Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

BitTorrent Traffic Falls In the U.S.

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the mulhulland-falls-too dept.

The Internet 129

First time accepted submitter CAKAS writes "After legal actions taken by several industry outfits, BitTorrent traffic has fallen in the United States to the all time low of 12.7 percent of internet traffic. However, this trend seems to be unique to the U.S. — In other parts of the world, like Europe and Asia, BitTorrent traffic continues to rise. 'According to Sandvine, the absence of legal alternatives is one of the reasons for these high P2P traffic shares.' In the U.S. legal content delivery has flourished and provided customers easy access to content. This seems to suggest that due to these alternatives, people are less willing to pirate and pay the publishers for entertainment." (Calling it an "all-time low" seems a stretch, when talking about something released in 2001.)

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (5, Interesting)

Feanorian (1664427) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115615)

Maybe Americans are getting smart and using VPN's and proxies :D

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (4, Insightful)

matazar (1104563) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115769)

Not to mention seed boxes that can be purchased for cheap. Why waste your home upstream, when you can use a 100mbit connection to download and easily transfer it to your home computer with ssh/scp/sftp.

Those companies must love seeing news like this. There's always another way..

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116061)

*sigh* So let them enjoy their news and hush.

Loose lips have been the reason they caught on with P2P in the first place. Why gloat, just enjoy.

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (1)

gottabeme (590848) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116813)

Yeah, sure, the reason for all the RIAA/MPAA lawsuits is because of comments on Slashdot...

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117993)

If it were only that simple. Read "The Hundredth Monkey" from a scientific mindset...using it as a lens for your comment...

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (4, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118867)

Comments on /. are not really the problem. Making something public knowledge certainly is, though.

As much as I was an advocate of "educating the masses" in my early geek days, I'm no longer a proponent of the idea of bringing our great new ideas and developments to them. Hate to say it, but we should simply keep it to ourselves.

Think back of the early days of P2P and general content swapping. Did the MPAA care? Did they hunt you down like rabid dogs? Nah. It was a nuisance, but a petty one. Much like blackboxing was in the good ol' days. Sure, a few people did it and they got away with it, but nobody cared enough to prosecute it. The damage was small and the few that did it were not worth the effort.

Think it would have been the same if it had been the widespread sport of Joe Randomboxer? Think AT&T would have been as lenient as they were? Think again.

It's a matter of magnitude. It's simply damage vs. cost to avoid damage for them. Keep the damage low and they don't care about you. Ramp it up and suddenly you're in their sights.

Yes, there are new ways of exchanging information and hiding it from the prying eye. But I'm no longer willing to share it with the masses. Call me an elitist bastard, so be it, but unless I can see some benefit in it, or rather, more benefit than harm, I see no reason to share that information with them.

So basically, freedom is only for the elite? (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118981)

Nice. We shall free the slaves! But not by actually telling them they are free, that way we avoid to much hassle.

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (1)

nmb3000 (741169) | more than 2 years ago | (#40117241)

Not to mention seed boxes that can be purchased for cheap.

While on this topic, does anyone have any suggestions for good seedbox providers? I've come across a couple that look attractive, but they often blacklist public trackers (which largely voids the whole point of a seedbox).

If you've had a good or bad experience with a provider I'd love to hear it.

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (5, Insightful)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115821)

Maybe Americans are getting smart and using VPN's and proxies :D

Or US Internet traffic is growing - something the ISP's & cell carriers are crying about on a regular basis. If the overall usage goes up, stagnant BitTorrent traffic rates - or if the BT rates are growing at a slower rate as compared to overall US usage - will look like it declined.

We've DOWNLOADED all the MOVIES (5, Insightful)

billstewart (78916) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116841)

The reason BitTorrent traffic is falling is that everybody's downloaded all the old movies already. So now we're just getting the new ones, not catching up on backlog.

Re:We've DOWNLOADED all the MOVIES (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116971)

But my hard drive just failed and I was too poor to buy a backup. Dammit now I have to download them all again- and this time in 1080p HD.

Re:New movies aren't even WORTH downloading (3, Insightful)

guru42101 (851700) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118571)

My opinion is that most new stuff hasn't even been worth downloading. Several of the "blockbuster" movies that I've downloaded I deleted within 15 minutes. For other people I think Netflix and Redbox are an acceptable alternative as well.

