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Four Years Jail For Bredolab Botnet Author

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the do-not-pass-go dept.

Botnet 47

angry tapir writes "The creator of the Bredolab malware has received a four-year prison sentence in Armenia for using his botnet to launch DDoS attacks that damaged multiple computer systems owned by private individuals and organizations. G. Avanesov was sentenced by the Court of First Instance of Armenia's Arabkir and Kanaker-Zeytun administrative districts for offenses under Part 3 of the Article 253 of the country's Criminal Code — intentionally causing damage to a computer system with severe consequences."

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47 comments

Always clean... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40097955)

Around a year ago, I was mindlessly surfing the internet (as I often do) when I came across an enigmatic web page. The page, which looked like a warning from my web browser, informed me that I had a virus installed on my computer and that to fix it, I should install a strange anti-virus program that I'd never heard of (which I found peculiar considering the fact that I already had anti-virus software installed on my computer). Despite having reservations about installing it, I did so anyway (since it appeared to be a legitimate warning).

I cannot even fathom what I was thinking at that time. Soon after attempting to install the so-called anti-virus software, my desktop background image changed into a large red warning sign, warnings about malware began making appearances all over the screen, and a strange program I'd never seen before began nagging me to buy a program to remove the viruses. What should have been obvious previously then became clear to me: that software was a virus. Frustrated by my own stupidity, I began tossing objects around the room and cursing at no one in particular.

After I calmed down, I reluctantly took my computer to a local PC repair shop and steeled myself for the incoming fee. When I entered, I noticed that there were four men working there, and all of them seemed incredibly nice (the shop itself was clean and stylish, too). After I described the situation to them, they gave me a big smile (as if they'd seen and heard it all before), accepted the job, and told me that the computer would be working like new again in a few days. At the time, I was confident that their words held a great degree of truth to them.

The very next day, while I was using a local library's computer and browsing the internet, I came across a website dedicated to a certain piece of software. It claimed that it could fix up my PC and make it run like new again. I knew, right then, merely from viewing a single page on the website, that it was telling the truth. I cursed myself for not discovering this excellent piece of software before I had taken my PC to the PC repair shop. "It would've saved me money. Oh, well. I'm sure they'll get the job done just fine. I can always use this software in the future to conserve money." Those were my honest thoughts at the time.

Two days later, my phone rang after I returned home from work. I immediately was able to identify the number: it was the PC repair shop's phone number. Once I answered, something strange occurred; the one on the other end of the line spoke, in a small, tormented voice, "Return. Return. Return. Return. Return." No matter what I said to him, he would not stop repeating that one word. Unsettled by this odd occurrence, I traveled to the PC repair shop to find out exactly what happened.

Upon arriving inside the building, I looked upon the shop, which was a shadow of its former self, in shock. There were countless wires all over the floor, smashed computer parts scattered in every direction I looked, fallen shelves on the ground, desks flipped over on the ground, and, to make matters even worse, there was blood splattered all over the wall. Being the reasonable, upstanding, college-educated citizen that I was, I immediately concluded that the current state of the shop was due to none other than an employee's stress from work. I looked around a bit more, spotted three bodies sitting against the wall, and in the middle of the room, I spotted my computer. "Ah. There it is." Directly next to it was the shop's owner, sitting on the ground in the fetal position.

When I questioned him, he kept repeating a single thing again and again: "Cannot be stopped! Cannot be stopped! Cannot be stopped!" I could not get him to tell me what was wrong, but after a bit of pondering, I quickly figured out precisely what happened: they were unable to fix my computer like they had promised. Disgusted by their failure, I turned to the shop's owner (who I now noticed had a gun to his head), and spat in his general direction. I then turned my back to him as if I was attempting to say that nothing behind me was worth my attention, and said to him, "Pathetic. Absolutely, positively pathetic. I asked you to do a single thing for me, and yet you failed even at that. Were I you, I'd be disgusted by myself, and I'd probably even take my own life. Such a worthless existence isn't even worthy of receiving my gaze!"

After saying that, I left the shop with my computer as if absolutely nothing had occurred there. And, indeed, there was nothing in that shop that was worthy of my attention. Still understandably disgusted by their inability to fulfill the promise, I said to myself, "I'll have to take this into my own hands." After getting into my car to drive home, I heard a gun shot from inside the repair shop. Being that it originated from the worthless owner of that shop, I promptly decided to ignore it.

