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Canada No Pirate Nation: Global Leader In Music Download Sales

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the secret-is-also-being-leader-in-eh dept.

Canada 179

An anonymous reader writes "The IFPI, the global recording industry association, recently released its Recording Industry in Numbers 2012, which provides detailed sales data from countries around the world. While CRIA talks about 'rebuilding the marketplace,' the industry's own data indicates that Canada already stands among the global leaders in digital music sales. Michael Geist digs into the data and finds that Canadians purchased more single track downloads than Germany or Japan, and more than double the sales in France, despite the fact that each of those countries has far larger populations. In fact, Canadian sales were larger than all the sales from Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Finland, France, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden combined. Not only is the Canadian digital market far larger than virtually every European market, it continues to grow faster than the U.S. digital music market as well. In fact, the Canadian digital music market has grown faster than the U.S. market for the past six consecutive years."

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179 comments

Global leader in music sales... (4, Insightful)

tiffany352 (2485630) | about 2 years ago | (#40232443)

And the recording industry is still hungry for money.

Re:Global leader in music sales... (5, Interesting)

0xdeaddead (797696) | about 2 years ago | (#40232453)

considering how many laws the write for us, I think its more than money, they seek ultimate power.

Re:Global leader in music sales... (2)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#40232709)

considering how many laws the write for us, I think its more than money, they seek ultimate power.

What is the difference?

Re:Global leader in music sales... (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 2 years ago | (#40233069)

once you have the power to create law you no longer have to by congress to do it for you and you save money that you can then use for swimming in, prosecuting small childern and old ladies, butt rape the country and make even more money

Re:Global leader in music sales... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233209)

As Peter Griffin once found out the hard way... money is not a liquid and swimming in money is therefore not recommended.

Re:Global leader in music sales... (3, Funny)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | about 2 years ago | (#40233449)

Peter Griffin is a fictional character, you can't believe anything he says. Scrooge McDuck makes it very clear that money, especially the coin variety, it great for swimming in.

Re:Global leader in music sales... (3, Interesting)

Tyr07 (2300912) | about 2 years ago | (#40232517)

RI is like homeless bums. You give them 20$ and they say, 'got any more?' and move on looking for more.

Re:Global leader in music sales... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233093)

They're actually worse than homeless bums. They're more like predatory gypsy contractors. Granny had one come to her house to say he'd been working up the street and noticed a little problem with her roof. By the time they were done she'd been bilked out of almost $3000.00. Of course, you should have see the look on their faces when I walked up to them (i'm 6'3" and 250 pounds of just rolled down off the mountain ugly.) and told them that Granny had asked me to talk to them about when they were going to get all the little things they'd started beyond fixing the roof done.

That's what we need to deal with the recording industry, something big, ugly and with a clear sense of right and wrong and not some wobbly moral compass that depends on how much money it can smell coming form a certain direction.

It's Our Penance (5, Funny)

mrclisdue (1321513) | about 2 years ago | (#40232485)

As a Canadian, I think I can speak for the country when I say that the reason we're a global leader in music download sales is that we feel so damn guilty for pirating all that stuff that we make amends by buying it.

Plus, how else can we push Justin Bieber to the top? Don't tell me non-canucks actually purchase his stuff, too?

We're just so damn polite. Sorry for the cuss words.

cheers,

cheers,

Re:It's Our Penance (1)

Mashiki (184564) | about 2 years ago | (#40232633)

Hey...
FUCK YOU!

Nah I'm sorry man...it just slipped out. I just got back from Toronto. Oh man...Toronto !@*(!.

Re:It's Our Penance (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234351)

Whoa, calm down big fella. One too many double-doubles today or what?

Personally, I am cool with the try-before-you-buy concept of digital media. If I can watch a flick first, then I can determine what it's worth to me, and wait to find it for sale at the price I am willing to pay for it. It's exactly like customer-determined-value, except I have to wait a lot longer for the supplier-managed market to adjust.

Title? (1)

schitso (2541028) | about 2 years ago | (#40232505)

Where in TFA is it suggested that this has anything to do with a lack of piracy?

