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Hundreds of IP Addresses Make Pirate Bay a Hard Target

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the fleeting-contact-on-the-sonar dept.

Piracy 224

jones_supa writes "Last week The Pirate Bay added a new IP address which allows users to circumvent the many court-ordered blockades against the site. While this proved to be quite effective, the Hollywood backed anti-piracy group BREIN has already been to court to demand a block against this new address. But that won't deter The Pirate Bay, who say they are fully prepared for an extended game of whac-a-mole using the hundreds of IP addresses they have available. Courts all around the world have ordered Internet providers to block subscriber access to the torrent site, and the end is still not in sight."

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oblig. leia (5, Funny)

niftydude (1745144) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141571)

The more you tighten your grip, Tarkin, the more star systems will slip through your fingers.

Re:oblig. leia (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141577)

Although true, Star Wars sucks. Get a new quote.

Re:oblig. leia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141595)

Leave. Now.

Re:oblig. leia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141675)

Leave for not liking Star Wars? That's a bit harsh. I'm not a fan either.

Re:oblig. leia (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141781)

It's not a question of substance, it's a question of style -- you can't just walk in and say Star Wars sucks, you have to pose your opinion of it as a quote or reference from some other SF/F/other geek-friendly-genre work. For example, dissing Star Wars in Klingon would have gotten him applause.

Re:oblig. leia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141913)

For example, dissing Star Wars in Klingon would have gotten him applause.

Gesundheit.

Re:oblig. leia (3)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141991)

That's German, not Klingon.

Re:oblig. leia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142025)

Woosh: http://translate.google.com/#en [google.com] |de|woosh

Re:oblig. leia (1)

dontclapthrowmoney (1534613) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141631)

With Sheldon and the bird (apparently a Blue Jay) at an impasse, Raj (Kunal Nayyar) and Howard (Simon Helberg) are stuck impatiently waiting so they can all watch Star Wars on Blu-Ray.

Howard: “If we don’t start soon, George Lucas is going to change it again.”

http://thevoiceoftv.com/recaps-and-reviews/the-big-bang-theory-5-09-the-ornithophobia-diffusion/ [thevoiceoftv.com]

Re:oblig. leia (1, Insightful)

Yaotzin (827566) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142697)

Howard: "Hey Sheldon, wanna see the new Harry Potter movie?"

The audience chuckles nervously

Sheldon: "No, Harry Potter is for children. I prefer realistic and dramatic films, such as Star Wars."

The audience laughs heartily

Sheldon: "Luke, I am your father!"

The audience begins laughing so hard they burst into flame and their lungs explode. They start pissing themselves from laughter, which fails to put out the flames but makes everything smell like burnt hair and urine. An older gentleman has a heart attack and dies on the floor, burning and covered in piss. The earth trembles below the studio, opening a gaping crack into the underbelly of the earth. Several members of the audience are dragged into the blackness, laughing so hard blood spills from their mouths as they descend into the molten core of the earth, smashing into the rock as they fall. The continued laughter echoes off the rock, causing the largest known earthquake in history, crippling the power grids of several of the world's major cities, plunging humankind into darkness for weeks. Martial law is called into effect as the riots increase in size and aggressiveness. As food begins to run out, haIf of the world's populace is dead, with the survivors now resorting to cannibalism and subsistence farming.

Re:oblig. leia (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141725)

Although true, Star Wars PREQUELSsucks.

There ya go. Fixed that for you. :-p

Re:oblig. leia (-1, Redundant)

westlake (615356) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141645)

The more you tighten your grip, Tarkin, the more star systems will slip through your fingers.

Re:oblig. leia (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141709)

Dang! That what I was just about to post. It is so appropriate for this.

The only thing all this legal action is doing, is making the Pirate Bay that much more popular.

Also this:
For some reason, every time Hermione caught sight of one of these signs she beamed with pleasure.

‘What exactly are you so happy about?’ Harry asked her.

‘Oh, Harry don’t you see?’ Hermione breathed. ‘If she could have done one thing to make absolutely sure that every single person in this school will read your interview, it was banning it!’

Re:oblig. leia (1)

Brucelet (1857158) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141729)

That said, even after blowing up the SOPA death star I'm worried about the Empire striking back.

Re:oblig. leia (1)

davester666 (731373) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142153)

Good thing SOPA 2.0 will ship soon and 3.0 is under construction...

Re:oblig. leia (3, Funny)

idontgno (624372) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142375)

As you can see, my young apprentice, your friends have failed. Now witness the firepower of this fully ARMED and OPERATIONAL IP Law!

--US Senator Palpatine

Re:oblig. leia (4, Funny)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141735)

The more you tighten your grip, Tarkin, the more star systems will slip through your fingers.

Just remind me not to be on Alderaan when he's in the process of figuring that out.