Once I returned home, I, filled to the brim with confidence, immediately installed the software that I'd found a few days ago: MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . The results were exactly what I expected, and yet, I was still absolutely in awe of MyCleanPC's [mycleanpc.com] wonderful performance. MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] removed every last virus from my computer in the span of a few seconds. I simply couldn't believe it; MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] accomplished in moments what "professionals" had failed to accomplish after days of work!

MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colours where no one else could! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my system, and increased my speed!

If you're having computer troubles, I highly recommend the use of MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . Don't rely on worthless "professionals" to fix up your PC! Use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] if you want your PC to be overclocking, if you want your gigabits to be zippin' and zoomin', and if you want your PC to be virus-free.

Even if you aren't having any visible problems with your PC, I still wholeheartedly recommend the use of MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . You could still be infected by a virus that isn't directly visible to you, and MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] will fix that right up. What do you have to lose? In addition to fixing any problems, MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] will, of course, speed up all of your gigabits until every component on your PC is overclocking like new!

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

Re:Always clean... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40097983)

I love those stories :3 I still wouldn't touch that app for any reason though... xD

Re:Always clean... (2)

Trilkin (2042026) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098021)

That's because it's a scam. That isn't the first time that story's been posted as a first post. Funny how a story about a botnet has a first post from someone probably using a botnet.

Re:Always clean... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098119)

I don't think so. Probably just a nigger.

Re:Always clean... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098311)

In Soviet union, we have no niggers, only comrades scamming for botnets.

Re:Always clean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40104379)

Suck my penis for Jesus little boy. Suck my cock good. Jesus Christ demands it.

Re:Always clean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098305)

Yes, but if they made an example of them by cutting off their hands, we'd have less spam. Balls too just in case they could still breed.
Botnet enthusiasts, spammers and scammers. Start lopping parts off them in direct ratio to their crime. Cruel and unusual? No, cruelty is allowing them to continue, not unusual either as this has been a punishment probably dating back to pre history. Cures chronic masturbation as well.

Re:Always clean... (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 2 years ago | (#40107565)

It's not as brilliantly bathetic as the one about the guy dying of cancer, his family abandoning him and his puppy committing suicide (or whatever).

My gigabits are zippin' and zoomin'! (-1, Offtopic)

Zippin'Zoomin' (2646667) | more than 2 years ago | (#40097967)

A few months ago, I accepted what at first appeared to be a very simple job: remove a virus from someone's computer. Given the fact that I owned a PC repair shop (and I still do) and had over 15 years of experience, I was confident that I could complete the job in a timely manner without any complications along the way. Little did I know, however, that accepting this job would spiral my life into a nightmarish den of anguish and uncertainty.

First, I tried booting up the PC. When Windows finally loaded, it became apparent that this was no ordinary virus; it was a merciless monstrosity of a virus that would stop at nothing to ruin your entire life. However, despite this, I bravely pressed on and attempted to combat the virus. "I absolutely will not let a mere virus scare me off!" I thought.

After numerous unsuccessful attempts at removing the virus and after exhausting every single option to combat viruses that I had, I finally realized that the situation was absolutely devoid of hope. This was a virus more fearsome than any other, and it was simply impossible for someone with my abilities (skilled as I was) to fight against it alone. Even reinstalling the operating system completely didn't help. I quickly sank into a pit of depression and despair.

Being that I was extremely stressed due to my numerous failures, I began verbally abusing my wife and kids a few days after I received the job. This situation soon worsened when I began resorting to physical abuse in order to relieve some of my anger. Eventually, after not being able to withstand my daughter's constant moans and whines any longer, I locked her in the basement in order to retain an ounce of my sanity.

That's when I had a stroke of genius: "If I can't fight this nightmare alone, then why don't I call in the World's Greatest Minds?" I immediately contacted the World's Greatest Minds and pleaded that they examine the computer. To my delight, they accepted the proposal, collected the computer, and began their experiments.

After weeks of trial and error, numerous experiments, and many failures, the World's Greatest Minds had at last reached a conclusion. They contacted me by phone and told me that this, being no ordinary virus, called for extreme measures. They quite vehemently recommended the use of MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] to combat the virus and destroy its very existence once and for all. "MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] will completely eradicate the virus without a single problem," they enthusiastically told me.