Re:We've DOWNLOADED all the MOVIES (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40118687)

This

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40115875)

Or paying for and watching streaming media without needing a digital copy...rather than legal actions, it might be the fact that such options are more available in the US...

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (2)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116119)

This. A billion times this. And atrocious dubbing, and delays (due to dubbing...) of a year and more in other countries before you can see your favorite shows (and well after the outcome of the season you are about to see has been discussed at length on the boards about it).

Let people watch their favorite shows a week instead of a year after they come out, in their original language without butchering them with dubbing that kills any kind of meaning of the dialogues, and there is exactly zero reason for them anymore to even ponder going through the hardship of sifting through the various offered downloads and finding the one that actually contains the show.

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (2)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 2 years ago | (#40117051)

and remind people where they aren't available again:

everywhere else in the world.

While you have this music/movie plethora on the US, it does not exist outside of the US. Even services to share movies are blocked in a variety of countries, which just creates more incentive to create more torrent traffic.

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116319)

Maybe Americans are getting smart and using filelockers.
FTFY

If you are under the incorrect impression that they are slower or harder to used than bittorrent I suggest you try a program like JDownloader.

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (3, Insightful)

Pseudonym Authority (1591027) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116941)

They get taken down to much. If you are after fresh material, IRC DCC bots are the best way to get it (at least for things like Anime and TV shows).

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (3, Interesting)

poity (465672) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116339)

But think about the logic of that for a moment.

If what the summary says is true -- that expanded legal alternatives have contributed majorly to the decrease in torrent traffic -- then it means that the argument that most piracy is the result of the content industry's sluggishness in adopting new business models rings true. However, if what you claim is true instead, then it means the former argument is wrong, and that piracy continues despite the industry's efforts to evolve and meet customers' desires.

So, if the article is right, then it is clear evidence to the industry that evolving their business model will have a positive impact, whereas if you are right, then the industry has even more evidence that changing their business model has no effect.

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (2)

kdemetter (965669) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118715)

Actually, they are both right :

If the content industry adapts it's business model, then most people will not go through the effort of pirating.
However, there will always be people who pirate, because they have the technical expertise, and so it's still easier for them.

In short : if the content industry adapts there business model, they will increase their revenue again.
However , they will never stop piracy completely, no matter how hard they try ( and waste money on it ).

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116701)

or given up on media :)

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117785)

"In related news, Americans are flocking to VPN services, and VPN traffic has increased exponentially from people not wanting the friggen government controlling their web usage."

Re:Perhaps it's not that Bittorrent traffic fell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40118277)

Hahahaha ....getting smart ....Americans ... :)

all time low? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40115631)

ha! the "all time low" for bittorrent should be 0.00%, you know, back before bittorrent was invented. saying "all time low" is an odd expression for something that started at zero.

Re:all time low? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40119017)

Yeah, that statement is really sub-par.
Below average.
Never encountered such a wrong statement in my life.
In fact, you might aptly call it ...

</ba-dum-ching.>

Netflix, not "legal actions" (5, Insightful)

TheEyes (1686556) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115637)

Filesharing lawsuits and six-strikes laws never did anything to stem the tide of piracy. What's been causing the fall of Bittorrent as a share of internet bandwidth in the US is the rise of legal streaming sites (Netflix, Hulu, etc), alternatives which don't exist in most of the rest of the world.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (2)

hendridm (302246) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115671)

What's been causing the fall of Bittorrent as a share of internet bandwidth in the US is the rise of legal streaming sites (Netflix, Hulu, etc), alternatives which don't exist in most of the rest of the world.

For the time being... [nypost.com]

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (5, Interesting)

neros1x (2492908) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115717)

Isn't it funny? Record companies swore that DRM-free mp3s would destroy their industry, and the MPAA fought for years to keep movies offline. The rest of the world argues, "People will pay for content that is easily available and user-friendly." Now we have the proof. I feel vindicated, somehow.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (2)

causality (777677) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116153)

Now we have the proof. I feel vindicated, somehow.

Unfortunately, these are not people who listen to things like proof and reason.

They're just like political and religious fanatics. When the facts contradict their articles of faith, they simply scream louder. These are not people who would ever say something like "wow, piracy isn't a threat to us after all, you know sometimes it's good to find out you were wrong about something, whew, that's a burden off our backs!"