Re:Title? (2)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 2 years ago | (#40232595)

Where in TFA is it suggested that this has anything to do with a lack of piracy?

Good point. Maybe we just need lots of indoor entertainment for, like, 8 months of the year or something like that...more than we could handily pirate :)

Arrr...eh!

Re:Title? (5, Insightful)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 2 years ago | (#40232693)

Piracy = increased sales? Canadians are one of the few who are protected under the law and can download as much pirated product as they like. The studies suggest that piracy leads to more purchases of the same type of material (music, movies, etc) so it can be true that we both pirate and purchase at the same time.

Re:Title? (4, Interesting)

tnk1 (899206) | about 2 years ago | (#40232777)

I know people who pirated movies or video games the first time that were there on opening day to buy the sequels. People will support what they know is awesome because they want it to continue and they know that it will not continue if the makers can't feed their families and pay mortgages.

They have rather less interest in keeping rich executives rich. Or for that matter, even in keeping rich artists rich.

Re:Title? (3, Informative)

anyGould (1295481) | about 2 years ago | (#40232973)

Piracy = increased sales? Canadians are one of the few who are protected under the law and can download as much pirated product as they like. The studies suggest that piracy leads to more purchases of the same type of material (music, movies, etc) so it can be true that we both pirate and purchase at the same time.

Bear in mind we're "protected" because we pay a levy on blank media - effectively it's impossible for a Canadian to "illegally download" material because we've already paid for it when we bought the hard drive.

IP enforcement in Canada chases after the seeders, because that part is still illegal.

I'd account a fair bit of the sales increase to people ditching cable - between iTunes and Netflix, I can watch every show I want for substantially less than what cable would be. (I still get my internet and phone through the cable company because I loathe Telus with a fiery passion, so the cable company is content.)

Re:Title? (5, Informative)

dubbreak (623656) | about 2 years ago | (#40234007)

IP enforcement in Canada chases after the seeders, because that part is still illegal.

Citation needed. Have you heard about any uploading cases in the last 5-8 years?

Seems like the prolific US propaganda and lobbying on the subject has skewed your view (as with many Canadians). A precedent was set saying it was not illegal (BMG Canada Inc. v. JohnDoe [wikipedia.org]). The appeal (which passed) stated that the legality still needs to be decided in court. To my knowledge it hasn't been tested yet (most likely due to the current legislation giving it a chance to go through as legal).

The Royal Canadian Mounted police's policy is: "Piracy for personal use is no longer targeted".

We covered this quickly in a law class (back in 2007) and the current state then was "not illegal". In order to make it illegal would require a risky court case (which I haven't heard of to date) or legislation (which the RIAA keeps trying to push in Canada and the Conservatives address periodically).

In conclusion: you have no excuse to be a leecher. Start seeding like the rest of us ;).

Re:Title? (1)

anyGould (1295481) | about 2 years ago | (#40234285)

IP enforcement in Canada chases after the seeders, because that part is still illegal.

Citation needed. Have you heard about any uploading cases in the last 5-8 years?

Only anecdotal - my parent's got a nastygram from their ISP listing the various movies that a houseguest was torrenting. Nothing came of it (other than the houseguest losing internet privileges), but it tells me that someone is still paying attention.

Now, I don't personally worry too much (if only because I tend to torrent obscure things that no-one cares about, and as you mention, seeding is polite and leeching sucks), but it's worth taking note of.

Re:Title? (1)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 2 years ago | (#40234503)

The original decision made it clear that downloading and seeding does not constitute authorization of infringement. That's not to say it protects those who engage in infringement and then distribute. ie: If I place a song I own in a shared folder that's not infringement, but if I do the same thing with something I do not own then the law doesn't protect me. The kicker here (and why it's not often pursued) is that the burden of proof is on the plaintiff to show how the material was obtained. If I downloaded something from a person in a country without copyprotection laws, or if I record a TV show on my computer to watch later, etc these are legal but if I upload a cam of a movie with a unique embedded ID then they may be able to prove I am the source of the infringement and go after me.

http://reports.fja.gc.ca/eng/2004/2004fc488/2004fc488.html [fja.gc.ca]

Re:Title? (1)

willy_me (212994) | about 2 years ago | (#40234047)

Canadians face similar limitations when it comes to sharing music that other nations do. For example, it is illegal to share music covered by copywrite. While I believe the receiver is not considered to be at fault, the sender is. Those using bittorrent are just as guilty in Canada as they are in the US.