As soon as I got the computer back from the World's Greatest Minds, I installed MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] , ran a free scan, and then sat back and watched in awe as it totally eliminated the very same virus that I had spent weeks trying to get rid of in mere seconds! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] had accomplished a feat that nothing else in existence could have accomplished! I was positively astonished by MyCleanPC's [mycleanpc.com] miraculous performance.

What was my daughter's response, you ask? "MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My dad's client's computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colours where no one else could! I recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] right this minuteness to fix all of your problems!"

MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my client's system, and increased his speed! As a computer repair professional, I highly recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] to fix all of your problems. That's not all: The World's Greatest Minds also recommends MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] for all of your computer repair needs. By using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] , you're ensuring that your gigabits will be running faster than ever, that all viruses will vanish off of your computer in seconds, and that you'll be overclocking with the rest of us!

Even if you're not having any visible problems with your computer, I still wholeheartedly recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . After all, you could have a dormant/silent virus on your system. Additionally, MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] will speed up all of your gigabits to levels you could never imagine! You'll be overclocking in no time thanks to MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] !

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

No more truly will away! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40097981)

A few weeks ago, I foolishly ran a strange executable file that one of my acquaintances sent me by email. As someone who doesn't know much about computers, at the time, I thought nothing of it. "Why would my acquaintance want to hurt me?" Following this line of thought, I ran the file without question.

How naive I was. Despite having what was supposedly the best anti-virus software out right then, a virus took over my computer and held it hostage. It was pretending to be a warning from Windows telling me to buy some strange anti-virus software I'd never heard of from a company I'd never heard of to remove the virus.

This immediately set alarm bells off in my head. "How could this happen? My anti-virus is supposed to be second to none!" Faced with this harsh reality, I decided to take it to a PC repair shop for repair. They gladly accepted the job, told me it'd be fixed in a few days, and sent me off with a smile.

A few days later, they called me and told me to come pick up my computer. At the time, I noticed that they sounded like whimpering animals, but I concluded that it must just be stress from work. When I arrived, they, with tears in their eyes, told me that the virus was so awful and merciless that they were unable to remove it. "Ah," I thought. "That must be why they sounded so frustrated and pathetic over the phone. Their failure must have truly ruined their pride as professionals." I later found out that two of them had committed suicide.

After returning home, I tried to fix it myself (despite the fact that even the professionals couldn't do it). After about a day or so, I was losing my very mind. I stopped going to work, stopped eating, was depressed, and I would very frequently throw my precious belongings across the room and break them; that is how bad this virus was.

That's when it happened: I found MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] ! I installed MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] , ran a scan, and let it remove all the viruses! They were removed in precisely 2.892 seconds. Wow! Such a thing! I can't even believe this as such never before! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colors where no one else could!

MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my system, and increased my speed! If you're having computer problems, or even if you aren't having any obvious problems, I recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . As a user, it did more for me that any so-called "professional." It'll even boost your PC & internet speed!

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

I can see the future of your ass... (-1, Offtopic)

MyMyMyAss (2646681) | more than 2 years ago | (#40097993)

A few days ago, a customer brought in their PC for repair. They told me that they had a very nasty virus that was holding their computer hostage and wouldn't stop unless they paid the creators $50. "Alright," I thought. "That's pretty standard."

But, soon enough, I found that I was overexerting myself trying to get rid of this virus. I had never seen a virus this bad before. Reformatting and using all of the usual software to try to remove the virus didn't help at all!

As a PC repair technician with 10+ years of experience, I was dumbfounded. I couldn't remove the virus, and to make matters worse, their gigabits were running slower than ever! I soon plummeted into a severe state of depression and anxiety.

That's when I found MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . I went to MyCleanPC's [mycleanpc.com] website, ran a free scan, and the virus simply vanished from their computer this minuteness. I couldn't believe how fast their gigabits were running afterwards just from using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] !

My customer's response? "MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my system and increased my speed!"

My thoughts: MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colors where no one else could! I love MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] !

The fact that such an experienced PC repair technician is recommending MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] should be more than enough to convince you that it is high-quality software.

If you're having computer problems, then as an experienced PC repair technician, I wholeheartedly recommend using MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] . Your gigabits and speed will be overclocking and running at maximum efficiency!