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40118019)

Unfortunately, the first thing mentioned is the lawsuits we all know don't work.

Easy legal availability was the answer the whole time, but the Movie And Film Industry Association of America was to busy being punitive to just read the writing on the wall.

It took a proprietary mindset (Steve Jobs) to convince them, because they wouldn't hear us...thus couldn't "fill the need" by the most cost-effective method (i.e. internet), even though it was pretty obvious to the rest of us.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40119057)

Well, MPAA is not about fighting off piracy, but getting profits off suing random people, running scare campaigns and avoiding at all costs that hollywood get the right thing done, as if they do that, they will profit so much off the web that they will lose the fear, and dismiss MPAA.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40119223)

This isn't anything similar to proof. The music industry is a fucking shell of what it was pre-MP3 era.

There's a slight scare of getting sued into oblivion, having to install a bittorrent client and VLC is too technical for some people. These are the only reasons people ever get anything off Netflix. And certainly more is stolen than is purchased.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40115813)

The problem with Hulu is that some content providers won't let Hulu run their programs until a week or more after broadcast. This is more than enough of a wait period to make torrents more appealing.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (2)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115841)

A much larger problem is going to be the rumored requirement of a cable subscription in the near future. That will be the death of Hulu and those bittorrent figures will jump back up again immediately after.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116441)

I've already cancelled my Hulu Plus account over that. I'm pretty sure I'm not alone.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (2)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116053)

Actually, it's problematically too long of a wait period. If the broadcasters prefer you to watch the show on the air, then a delay of longer than the new-show interval works against that goal by keeping viewers who want to watch shows in the correct order from catching up after a missed episode until the hiatus.

It's almost as if their business plan is to punish viewers who fall behind for even a single episode...

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (1)

causality (777677) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116185)

Actually, it's problematically too long of a wait period. If the broadcasters prefer you to watch the show on the air, then a delay of longer than the new-show interval works against that goal by keeping viewers who want to watch shows in the correct order from catching up after a missed episode until the hiatus.

It's almost as if their business plan is to punish viewers who fall behind for even a single episode...

It's also as though they want people in other countries to torrent their content. Trying to stagger your releases so that one region gets a movie or a show days/weeks/months before other regions do makes absolutely no sense in the face of a global Internet. How people will respond to that is predictable.

That just can't be so hard to understand.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (1)

onebeaumond (1230624) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115977)

This is very true in my case. But as soon as Hulu and Netflix don't continue as is, it's back to HMA for me.

Re:Netflix, not "legal actions" (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116443)

Plus with all the mobile devices I would imagine that internet bandwidth has grown to accompany this. But how many people download a torrent on their mobile phone?

TL:DR (2)

Deathlizard (115856) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115665)

Netflix works.

Re:TL:DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40115723)

Netflix works.

I enjoy Netflix, but it is no replacement for the torrents, unless you only ever want to watch moldy shit.

Same with Hulu Plus. I like it, but sometimes stuff is missing, there is a huge delay in adding new episodes, it's "web only", etc, etc...

Once they require a cable subscription to subscribe to Hulu Plus, I'm gone.

Re:TL:DR (4, Interesting)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115917)

The thing I don't understand with Netflix is why the fucking PS3/360/Wii clients are so godawful. Why the hell do they not just give you a goddamned alphabetical list of everything they stream? Because it would be too easy for people to find what they really want to watch?

I refuse to watch Netflix on my Windows PC because fuck silverlight in it's stupid ass, but the arbitrary beshittedness of the console clients has me utterly perplexed because I can think of no reason why they would release a client like that in the first place. It's ridiculous that I have to use a 3rd party site [instantwatcher.com] to browse their offerings like someone that isn't only interested in shows related to the last goddamned thing they watched or some ridiculously specific categories ("Ooh, let's browse the 'heartwarming family films from the 80's' category, that's bound to have a wide selection to choose from for streaming!").

Re:TL:DR (1)

adolf (21054) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116713)

It used to be -lots- better, at least on the PS3 and on a real web browser.

They gimped it, apparently in a successful attempt to unify the interface with that of the shittiest of Netflix clients: Discount BluRay players that just happen to have some sort of Ethernet connectivity.

It is, IMHO, just another failure of lowest-common-denominator.