Re:oblig. leia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142257)

Or, while dangerously close to getting on topic, don't be anywhere near thepiratebay, legally speaking, when they find out just what crime one commits when taking deliberate action to obstruct an order issued by a judge.

Generally speaking a judge's ruling is the last peaceful step the state will take "against" you before allowing the plaintiff to seek direct means of enforcement. If you ignore a judge's ruling, you are essentially daring the state to use direct violence against you. There is no form of association or contract that can protect you from this (in other words, your boss orders you to ignore a judge's ruling, and you do it, you go to jail, not (necessarily) your boss) (other than, of course, duress).

The plaintiff can literally ask the police commissioner to come into your house and start shooting at that point, and while that violates the spirit of the law (which still seeks minimum amount of violence necessary in these cases), it does not violate the letter. At this point, the plaintiff has gained the right to get the state's assistance in using violence against you. They can even ask the judge to order violence (usually forcible arrest) against your person. They can forcibly restrain you and throw you in jail for this (this is in fact regularly done, though not generally in copyright cases. In fraud cases, this happens 10 times a day).

Do we really want to force Europe into actually doing that ? Because if you show the justice system in a high-profile manner what morons they are, this is what will happen. The admins of thepiratebay are Euro citizens and will be extradited as soon as the copyright claimants convince a single prosecutor anywhere in Europe to demand it.

This is not legal advice of course. I could be entirely wrong. Furhtermore, want to test the limits of the justice system and accept the risk that it may destroy your life ? Don't let me stop you. But please be aware of what you're risking, especially if you're thinking of helping other people avoid these blocks. And this is (obviously) 100% legal. The legal system does have teeth, and you would be very wise to avoid them.

I wonder if they have IPV6 support (5, Interesting)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141579)

I wonder if they have IPV6 support, unfortunately searches on "the pirate bay" are blocked here at work. If tey do they could add billions of IP addresses!

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141627)

I'd cough up a couple bucks to buy them the 5eed:: block if I knew who to send the money to.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (4, Insightful)

grahamm (8844) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141649)

Buying a whole block would probably not work, as then it would be simple to block the whole block.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (1)

Scootin159 (557129) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141693)

Just curious, how are they blocking your searches? Not that you really want to get into this game with your employer, but couldn't you just run your search at https://www.google.com/ [google.com] instead?

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141799)

Just curious, how are they blocking your searches? Not that you really want to get into this game with your employer, but couldn't you just run your search at https://www.google.com/ [google.com] instead?

They have blocked the https version of google, bing, and some others. I am sure that I could find some search engine but it might attract unwanted attention.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (3, Interesting)

Lord_Alex (710459) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142303)

Everybody thinks using HTTPS within corporate walls means your traffic is encrypted. We control (Via AD) who your trusted root signers are. And if you look at who signed Google.com or paypal.com, it was us. EVERYTHING seems to be signed by the corp key. Also, the web filter appliance sees all the internet in plain text, SSL doesn't matter.

Executing a MITM SSL attack is easy when all the PCs trust your signing key.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (4, Informative)

SirDice (1548907) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141697)

http://thepiratebay.se.ipv6.sixxs.org/ [sixxs.org] Not blocked via DNS nor via IPv6. None of the injuctions seem to cover IPv6. I'm actually wondering if BREIN knows IPv6 exists.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141829)

Oops! Google Chrome could not find thepiratebay.se.ipv6.sixxs.org

C:\Users\Mike>tracert thepiratebay.se.ipv6.sixxs.org
Unable to resolve target system name thepiratebay.se.ipv6.sixxs.org.

???

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141859)

Your ISP doesn't offer ipv6 support yet.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (3, Informative)

SirDice (1548907) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141861)

It obviously only works if you are running IPv6.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (2)

Inda (580031) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141843)

This is the first time ever I've been able to view TPB from work (without resorting to that long and drawn out process of removing my phone from my pocket).

I now have nine URLs for TPB, up from the single one I had a few weeks back. Thanks Virgin Media. Thanks BREIN. Thanks for court orders. Thanks.

Fits and giggles all round.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (5, Insightful)

FridayBob (619244) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141887)

I wonder if they have IPV6 support, unfortunately searches on "the pirate bay" are blocked here at work. If tey do they could add billions of IP addresses!

That was my thought as well. Keep in mind that IPv6 addresses are often allocated in /64 and /48 subnets, so it's possible that's how the anti-piracy groups will be seeking to block them. Still, even if they attempt to block by the /48, that still leaves thousands of billions of these address ranges in which to hide. But, even with IPv4 it sounds like the TPB has address space to burn.

It's stupid, really. IMO, all that's necessary to end this ridiculous cat and mouse game is for the entertainment industry to offer streaming services to the masses at reasonable prices (per movie/show/series/episode/album/song) and all this bad behavior will be unnecessary on both sides.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142253)

all that's necessary to end this ridiculous cat and mouse game is for the entertainment industry to offer streaming services to the masses

Quite true, quite true. I stopped pirating music when Amazon MP3 came around: Download plain and simple well-tagged MP3 files. That's a technology I'm willing to live with for my music.

