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The Real-Life Doogie Howser

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the boy-wonder dept.

Education 303

An anonymous reader writes "Sho Yano this week will become the youngest student to get an M.D. from University of Chicago. He was reading at age 2, writing by 3, and composing music by his 5th birthday. He graduated from Loyola University in three years — summa cum laude, no less. When he entered U. of C.'s prestigious Pritzker School of Medicine at 12, it was into one of the school's most rigorous programs, where students get both their doctorate and medical degrees. Intelligence is not Yano's only gift — though according to a test he took at age 4, his IQ is too high to accurately measure and is easily above genius level. He is an accomplished pianist who has performed at Ravinia, and he has a black belt in tae kwon do. Classmates and faculty described him as 'sweet' and 'humble,' a hardworking, Bach-adoring, Greek literature-quoting student. And in his own words, 'I may not be the most outgoing person, but I do like to be around people.'"

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Does he wear (0)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209427)

Nike Air Revolutions?

Re:Does he wear (2, Funny)

Mike Hock (249988) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209649)

Better Question... does he use Linux... or even better, Does he blend?

Stuoid people (3, Funny)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209447)

>Despite his gifts, success was not guaranteed. Several medical schools wanted no part of him because of maturity questions. Even at Pritzker, some faculty members worried they would be robbing him of a normal adolescence. On a college campus, he was a natural target for wisecracks. Some asked harsh questions about whether his mother was pushing him somewhere he didn't belong.

Now Imagine if he had mutant powers...

Re:Stuoid people (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209621)

now imagine if he was rolled into real science, like physics or maths.

Re:Stuoid people (2)

Squiddie (1942230) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209967)

I would say that those are real concerns. Seems like they were unfounded in this case. Good for the lad, I'm glad for him.

Re:Stuoid people (2)

CrowdedBrainzzzsand9 (2000224) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210191)

Obviously the young fellow won't be a /. reader. For example, I can never remember if my PW is abc123 or 123abc.

Re:Stupid people (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40210209)

Some asked harsh questions about whether his mother was pushing him somewhere he didn't belong.

That Tiger Mom can push as hard as she wants. There is simply no way Mark Zuckerberg is going to marry a dude!

IQ? (0)

dave420 (699308) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209465)

I do wish people would stop using that as some sort of gauge of intelligence - it has very little to do with intelligence, and just modernity.

Re:IQ? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209495)

[citation needed]

Re:IQ? (5, Informative)

umrguy76 (114837) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209629)

I do wish people would stop using that as some sort of gauge of intelligence - it has very little to do with intelligence, and just modernity.

[citation needed]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iq#Criticism_and_views [wikipedia.org]

Re:IQ? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209763)

I'm familiar with some of those criticisms. Stephen Jay Gould is perhaps one of the most prominent ones. Unfortunately Gould himself has been discredited when it was recently (1-2 years ago IIRC) that he was basically making up stuff in "Mismeasure".

Some of the other people think that 'g' is too restrictive of a measurement and misses out on some other aspects of cognition. While I agree to some extent that there is more to us than just mere g, g itself (as proxied by IQ scores) has been shown to be an extremely reliable predictor of success and personal outcomes in life. So far, I've seen no real substantive rebuttal to that.

Re:IQ? (4, Insightful)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209929)

I do wish people would stop using that as some sort of gauge of intelligence - it has very little to do with intelligence, and just modernity.

[citation needed]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iq#Criticism_and_views [wikipedia.org]

Now that's just plain funny...

Re:IQ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209507)

Someone is crying because he couldn't get into MENSA? Dude EVERYONE gets into MENSA... er except you.

Re:IQ? (2)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209653)

Someone is crying because he couldn't get into MENSA? Dude EVERYONE gets into MENSA... er except you.

My cat got into Mensa

Re:IQ? (2)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209521)

True it isn't the best but there is a rather nice coordination between smart people and higher IQs.

Re:IQ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209577)

And correlation too!

Re:IQ? (4, Funny)

Tanktalus (794810) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209623)

Please excuse jgtg32a, he didn't get into MENSA, either.

:-)

Re:IQ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209609)

Unless you were making some kind of obscure pun, I believe the word you were looking for is 'correlation' not 'coordination'....

Re:IQ? (1)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209795)

You can come up with basically any test and intelligent people will get high scores on it. Intelligence means general problem-solving skills, and intelligent paople will perform better than average under any conditions. The problem with IQ is not that it gives low scores to intelligent people, but that it has a large number of false positives, and that is basically unreliable in accurately measuring average people.