That said: Thanks for the link. Here is an RSS feed which lets you see the latest in Netflix [netflix.com] . With Firefox's Live Bookmarks functionality turns into a handy dropdown of new shit.

Re:TL:DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117267)

i use my bl;u-ray players app and it also kind of sucks. for example, i can find concert films listed in new releases when thay ad them, but browsing by genre, there is no music genre?! wtf. sure, i can go to the website, which DOES have a music category and add them to my streaming queue.

Re:TL:DR (2, Interesting)

Deathlizard (115856) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115947)

I wanted to keep the original post simple, but you're right.

The biggest problem here is that content providers don't want services like Hulu and Netflix. They would rather you pay for cable or Satellite or DVD's ETC. Hell, they don't even like VCR's or DVR's for that matter.

A great example I could give is lets say I want to create a cable company called CableNet which would be a cable company that uses internet streaming boxes (ie Roku, Boxee, Google TV, ETC) and HTML5 web browsers to stream live cable TV channels to any PC, TV, or mobile device. Lets say I even charge Cable rates for the service. (ie 19.95 to 59.95 depending on channel packages.) I guarantee that It would be near impossible to get content providers on board even if I was willing to pay the same or even higher license fees that the big cable companies like TWC and Comcast were paying simply because I'm using the internet instead of Coax or a satellite to stream Live TV. If they did get on board they would force restrictions like you could only use one stream per account, or allow multiple streaming for one IP only. Or would have to DRM the hell out of the stream or even block certain content. I won't even get started with Internet providers regarding this service. TWC and Comcast would do whatever it takes to kill this model from Data caps to price hikes for cableless internet.

This is the problem that Netflix and Hulu have. RIAA and MPAA knows Netflix works. Its a shame that they keep trying to kick Netflix and Hulu to the curb.

Re:TL:DR (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116073)

No, they are trying to kick Netflix to the curb using Hulu.

Which is why Netflix is starting to fight back by producing their own content....

Re:TL:DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40119235)

What? They like money. They aren't a charity. In a real marketplace, they would sell the product at a price that may be reasonable or may not be, and if it was unreasonable nobody would buy it and lose money.

As it is now, 90% of the market steals videos. They can make that 86% if they license the movie to Netflix for pennies on the dollar. Netflix and Hulu pay peanuts.

Re:TL:DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116985)

Not On Linux

Re:TL:DR (1)

dbet (1607261) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116997)

Nah, it's just that we've already downloaded everything we want.

Re:TL:DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117661)

Not on Linux.. oh crap, we're going to be stuck with only DRM options, aren't we?

Re:TL:DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117985)

Fear works.

Is actual usage falling? (4, Insightful)

hkmwbz (531650) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115737)

So, is actual BT usage going down, or is something else simply growing much faster?

Actually, the article states:

it's clear there's little to no growth in BitTorrent use

But:

These numbers don't take into account that absolute traffic has increased

So what does that mean? How did they conclude that there's little to no growth if the numbers don't even take a very important fact like absolute traffic growth into account? Just wild guessing?

And little to no growth doesn't mean decline. It means it's stable. So it's not really accurate to claim that "BitTorrent Traffic Falls In the U.S."

Maybe one will have to read the full report, and it's all there. But I don't think the linked article supports the assertion that BitTorrent traffic is falling in the US. At worst, it's growing slower than other services.

Re:Is actual usage falling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116105)

It's another Sandvine report to help hock their wares. Ever follow the history of the company? It's interesting that one of their original products was to help optimize and facilitate file sharing. Gotta love those opportunistic buggers...

 

Re:Is actual usage falling? (1)

morgandelra (448341) | more than 2 years ago | (#40117189)

Not that they really need to hock wares. Thier stuff rocks, it was easily one of the best purchase decisions I ever made and I have never had a regret for it. Not to mention the group I deal with there is very very good at what they do.

Sadly, I sound like a shill, but my expierance with them has been that good.

Re:Is actual usage falling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117633)

All this could have been solved with a simple image showing the data. Instead it is vaguely described in words. Deceitful or just lazy?

Re:Is actual usage falling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117757)

Lies, damn lies, and statistics.