But, in my experience, even if you're not having any visible problems, you could still be infected. So get MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] and run a scan this minuteness so you'll be overclocking with the rest of us!

Watch their commercial! [youtube.com]

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

Re:I can see the future of your ass... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098429)

Wait, what's with the headline? The future of your ass?

Re:I can see the future of your ass... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40099335)

I was wondering the same thing. Don't leave us hangin'!

What were the consequences (2, Interesting)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098067)

for the staff in charge of security? (Since there was damage to multiple computer systems, not just unavailability)

Re:What were the consequences (4, Interesting)

gweihir (88907) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098167)

Nothing. After all, even if you have glass windows, if somebody throws a stone at them you do not share responsibility. Vandalism (and that is what was effectively done) is always 100% the fault of the vandal.

Now, having inadequate security is something else. But the respective laws are still in their infancy.

Re:What were the consequences (1, Interesting)

Alex Belits (437) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098291)

If it was possible to prevent glass windows from being broken by properly maintaining them, having a window broken would indicate professional neglect (what translated into various crimes and civil actions for at least some professions).

There is no excuse for having an insecure system operating in an insecure manner while there are cheaper ways of having a secure system operating in a secure manner. Just because Microsoft taught people to accept glaring flaws and deficiencies as facts of life, doesn't mean that there should be no responsibility for having them.

Re:What were the consequences (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098303)

Let me give you a more valid window glass analogy. If you had invested in better glass, the kids rock would not have smashed your window.

Plus we're talking about DDoS here. That is not trivial to protect against. Your jab at Microsoft is silly.

Re:What were the consequences (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#40099595)

Your jab at Microsoft is silly.

No, he raises a good point. Way too many people just shrug and say "you can't write a bug-free program". It's like being brought up in a leaky shack, you'll have the attitude that a poorly constructed shack is "just the way it is." Without all those poorly constructed shacks, and all the people using them who have the attitude "there's nothing we can do about it" DDoSes would be much harder to pull off id Windows wasn't so easy to break into. Remember, the botnet is made up of Windows PCs.

Re:What were the consequences (2)

serialband (447336) | more than 2 years ago | (#40100593)

And the command and control IRC servers are typically running on linux.

Re:What were the consequences (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#40108767)

Of course they are. The C&C operators don't want someone else to take over their botnets!

Re:What were the consequences (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098331)

If it was possible to prevent glass windows from being broken by properly maintaining them, having a window broken would indicate professional neglect (what translated into various crimes and civil actions for at least some professions).

I would have just said that breaking window is a bad anology. What you said makes no sense.

There is no excuse for having an insecure system operating in an insecure manner while there are cheaper ways of having a secure system operating in a secure manner.

Pretty much. Unless the hacker has found some security flaw that was missed by every other security expert and academic out there, I'm with you.

Just because Microsoft taught people to accept glaring flaws and deficiencies as facts of life, doesn't mean that there should be no responsibility for having them.

You tell'em!

I'm still pissed that the goddman Japanese bomber Pearl Harbor, too! And don't get me started about the South firing on Fort Sumter and then having the GAUL to call the Civil War the "War of Northern Agression"! Plah-ease! Who fired upon whom?!? And then the fucking Gemans for causing ALL of the European wars from the mid 19th century till the mid 20th! Fucking Krauts! And NOW they're fucking with the European economy!

Re:What were the consequences (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098491)

There is no excuse for having an insecure system operating in an insecure manner while there are cheaper ways of having a secure system operating in a secure manner.

Those computers shouldn't be dressing so provocatively, they had it coming. And, given that there are self defence classes one can take, there's no excuse for not fending off an attacker.

Re:What were the consequences (4, Insightful)

flonker (526111) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098547)

How would you "secure" a system against a DDoS? The only solution is to throw money at the problem. Yes, you can mitigate to some degree, but the numbers get very big very fast regardless.

Quick google turns up "DDoS attack size broke 100 Gbps for first time" from Feb 2011. The only way to prevent 100 Gbps of traffic from drowning your site is to have *significantly* more than 100 Gbps of bandwidth available to you, or to hire someone who does. And even then, someone must pay for that bandwidth.