Also, the recent reports of Canada being a haven for pirated media are BS. It's a political game where the recording industries are trying to make it look like Canada needs tougher laws. Last I heard, the proposed law was struck down / derailed so it appears that the recording industries need to try harder.

The studies suggest that piracy leads to more purchases of the same type of material (music, movies, etc) so it can be true that we both pirate and purchase at the same time.

You're jumping to conclusions. I would say that if piracy is easy and provides HD media, then it is a bad thing. The industry should combat this by allowing for free, or add sponsored, distribution of their media in SD format. This would cut down on much of the piracy and keep most people doing things legally. They can then charge for HD media that doesn't suck (allow skipping commercials on discs I purchased you bastards!!).

It's almost like the question of legalizing marijuana. If left illegal it becomes a gateway drug and connects people with those who distribute drugs that are actually harmful. If legal, most people would never connect with the dealers of harmful drugs. Same with piracy - provide easy access to legit media and most will never visit the pirate bay.

Re:Title? (2)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 2 years ago | (#40234733)

Canadians face similar limitations when it comes to sharing music that other nations do. For example, it is illegal to share music covered by copywrite. While I believe the receiver is not considered to be at fault, the sender is. Those using bittorrent are just as guilty in Canada as they are in the US.

First, it's copyright. Second no they don't. In the above linked court decision the judge equated placing copyrighted music in a publicly shared folder (specifically citing P2P) is the equivalent of a library placing a photocopier in a room full of copyrighted books. The library is not authorizing you to copy a book, if you do that's on you. However, if you do copy something digital from a P2P network (or any other source) you have no way of knowing if the source is a legal one or not so you cannot be held libel for it.

The studies suggest that piracy leads to more purchases of the same type of material (music, movies, etc) so it can be true that we both pirate and purchase at the same time.

You're jumping to conclusions. [snip]

No, there are actual studies like: http://www.scribd.com/doc/93891327/Hammond-File-Sharing-Leak [scribd.com]

Re:Title? (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | about 2 years ago | (#40233289)

According to the report the United States and the U.K. are number 1 and 2 on the list. Canada is number 3. Considering the shared culture between the UK, USA, and Canada it is not surprising that customers in these countries behave the same.

Re:Title? (3, Informative)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 2 years ago | (#40234849)

Well, there's this:
http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6456/125/ [michaelgeist.ca]

But did you also know that the Conservative Party of Canada lobbied the US government to bump up Canada's position on that list?

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1048993--leaks-show-u-s-swayed-canada-on-copyright-bill [thestar.com]

The cables, from the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa, even have a policy director for then industry minister Tony Clement suggesting it might help U.S. demands for a tough copyright law if Canada were placed among the worst offenders on an international piracy watch list. Days later, the U.S. placed Canada alongside China and Russia on the list.

Facts are fun!

Artist really do suck (1)

fluffythedestroyer (2586259) | about 2 years ago | (#40232519)

Before you flame, the numbers are there. Artist that makes albums in the end, mostly suck. not completely because they do have some good songs but is 15-25$ a good "reason" to buy the whole album so you can listen to 1 or 2 songs ? I think not. Lots of albums aren't suppose to be released in exception of some songs. Thank god the digital downloads are an option for songs...really.

Re:Artist really do suck (2)

reub2000 (705806) | about 2 years ago | (#40232813)

Err, thank god for artists that can fill an album with 40-50 minutes of music that we want to listen too.

Physical Media Please (1)

acoustix (123925) | about 2 years ago | (#40232551)

I still by CDs and DVD-Audio discs because I want to rip the files into a lossless format. Plus I still listen to entire albums from start to finish. I guess I'm just old school at the ripe old age of 33.

