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MIT Creates Superhydrophobic Condiment Bottles

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the that's-some-fast-mustard dept.

Science 292

An anonymous reader writes "First we had a superhydrophobic spray that meant no dirt or sweat could stick to your clothes. Then a hydrophobic nanocoating was created for circuit boards to make them water resistant. Now MIT has gone a step further and solved one of the ongoing problems of using condiments: they've figured out how to make a food-safe superhydrophobic coating for food packaging. It means ketchup and mayonnaise will no longer be stuck to the insides of the bottle, and therefore there will no longer be any waste. What's amusing is this seems to be a happy accident. The MIT team was actually investigating slippery coatings to stop gas and oil lines clogging as well as how to stop a surface from having ice form on it. Now their lab is filled with condiments for continued testing of their food-safe version."

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I just flip the bottle upside down (0, Redundant)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095447)

then either give it a good shake, or store it for next time

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (1)

issicus (2031176) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095561)

ketchup lovers rejoice!!!

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (5, Funny)

poity (465672) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095711)

I spin them with my arm out like a centrifuge and pretend I'm refining the ketchup. Also, woe be to he who doesn't cap the bottle all the way.

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095817)

True story... I used to work in a restaurant. If you've ever seen the movie cocktail, you'll get a rough idea of how I was at work: one man show. One day the cap was NOT on tightly. Poor girl never saw it coming. Blonde to redhead in .5 seconds.

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096051)

did the curtains match the carpet?

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (4, Funny)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096355)

did the curtains match the carpet?

Depends on the time of the month.

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096439)

Way to turn that comment fucking nasty...

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (2)

jimmydevice (699057) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096105)

About 1973, One of the Taunton kids (Neil) and I were in his parents restaurant, the Spouting Horn in Depoe Bay Or. We sat down at the counter and ordered burgers and fries. Delivered, He opened the ketchup bottle and slapped down on the opening. The bottom of the bottle dropped out and everything within 6 feet was splattered.
Sounds like a good idea.

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (4, Funny)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096529)

I was actually present once when someone did that the other way around: they were banging on the back end of the bottle with the heel of their hand to try and get it started and the bottle literally separated in half right there in his hand. The neck end slipped through his fingers and crashed to the floor, spraying everyone sitting at our table (and a few tables around us) under their tables from the knees down with ketchup with some broken glass fragments thrown in for good measure.

The best part was his reaction to it, he was so completely unprepared for that possibility that for a few seconds he just kinda sat there with the busted end of the ketchup bottle in one hand (as it quickly emptied of the remaining ketchup onto his lap and the floor) with an expression much like the one on the T-1000's face when he gets blown up [youtu.be] at the end of Terminator 2.

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096377)

That'll separate the semen from the ketchup. Nice thinking.

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (1)

Ocker3 (1232550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096045)

My fathers special technique is to hold the bottle in one hand, mouth downwards, bottle at approx 45 degrees, and move the bottle towards the other hand, which is held palm up, with a diagonal motion. The bottle's shoulder should strike the gap between thumb and forefinger, forcing a limited amount of sauce out of the bottle, very useful for a viscous subtance.

Re:I just flip the bottle upside down (1)

j-stroy (640921) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096601)

i use the same technique.. very effective and controllable. tap tap tap, yum.

Gee Whiz factor is off the scale! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095477)

Just wonder if they'll do a test like Anthony Perkins pours a mayonnaise jar of jizz over Kathleen Turner.

Re:Gee Whiz factor is off the scale! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095743)

lol, good call. I can't be the only one who heard the news and wondered if I could spray it before butt-fucking to prevent shit-stains on my cock.

Re:Gee Whiz factor is off the scale! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095761)

Well fuck me raw...

How durable? (4, Interesting)

j-stroy (640921) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095527)

Is it durable enough to be used on washless or "rinse-off" dishes? Also possible application as a coating on bathroom fixtures, or perhaps applied to the inside of wax paper bags so the icing stays on my take-out snax.. come to think of it toothpaste tubes and racing swimsuits. Let alone the prank potential!