Another hurdle to overcome is if someone is attacking your application layer, you have to throw CPU cycles (and possibly RAM) at the problem to solve it. If you assume a typical HTTP request of 1k, handling or filtering 100M (or even 1M @ 1Gbps) http requests per second is going to require some hefty hardware. A quick google gives the number 3k requests per second for a typical apache server serving blank pages. You would need 300 web servers to handle 1M requests, and 30,000 to handle 100M requests. Numbers are just ballpark figures, and may be off by an order of magnitude or two, but you get the idea.

In short, protecting against a DDoS is hardly professional neglect. It's a financial decision. Even if you hire someone else to handle it for you, someone eventually pays the price.

Re:What were the consequences (2)

gweihir (88907) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098641)

Indeed. Easy DDoS is a consequence of the design of the Internet. Defense is expensive, but entirely possible. Just talk to Akamai, they can tolerate basically anything that can be thrown at them with only local outages.

That said, even if the target could easily tolerate the DDoS done, the criminal doing it should still be punished.

Re:What were the consequences (1)

gweihir (88907) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098595)

That is nonsense. It is possible to have unbreakable windows, but it is generally recognized that properly designed windows break only due to accidents or malicious intent. Liability comes into play for example for windows that break too easily, or, for car-glass, windows that break into large shards.

Now, what exactly the standards are that are acceptable in IT security is still in flux, but just because an attack was easy does not make the action of attacking any less malicious. Well, maybe lower in criminal energy, which can result in a lighter sentence.

Re:What were the consequences (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098839)

If it was possible to prevent glass windows from being broken by properly maintaining them, having a window broken would indicate professional neglect (what translated into various crimes and civil actions for at least some professions).

There is no excuse for having an insecure system operating in an insecure manner while there are cheaper ways of having a secure system operating in a secure manner. Just because Microsoft taught people to accept glaring flaws and deficiencies as facts of life, doesn't mean that there should be no responsibility for having them.

I take it you never had to work for enterprise customers before? Try supporting 300 apps in 10 countries with different configurations for each tree in the forest on the AD? Now imagine a single piece of software in that configuration that requires all XP SP 2 desktops to have time frozen on March 2008 on a Tuesday or else megaCrap wont support the product?

You have over 120 updates for Windows 7 according to my desktop which includes the early 2009 version of Windows 7 if I rebuild it to make it modern to 2012? If I were to do this in a client site above I would have to do regression testing for all 120 updates for all 300 apps! How do I know that security update wont break something? What if it does?

I am fired and sued into an oblivion! Cost accountants love to have the system work only if no one ever calls in sick or goes on vacation and the IT team just puts out fires rather than prevents them. It helps raise the client's share price so the CEO can get his bonus.

IT does not have time for these tests and its impossible without tens of millions of dollars of wasted shareholder money. This was the drive for intranet apps originally to leave this nightmare, but guess what. Slashdotters are now whinning how horrible IE 6 is. Now they do not want to go the intranet route again after having this nightmare now with IE 6 thanks to everyone whinning about it.

Home users have it easy. Maybe this will change when intranet apps are HTML 5 based in the future and will work on every browser/machine? Pfft yeah right. No vendor wants to certify anything outside IE on the desktop and have it in the contracts not to support any security updates with its products. For this reason alone I did a PC Refresh project for a hospital and all the new Desktops had the unpatched XP SP 2 with IE 6 on them for this reason. The vendors wont support us otherwise.

Re:What were the consequences (0)

michelcolman (1208008) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098593)

But they didn't throw a stone at the glass, they merely picked the lock and opened the window, and this somehow caused the glass to break even though they didn't even touch it.

How do you damage a server merely by sending it too many requests? Surely it should just shut down if it overheats?

Re:What were the consequences (2)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098857)

How do you damage a server merely by sending it too many requests? Surely it should just shut down if it overheats?

People set up servers for a reason - because they want visitors. Shutting them down isn't really a 'cure'.

Re:What were the consequences (1)

michelcolman (1208008) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098951)

No, but the article said equipment was "damaged". Surely a shut down server is better than a damaged one? Isn't that a mandatory safety measure?

Re:What were the consequences (1)

tomhath (637240) | more than 2 years ago | (#40100553)

No, but the article said equipment was "damaged"

Nope, the article said the *system* was damaged. That would cover more than physical damage to the hardware. I assume it would include denying the use of the system by attacking it with a botnet.

