc.). Graphing and programmable calculators are expressly banned. As a consequence, I can freehand draw most functions you'll ever need.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40027415)

Well then, it doesn't seem like high school is preparing you that well for university. The best high school math class I ever did was grade 10. Because the teacher said no calculators. I became really good at doing math in my head that year.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | more than 2 years ago | (#40042201)

Agreed, they don't prepare us very well. On the plus side, though, I learned to program on my graphic calculator, (Casio
FTW!) in a weird cross-breed of apl and basic.
GOTO FTW.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40046843)

This app, by Fall (if funded) will probably be your best answer. It will do all of what you ask but, user friendliness will be improved over the following year, along with features you don't need. For basic math, Octave language is completely straight forward.

Re:What's a good free calculator for Android? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40082321)

Another free matlab-like app, Mathmatiz is also pretty good. It has a much better interface, better plotting support, and the developer is working on getting more functions into the app. Check it out here: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gcmath.ui

Old. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40014435)

I've had gnuplot on my N900 for ages.

my N900 runs R, numpy, matplotlib (3, Interesting)

Kludge (13653) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014483)

Now, we just have to worry about people working on simulating solar irradiation while driving.

Been there. I have an N900 that runs R, numpy, matplotlib. Handy for computing when I can't sit on the bus or subway.

Good news ! (1)

fredboboss (1059056) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014769)

Though I very rarely use Octave, Gnuplot is one of my favorite tools, I like it a lot, it is very powerful. This a very good decision to port them on Android, because associated with ADK it can enable easy custom applications for data acquisition and analysis on the field.

Slashdot here's your chance (1)

kervin (64171) | more than 2 years ago | (#40014847)

I just backed this project after reading this article. It would help if Slashdot editors can regularly promote crowdfunded Open-source projects as a feature, or type of article.

Personally, I'd love to hear about other open-source projects when they make it to Kickstarter.

Re:Slashdot here's your chance (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40079625)

Appreciated. Didn't quite get the slashdot bounce that sometimes can be seen. People are pretty hung up on paying for the development of free software. People also seem hung up on the fact that you can use Octave on other types of devices, which doesn't really help the larger audience out.

Remote Analysis, local visualization (1)

fermion (181285) | more than 2 years ago | (#40015913)

Gnuplot saved my ass back in the mid 90's when I was a lab assistant. I had a remote fast machine that ran my code for analysis, but no real way to quickly get the hundreds of time lapsed graphs. Then I found Gnuplot and presto. The job was done. A plotter(real old fashioned kind) hooked to my slow Mac and the world was a good place. Certainly any smart phone is faster than a 1990 Mac, and I can imagine beng in the field needing to do a quick plot.

On recognizing problems (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40016891)

Awww geeze. Ok, I've got a problem. I saw the headline and all I read was Octavia's Plot. Is there an AA equivalent for this?

Great news! Too bad no iOS version... (1)

RobertJ1729 (2640799) | more than 2 years ago | (#40017083)

As a mathematician and hobbyist iOS developer, it really sucks that so much great mathematics software is GPLed. You can't port Octave, for example, to the iPad as its license is incompatible with Apples terms. I'd love to see this kind of stuff on my iPad. I'd even write it myself! But nope... A few great non-GPLed mathematics packages that have made their way into the iOS ecosystem. There's a Reduce implementation, for example, that looks really nice.

And while I'm rambling (sorry), LaTeX on mobile is just in shambles. I mean, it's in shambles on the desktop, too, but it's nearly impossible to do on mobile. It needs a rewrite. Period. But the mobile dev community has done a really great job getting as far as possible with what we have with LaTeX.

Re:Great news! Too bad no iOS version... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40017653)

Just don't use an iOS device untill Apple changes there silly, unwarranted pollocy against the GPL.

There is absolutely no good reason why GPL software can't be included in the "App Store"

Re:Great news! Too bad no iOS version... (1)

RobertJ1729 (2640799) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018657)

I don't know the legal ins and outs. It sure does seem stupid to me. But the fact is, iPads and iPhones have a significant market share and are otherwise great products. I want to write software for it, but Apple is keeping me for including GPLed mathematics software, and that's frustrating.

Re:Great news! Too bad no iOS version... (1)

Qubit (100461) | more than 2 years ago | (#40073237)

I don't know the legal ins and outs. It sure does seem stupid to me.

Hint: If it sounds stupid to you, it probably is. Go with your gut until proven otherwise! (and if you have time, read up a little about it -- you're a mathematician, so reading legal code shouldn't daunt you in the slightest :-)

But the fact is, iPads and iPhones have a significant market share and are otherwise great products.

Yes, Apple products have a very large marketshare.
Yes, Apple products have some great designs and have some great integration features.

BUT, there are detractions such as these. Big detractions, I think we can all agree.

I want to write software for it

indeed -- I think it's just human (geeky) nature to hack on things...

but Apple is keeping me [from] including GPLed mathematics software

Yes they are. And I acknowledge that, although I don't agree with their policy, in most cases they have every right to make these kinds of walled cities. (I believe that you should have the right to jailbreak/root any device you own, too, but that's a separate discussion)

The question is: What are you going to do about it? Every time you purchase another item from Apple you are sending them the message that you're okay with being forced to play in a walled garden. Every application you make for iOS instead of a more open mobile platform is pushing more users towards the iOS platform and encouraging them to accept this user-unfriendly compromise.

and that's frustrating.

I agree -- it's really frustrating that you don't have the power to hack on your own devices the way that you would like to. But looking at it from my perspective, it's frustrating for me to see people who are continuing to give money to a company who is not giving them what they want (or only half of what they want) when there are alternatives.

I think that you and I are both in agreement that we'd like to see more freedom for users and more openness in devices. But I'm not sure how we're going to get there when there are a plethora of programmers and hackers just like you who are loath to give up their Apple hardware and software.

What can I say to you to convince you that you should wean yourself off of Apple hardware and software and consider moving to GNU/Linux, Android, and the rest of the FOSS ecosystem? As a mathemetician, I'm sure you already know more about LaTeX than any mortal ever should :-) What's keeping you tied to Apple?

Re:Great news! Too bad no iOS version... (1)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#40018723)

As a mathematician and hobbyist iOS developer, it really sucks that so much great mathematics software is GPLed. You can't port Octave, for example, to the iPad as its license is incompatible with Apples terms.

... or, to look at it from a slightly different viewpoint, it really sucks that Apple have chosen to make their terms incompatible with the GPL.

I am the developer, fire away with your questions (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40017235)

I have a day job and a long meeting this morning, but I will be a good sport and try to answer any questions, concerns, etc later. I have a good sense of humor, so I can handle jokes and flames too. So, fire away! Corbin Champion

Re:I am the developer, fire away with your questio (1)

X43B (577258) | more than 2 years ago | (#40022569)

Thank you for doing this.

Are there any plans to enable access to the sensors on the phone through Ocatave scripts run on the phone?

Re:I am the developer, fire away with your questio (1)

corbinlc (2436390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40022939)

Yes there are. That is not the initial thrust of this campaign, but yet, I have thought of it and will work on it (hopefully with others) once promised functionality is provided.

Re:I am the developer, fire away with your questio (1)

X43B (577258) | more than 2 years ago | (#40025187)

Thanks! I donated.

N900? (3, Informative)

Evil Pete (73279) | more than 2 years ago | (#40019531)

Wait, what? I had gnuplot and octave on my N900. Two years ago. Gees, bit slow there android.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>