This stuff should probably be shipped in double walled tanker trucks.. hate to see what it does when spilt on a roadway.

Re:How durable? (5, Funny)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095603)

"Is it durable enough to be used on washless or "rinse-off" dishes?"

To hell with the dishes, think of the Fleshlights!

Re:How durable? (5, Funny)

Macgrrl (762836) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096029)

I'd really rather not...

Re:How durable? (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096079)

"Is it durable enough to be used on washless or "rinse-off" dishes?"

To hell with the dishes, think of the Fleshlights!

Then let's hope it's washable.

Re:How durable? (1)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096607)

It doesn't need to be washable. That's the whole point. Nothing sticks to it.

Re:How durable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095611)

I would love to see what it does when spilt on a roadway. 405 preferrably (west coast here)

Re:How durable? (1)

iknowcss (937215) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096619)

NorCal, too, apparently. The proper syntax is "The 405" ;)

Re:How durable? (2)

Yaztromo (655250) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095709)

This stuff should probably be shipped in double walled tanker trucks.. hate to see what it does when spilt on a roadway.

Yeah, but shipping it in large tankers would be awesome -- if they had a spill, the compound would simply hover about 1.5m off the surface of the waves!

Yaz

Re:How durable? (1)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095727)

As funny as it sounds, to reduce skin friction, you need to introduce turbulence - a very special type of turbulence. This has been the focus of quite a bit of research especially for aircraft and boats. This link [onera.fr] (PDF warning) will explain how this is achieved.

Re:How durable? (1)

fluffy99 (870997) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096549)

As funny as it sounds, to reduce skin friction, you need to introduce turbulence - a very special type of turbulence. This has been the focus of quite a bit of research especially for aircraft and boats. This link [onera.fr] (PDF warning) will explain how this is achieved.

That's not friction. That's drag.

Heinz shaped their bottles specifically so that the ketchup would be harder to get out, thereby adding to the illusion that their product was thicker and better.

Re:How durable? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095903)

This stuff should probably be shipped in double walled tanker trucks.. hate to see what it does when spilt on a roadway.

Is hydrophobic synonym with frictionless?

If not, price aside, then it might be even a good idea, as an improvement for the water draining capacity of the road.

Re:How durable? (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096153)

How about on cars and jets? Would that reduce drag and keep the water off?

Wrong Item (4, Insightful)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095549)

Need superhydrophobic keyboards.

Re:Wrong Item (1)

TheGoodNamesWereGone (1844118) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095579)

Mod up. I just last night spilled half a bottle of beer into an irreplaceable Model M keyboard. I'm lucky I had another. Maybe I can take it apart and clean it. Also, back to on-topic: Isn't Teflon already pretty hydrophobic (though a bit too expensive to make throwaway ketchup bottles with)?

Re:Wrong Item (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095597)

>I'm lucky I had another.

I don't think irreplaceable means what you think it means...

Re:Wrong Item (4, Funny)

jamesh (87723) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095771)

>I'm lucky I had another.

I don't think irreplaceable means what you think it means...

He has 20 of them. Each one irreplaceable.

Re:Wrong Item (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095965)

another beer, not another irreplaceable keyboard

Re:Wrong Item (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096389)

It's a Model M, silly mortal. No quantity of beer is a threat, unless it's the sort of brew enjoyed by Xenomorphs.

Stick that puppy in the dishwasher and let it dry thoroughly.

Freak coincidence (1)

overshoot (39700) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095559)

And curiously, a radio ad I hear a lot lately is starts off about the super-high-tech drains that can't clog. Then it goes on to say that those drains don't exist and pimps a drain-cleaning company.

So how long will it be before we have superhyrdophobic sewer pipe?

Re:Freak coincidence (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095925)

And curiously, a radio ad I hear a lot lately is starts off about the super-high-tech drains that can't clog.

Can't clog? You mean even if I'm throwing a bucket load of superglue down the drain?