Re:Is actual usage falling? (1)

Ardyvee (2447206) | more than 2 years ago | (#40119391)

Or, you know, they just don't see the traffic. I'm sure if you see fully encrypted traffic that is undistinguishable from chaos, they aren't going to count that towards BitTorrent traffic, even if it was. Or then you have seedboxes.

idiots (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40115747)

let me see they migrate to a new format that cuts the size roughly in half and the traffic is at 12.7 % that means to equate it to old use would be 25.2% an actual increase form the 17 % it was the previous year...
WOOT FOR STUPID PAYING ATTENTION
and cudos to x264 for making it to the big time ( i been making my own SD x264 rips since 2004)

Not all torrent traffic is illegal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40115825)

Games are still using torrent protocols in the background to push updates and added content around. It saves them bandwidth and server wear and tear. Until all the ISPs switch to metered contracts, that is, which would probably put a dent in the gaming industy's business model.

Re:Not all torrent traffic is illegal (1)

MrQuacker (1938262) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115883)

They might have to put some more effort into boxes again, instead of forcing the customers to do product delivery for them.

I was a pirate when I was poor, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40115851)

but now that I am well off, I have too much to lose from an RIAA/MPAA lawsuit. I won't give these scumbags my money, so I am essentially blacked out from all their media.

Re:I was a pirate when I was poor, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40119191)

The chance of you getting caught might as well be said to be zero if you know what you're doing.

I doubt it (2)

moogied (1175879) | more than 2 years ago | (#40115867)

It doesn't make any real sense why people would stop downloading over bittorrent suddenly this year. If anything I imagine the big bittorrent users(The scene guys and usenet folk) just started to using encrypted tunnels to rented servers. You can get a decent one with 500gb's of traffic for cheap. You can easily ramp that up to 1tb+ for under 100$ a month. While yes, that is beyond what most people will use, but its not unreal to think that the big bandwidth users(500gb + a month) are moving towards it. I know that several scene users utilize these remote servers. Combine that with SSL encrypted traffic between clients and wham! Big drop in detectable traffic.

This is the 21st century (1)

Karmashock (2415832) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116009)

Join it or die. I really have lost patience with these idiots.

Re:This is the 21st century (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117449)

This is the 21st century ... Join it or die. I really have lost patience with these idiots.

And I thought it just me that was fed up,

But I lost all patience with them at the end of the last millenium and I'd take it further:

"Fuck 'em. They're old, they're obsolete and they're dying as we speak!"

Re:This is the 21st century (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40118383)

says the guy still watching movies, which haven't changed in form since the late 1930s.

Re:This is the 21st century (1)

kamapuaa (555446) | more than 2 years ago | (#40119251)

If you don't like them, stop watching them. Play video games, take up gardening.

They're not idiots for wanting money for the product that they created. Yet DVDs and the rental market have been basically supplanted by stealing. Putting movies on Netflix or Hulu may turn that down a very slight amount, but they only recieve a pittance.

Meanwhile, the audience is a bunch of entitled bitches who think having any movie they want for free is some kind of god-given right.

Different conclusion: (4, Interesting)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116017)

1 - Nothing released recently is worth getting..
2 - Proxies/darknets

Re:Different conclusion: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116429)

gotta agree with you there. i check the pirate bay once a week. haven't seen anyhting worth downloading since november

Re:Different conclusion: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116727)

gotta agree with you there. i check the pirate bay once a week. haven't seen anyhting worth downloading since november

Timing matters. I don't find too many TV shows I want to download now because all the shows I watch are on hiatus. Wait until new episodes of Dexter! :D

As for movies, yeah, there hasn't been much that has been released to DVD lately that is any good, but I'm dying to see Avengers and Hunger Games (and I refuse to watch a CAM version). It looks like it's going to be a good movie summer for me this season, too, but of course I'll have to wait until they come out on DVD (or someone releases an inside copy).

Encourgement (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116039)

This just encourages the *aa's to continue harassing us. Need to step it up people.

Re:Encourgement (2)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116515)

It's lose-lose for us. BitTorrent numbers go down, *AA's go "hey, look, our methods are working. Now to turn up the heat even more!". If the numbers go up, they say "our current methods aren't working, we need to get even more strict and ruthless." Either way, we lose.

What alternate timeline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116131)

are you living in?
  In the U.S. legal content delivery has flourished and provided customers easy access to content.
Torrent traffic has probably fallen due to fear of SWAT teams busting your door down. Not any attempt by content providers to adapt.

The reason for the decline (2)

charliestl (1021503) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116159)

The new season of Breaking Bad has yet to air.