Don't they have something like that for video (music, tv series, tv shows, sporting events, movies) yet? It's been a while I haven't been looking. Propose me a $5 movie where I can download a 1080p MKV properly subtitled with multiple audio tracks and I'm in. Ah yes, I need to grab it in less than two hours on my DSL line and I'll keep it until I've watched it. Anything else is less than what I have today so there is no need to bother.

Re:I wonder if they have IPV6 support (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142579)

Lol, lets just block all IPv6, there is no legitimate service that cannot also be accessed by IPv4!

Poisoned forever? (5, Interesting)

weave (48069) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141583)

So Pirate Bay goes around and getting new IPs and I assume releasing the old ones. Then what? Imagine getting a new netblock for your own stuff and finding out it used to be a PB IP. How do you go about getting that unblocked all around the world.

Re:Poisoned forever? (4, Interesting)

dontclapthrowmoney (1534613) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141601)

That'd make for some interesting firewall logs. Also, from TFS:

an extended game of whac-a-mole using the hundreds of IP addresses they have available

I also would have expected that it wouldn't be that hard for the courts to find out what IPs TPB already own, so they can block them proactively?

Re:Poisoned forever? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141651)

Perhaps people should buy IPs and donate them?

Re:Poisoned forever? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141669)

I also would have expected that it wouldn't be that hard for the courts to find out what IPs TPB already own, so they can block them proactively?

Start using the IP addresses of politicians' websites as claimed alternate IP addresses, see if you can get the court to order the blocking of people who will not take that sort of thing lying down. (Yes, it would cut multiple ways at once but the shitstorm would be funny.)

Re:Poisoned forever? (2)

CodeHxr (2471822) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142709)

No... the shitstorm would be epic. Even better, they could claim they're using RIAA and MPAA IP addresses and get those guys to block themselves. Reminds me of the first Hackers movie...

Re:Poisoned forever? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141721)

I also would have expected that it wouldn't be that hard for the courts to find out what IPs TPB already own, so they can block them proactively?

Even if they don't have anything considered illegal* on those IPs?

* not that they have anything really illegal on the other IPs, not unless you consider what Google does illegal too.

Re:Poisoned forever? (1)

dontclapthrowmoney (1534613) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141877)

I also would have expected that it wouldn't be that hard for the courts to find out what IPs TPB already own, so they can block them proactively?

Even if they don't have anything considered illegal* on those IPs?

* not that they have anything really illegal on the other IPs, not unless you consider what Google does illegal too.

I don't think the courts care much any more about what is/is not illegal.

Re:Poisoned forever? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142067)

Who said anything about TPB owning these IP's exactly? You really think people aren't offering up available IP's either for temporary, or extended use?

Re:Poisoned forever? (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142231)

I also would have expected that it wouldn't be that hard for the courts to find out what IPs TPB already own, so they can block them proactively?

It will be impossible. TPB is a foreign web site, the identity of all the operators is unknown and they can easily buy IP addresses anonymously or through third parties.

Re:Poisoned forever? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141629)

You don't. We switch to IPv6 and then there's enough addresses that nobody cares anymore.

Re:Poisoned forever? (4, Interesting)

mepperpint (790350) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141687)

I would think the IP addresses would be useless forever. It would likely take way more effort than it is worth to get them unblocked. Even if the court lifted the block, it would be hard to guarantee that they had been unblocked by every ISP out there. If this goes into overdrive, we might have a new compelling reason to switch to IPv6 as larger and larger swaths of IPv4 addresses become dead.

Re:Poisoned forever? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141739)

This is partially one of the points they are making in the long run.

Whacking out every IP still won't prevent people from getting to the site.
All it is going to do is annoy people in however many years time who got a blacklisted IP for other business.

The longer we have actual retards in control, as well as the ignorant, this won't end.

Re:Poisoned forever? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141875)

The longer we have actual retards in control, as well as the ignorant, this won't end.

Goes a long way to understanding the statement "this is the way it's always been, this is they way it will always be". Retards are always in control. Smart people have better things to do.

Re:Poisoned forever? (4, Interesting)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141745)

The last place I worked had an issue like this. We switched ISPs and found that two of the four new IPs assigned to us were blocked by a number of other ISPs and services for spamming. That took a few weeks to get it mostly straightened out, although we were still on some block lists six months later when I left. A friend of mine found that his newly registered domain name was blocked by a lot of places for spam as well, seems the previous owner of the domain may have been Russian...

Meet the Internet (4, Interesting)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141623)

The Internet is not just some fancy cable TV system; websites are not channels, "access devices" (read: personal computers) are not "view only," and BitTorrent is not some service that can be shut down. Millions of people want to share and download their entertainment; I would guess that they outnumber the people running the various businesses that are still struggling to adapt to this "new" technology. How about instead of fighting a battle that can never be won, we tell the copyright industry that they need to adapt or die?