Re:Freak coincidence (1)

chromas (1085949) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096267)

Well, first, you'd have to visit every store in your city and clear out their entire inventory of those tiny, tiny tubes to get even half a bucket-worth of super glue.

Re:Freak coincidence (2)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096457)

Well, first, you'd have to visit every store in your city and clear out their entire inventory of those tiny, tiny tubes to get even half a bucket-worth of super glue.

You [palmlabsadhesives.com] reckon [instantbond.com] ?

Re:Freak coincidence (2)

chromas (1085949) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096527)

Shh! Let me wallow in my ignorance.

Maybe it's irrational... (0)

nomel (244635) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095599)

...but I definitely have a fear of consuming or inhaling anything nano-particle based. But, I also think it's insane that we have no long term medical studies...of anything really.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (2)

Tr3vin (1220548) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095665)

As long as consuming it provides a nice coat inside my veins, I'm good with it.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (3, Interesting)

rodarson2k (1122767) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095683)

Should we start long-term medical studies of things before the things are invented?
But seriously, there are a lot of people investigating nanoparticle safety. Some of them across the hall from me. Time will tell whether your fear is well-founded or not.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095737)

Everything is 'nano-particle' based.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (4, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095777)

True. Just this morning, I wondered why there hasn't been any long-term medical study about crotch-punching Mark Zuckerberg for hours at a time. Will you injure your hand? Should you wear gloves? Take breaks every 15 minutes? We just don't know. That's why we need these studies.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (1)

Fwipp (1473271) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095799)

As long as it's not tested on animals!

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096361)

IN them is okay, but not ON them.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095787)

I kinda feel the same way. Glass works fine, and if I don't get that grungy little bit at the end of the bottle, well, I can live with that. No, if this coating can cause less friction the inside of, say an oil pipeline, or maybe even gas lines, or coolant lines in a car, then good on 'em. Just so long as they don't start trying to pump my catsup to me.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (2)

ldobehardcore (1738858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095865)

Anything Nanoparticle Based?
What about all the food you eat? It's full of ribosomes! Nano/micrometer sized robots packed into every bite of organic food. AND they construct more of themselves! They're Von Neumann Machines! /Pedantic

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (4, Insightful)

10101001 10101001 (732688) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096129)

True, but then there are things that are organic and food and things that are organic and not food--either be indigestible or outright poison. Meanwhile, most said nano organic things are mostly contained until they enter the digestive track--something which above nano-particles are unlikely to be--and aren't inhale-able/injected--there's very few things you can direct inject--, and the body can usually safely broken down in the digestive track those organic nano-particles or they can be contained and expelled by the body before entering the blood stream--a by-product of billions of years of digestive and defensive evolution to extant, potentially lethal organic or inorganic nanoparticles. But, like I was saying, that's still far from foolproof and there's still lots of stuff that can kill us.

So, yea, I understand your pedantic point, but I'm pretty sure the discussion is on man-made nanoparticles and cutting out "man-made" is just shorthand. Meanwhile, I'm not a supporter of the idea of halting the use of man-made nanoparticles until long-term medical studies are done. That doesn't mean we shouldn't do those studies as man-made nanoparticles used, to see if they really are a threat. It's the same with just about anything radically new and innovative, really, because there's a lot of room for not only positive outcomes but pretty extensive side-effects. I mean, I don't think it likely that all the major conceived designs for man-made nanoparticles (ie, the expected foundation and components) have an inherently Achilles heel of being unsafe, but then who's to say there won't be a man-made nanoparticle version of DDT or asbestos and the component responsible is present in a large percentage of man-made nanoparticles? Such would likely mean simply reworking those man-made nanoparticles to overcome the side-effects. Still, the damage would be done. :/ But, that's just a sad truth of life, with hindsight and everything. I mean, to know if progress is harmful or not, you have to progress first. :)

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (1)

ldobehardcore (1738858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096261)

What a well thought out and cogent point.

I was just being a smartass. I actually agree with your point.

I certainly wouldn't be comfotable ingesting a bleeding edge, anthropogenic nanostructure rich substance without at least some animal studies first.