Re:Physical Media Please (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40232655)

maybe you've just become this man at the ripe age of 33.
http://www.theonion.com/articles/area-man-constantly-mentioning-he-doesnt-own-a-tel,429/

Re:Physical Media Please (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | about 2 years ago | (#40232859)

Ha, at 33 I still bought CDs too. Now I'm past that

Re:Physical Media Please (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40233943)

I buy CDs too (not the individual albums, but the Greatest Hits collection). I rarely listen to them. Buying the disc is simply my method of (1) supporting the artist, engineer, musician, etc and (2) backingup my songs in a non-erasing format.

Re:Physical Media Please (1)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | about 2 years ago | (#40233215)

I listen to entire albums from start to finish, too, and I haven't burned a music CD in at least a year (and that wasn't even for me, but for a friend to listen to in his car)...I'm still 1/4 of the way through the 50 CD spindle I bought back in like 2007. It's been even longer for DVD-R's.

I don't think I'm even going to bother putting an optical drive in my next PC build. Seems like there's no point anymore.

RIAA and facts (1)

azalin (67640) | about 2 years ago | (#40232563)

Not that the RIAA and their siblings ever would let facts get in their way. Most of the piracy discussion resolved around protecting existing (but somewhat outdated) business models and increasing the power over the consumer.

So you mean... (2)

Das Auge (597142) | about 2 years ago | (#40232569)

So you mean that if you respect the privacy of your citizens (Canada has the best privacy laws in the world) and don't treat them like criminals...that they won't generally act like criminals?

I'm freakin' shocked.

Re:So you mean... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233029)

If Vic Toews has his way all of this will change very soon.

Re:So you mean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234337)

Don't forget to #tellviceverything.

I could be wrong... (1)

rumpsummoner (1021011) | about 2 years ago | (#40232609)

I was in Edmonton earlier this year for work. I was talking music with some guys that lived there and they hadn't heard of spotify. I went to show it to them an lo-and-behold it didn't work in Canada. I don't know if it was just spotify, but perhaps their sales are high because of a lack of easy alternatives. It would be interesting to know if Canada had more draconian laws against file sharing and streaming, or if it is actually something cultural.

Re:I could be wrong... (5, Insightful)

AdrianKemp (1988748) | about 2 years ago | (#40232661)

We have incredibly lax laws compared to many places; the reason that such services don't tend to work here is simple.

Negotiating the licenses and contracts costs some money

Canada has 1/10th the population of the U.S. so it often isn't worth it.

Netflix, for instance, works perfectly well in Canada but has 1/10th the library of the U.S. version.

Re:I could be wrong... (5, Informative)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | about 2 years ago | (#40232745)

There are Canadian Content rules which specify material which is deemed Canadian Content (% written/produced/performed by a Canadian) must receive x amount of airtime. It's been complained about for a number of years by people in the music industry, however it has given airtime to great artists like The Tragically Hip, Paul Brandt, I Mother Earth, and George Canyon so it's both good and bad.

Personally, I find CBC (especially CBC Music) to be a goldmine for music - free streaming of a pile of concerts, podcasts, you name it.

Re:I could be wrong... (1)

value_added (719364) | about 2 years ago | (#40233355)

It's been more than a few years since I've been back, so I'll assume that what you say about Canadian content is still valid. And while I agree with your comment, I'll add that there is nothing you or anyone else can do to give me the years I endured listening to Gordon Lightfoot, Anne Murray and Rush on the radio.

NPR on this side of the border isn't half bad. There's college stations just about everywhere that stream fairly good music (KCRW in Los Angeles, as one example), in addition to news and commentary, etc.. I stopped listening to music when the Pixies broke up, so I really don't care one way or the other.

Now, if all those Anne Murray songs would leave my head ... and Celine Dion would stop yelling ...

Re:I could be wrong... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234749)

CBC Radio (all stations) still puts me to sleep. Every year or so I give it another try, still the same crud. Not a big fan of their on-air talent. They have decent news and weather, thats about it.

Not surprised (-1, Troll)

AdrianKemp (1988748) | about 2 years ago | (#40232617)

Nearly all of my friends and family buy their music. Probably because we're not assholes.