Re:IQ? (5, Informative)

Lev13than (581686) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209573)

I do wish people would stop using that as some sort of gauge of intelligence - it has very little to do with intelligence, and just modernity.

Sure, but the only thing worse than an IQ test is every other form of intelligence measure. Claiming that the test has issues (it does) should not be used to divert attention from the fact that some people are very smart while others are mind-bogglingly stupid.

It's like saying that thermometers suck because they don't account for wind chill, humidex, UV exposure or different peoples' metabolism. You may be correct, but I'm still going to check the temperature before going outside.

Re:IQ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209709)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_multiple_intelligences

Some of us don't actually believe that's why the IQ test is bad.

I don't think there are stupid people. Just people who are smart in different ways, and I don't think I'm the only one. And thermometers do suck when you're trying to gauge everything about the outside but only choose one measurement. You'll get that measurement, for better or worse.

Re:IQ? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209743)

I don't think there are stupid people. Just people who are smart in different ways, and I don't think I'm the only one.

Please spend an afternoon in a jury selection pool and then let us know if you'd like to change your hypothesis.

Re:IQ? (4, Insightful)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209885)

Yes, people are smart in different ways. Some people excel in multiple categories. Others barely budge the needle across the board. The latter are what we call 'stupid people'.

Re:IQ? (4, Insightful)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210157)

I don't think there are stupid people. Just people who are smart in different ways,[...]

Someone clearly didn't work in tech support when he/she was younger.

Six months of that and it should be pretty clear to anyone with a couple of neurons still firing that yes, there are stupid people. In fact, stupid people are very likely to call tech support, not just because their internet connection is down but because the power is out, they don't like their neighbor or they just plain feel like yelling profanities at someone who works for a company they have no relationship to.

Re:IQ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209819)

I do wish people would stop using that as some sort of gauge of intelligence - it has very little to do with intelligence, and just modernity.

Sure, but the only thing worse than an IQ test is every other form of intelligence measure. Claiming that the test has issues (it does) should not be used to divert attention from the fact that some people are very smart while others are mind-bogglingly stupid.

It's like saying that thermometers suck because they don't account for wind chill, humidex, UV exposure or different peoples' metabolism. You may be correct, but I'm still going to check the temperature before going outside.

OK, read the temperature then. It says 75 degrees. That sounds perfect to you, so you head outside in shorts and a t-shirt...right into the pouring rain.

Oh, oops. Did your thermometer not accurately measure barometric pressure or humidity to try and provide you with all the information needed to make a proper assessment of the weather? A rather singular view not working out so well? Hmmm, I wonder if there's a correlation there with IQ tests...

Re:IQ? (1)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209953)

Even if IQ was the best method doesn't mean that we should rely on it as a precise measurement of intelligence. Maybe intelligence is too variable, complex and human to be measured in a single number? Just because current weather forecast is the best we have, I'm not going to leave my water-sensitive stuff in the garden for weeks even if they don't predict rain, because I know that it's not that accurate.

Re:IQ? (5, Informative)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209705)

Except for, you know, all the things the IQ predicts with strong correlation. You know, useful extrapolation, a fundamental tenant of science. Within that category of things, there's all sorts of things IQ is useful as a predictive gauge for:
*Productivity of new employees without previous experience in the field
*Income(up until about IQ 120, where huge diminishing returns take effect)
*Crime rates and recidivism rates
*Lifespan
*Chance of acquiring an advanced degree
*Political views

You know, other than all those major, life-impacting things, IQ doesn't predict anything.

I believe judging an individual on a single characteristic is both pointless and wrong. I just take issue with the meme that IQ is somehow irrelevant or useless as a means to understanding human intelligence. It reflects an ignorance of the observed reality we live in.

Re:IQ? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209891)

IQ tests like many forms of test is a way to quantify peoples abilities. People with High measured IQ tend to be more intelligent then people with low IQ. However there are a lot of factors that goes into be an intelligent or a mentally useful person. However the IQ is a form of measurement, and chances are your performance will coincide with the standard distribution level you are in.