Re:Meet the Internet (1)

kaizokuace (1082079) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141767)

telling the industry to adapt or die is futile. They don't give two shits about what we think they should do. The part you say about the Internet as not "view only" is pretty interesting though. Or at least puts into words something I had in my mind. The reason the industry does not seem to be getting it is because of fundamental misunderstandings of the very nature of the Internet not just being two-way but N-way connections.

Re:Meet the Internet (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141901)

They don't give two shits about what we think they should do.

Conversely, we don't give a damn about what they think we should do, either. And we still haven't gotten to the point where small groups of people get together and rent PC's that are connected to the internet in other countries, and access "blocked" sites from there over encrypted connections. Not on a wide scale, anyway.

For rent, one slightly used 3rd world WAN.

Re:Meet the Internet (0)

jdgeorge (18767) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141945)

If the content creators don't fight against people (illegally) making free copies of their pictures, books, movies, art, video games, etc, then there will be very little financial incentive to create the content we enjoy because nearly everyone will just copy stuff for free.

Perhaps what people on Slashdot don't realize is that this "I want it for free, so your rights as a content create" approach won't mean that new content doesn't get made; its just that the only movies (and books, etc) you'll get will be produced in India, China, and other places with extremely cheap labor.

You may dismiss this as fantasy created by the "copyright industry", but you'll wonder what happened when every new movie you see has a Hindi song and dance number at crucial plot points.

Re:Meet the Internet (4, Interesting)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142041)

there will be very little financial incentive to create the content we enjoy

for over a decade now, there hasn't been much on tv or movies worth watching.

'content we enjoy' is now shifting. I get my 'content' via typing and reading what's online. the story lines on modern movies and tv really suck, the acting sucks, the commercials deter from the whole thing and I mostly lost interest in mainstream 'entertainment'.

it would not bother me one tiny bit if ALL the major studios went out of business. same with record labels.

I would not lose one bit of sleep or feel at all like we've lost anything valuable.

maybe I'm just getting too old for tv and movies; but it lost all its magic, like I said, about a decade or so ago. now, its a total waste of time and an insult to my intellect every time I try to watch anything current.

hours spent on the one-way tube seem wasted, to me. hours spent ENGAGING people online via conversations seem much more stimulating and interesting to me.

old one-way media is a has-been and I expect it to fade as other people get disillusioned, like I did.

let the studios rot and fade away. good riddence! seriously. other stuff will fill the void.

Re:Meet the Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142189)

Many of the greatest paintings and works of literature of all time were created when there was very little or no incentive to create them. To a large degree, I welcome a return to the time when art was made because people had something they truly wanted to share, and not the mass marketed lowest common denominator crap we have today.

Not to mention that as always live performances always are a way for a talented group of artists to make money without copyright. There is no way to pirate attending a concert or a play - video recordings just aren't the same thing (its about like comparing getting laid to watching a porno - just not the same thing).

Too many people assume that the IP (imaginary property) approach to ideas is the only way things could possibly work, and that simply is not the case.

Re:Meet the Internet (1)

ycv (323823) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142439)

So, the old way of creating content and get a financial reward will disappear. Is it a great loss ? I am not sure as the end result that we are getting at this moment is not very satisfying. Most artists don't get a fair share for their creation while a few are overly rewarded. And I'm not even mentioning the "copyright industry".

I am sure that the will to create is so strong that people will find new way to get paid for their creation. And we can hope that the money will be more evenly distributed and that more people will be able to create content. That's the way it goes in a free market, the same that is so much praised in the content produced by the entertainment industry

Re:Meet the Internet (1)

hazah (807503) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142497)

What planet are you from?

Re:Meet the Internet (1)

WillDraven (760005) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142181)

Depends on what you mean by die. I bet they might care when the people who they've financially ruined for life with outrageous fines borrow their uncles rifle and go CEO hunting.

Disclaimer: I'm not condoning this, but when people get pushed into a corner (or off a cliff) revenge can become more important than legal victory.

Re:Meet the Internet (1)

dmbasso (1052166) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142055)

We already said that, and they replied "fuck you".

Re:Meet the Internet (4, Insightful)

lexsird (1208192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142059)

Now that would be entirely too logical. But while we have whore politicians who will dance for whatever jackass pays them the most, they will make laws that burn us. We are to blame partially. We don't hold politicians accountable for their betrayals. They should be terrified to cross us. They should ponder that big fat bribe as a death sentence. We also need to get rid of legal bribery, the whole process of lobbyists needs run down and beat out of our system with extreme prejudice.

When you look at this issue it's just systematic of larger issues that plague us. Until we the people get back our government from big money, they will continue to bend us over and jam whatever they wish up there. It's problematic, because asking the current power holders in government to fix this is like asking the fox to fix the hen house.