Kill it (1)

SuperTechnoNerd (964528) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116191)

Yes lets kill it.
Government announced that FTP protocol will be made illegal by July.
News at 11:00

seedbox. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116215)

I and many people I know have been getting seed boxes. I think more torrent traffic is just becoming encrypted.

Re:seedbox. (1)

capedgirardeau (531367) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118421)

Someone up thread and also myself are looking for recommendations for a good seed box provider. Suggestions?

Linux usage has declined? (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116225)

So Linux downloads has declined in the US? That is bad news!

Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116237)

It's because everybody already downloaded everything and there are no good movies any more.

What about traffic 'shaping' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116247)

I'm an avid user of torrents for multiple pieces you cannot get via 'authorized' sources. In the past year, I've seen the performance of torrent downloads degrade here in the US, primarily with Time Warner. The reason, so called traffic shaping. I see exactly at which point the ISP interferes with my downloads, just a few seconds after they start usually no more than a minute. The threshold used to be somewhere in the neighborhood of 2MBPS, but now its more like 1.25. Throughput burst past that for a couple of seconds and then it cuts back and flatlines right back to 1.25 consistently for the duration. That's traffic shaping at work. That would account for the huge drop in bittorrent traffic overall, but I agree more and more legitimate sources has also helped.

Truth be told, many of these legitimate sources would benefit from using the torrent protocol but for one reason or the other they don't use it.

It's not piracy! (2)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116367)

"This seems to suggest that due to these alternatives, people are less willing to pirate and pay the publishers for entertainment."

Downloading is NOT piracy! They are two very different things. Stop doing the copyright trolls' jobs for them by calling it what it isn't.

Stupid 'just to be heard' editorializing (2)

SuiteSisterMary (123932) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116409)

(Calling it an "all-time low" seems a stretch, when talking about something released in 2001.)

What, '10 year low' sounds like a stretch?

Re:Stupid 'just to be heard' editorializing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116987)

It's low in percentage, not in numbers. If you read the article, quite simply, bittorrent traffic stopped growing while other traffic increased (probably legal video streaming, much of which can't be accessed outside the US). Decline is a really bad word for this case, stagnation is a much more appropriate word.

Re:Stupid 'just to be heard' editorializing (1)

wrook (134116) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118445)

In the year 2000, the percentage of the internet used for bittorrent was 0%. Saying that bittorrent traffic is at an all time low is kind of strange since for the majority of time that the internet has existed, bittorrent has not.

It would be more appropriate to say, "Bittorrent traffic is at it's lowest point since it was introduced". It's a subtle difference, but I appreciate the attempt of the Slashdot editors to *reduce* the sensationalism of a story for once.

Now the only question is if it's actually true. Was Bittorrent's traffic really more than 12.7% of internet traffic in it's first year of availability?

Re:Stupid 'just to be heard' editorializing (1)

wrook (134116) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118477)

Ahhh... I can answer my own question. The first time bittorrent traffic was measured was 2004, as far as I can tell. This is apparently the lowest point since then. So basically, the assertion was very misleading and the editor was correct in questioning it. It would have been nice to correct it in the summary too... It didn't take me that much googling to figure it out.

Lies, damned lies, and statistics (2)

patchmaster (463431) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116433)

The conclusion that BitTorrent traffic has "fallen" is not actually supported by the Sandvine report. They complicate things by reporting everything as percentages, but if you dig deep enough you find overall mean traffic is up 40% year-over-year. So, in reality, BitTorrent traffic has continued to GROW, it's just a smaller percentage of the overall traffic.

They actually make this point about Netflix in the report. Their share of peak traffic increased by only 0.2%, yet they point out that due to overall traffic increase this amounts to a 30% increase in absolute traffic associated with Netflix.

whatever... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116529)

why even use bittorrent through a paid proxy if you could spend that money on a usenet account and get everything at max speed, SSL'd, right off the bat?