The last time I was formally tested for my IQ I was in middle school, they did it not to rate how smart each child is, but to find underachiever in the system were they can get extra help. At the Time my IQ was above average, it wasn't genius, but it was strong. Later because I had problems in school with writing I had a bunch of other tests taken, it showed my Reading Skills was Average, my Writing Skills were near remedial, but my Abstract Reasoning was Genius. While I have worked on my reading and writing skills, which it seems every Grammar Nazi points out, is one of those setbacks that hold me back, however my stronger skills, I have learned to compensate and relay more on them to help push me further. To be honest I have judged my life to be Well above average compared to my peers.

The IQ test seemed to average a persons intelligence. But it doesn't mean that they overall stupid or smart, it is just an average. As people may have stronger skills and weaker skills, and unlike Role Playing games, they are not fare and balanced, You can get The Super Smart Kids, who is good with people, and is a good athlete too, you can also get the Weak Little Kid, who had severe learning problems, and is just a complete jerk.

Re:IQ? (0)

SockPuppetOfTheWeek (1910282) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210217)

While I have worked on my reading and writing skills, which it seems every Grammar Nazi points out, is one of those setbacks that hold me back, however my stronger skills, I have learned to compensate and relay more on them to help push me further.

Aaaaaaag. I cringed reading that.

I'm still not sure whether you meant Grammar Nazis point out your mistakes, or that they point out that the poor reading and writing skills are holding you back. Probably the former, but jeez.

Also, you misspelled rely.

"While I have worked on my reading and writing skills, which it seems every Grammar Nazi points out, they are still one of those setbacks that holds me back. However, I have learned to compensate and rely more on my stronger skills to help push me further."

(Lucky thing I proofread this - I edited in a word and put it in the complete wrong place. That would have been embarrassing...)

One can only hope (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209467)

Hopefully he will go into research and stay away from patients, because there's more to being a successful clinician than sheer brain-power, and most of it comes with experience and invariably, age.

much congratulations (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209471)

always good to hear that someone is excelling at a young age like this kid. i just hope he doesnt feel like he missed on life experiences later in life. i cant imagine if prodigies feel that they missed out on college-keggers, or proms or things like that.

Re:much congratulations (4, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209515)

Yeah, most of the best parts of college are not the classroom stuff at all. I feel sorry for people who miss out on that, as the social stuff is the one part of college you can't come back to 20 years later or even a few years earlier.

Re:much congratulations (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40210077)

what, binge drinking? Universities in different part of the worlds have different value on the "social stuff." Just because he doesn't conform to the US norms doesn't make him a freak, nor does it necessarily stunt his ability to grow or mature. As he stated in the article, his fellow undergrad spent afternoons watching cartoons.

My undergrad experience, my peers were playing 90s nintendo games trying to recapture some kind of nostalgia, while others were doing keg stands. Personally, I wish I could've skipped all that and done something better with my time. I don't even keep up with those friends and last I heard, they had menial jobs. I'd rather associate myself with people who are ambitious and work towards a future.

10-15 years from now (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209473)

We will either see his name in the papers for a suicide cause he got so depressed because he was never a child or he will become a drug addict... I suggest we feed him LSD or shrooms see what the little guy can come up with then.

Obligatory (1, Flamebait)

meekg (30651) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209475)

What a snob!

spoiler alert (1)

kobi77 (2605409) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209485)

She and Dr Robert Chase didn't really kiss in House MD, it was just a plot device! CO out

An Extra Ten Years Being a Pediatrician? (4, Insightful)

rossjudson (97786) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209511)

Sounds like he's headed to spend the next five years as a pediatrician resident. What strikes me is this: After all the acceleration, does he end up simple having a professional career that's ten years longer than normal? Without some exceptional accomplishments along the way, it might not have been the best trade-off.

Re:An Extra Ten Years Being a Pediatrician? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209535)

and he got to skip all the school crushs, dances, in-crowd/out-crowd stuff for ..... ?

Re:An Extra Ten Years Being a Pediatrician? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209673)

A mansion, exotic cars, social status......

Re:An Extra Ten Years Being a Pediatrician? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40210237)

He's going Peds Neuro, so not even

Re:An Extra Ten Years Being a Pediatrician? (3, Insightful)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209839)

We did too, and we all turned out okay!

Re:An Extra Ten Years Being a Pediatrician? (3)

V. P. Winterbuttocks (2246736) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210053)

We did?

excellent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209519)

It is people like him who eliminate the quasi-religious belief of meritocrats that success is dependent on hard work and that you "get what you deserve".

Fact is, it's mostly down to nature.