Here is something to consider, they could tap into this and make money instead of whining about it. They are missing out on fortunes by not adapting to the times and technology. So it makes me wonder, are they just damn stupid or are they just an excuse to try to clamp down on the Internet by the powers that be because they are frightened of it? It's probably both, come to think about it.

Politicians didn't give a rat's fat ass about this until the "Arab Spring" that materialized out of Internet social networks. Then factor how the London riots were guided by the tech as well, and you get paranoid "powers that be" that are afraid we will collectively snap out of this dream world they have fabricated for us and come howling in one giant unstoppable mob for their heads on sticks. OWS was looking scary to them, and if the media didn't get on it's job of either completely ignoring it and covering it up or smearing it into oblivion, they were going to have to do something drastic to avoid mass revolution via the Internet.

But thankfully for them, the movement has been contained. The American public has proven apathetic to it's citizens exercising Constitutional rights being beat down and gassed by thug military forces aka the police. OWS members have been successfully painted as filthy dirty hippies instead of modern patriots, they are now on the proper watch lists and the steam is out of the movement.

They can now go back to letting the Internet function and use it to spy on us via social networks. They get to have their cake and eat it too.

That explains volumes, no? It's not hard to impress upon dolts in office who can't set up their own email with scary stories of "cyber criminals, terrorists and warfare". Lion, tigers, and bears! OH MY! For the children!!! Release the Kraken!

Silly rabbit, Tricks are for kids! It's all about control, the entertainment industry are just retards who pay the bribes to get them to do what they want to do to begin with and to have an excuse. It's incumbent upon us now to fight back and shove it all up their asses.

Re:Meet the Internet (1)

sribe (304414) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142399)

I would guess that they outnumber the people running the various businesses...

By 3-6 orders of magnitude!

They should set the IP to 127.0.0.1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141661)

Nobody will ever successfully block that one. It'll be brilliant.

Host Pirate Bay on shared hosting (1)

NuclearCat (899738) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141703)

Probably if IP address will be shared with other resources (who are not related at all to Pirate Bay), it will be illegal to block the IP. Let's see what they will do with that. In case they block by IP, resource are free to sue ISP who blocked ip - for damages.

Re:Host Pirate Bay on shared hosting (1)

niks42 (768188) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141785)

Did such an arrangement save MegaUpload? I think not, baby puppy.

Re:Host Pirate Bay on shared hosting (3, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141803)

Probably if IP address will be shared with other resources (who are not related at all to Pirate Bay), it will be illegal to block the IP.

Why would you think that would make it illegal to block the IP? I'm not aware of any laws that say "You can only block an IP address if it ONLY hosts illegal material." In fact, quite a few raids have been made against servers that also hosted legitimate content (MegaUpload, for example).

Re:Host Pirate Bay on shared hosting (1)

NuclearCat (899738) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141915)

Megaupload had _dedicated_ servers. And for sure their ip's was not shared.

Re:Host Pirate Bay on shared hosting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141893)

Wrong. Besides a real service wouldn't share an IP. Seriously if you cannot afford $20/mo (or less) for a server with its own dedicated IP who are you going to sue? Are you going to sue for the lost 3 visitors from your blog while it was down? Do you think amazon paid "damaged" to all the companies who were down when their datacenter was out? The most you can hope for is reimbursed for downtime from your bill. Try suing your cell phone provider for "damages" because it didn't work and you lost out big on some deal. It won't fly.

Oh, joy. (5, Insightful)

perrin (891) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141713)

IP addresses tend to change hands. The "bad guys" get new IP addresses, while some innocent bystanders gets the old, tainted ones. It is hard enough to get an IP address off a vigilante style blacklist, but how bloody hard would it not be to get it off a court ordered IP block? The block would likely be in a different country altogether, or perhaps several countries at once.

They are really starting to mess hard with the core structure of the internet. But of course, these big cartels do not care. They get their slightly higher profits, and as usual someone else gets to sort out the mess later on.

Re:Oh, joy. (1)

davegravy (1019182) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142187)

If some legitimate service launches on a blocked IP and makes fantastic profits within the few countries that aren't blocking that IP, would there be a case for a massive lawsuit due to lost profits? IANAL.

Re:Oh, joy. (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142199)

They are really starting to mess hard with the core structure of the internet.

The technique of scorched earth [wikipedia.org] could prove useful too. Let the MAFIAA and their judicial arms around the world destroy the internet structure until it starts to hurt other megacorps with deeper pockets than the MAFIAA's.

Of course, that's merely theoretical: the IP addresses allocated to TPB's providers are but a tiny subset of the IPv4 address space. Even if they blocked all the them, the rest of the Internet wouldn't notice.