And before the bleeding heart PETA folks get on my ass about animal testing let me say that: since we don't have a theory of everything, there are always unaccountable effects of substances that simply can't be calculated from theory. Animal testing done as humanely as possible saves lives. And anybody who would die so a rat doesn't have to can kiss my grits and enjoy the possible and likely systemic damage from untested materials.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096315)

What's a little asbestosis between friends?

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096341)

But, I also think it's insane that we have no long term medical studies...of anything really.

That's because you were raised in a culture of fear, inculcated with protectionist expectations from infancy. As such, you're easily manipulated and frightened, your highest aspiration being to live as long as medically possible. Any jeopardy that might deprive you of your eventual and inevitable decrepitude you remand to your protectors to be outlawed for all, lest you experience the trauma of even witnessing its consequences.

You and most of the other ~1.5E9 Western sheeple.

Re:Maybe it's irrational... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096367)

Nanoparticle have been around for over a billion years...
enough natural research there, we've been eating Nanoparticle ever since we started producing pottery and enamels...

you've got a pseudo scientific christian loby groups wanting to return your country back into the stone age so they can make huge profits on your idiocy...

What is this stuff? (2)

methano (519830) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095647)

I wonder what this stuff is. It's pretty easy to silylate vast quantities of glassware in a vacuum oven with hexamethyldisilazane. Water beads up on the glass after treatment. It's covalent so it doesn't wash off unless you add something to dissolve the glass. Glass surfaces act sort of like an iPad. Maybe that's what they do to it to give it that greasy feel.

Of course, the article provided a wealth of chemical information as one would expect.

Re:What is this stuff? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095729)

Glass surfaces act sort of like an iPad?

What?

True progress means... (1)

ACAx1985 (989265) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095677)

Now the product will cost more to use this technology. Don't worry, you'll still be getting the same 8 ounces of product, but it's okay that they charge you more because you'll finally be able to use all 8oz!

Re:True progress means... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095767)

That's not the way things work. Presumably, if people can actually use all of the product, they won't have to buy as much of it. Lower demand equates to lower prices.

A better question may be whether this would affect the process of plastic recycling.

Oh, and whether my idea of mustard in a tube like toothpaste is now obsolete.

This presumes the waste is undesirable... (4, Interesting)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095679)

... but it's not, not to the people running the companies that sell the condiments and spec the packaging. They WANT people to waste the product, because that means the companies can sell more, and it's far cheaper for those companies to make more than it is for consumers to waste it. Guess who winds up profiting from the waste?

Another example: something so mundane as toothpaste. For decades there have been TV commercials and print ads depicting actors using completely obscene amounts of the stuff, literally an order of magnitude more than is required for an effective result. Colgate and other companies have been encouraging that waste for decades, and that stuff has consequences when it winds up in bodies of water. I also suspect there was a bit of sinister collaboration in the design of at least one electric toothbrush, again intended to manipulate people to use more toothpaste than required: one model originally had just the useful rotating circular head, but then later added a fixed-bristle region adjacent for - you guessed it - holding more toothpaste.

The final insult: at least one of those makers decided to tinker with the diameter of the toothpaste tube opening, which had been a de facto standard for decades. I have a backpacking/travel toothbrush that I bought in the Eighties, which included its own mini-tube that had to be refilled by screwing a tube of toothpaste into one end and squeezing; this was only made feasible because all tubes of toothpaste used exactly the same opening diameter and thread spacing. Fast forward to 2010 and my purchase of toothpaste made by Church-Dwight, and my subsequent angry discovery that they had increased the diameter of the tube opening such that it no longer fit my old travel toothbrush. Now why would they increase the diameter of the opening? It couldn't possibly have anything to do with promoting incidental waste and selling more tubes of product, could it?

I'm a perennial cynic and skeptic, but I doubt these superhydrophobic containers will ever be used for condiments. Not only would the more expensive packaging cut into profits, the reduced waste would make a dent in them, too.