Re:excellent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209575)

success is dependent on hard work [...] Fact is, it's mostly down to nature

no, luck is 10 times more important.

Re:excellent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209659)

success is dependent on hard work [...] Fact is, it's mostly down to nature

no, luck is 10 times more important.

There is no such thing as luck! It's who you know and where you are from.

Re:excellent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209861)

Maybe it is who you know and where you are from but luck put me there and made me run into them by chance.

Re:excellent (2)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210233)

Those are great examples of luck-based factors.

Other luck-based factors are things like when you start your company (the timing feels sort of right but is the market really ready for your product? or maybe you've already missed the boat? This obviously isn't all luck but to a large degree it is, sometimes the difference between the winner and the also ran can be that the winner had a slightly crappier product but ever so slightly better timing) and minor marketing choices (your research shows both advertising campaigns should result in a 20-50% increase in sales but the truth is that six months down the line one will give you a 200% increase in sales, the other will only get you a 20% increase, which one should you pick if all the research shows them to be equal? What if I told you a factor is a random celebrity making some statement on TV two weeks after you've chosen which one to pick? Didn't make it easier now, did it?).

Real life Doogie Howser? (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209525)

He'll go into obscurity for a few years. Then, out of the blue, he'll show up to help the real-life Harold and Kumar and then become a womanizer in NY on a real-life "How I Met Your Mother".

I'm nineteen years old and what is this ? (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209907)

What's a "Doogie Howser" ?!

Re:I'm nineteen years old and what is this ? (1)

Pope (17780) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210023)

And you're too stupid to copy and paste something you don't know into your favourite search engine? Geez.

Re:I'm nineteen years old and what is this ? (5, Informative)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210029)

What's a "Doogie Howser" ?!

A TV show about a boy genius doctor [wikipedia.org] from 1989-1993.

Now, please get off the damned lawn. ;-)

Not an easy life (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209533)

My father was someone like that, IQ literally off the charts, used by the University of Chicago to help calibrate IQ tests for people with IQ's over 200. Multiple degrees for the sake of multiple degrees, the whole nine yards. Did his buddy's doctorate thesis for his PhD in an unrelated field just to help him out, and his buddy is now a leading expert in his field. People's expectations were off the charts with how they how wanted to exploit him. His own expectations of himself and others became unfathomably high.

Had trouble his entire life connecting to normal people, even people of normal genius level intelligence had trouble relating with him. He thought so far ahead of everyone else that he even thought ahead of himself. When you spend so much time thinking past tomorrow you have trouble living for today. The result was this life was a mess and the practical details of his life were something that I often had to to take care of for him.

Being a genius is an accident of birth, being a genius compared to other geniuses is arguably more of a curse than a gift. In the end the longer he lived the more he learned to dumb himself down when around others. It was a social survival skill. I do not envy the person in this article.

Re:Not an easy life (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209631)

True genius is being way ahead of the crowd but still learning to blend in.

Re:Not an easy life (-1, Flamebait)

mr1911 (1942298) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209741)

My father was someone like that, IQ literally off the charts

No, that was your mother's husband. Your father was an utter moron who's only skill was making your mom happy when your "dad" was off doing other folk's doctoral dissertations for them. Your parents thought it best not to tell you and let you figure it out on your own. Apparently you got your father's IQ so you get to find out today on Slashdot.

Re:Not an easy life (1)

Idbar (1034346) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209747)

I couldn't agree more. Like life wasn't full of jerks already, a person like him will have to face them at a faster rate.

Re:Not an easy life (1)

amirishere (2651929) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209783)

he learned to dumb himself down when around others.

yeah I know what you mean, my fellow earthling.

i judge genius by creative output not grades (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209865)

real geniuses produce breakthroughs in art, science and technology. paper geniuses collect academic credentials.

so far all this kid has proved is that he has the academic game figured out.

Re:i judge genius by creative output not grades (4, Insightful)

aintnostranger (1811098) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209985)

real geniuses produce breakthroughs in art, science and technology

this. You nailed it. How is it that we rate someone as genius because of this degrees and IQ?? Does anyone care about Bach's IQ / degrees? Would we remember Newton if all he had were IQ and degrees?

Re:Not an easy life (2)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209875)

Interesting quote from the article:

But he'd much rather talk about his upcoming residency in pediatric neurology, which will dominate the next five years of his professional life. He became enamored of the field while doing a rotation at LaRabida Children's Hospital in Chicago, caring for patients with cerebral palsy, shaken baby syndrome and other ailments.