Re:Oh, joy. (0)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142225)

They are really starting to mess hard with the core structure of the internet. But of course, these pirates do not care. They get their thrills, and as usual someone else gets to sort out the mess later on.

There, fixed that for you.
 
Seriously, Slashdot forgets that it's the pirates that are legally in the wrong.

Re:Oh, joy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142369)

What law is TPB breaking?

Re:Oh, joy. (1)

hazah (807503) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142615)

If the law does not represent the people, it isn't for the people.

Re:Oh, joy. (1)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142283)

You forgot the most important point: All the shit they're moving doesn't bring them a dime in return, at the contrary! All that publicity for TPB make them more and more popular.

An example (3, Insightful)

wbr1 (2538558) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141717)

I will take a heavily pirated piece of software as an example here.
I love Photoshop. I know it well, and can do things in it far easier than I can in GIMP, largely because of experience, but I do not have the time to invest to learn GIMP well.
If I want to make a quick button for me website, or clean up a photo, or make a nice card from my girlfriend, it is the tool I go to.
I am not well off.
Graphic design is -not- my career, therefore I really only have need to use Photoshop once a month or less.
I am not going to pay $700 or more for software that I only use 6 or 8 times a year. That equates to about $100 per project/use.
If I could somehow rent it for less. Say, $25 for a week, then I would be more willing to pay for it.
Of course, adobe now has their creative cloud, which if you sign up for a whole year is $50 a month. For a single month it is $75.
However, I do not need the whole month when I have a project I want to complete. I may need 2 days to a week, so that $75 still feels an unfair price, and untenable on my budget.

Ergo, pirating as solution.

That is one scenario for pirating out of thousands. But the bottom line is, as long as people have things they desire--music, movies, software, designer clothing, etc--that are out of reach to them because of the price or the pathetic way in which it is delivered, there will always be some sort of black market. Some sort of theft, because there will always be people who see the reward as greater than the risk.

Re:An example (2)

BlackPignouf (1017012) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141763)

You could try to send this mail to Adobe and explain your situation.
You'll probably get some "student" discount.

Re:An example (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141789)

Not exactly what you're looking for, but there is a subscription model for Photoshop - $50/mo. Not sure how well it handles a month here and a month there rather than a continuous subscription.

http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshopextended/buying-guide.html [adobe.com]

Re:An example (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141795)

Misread the latter half of your post and didn't realize I was repeating what you said. But the subscription model is still a step in the right direction for these high-price software packages that some users don't need often.

Re:An example (1)

Svartalf (2997) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142385)

Subscription for $50/month... Heh...might as well BUY it for that because you'll be in the ballpark in 1-2 years' time. It's not a step in the right direction. A step in the right direction would be $5/10 per month.

Re:An example (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142635)

As suggested in my previous post, I don't know how well their model works for people that only want a month here and there as opposed to continuous subscription service. I would only need Photoshop perhaps three months out of the year, in which case it would be almost 5 years before subscription became more expensive than outright purchasing a license.

Re:An example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142443)

So you suggest that instead of paying $700 once for photoshop, he pay $600 per year. Yes, that price requires paying up front for the year.

Like him, I'll stick to pirating until the cost goes down into the less than a fancy date per use range.

Re:An example (2)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141797)

The GIMP. stop whining and download and use it. You have a free option that is perfectly usable for your needs.

Re:An example (0)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141855)

He explained that: Once someone has learned on a particular product, it is a non-trivial task to learn to use an equivilent alternative. Why do you think so many companies offer dirt-cheap student licences and heavily promote their software in education?

Re:An example (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141975)

No, he used that as a lame excuse to pirate software. Is he challenged and is not able to learn something? He has time to do so.

Lazy is not a valid reason.

I also believe that it's not valid to pirate something that a free app can do the job just fine.

Re:An example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142251)

At this point you could call this the Free Software Fallacy. It's a question of what you think your time is worth. My mom has all the time in the world to learn to use Linux, thus freeing herself from the oppressive yoke of whatever the fuck, but she has other things she'd rather be doing with her time. OP would like work on his project, not spend hours learning to use a piece of shitware just so he can make a button. There's also the obvious stigma of having an icon somewhere on your computer that links to something called "the GIMP."

His point is a microcosm of the software piracy argument. If I can download Photoshop with zero risk in less time than it would take me to download and learn to use GIMP, I'm going to do it every time. Does the creator lose anything if I only need to use it a few times a year, and otherwise never would have bought it anyway? No. Implement the ability to buy a two day pass for 10 bucks, and Adobe would make approximately 12 hojillion dollars, and we'd no longer have an excuse to pirate software that we clearly love.

Re:An example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141869)

Pirating Photoshop is just as free and has the UI he already knows.

Re:An example (1)

txgunslinger (932679) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142241)

I miss GimpShop

Re:An example (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141847)

I love Photoshop. I know it well, and can do things in it far easier than I can in GIMP, largely because of experience, but I do not have the time to invest to learn GIMP well.