There's no excuse not to pay for the multimedia you use these days. I can get any show/song I want on iTunes. If I didn't want to pay $3 an episode or a buck a song, I just wouldn't bloody own it.

Re:Not surprised (-1, Troll)

AdrianKemp (1988748) | about 2 years ago | (#40232887)

Ah slashdot, home of the " Don't you dare copy my source code without my permission but I'm sure as hell not going to pay for what you produce" crowd.

That's okay, you can down mod the truth all you like I have plenty of Karma

Re:Not surprised (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233163)

Ah the modded down, home of the "I posted inflammatory remark(s) at an unspecified group of people (allowing for a greater audience to message), but the reason I got down modded obviously had nothing to do with it" attitude.

That's ok. You keep telling yourself what you want to hear.

Re:Not surprised (1)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 2 years ago | (#40234037)

Delusions of being special, different, and self righteous, anger towards a nameless, faceless opposer that is trying to suppress a "truth" that only you see... I can show you a dozen other paranoid schizophrenics on any given Sunday.

Re:Not surprised (0)

AdrianKemp (1988748) | about 2 years ago | (#40234117)

Well the only thing I said was that pirates were assholes. Now aside from the fact that they self-identify with the people who went around stealing and raping, their actions make them assholes too.

There's nothing self-righteous or special about calling people out when they're acting like scum. I respect people who produce things, pirates don't.

Re:Not surprised (2)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 2 years ago | (#40233231)

Nearly all of my friends and family buy their music. Probably because we're not assholes.

There's no excuse not to pay for the multimedia you use these days. I can get any show/song I want on iTunes. If I didn't want to pay $3 an episode or a buck a song, I just wouldn't bloody own it.

Unless you use Linux where iTune and Netflix doesn't have a native client. Remember not everyone here likes Apple or Microsoft and some of us want a OS that works they way we want it to, and gasp would also like to be able to consume media. some of us don't want to support monopoly abusing patent trolls.

Re:Not surprised (0)

AdrianKemp (1988748) | about 2 years ago | (#40233543)

If only there were other options

http://www.hmvdigital.ca/ [hmvdigital.ca]
http://www.puretracks.com/ [puretracks.com]
http://music.scene.ca/ [scene.ca]
http://ca.7digital.com/ [7digital.com]
http://mp3caprice.com/ [mp3caprice.com]

and of course
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Netflix_Instant_Watch_Devices/ [wikipedia.org]

Re:Not surprised (2)

bzipitidoo (647217) | about 2 years ago | (#40234453)

If only the issue was so simple! Hammer, meet nail.

We, the people, demand a share in the incredible exposure and savings our technology has brought to music. I don't see the entertainment cartels thanking us, and perhaps more to the point paying us, for the invention of the camera, microphone, speaker, electric guitar, synthesizer, radio, TV, vinyl record, mylar tape, VCR, CD, DVD, huge hard drives, fast consumer grade computers, sophisticated music composition, scoring, recording, mixing and playback software, digital mastering, pitch correction, and most of all, the Internet. No, instead, they have the nerve to whine, complain, snivel, cheat, and even fight and vandalize over the advances that have enriched us all and made possible their industry. They have demonstrated over and over that they are fools who would rather kill their business than move with the times and the technology. Remember that Hollywood itself started as essentially a pirate operation, purposely located in a place distant enough that Broadway could not easily assert their supposed rights. They don't fool us. We know all their talk of rights is really a cover for sheer greed.

We are NOT going to pay 19th century expenses for entertainment!

Copying is NOT stealing! There are many crimes that are not stealing, and many actions that should not be criminal. The world is more complicated than that. We can't draw boundaries around concepts, can't divide the universe into lots and assign ownership, can't dictate every use. No one owns the air we breathe or the water we drink, yet we obviously have an interest. Except for a few private toll roads, we all own the roads. Therefore we use more mechanisms than property rights to manage air, water, roads, and other things. The concept of property rights as applied to real estate or physical goods should not apply to data because, like air and water and roads, they are fundamentally, qualitatively different things.

Re:Not surprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233245)

I'd mod you up if I had the points. Posts like these keep my misanthropy in check.