"I really liked not just taking care of kids, but the way the whole team worked together - the medical team, the social workers, nutritionists, DCFS workers ... the idea that you can do a lot for these patients, even if you can't cure them."

To me that does not sound like some sort of idiot savant. If anything he sounds more interested in getting a job and doing work, rather than amazing us gawkers with brilliant insights.

In any case, I think picking a single person in advance and waiting expecting them to make a great discovery or a huge fortune is a mistake. It downplays the role of luck in the process. 92% of smokers will never get lung cancer.

Lots of people could do this (4, Interesting)

lemur3 (997863) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209537)

IF only the school systems in america werent structured how they are I imagine that we could have many folks finishing schooling much earlier than 18 and college a few years later..

I know many students who were held back merely because they had to wait to go on to the next year.. at best put in an "advanced placement" course..

we could easily have students graduating highschool at 14 or 15 ...if not sooner.. with the 'smart' ones beating that.. all of the time.. but.... it just doesnt seem to happen

Re:Lots of people could do this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209637)

we could easily have students graduating highschool at 14 or 15 ...if not sooner..

It depends what you want to teach them. If you want them at a higher level of education, then no. Most kids are struggling with certain things such as simple math.

Re:Lots of people could do this (4, Insightful)

Shadow99_1 (86250) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209667)

I would agree with this, in sixth grade my reading skills were measured as 'beyond college' and my math skills were 'college level'. However my school had been reteaching me the same set of things for like four years and I was bored to tears. By the time I did go to college my love of learning had worn off and I didn't really care about pleasing teachers or scoring particularly high. I had already started working in my field though during high school, so I had some idea of what I planned to do. That alone is better than most people I see come to college as undeclared and then they ramble about taking random classes for the next 4 or 5 years.

Re:Lots of people could do this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209675)

Or better yet, give smart kids a full course of education that's at an appropriate level for their abilities!

Re:Lots of people could do this (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209715)

But in order to do provide an appropriate education, wouldn't the state have to steal more of your money through its department of revenue?

Re:Lots of people could do this (4, Insightful)

green1 (322787) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209737)

This always struck me as odd. When I was in school it always felt to me like I could finish all the learning for each year in a couple of months if only I was allowed to do so. But instead I had to sit there while the teacher went over each thing a dozen times, and then reviewed it a dozen more. And you couldn't read ahead because you'd be told that the class hadn't got there yet. One of my friends in grade 7 gave up and taught himself calculus during math class, the teacher didn't dare stop him, but neither did he allow him to complete a single assignment or test before the requisite time, nor could he advance to the next grade early (despite the fact that he was already working himself 5-6 grades ahead of the class)
And yet despite this you see stories like this from time to time where someone manages, despite the system, to come out ahead. Personally I want to know how they managed to get through the school system before the age of 18. The system which seems designed more to keep young people off the streets than it is to educate them.

Re:Lots of people could do this (0)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209815)

I think schools would be much better off if they started separating the students into different academic abilities much earlier on. When I was in highschool, they put all the students in the same classes for grade 9 to figure out where they should really be before separating them into "Basic" (highest aspirations are to graduate high school, with a very simple workload at that, realisticly they probably only have a grade 8 education anyway. Mostly for people with learning or behavioral problems.), "General" (for students who want to prepare for trade school/community college), and "Advanced" (For students who wanted to go to university). This was great because once you got out of grade 9, if you were serious about school, so were the majority of the kids in your class. Unfortunately, it also made me realize how much of a waste the 9th grade was, when they were trying to evaluate and figure out where to put everyone. Only a few years before that, the students has to decide which stream to go in before they entered high school. I think this whole process could be put much earlier. Probably around grade 5-6 you could start to separate out who the kids were who were going to make it into higher education. I guess some people probably think that's a little young to "give up" on students who could possibly make something of themselves. After a 2 years of "general" courses, it's almost impossible to make up for the lost time and graduate from the "advanced" program. But I think that we have a lot to be gained in not holding back those who can, and want to, do something great with their life.

Re:Lots of people could do this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40210007)

People have been around for longer than the US system or the US itself. The % of extraordinary people probably hasn't changed much.

Part of being extraordinary is doing something most people cannot do.