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095917)

How much mayonnaise gets stuck in the bottom of the jar? Maybe one or two percent? If it's a conspiracy it's one of the most inane conspiracies ever conceived.

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (1)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096013)

There is no doubt some truth to that but I think this could be seen as something that would boost margin on a "premium" product.

Oftentimes the exact same sauce (or toothpaste) comes in different bottles (not simply different sizes). Perhaps both a glass bottle and a squeezy bottle right next to each other on the shelf with the squeezy bottle being more expensive due to the "convenience". It's not hard to imagine these swanky bottles being used to achieve some price differentiation, extracting more money from people who perceive them (or themselves) as being worth the money while still offering basic bottles for the price concious.

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096031)

I'm in on your conspiracy! I just got a fresh bottle of sun screen where they have rounded the top of the cap so you can't stand it upside down to let gravity get that last little bit out for you.

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096059)

Go back to bed, grandpa.

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (5, Interesting)

EvolutionInAction (2623513) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096121)

Sorry, but you're full of shit. My Uncle used to work for a company that produced gelled consumables - stuff like ketchup. He designed bottles that would avoid high adhesion at the bottom. See, it turns out that people get really annoyed when they can't get that last bit out of the bottle. Enough to switch brands, even.

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (2)

Crash24 (808326) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096239)

Even if most condiment manufacturers find it more cost-effective to skip on the coating (for whatever reason), there are bound to be at least a few that use it to set themselves apart as a superior product.

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (2)

l00sr (266426) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096135)

My guess is that the decreased buying frequency due to less waste will almost certainly be outweighed by the increased buying frequency due to the product being easier to dispense. Think, "oops, I just squeezed out the entire bottle of ketchup again!"

Re:This presumes the waste is undesirable... (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096417)

They WANT people to waste the product, because that means the companies can sell more,

This assumes that the wasted product is worth more than the packaging it's stuck in. In other words, this assumes that the winner is the product manufacturer rather than the container manufacturer.

and that stuff has consequences when it winds up in bodies of water.

General Ripper claims prior art.

Now why would they increase the diameter of the opening?

Because people are keeping their natural teeth longer, and old people have trouble squeezing things. Increasing the diameter of the nozzle reduces the necessary pressure to get the same mass flow, making it easier for people with reduced manual strength to get some out of the tube.

Just like most innovation. (1)

Voogru (2503382) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095783)

It happens by accident.

Re:Just like most innovation. (1)

xQuarkDS9x (646166) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095919)

It happens by accident.

That's what he said...

no smudge phone ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095851)

Wonder if it would keep fingerprints off my phone screen.

Re:no smudge phone ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096281)

are your fingerprints made of water?

It's a great world we live in... (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095869)

and now less sticky.

Next step - get rid of those silly bottles (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095885)

Now all we need to do is get rid of those silly bottles that don't fit in the fridge, take up too much shipping space getting to the stores and clog up the recycling system. Instead we could use simple plastic bags (just like in Russia) that conveniently fit in any free space in the fridge, and don't waste space. Also, you cut the hole in the corner with scissors so you can choose how big it is (and therefore how fast it is dispensed). The bags could be biodegradable (or recyclable in bulk like paper is).

There are lots of business opportunities waiting for clever business people that travel to the former Soviet Union and think a bit about what they see. This way of dispensing mayonnaise, ketchup, yogurt and so on, makes it easy for small convenience stores to stock it all (small amount of space) which means that people don't have to drive a gas guzzler (any gasoline powered car) to do their shopping.
 

Re:Next step - get rid of those silly bottles (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096291)

what if you dont use it all, are you going to wake up and see a bunch of ketchup water all over the place?

New song (5, Funny)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095899)

Super Hydrophobalistic Condimental Bottles,
The glass inside remains so clean just like the twelve apostles,
From them ketchup flows so fast you'll need to use some throttles,
Super Hydrophobalistic Condimental Bottles!

(to the tune of...)