Re:What were the consequences (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098417)

If you leave your doors unlocked and get robbed and the thief gets caught. We should just slap them on the wrist?

Re:What were the consequences (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40103069)

What's my cock taste like in your faggot mouth motherfucker?

Mmmmmmm does it taste good faggot?

Help beating the Axis! (-1, Offtopic)

gentryx (759438) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098127)

Buy Firefox bonds!

Re:Help beating the Axis! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098513)

Wrong thread, dude.

Niggers (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40098213)

Can't live with 'em. Can't hang 'em.

Spam Flood (3, Interesting)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098545)

"Never in the history of Slashdot have so many spam posts been posted by so few in such a short time".

Winston Smith.

(Perhaps triggered by "botnet author" in the articles title?)

damaged multiple computer systems ? (2)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40098991)

How does one *damage* a system via a DoS?

Sure, it's uncool and he needs to be in jail, but propagation of false concepts is just as dangerous, if not more...

( reminds me of the 'copyright infringement is theft' propaganda )

Re:damaged multiple computer systems ? (0)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#40101757)

By making it shit electrons all over itself. I hear that's quite a mess.

Re:damaged multiple computer systems ? (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 2 years ago | (#40107603)

How does one *damage* a system via a DoS?

Sure, it's uncool and he needs to be in jail, but propagation of false concepts is just as dangerous, if not more...

If my entire system becomes unusable because some fuckwits are DoSing it, then it has been damaged..If it is a business, there will be direct, real monetary losses You are just thinking about physical damage to the hardware, which is irrelevant.

( reminds me of the 'copyright infringement is theft' propaganda )

It reminds me of a drooling retard with a one track mind, but hey ho.

Jailtime: Addware 15 years, DDOS 4 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40099381)

Wow there are some F***ed up laws in the US. 15 years for Russians for a botnet click scan. Meanwhile a DDOS botnet attack gets 4 years.

WTF, It goes to show you nobody who makes any laws in the US has any clue about the big tubes on the internet. Because they only look at the big boobs on the internet.

Re:Jailtime: Addware 15 years, DDOS 4 years (1)

sed quid in infernos (1167989) | more than 2 years ago | (#40099469)

You do know Armenia isn't actually in the U.S., right?

Re:Jailtime: Addware 15 years, DDOS 4 years (1)

KhabaLox (1906148) | more than 2 years ago | (#40100145)

It is if you're in Glendale, CA.

Interesting note from the article (4, Interesting)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | more than 2 years ago | (#40099653)

I am not claiming to personally be the greatest expert on Slashdot of the ex-USSR. However, I do speak Russian reasonably well and I have traveled in the ex-USSR so I do think it's fair to say that I'm more familiar with the CIS countries and the people that live there than most people. I admit to being a bit puzzled to read that Armenia jailed someone. Armenia is seemingly uninterested in joining NATO and the EU and as far as I know they get along pretty well with Mother Russia. Outside of the Baltic Countries (Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia) who are fully integrated into the EU and NATO, laws are weak and corruption is high. I was wondering "Why would Armenia bother to prosecute this guy and jail him, given that in the past the entire CIS has basically never been interested in such?". There doesn't seem to be any political reason (ie. no sucking up to the EU or NATO) at work here. Surely this guy would have been smart enough to just bribe his way out of trouble. Then I noticed this in the article:

One of the attacks that Avanesov was found guilty of instrumenting took place on Oct. 1, 2010, and targeted a Russian telecommunication company called Macomnet.

Ah. He foolishly attacked Mother Russia. Now I understand why he was convicted.

Well, that's good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40100111)

I'm sure this computer criminal will pick up a bunch of new polite habits while rotting in Armenian prison. I can't wait to see him released and reformed!

Re:Well, that's good. (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 2 years ago | (#40107701)

I'm sure this computer criminal will pick up a bunch of new polite habits while rotting in Armenian prison. I can't wait to see him released and reformed!

Well, by that logic you wouldn't put anyone in jail in case they gotmore criminally hardened. Just remember that not all criminals are greedy geeks like this dweeb, there are also rapists, murderers and child molesters in prison too.

What a ruse (1)

ourlovecanlastforeve (795111) | more than 2 years ago | (#40104749)

That's right, you give him four years of free room and board, three square meals a day, free access to health and dental and psychiatric care. That'll show him who's boss.
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