Before my time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209551)

What's a Doogie Howser?
              - Sincerely, a young'un

Re:Before my time? (1)

Tanktalus (794810) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209787)

There's this thing called "google" which can be helpful. I mean, you're already on the net in a browser, it's not hard. Heck, just going directly to wikipedia gets you the hit in one try.

Re:Before my time? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209807)

Sincerely, learn to fucking google. I highlighted the words and right clicked to the answer.

I went to school with him at Mirman in Los Angeles (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209595)

I went to school with Sho at Mirman in Los Angeles. Humble? But, of course, this was before puberty, so things may have changed. As for gifted, I wouldn't know since I didn't really understand the deeper meaning of anything he had to say. And this from a student who also wen tot a school for gifted children. Looking back on the experience, I wish I had been gifted a little more like Harry Reems and a little less like Sho.

When I was applying to med schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209635)

(didn't get in btw) one of the things they kept saying when I went on interviews is that they wanted to make sure this is something you really wanted to do. I kind of felt this was horseshit and just another hoop to jump through and of course this is a data point in support of that position. (Since I could very easily see that a decision a12 year old made might not be the one he agrees with as an adult. Hell, he's already a pianist, he could dump medicine to go on to a career as a classical musician.) Admittedly some of the schools arguably thought that way but the fact at least one did makes me wonder.

Do any of these geniuses ever pan out? (4, Interesting)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209641)

Perhaps you just don't hear about their childhoods after they've found success, but I always hear stories about these geniuses graduated X years early, but rarely about their professional accomplishments.

Re:Do any of these geniuses ever pan out? (2)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209825)

I graduated a year early. My work's generated millions of dollars and saved thousands of lives.

You've also never heard of me, which is nice.

Re:Do any of these geniuses ever pan out? (1)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209897)

That's because in this day, hard work and dedication is almost distinguishable from intellect. I mentioned this in a post below, but I knew 3 people who graduated college at 17/18, and then went on to do nothing. I had very close interactions with one, and he was the laziest person I'd ever met... basically graduated college and figured he had proven himself, without realizing that's when then real work begins.

Re:Do any of these geniuses ever pan out? (4, Insightful)

hvm2hvm (1208954) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210011)

Maybe because they get employed by huge corporations and you only hear <INSERT CORPORATION NAME HERE> found the cure for cancer/designed a mind reading device/etc.

Too Bad for Humanity as a Whole... (4, Interesting)

trenien (974611) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209655)

Am I the only one who thinks that such a genius is bound to make major leaps in whatever field he invests himself in?

As such, the path he has chosen is good news for diseased children. However, humanity as a species isn't affected by those personnal tragedies he decided to focus on. On the other hand, there's a number of subjects in physics, genetics or even medecine that could have had a much wider impact.

Yes, I'm aware such a way of thinking classifies into the cold-hearted bastards category.

Re:Too Bad for Humanity as a Whole... (2)

tanujt (1909206) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209727)

I see the point, though where do you propose to draw the line in deciding what's best for a person to do in the interests of humanity?

Re:Too Bad for Humanity as a Whole... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209843)

the key is to talk them into it so they make the choice themselves

Re:Too Bad for Humanity as a Whole... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209963)

Am I the only one who thinks that such a genius is bound to make major leaps in whatever field he invests himself in?

That's the same as saying that the guy who buys 10000 lottery tickets is bound to win the lottery. True, his odds are better than most, but there are too many other factors in play. The age of solo science is long past. Modern science is a collaborative endeavor. You need to be able to work with other people. If you are a genius, you need to be able to work with less intelligent people. Your destiny is shared among them.

Re:Too Bad for Humanity as a Whole... (1)

bosef1 (208943) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210085)

I understand your comment. But think of it like this: children get sick with a lot of the same diseases adults get. What if this guy says, "You know what, on my weekends, after my round of banging supermodels after blowing their clothes off with my mind, I'm going to kick cancer's ass. 'Cause what pisses me off more than anything is to have to tell a seven-year-old they probably aren't going to make it to nine." Or what if he comes up with a new surgical procedure that makes it easier to fix some congenital defect that a lot of people get, so now there's a lot more people who can have normal lives. Wouldn't that be awesome for the species?

Re:Too Bad for Humanity as a Whole... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40210235)

No, people with those problems should be weeded from the gene pool. Yes I'm joking, and yes some people think that if we killed all those who need glasses, we'd get more people with better eyesight...

medicine is a waste of time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209671)

if this kid wants to be successful he needs to go to Wall St. everything else is for chumps.