Lobbyist is just another word for Liar (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40232641)

"The Canadian music market is being destroyed by downloads!" (And oh by they way we're the global leader in sales.)

Almost any artist can bypass any publisher (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | about 2 years ago | (#40232653)

and just hire someone to make a website and some server space and just sell their music/movie/whatever online now. The options for artists are great now.

Let's face it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40232659)

All those anti-file sharing lawsuits are raking in the moolah. Up to $750,000 in damages per song! is it any wonder profits are skyrocketing?

Oh look, egg on our face.

Cold (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40232665)

Stay inside where it's warm and have your music delivered or go out? I'll bet Canada is a global leader in pizza deliveries too ;)

Too Polite (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40232697)

Canadians are just too nice to pirate.

So they (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 2 years ago | (#40232753)

Pay to download the music and they pay a surcharge on the media to burn it to.

BTW Maybe people in the rest of the world would pirate less if there were legal ways to download and pay, I don't think Amazon's mp3 store is accessible in other countries.

Epic fail (2)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#40232779)

I predict a epic fail. Lots of discussion about morality and ethics of downloading / sharing by country, no discussion about availability in the marketplace.

A lot more chopsticks are sold in .jp and .cn than in .se or .fr. That doesn't mean the people in .jp rarely pirate chopsticks and everyone in .fr prints stolen 3-d printer copies of chopsticks or relies on gray market imported chopsticks. I'm guessing that most of the online available music appeals to .us and by extension (since their govt is just a lapdog of the us, etc etc) the music appeals to .ca. On the other hand Garth Brooks and the Dixie Chix don't sell so well in Paris.

Maybe this'll get results... (2)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 2 years ago | (#40232787)

Well now, perhaps studies like this will help motivate the other large US music sellers (Amazon, Google) to get off their collective asses and start porting their services to Canada. Have been (not so) patiently waiting for this for, what, five years now?

I am no fan of Apple, but right now that's the only large-scale digital music purchase option available to Canada...at least they provide iTunes cards so I don't have to, you know, enter any real personal information for an iTunes account. The interface and bloatiness still sucks, though, and I'd hop on Amazon or Google in a heartbeat (well, once my current credits are used up).

Re:Maybe this'll get results... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234705)

Amazon ate one of my favourite music sellers, Aimestreet, that used to sell to Canada. I miss their pricing model where prices decay over time, but go up again by a penny for every X buys. You could also earn (a little) money if you recommended tracks and they got a lot of buys.

eMusic is still okay. Monthly fee, but you keep the tracks even if you unsubscribe. There's also Puretracks. And then the niche sellers, like Beatport for electronic or cdbaby for smaller bands.

To be honest though, the US options are still better. I have a US credit card and Amazon MP3 is pretty good. So is Spotify. I like it for its radio at home and offline cached copies of songs for the subway. If any of the albums I really like go on sale for a couple bucks I snag them. I expect I'll want to cancel my Spotify account one day, just like I did my eMusic account.

*Mafioso voice, holding cigar, oak-panelled room* (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#40232803)

Canada, Canada... I don't think that we properly understand each other.

It's not about the money anymore, it's too late for your damn sales figures. It's about respect.

You always were one of our top earners, kid; but that wasn't good enough for you. You had to go mouthing off against the MAFIAA, against the family...

Must be because of (1)

slazzy (864185) | about 2 years ago | (#40232819)

Must be because of our strong Canadian laws against piracy and strict enforcement against - oh wait...

Say goodbye to CD tax? (2)

rrossman2 (844318) | about 2 years ago | (#40232865)

Since apparently the legit digital market is growing leaps and bounds, would it be a good time to suggest repealing any CD-R and SD type card taxes the CRIA managed to get passed into law? It only seems fair and makes sense to me.

Re:Say goodbye to CD tax? (2)

PktLoss (647983) | about 2 years ago | (#40233179)

Re:Say goodbye to CD tax? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233687)

Hell No. Then that opens the floodgates to turn our lovely land into the USA's RIAA pirate witchhunt. That levy is what allows for downloading, and holds off those dogs of war.