If I want to make a quick button for me website, or clean up a photo, or make a nice card from my girlfriend, it is the tool I go to.

Dude, if you have time to make yourself nice cards from your imaginary girlfriend, you have enough time to learn GIMP.

Helm Car Service Manuals (1)

trout007 (975317) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142027)

Helm has just such a service for car service manuals that I've used many times in the past. They have a 1 year ($350) , 1 month ($50) , or 3 day ($10) subscription. So if you are working on your car and want all of the up to date information for troubleshooting a problem you can get the 3 day subscription and have access to everything the dealer does including service bulletins and warranty repairs. I used to go try to find a .pdf manual for my car and download it but I'm fine paying $10 to have all of the up to date information.

http://www.helminc.com/helm/Result.asp?Style=helm&Mfg=AHM&Make=AHM&Model=ACRD&Year=2006&selected_media=ES&st=S [helminc.com]

Re:An example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40142191)

You can buy photoshop elements for £60 that can do everything you need to do if you are not in a graphic design career.

i wonder what mirroring TPB would accomplish (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141757)

Of course, if only a handful did it, the lawyer goons would stamp you out mercilessly and put you in something as close to debtors prison as currently legally possible.

But you could also have an "I am Spartacus" moment:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8h_v_our_Q [youtube.com]

Anyone remember this 5 years ago?:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AACS_encryption_key_controversy [wikipedia.org]

The controversy was further escalated in early May 2007, when aggregate news site Digg received a DMCA cease and desist notice and then removed numerous articles on the matter and banned users reposting the information.[7] This sparked what some describe as a digital revolt[8] or "cyber-riot",[9] in which users posted and spread the key on Digg, and throughout the Internet en masse, thereby leading to the Streisand effect. The AACS LA described this situation as an "interesting new twist".[10]

At first, websites and individuals were bullied into censoring the hex number. But as the outrage grew, a trickle turned into a torrent, and the bullying tactics were turned into a joke: their bullying dynamic turned against them.

I'm wondering if the same dynamic could apply to mirroring TPB?

That is, we aren't talking about something as simple as a hex number, but if the issue can be framed as a simple webpage to cut and paste, or I don't know, a bit of javascript, something that can easily be encapsulated, something simple and small that people can easily cut and paste all over the web, in revolt, then we have the making for the same PR failure dynamic as the HD-DVD hex number.

Their own menace on our freedoms can be harnessed to turn public outrage against bullying tactics into a final verdict in the court of public opinion on these IP law douchebags.

Anyway, just a tactic that might be worth considering, in some form or another.

Re:i wonder what mirroring TPB would accomplish (1)

EdgePenguin (2646733) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141961)

Its already been done - by amongst others, the UK Pirate Party:

https://tpb.pirateparty.org.uk/

Now, they could in theory demand that domain by shut down, but taking legal action against a registered political party will mostly serve to give the PPUK the national publicity they lack at the moment.

Useless anyways.... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141783)

TPB has a torrent of their entire database that is updated every 8 hours. All it takes is one person to release it elsewhere for TPB list of magnet links to get out to those being oppressed.

How I avoid infringement notices... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141813)

I like TPB but the super easy way that studios are able to subpoena a face behind an IP just makes me stop stop using it. You can use a proxy but you end up with slower downloads. I decided to go back to trusted, tried and true friend usenet! It uses SSL (so my provider doesn't know what I'm downloading) and it's faster than torrenting anyway. easynews.com will do all of this for about 10.00 a month. Save the torrenting for Linux images kids!

Re:How I avoid infringement notices... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141943)

I like TPB but the super easy way that studios are able to subpoena a face behind an IP just makes me stop stop using it. You can use a proxy but you end up with slower downloads.
I decided to go back to trusted, tried and true friend usenet! It uses SSL (so my provider doesn't know what I'm downloading) and it's faster than torrenting anyway. easynews.com will do all of this for about 10.00 a month. Save the torrenting for Linux images kids!

Not quite $10.00 but I have a VPS in an eastern european country with fast pipes that I use to download my stuff from.

My only connection to the box is via SFTP & SSH.

I'm paying close to $50/ month but that's because I wanted more disk space to store my downloads/ seeds before I had a chance to suck them down to my machine.

Re:How I avoid infringement notices... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40141997)

It uses SSL (so my provider doesn't know what I'm downloading)

You should go and google "SSL inspection"...

Geez. (5, Informative)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141897)

Wait until they find out that TPB is only one of many torrent sites.

.onion, .bit .i2p (1)

gellenburg (61212) | more than 2 years ago | (#40141903)

Does The Pirate Bay have any accessible proxies via TOR (.onion), NameCoin (.bit), or the Invisible Internet Project (.i2p)?

I'd like to see the MAFIAA try to shut those down.