Measurement of IQ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209681)

"...according to a test he took at age 4, his IQ is too high to accurately measure.

I never really understood why statements like this are made, as if he could never be tested later in life to re-validate or measure his IQ accurately. Regardless if he proves to be off the charts again at age 10, 15, or 25, it just sounds very stupid to make statements about single-digit age IQ tests that make it appear that a 4-year old "stumped" test writers. Or perhaps it begs the question of the validity of IQ testing at that age in general.

I wish him success (1)

Karmashock (2415832) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209691)

I'd almost prefer him go into music... none of my business of course... it's just that exceptional people probably do the most good doing something creative. Be that expanding our understanding in science or advancing something in one of the arts or inventing something in some form of engineering.

He's a 21 year old kid that has spent a lot of his time hitting the books harder then anyone. And he can do whatever wants. The best of luck to him.

Key info missing from summary: MD at Age 21 (5, Informative)

Guidii (686867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209699)

I hate having to RTFM just to find the one key point.
Editors: Stop burying your leads!

Genius (4, Interesting)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209731)

I don't know any genius level people, but I know 3 who were fast-tracked through high school and graduated very prestigious colleges at 17/18. They all went on to get PhDs, and they all failed out for the same reason: sometime during their PhD they wanted to try to re-live their youth as they should have, and began acting like teenagers again again. Drinking, partying, getting in trouble.... these guys were the smartest guys I knew, but each one, on their own, managed to derail their careers because they completely missed their youth.

Not saying this kid is in any danger of going down the same path... maybe his massive intellect will divert him from temptation. But every time I hear about someone graduating college exceedingly young, I always wonder when their fuse is going to run out.

Re:Genius (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209879)

If it wasn't for people pushing the gifted to their limits we never would have had the pleasure of Asia Carrera

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asia_Carrera [wikipedia.org]

Re:Genius (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40210099)

I know that experience. Not that I was on some fast track gifted program or anything but one day in college I realized "Holy shit, I'm going to graduate without get laid once!" and then spent the last two semesters chasing girls. Had sex with some hot chicks but my GPA turned shitty and now I'll never a get a Phd, at least not from a good school. When I look back at my college days in my head I hear one of those game show noises they play when somebody loses like "Bwom, bwom, bwaaaa". Fuck. Oh well, life goes on.

Just 21... (1)

identity0 (77976) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209739)

He will now be taking charge of a research program on the effects of alcohol on a brilliant young mind.

That's nothing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209745)

I entered Harvard at 5, and graduated summa cum laude. I was tenured by the age of 6. By the age of 7 I burnt out and turned to drink, hookers and gambling. Now I am a bitter 8 year old who hates the world, and can't get a job due to my prison sentence.

It'll be just the same for this guy, just you watch.

Asians! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209755)

All those ages (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209769)

and you can't put the age he's at now/getting the degree at into the summary? PFFT..

Bad summary-

Nerds!!!! (1)

Virtucon (127420) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209793)

Where are the Alphas [untoldentertainment.com] when you need them?

Genius level ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209923)

What do you mean IQ above genius level ?
Where does the genius level IQ start ? How can you be over genius, what's that called ?
This is nonsense.

Damn you slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40209933)

Thanks for making me feel like an under-performing old fart! *shaking fist*

Daniel Goleman (1)

Saija (1114681) | more than 2 years ago | (#40209955)

I'm reading now "Emotional Intelligence" and this book talks about how only the IQ is not the only key to success in life. There is also some information about how persons IQ-centric often lack some social skills

Smart kid, dumb career move. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40210059)

Ok so they say he's so smart but then he goes into Medicine?

Ok, was it as a researcher? Or just your average run of the mill speciality that anyone who has the money to get through school can get?

As mentioned previously, engineering, physics, biochemistry et al seem to be a better fit for such a mind.

Seems whomever was guiding him to a career may have made the choice FOR him.

In another two decades ... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210145)

... with experience and the inevitable cynicism that comes with it:

Dr House.

IQ test at 4 (1)

AdrianKemp (1988748) | more than 2 years ago | (#40210171)

How about a measurement at some point that matters?

This just in: all children 6 months old are super geniuses! None of them can be accurately IQ tested!

Do one now, find out that yes, he's very gifted with work ethic and otherwise he's pretty run of the mill smart. I'd be shocked if he was over 200, and floored if he was substantially over it.

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