Useful (1)

andrew2325 (2647845) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116591)

It can be useful for things like debian ISO's, but ya know, some of that is the paranoia of the users because of the number of cases against pirates. This is a good thing, unless you own a copy of CD that's scratched to death. Then you have to repurchase it on amazon or itunes. At least most of them are only ten bucks. I purchased a good bit of music around Christmas time for myself and family from Amazon.com in digital form. It's nice because they store it for you. I'm also a prime subscriber so there is a vast number of movies available for free, plus 2 day delivery so I don't have to drive to the mall and up the gas prices for my neighbors who drive back and forth all day long for little pay. I'm not loaded, but it's come in handy in this hard time. Fix a few computers here and there, but I'm supposed to lay off the computer more because I may be having seizure activity. Surf responsibly, if you don't own the rights, down let yourself get served with a ten million dollar lawsuit for 12 songs. One thing I found somewhat comical about it was that they punish so greatly, when people are doing almost the same thing they did in the 1980's when the VCR was invented, recording movies off of HBO I see.

P2P traffic is legal! (1)

blackfrancis75 (911664) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116623)

high P2P traffic shares.' In the U.S. legal content delivery has flourished...

Please, let's not buy into this bullshit that P2P traffic is not and cannot also be used for legal content delivery
That's called aiding and abetting RIAA's theft of technical terminology.

Re:P2P traffic is legal! (2)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#40117823)

Only minor share of P2P is used for legal purposes. Most of it is warez.

BFD, torrent traffic down... (1)

shoes58 (1203522) | more than 2 years ago | (#40116795)

Could it be... just MAYBE... these "torrenteers" (as I myself used to be..) have discovered NZB's? No seeding, faster downloads, supports encrypted streams... Overall, much better. Only down side, it's harder to provide files. Releasers need to have a brain. Erm... or so I'm told, of course...

Re:BFD, torrent traffic down... (1)

tommy8 (2434564) | more than 2 years ago | (#40117665)

And where can I find info on your "discovery"?

Re:BFD, torrent traffic down... (1)

FrkyD (545855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40119367)

You seem to have forgotten the first rule...

the scene makes smaller files (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40116929)

It's probably the switch to mp4 that's causing the drop, tv episodes that used to be 150mb are now ofter under 100mb, same for movies and other releases.

Piracy existed before the internet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117431)

If piracy seems down (assuming that all the reduced BitTorrent traffic is piracy) it's either because people have discovered another way, it's being hidden better, or it's simply taking place offline. When I was a kid, and software came on floppy disks, I knew people who shared games, and either copied them if it was possible, or just played and then passed the game to someone else in trade. Kinda puff puff pass back in the olden days.

If someone set up a completely separate network that was not hooked to the internet at all, either using old-style BBS or some other means, how would they detect that?

I wonder how hard it would be to do that...

Nice (1)

Nihn (1863500) | more than 2 years ago | (#40117433)

I like how people can just make up stats for things. I know for a fact people are STILL unhappy with movies and music. But this lie is trying to tell people they need to stop because people around them are stopping. Like passive aggressive peer pressure. And the sad thing is there is a portion of people who actually fell for it. And it also uses nationalism too. Claiming america's enemies are doing it more making it a no no to those who support democracy. Download a shit movie you support terrorism...even tho it's doesn't actually make anyone money or support anything but ones desire to know what they are buying...but still, they say it is, and why would the government or it's agencies ever lie to you?

fai7zors! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40117819)

lo6 on Then the Fuck The Baby

You mean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40118233)

People will actually pay for things if you give them cheap and easy legal alternatives just like they said they would? SHOCKER!

So how about you put all your shit on Netflix and Hulu then you get money and people watch it legally instead of pirating it, studios? We're getting there, but not nearly close enough.

even more drastic (2)

slashmydots (2189826) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118505)

If you consider that average bittorent files have gotten larger due to faster encoding computers, faster upload speeds, cheaper large storage, etc then it's even more drastic of a drop off.

Horse shit. (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 2 years ago | (#40118743)

Horse shit.

The decrease (if there really is one) is more then likely a result of ISPs hopping between the sheets with the MPAA and RIAA--ISPs are now an enforcement arm of those groups in that the ISPs are now sending threatening emails to those that have downloaded torrents that were tracked. They simply threaten to disconnect you (yes, I've received one, and yes, I ignored it).

Comcast used to simply limit P2P downloads (throttling caps). Now they throw a steady stream of reset packets in there during prime time.

So, the headline should read "ISP and Recording Industry Extortion Tactics Successful".

I wish just ONE industry leader would ask ME how all of their gyrations have effected me and my spending habits (really simple answer--I stopped buying games and music altogether. I play old games now, and I make my own music or listen to local performers).

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?