Of course, .bit wouldn't help for blocking an IP address but .onion and .i2p addresses certainly would.

I don't respect their Double Standards... (3, Insightful)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142057)

In the Beta Max case, Universal sued Sony [wikipedia.org] because their video device could record TV, and dual decks could dub copyrighted video tapes. The court found that, regardless of the primary use case, the devices were legal because of the mere POSSIBILITY that they could be used in non-infringing ways.

Now... That was a court in the USA, and the US is not the world... TPB isn't blocked via my US ISP, either. However, it's primarily US corps petitioning the US government to make treaties that push US laws into foreign lands with only all of the bad, and none of the beneficial parts going with them.

I download lots of legitimate stuff using torrents from The Pirate Bay (my OS, Project Gutenberg works, Revision3 shows, etc), I wonder how many people pressed the record button on their VHS and Beta decks while watching TV? I mean... The things had whole menu systems with multiple timers and some could even record one show while you watched another. Point is, copying information is the basis of life, it's not going away any time soon.

I fear the end result will just be raised ISP bills, just like the blank CD & DVD tax. My whole life I've tried to play by the book. I didn't make mix tapes, I didn't dub rented videos, I didn't rip & burn CDs or DVDs of copyrighted content... I created my own content and backups to store on these, but I paid the infringer's tax the whole time -- for my whole damn life. Screw these entitled media bastards. It's enough to make me want to cancel Netflix (which I just did, after I read this article), and not fund the big media in any way possible.

I have kept full regular backups of my entire life's worth of content, photos, slides, etc on multiple media formats... I calculated that I've paid over US$5,000 in "pirate taxes" just over the existing media I still have on hand. The idea was that such tax would pay for any possible infringing I might do. The money I've already paid to cross the trolls under the digital bridge would more than pay for my media entertainment expenses for the next five years, at least... That's why I cancelled Netflix. I'm not paying them another red cent, I'll import my blank media if I have to.

All that time NOT infringing any of their content while paying a "pirate fee" for all my blank media?! I can see how some people would just say, "Screw it, if I'm going to do the time, I might as well do the crime." Petitioning our "representatives" isn't working either, because $$$ = speech. Well, screw it I say. You know what happened last time there was a bunch of taxation without representation and or mock trials that unjustly rule in favour of the corrupt establishment? Well, then you can guess what happens next. This is going to get a lot worse before it gets better.

Re:I don't respect their Double Standards... (2)

sribe (304414) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142471)

The court found that, regardless of the primary use case, the devices were legal because of the mere POSSIBILITY that they could be used in non-infringing ways.

No, they found that the primary use was non-infringing--that "time shifting" TV shows was fair use.

You may be thinking of an earlier case, involving publishers vs Xerox. But even there, it wasn't "the mere possibility" of non-infringing use, it was that there were substantial non-infringing uses. And this is what killed Napster--although there were non-infringing uses, they were minor, and the primary use was infringement on a massive scale.

By looking at what it was like (-1, Offtopic)

beats571 (2650175) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142293)

Cheap Beats By Dre [discount-b...ydrdre.com] By looking at what it was like, what happened, and what it is like nowBy Dre [discount-b...ydrdre.com] .

Not sure to what I'm referring (-1, Offtopic)

beats571 (2650175) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142355)

Dr Dre Beats [discount-b...ydrdre.com] Have I hit your too good to be true button? If so, then know you're in good company. In fact, if you read what experts say about Asperger's and at the same time, pay close attention to what they disagree about the most, you'd find this question; will my child ever be normal, underlies much of what they argue about By Dre [discount-b...ydrdre.com] .

Consider... (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#40142421)

Let me begin by saying that this post is *NOT* a deliberate troll.

Although I recognize that it might sound like one. It is actually a sincere question. I'm not taking sides here, I am simply trying to project what I think might potentially happen as a result of things like this. I am prefacing my comment with this disclaimer, because the one other time I pointed out what I am going to say below on slashdot, I ended up getting flagged at -1 troll within about 15 minutes or so of my post, from which I can only infer that people were not understanding my meaning, since I'm was not making the point to start an argument, rather because I wanted (and still want) people to think about the possible repercussions.

So with that disclaimer out of the way, does anyone think that it is possible that prolonged disputes like these might actually end up slowing the widespread adoption of IPv6? With IPv4, the number of potential addresses to have to block to effectively blacklist a site that the recognized powers have deemed offensive is substantially smaller than it could be with IPv6. Even though there may be many v4 IP's available right now, that number is still shrinking daily, and cannot possibly last more than a few more years. With a full-scale move to IPv6, even *hoping* to block an organization by IP would be completely impossible on any sort of time scale that humans could identify with, so would the organizations that are trying to shut off places like the pirate bay be lobbying to try to slow (or even halt) the adoption of IPv6, so that what they are trying to do here doesn't end up becoming completely unworkable? Why? Or why not?

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