Re:New song (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096023)

Um diddle diddle diddle um diddle ay

Because I tried to boink while dry
I made the ladies mad
My girlfriend gave me %$^ a tweak
And told me I was bad
But then one day I found some stuff
And now I glide right in
They used the same new formula
To line my lover's quim
Just... like... those...
Super Hydrophobalistic Condimental Bottles (refrain)

Cool (1)

koan (80826) | more than 2 years ago | (#40095905)

I've started storing everything in glass.

Serendipity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095945)

Hmm... serendipity seems to be a central theme to research in chemistry and material sciences.

Out of curiosity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095963)

Why is this story under idle?

Inventing ways of making sealing wax -- dept (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095973)

When you were a child you were a treated kind
Byt you were never brought up right
You were always spoiled with a thousand toys but still you cried all night
Your mother who neglected you owes a million dollars tax
And your father`s still perfecting ways of making sealing wax

You better stop, look around
Here it comes, here it comes, here it comes, here it comes
Here comes your nineteenth nervous breakdown
Oh, who`s to blame, that girl`s just insane
Well, nothing I do don`t seem to work
It only seems to make the matters worse. Oh, please

-- Rolling Stones "19th Nervous Breakdown"

more (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40095981)

more useless plastics that don't deterioration...

Recyclability? (3, Interesting)

dacarr (562277) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096053)

So what would this do to the ability to recycle the materials? A general rule is that recyclers want you to clean glass (rightly so, as ketchup turns to pretty much carbon at the 2000 deg F required to melt glass, thus spoiling the recyc batch), but what would this do under intense heat?

Re:Recyclability? (1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096133)

It would spawn kittens.

Re:Recyclability? (0)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096397)

Why does anyone bother to recycle glass? It's made from sand, for Pete's sake.

Christmas Vacation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096169)

Anyone else picture Chevy Chase beginning his sledding run in Christmas Vacation?

Very cool stuff, I did a small presentation on this technology in college.

Water Repelling Condiment Containers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096183)

Seems like an Eureka episode waiting to happen...

easy pour fish oil (1)

epine (68316) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096195)

I would love to see sardines cans with a BPA-free liner where the fish scoots right out without having to bang the can around upside down while spraying stinky fish oil all over the counter-top.

The last large sardine in my can today had such incredible BPA suction I had to pitchfork it out. Even after I slid it around, it still didn't peel off when inverted.

Health studies usually report that the benefits of high omega-3 diets outweigh the notorious toxins also contained.

Re:easy pour fish oil (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096321)

what about all the salt in canned meat?

dont get me wrong I LOOOOVE canned meat, but just for the fact its meat flavored salt paste and fat, so I cut that out pretty quick

Ketchup! (1)

Shavano (2541114) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096203)

Finally, I'll be able to get my ketchup out of the bottle.

"Condiments"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096211)

TFA is much funnier if you substitute "condoms" for "condiments".

Re:"Condiments"? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096339)

its a condom! its a mint! its a condiment!

Slip-n-slide (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096293)

I wonder if this would make a slip-n-slide more painful, or less?

Snowboard (1)

Lawrence_Bird (67278) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096319)

I need this. You have 6 months to get it to me. I'll finally be able to break 60 mph even on sierra cement

Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096347)

This is great. I've always wanted to chug-a-lug catchup.

Nothing new at MIT (1)

FranTaylor (164577) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096369)

Building 57(!) is an old Heinz factory

MIT is no stranger to ketchup

Not bad, MIT... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096405)

Now if they could only come up with a coating to keep peanut butter from sticking to the roof of your mouth, and keep biscuits and gravy from sticking to your ribs...

Hydrophobic material Food Grade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40096493)

Wonder if you could use this to line arteries and coat stents

Super Rabies? (2)

user flynn (236683) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096501)

    Why the hell would they put super rabies in condiment bottles? I already get enough froth from the damned ketchup and mustard bottles when I first use them. Stupid researchers.

Condiment Bottlers Hate This (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 2 years ago | (#40096631)

All of that waste is product consumers buy, but can't consume. So it doesn't put off the next time they buy more. There's no way condiment bottlers are going to use this invention that means you'll buy replacements less often.

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