Re:Say goodbye to CD tax? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234443)

Keep watching. Eventually, we'll be paying that surtax and be subject to the same harassing lawsuits as the US consumers. That's what bill C-11, if I remember correctly, is all about. Most people don't notice bill C-11 because everyone's distracted by bill C-30 and now the budget bill C-38. Now there's a bit of work. Everything they couldn't pass as a separate bill is being lumped into what is supposed to be the Canadian Budget for the next year.

Re:Say goodbye to CD tax? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233295)

Just curious...is there a flourishing blackmarket for blank CDs & SDs & flash drives?

[OPPORTUNITY!]

Thus we need DMCA-style Bill C-32? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40232899)

RIAA/MPAA: Obviously the current copyright law isn't working, and we need DMCA-style laws to protect the media industry and artists, and piracy is rampant in Canada, so we'll lobby to put them on piracy watch lists. Oh, wait, digital sales are fine under the existing law, and are in fact better than the USA where the DMCA originated? Uh, um, well, just imagine how much more we would make on top of that if there wasn't piracy.

We are so gullible. Greedy media companies and our silly governments willing to cave in to them. They don't even care about the data. It makes you wonder why our copyright law needs to be "fixed" at all.

h_omo (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40232947)

po5ts. D0e to the

I'm a Canadian, and I do buy stuff, yes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233085)

I'm a Canadian, and I often buy music from Beatport.

Why? Beatport runs very counter to big evil record companies, and it's also pretty much the only way to get the freshest, cutting edge dance music. Much of the good stuff is just too new and/or obscure to make it onto large p2p networks... you have to be in the scene circles. Not only that, but Beatport actually pays artists a fair percentage without ridiculous recording contracts.

I will never, ever purchase content from Big Media, because I don't see it as actually helping artists and the vast majority of big name music is horribly stale crap anyway. Beatport DOES support artists AND has much better music!

Doing something right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233087)

Just from passing knowledge of skimming various articles, it appears Canada has a well balanced set of laws on the books. Stealing is illegal, but the punishment fits the crime.

Secondly sharing appears to work as a music discovery service, much like radio was back when there was actually music being played.

We listen for free and buy the product we like! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233251)

It's not hard. Canadians listen to the music for free, then buy the product that we like. This is how it should be. What's the big deal?

so lets pass a stupid copyright law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233321)

ya one 84-90% of canada dont want , i swear im a punch a conservative if any of you wish to admit it you are.

Re:so lets pass a stupid copyright law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233531)

People who identify as "conservative" don't necessarily support King Stevo and his corporate cronies. Some of them want actual fiscal conservatism without the hiding behind closed doors and anti-fact holy ideologies.

Sadly, there is no good party for these people to vote for.

Why we buy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233347)

I think its because we have no music or video stores anymore. We cheered when Rogers Video and Blockbuster gtfo, Im pretty sure we cheered too when the music giants packed up and leftyears ago too. I mean , u could still goto walmart and buy a disc, but, really? who buys discs anymore?who wants to goto walmart for that matter. jeez.

Nice country list ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233349)

"Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Finland, France, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden" ... these are either small contries (Austria, Croatia, Belgium, ...) or ones that are near bancrupcy (Greece, Spain), so not really surprising.

Re:Nice country list ... (1)

Gravitron 5000 (1621683) | about 2 years ago | (#40234735)

Here's a list of population and GDP pulled from wikipedia against the entire country list:

Austria 8,452,835 $419,243

Belgium 10,951,266 $513,396

Croatia 4,290,612 $63,842

Finland 5,410,550 $266,553

France 65,350,000 $2,776,324

Greece 10,787,690 $303,065

Ireland 4,588,252 $217,669

The Netherlands 16,736,075 $840,433

Portugal 10,561,614 $238,880

Spain 46,185,697 $1,493,513

Sweden 9,495,113 $538,237

Total: 192,809,704 $7,671,155

vs.

Canada 34,819,500 $1,736,869

No Spotify = no progress. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233403)

That's because we don't have Spotify in Canada. I stopped buying music the day I downloaded Spotify (I have a European credit card). This is not progress... this is backwards.

Why I pay. (1)

steveaustin1971 (1094329) | about 2 years ago | (#40233419)

I download a LOT of music. When I find a band or artist I like, I tend to purchase the songs I like because its not very expensive and I just feel better paying for their work if I think it is good. I know that a lot of the time they really don't get much from the sale, but I hope that the sales at least help encourage the artists in their careers. I still download from alternative sources, mostly if I want to check out some new music, but if I find stuff I like I am pretty likely to go purchase some tracks.

Well two things. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233695)

Maybe Im wrong on this because Im not canadian but as I know they dont have the restrictions against copy protection that say we do in the US which means they can pirate more stuff without worry of being sued for everything they have just beause they want to say watch a movie or a tv show that they cant anywhere else except via piracy, or maybe they are tired of paying a lot of money for terrible music or bad movies and want to sample them first instead of paying way to much for a movie or a album. So they might pirate stuff and then go buy it. If you get on youtube and seach for "neil gaiman piracy" there is a video on there where he explains how so called piracy increased his book sales and new audiences found they liked his work that normally didnt know about him before. His book/comic book sales increased when piracy became a big thing.

Secondly canada isnt that populated compared to the majority of other modernized countries where broadband and computer use is used by the vast majority of the populace. Canada probablly has the 10th of the population compared to the US so the fact they pirate less isnt surprising. Thats like saying that country X has a lower crime rate than country Y when country X has a population of 25.000 people where country Y has a population of 150,000 people of course there will be less crime because there is a lot less people.

You forgot to (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40233837)

add Luxembourg and New Sealand?

Hum. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234253)

Perhaps Canada simply doesn't have music even worth pirating?
That Bieber failure came from there, after all.

Piracy = Profit (1)

loimprevisto (910035) | about 2 years ago | (#40234303)

I don't understand the headline.

How does the fact that Canada is a global leader in music sales imply that they are not a "pirate nation"? Has any credible study shown that one would expect that to be the case? The studies and surveys that come to mind all indicate that those who pirate the most media also spend the most...

A note about the comments and summary (4, Insightful)

brit74 (831798) | about 2 years ago | (#40234465)

When I first read the summary, a red flag went off for me - and it was the fact that we're *only* talking about digital sales - and even worse, the summary talks about one subcategory of digital sales: "single track downloads". The summary seems to have ignored physical sales of music and whole album digital sales. My first thought was to question how the Canadian balance of physical to digital sales differed from other nations.

Also, talking about how the Candian digital sales is growing faster (percentage-wise) than the US could also be a red herring if the Canadian market for digital sales was very low five years ago. (Example: if you start with 10,000 digital sales per year five years ago, you can get 100% growth each year and still have lower overall digital sales than a country that was selling 1,000,000 sales five years ago and had 10% growth each year.) In fact, the MichaelGeist information confirms that this is what happened - i.e. that the Canadians digital sales numbers started much lower - when he says "Canada seems likely to pass the U.S. on per capita single track downloads in about 18 months". So, the chart Michael Geist produces showing six years of faster-than-US sales growth in "single track downloads" is really a chart showing that Canada is still playing catch-up. Also, I wonder how "single track downloads" differs from "digital sales" in general.

According to the Norway sample data (http://www.ifpi.org/content/library/RIN-samplepage-2012.pdf), digital sales account for 45% of total revenue and "single track downloads" accounts for 18% of digital sales. This means in Norway that "single track downloads" accounts for only 8.1% of revenue. This also raises a red-flag for me because it makes me think that "single track downloads" was a subcategory that Geist could seize on to paint a rosy picture, even if the total picture was different.

I've also noticed that a lot of comments on the Slashdot thread seem to think we're talking about "total sales" when were talking only about one component of music sales: "digital music sales" or "single track downloads".

As much as I hate when the music industry spins numbers (for example, assuming that one act of piracy equals one lost sale to calculate the amount of money lost to piracy), we should also acknowledge that the pro-piracy crowd spins their numbers as well. I'd look at the actual numbers, but the entire report is only available if you pay.
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