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Richard Feynman's FBI Files Released

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the soviet-sympathizers-beware dept.

Privacy 181

v3rgEz writes "The FBI files of noted physicist, esteemed author and all-around geek Richard Feynman have been released. Feynman and the FBI had an extended encounter after the Bureau discovered he had been invited to speak at the USSR, which set off a flurry of investigations into his loyalty — even as he pestered the State Department for guidance on whether he should or shouldn't go, guidance they only gave belatedly. Of particular interest to the FBI was his avid devotion to the art of lock picking, his high school membership in a socialism club (for social reasons, he swore), and the fact that he was a godless scientist who loved his bongo drums. Original documents are available. One other element? A seven-page letter detailing a conspiracy theory that Feynman was a sleeper agent for enemies unknown, but probably communist ones."

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During the Cold War (5, Funny)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234017)

The summary forgot this was during the height of the Cold War. Stuff like this doesn't happen today. The government wouldn't waste time doing a background check just because you flew to modern-day Democratic Russia.

hahahahahahahahahahahaaha
I kill me.

Re:During the Cold War (5, Funny)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234065)

Nah, they'd already know what you were up to from having taped all your phone calls first.

Re:During the Cold War (2)

zlives (2009072) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234377)

"taped" reminisce nostalgic

Re:During the Cold War (1)

davester666 (731373) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234573)

Nope. If the investigation got to the same state today that it did back then, he would be declared an enemy combatant and rendered to another country for a little bit of information retrieval.

Re:During the Cold War (1)

ClintJCL (264898) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235923)

nice of you to slip a Brazil reference in there ;)

Re:During the Cold War (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234069)

Shut the fuck up, faggo.

Re:During the Cold War (5, Insightful)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234073)

No, they wouldn't. Actual background checks take too long and return far too much information. Today, your visit is recorded in a database, correlated with the fact that your plane had held a suspected terrorist in its last flight, so the conclusion is that you must be the recipient of a secret package hidden inside your seat cushion. That's enough to get a GPS tracker on your car and addition to the no-fly list.

Re:During the Cold War (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234237)

>>> the conclusion is that you must be the recipient of a secret package hidden inside your seat cushion.
>>>That's enough to get a GPS tracker on your car and addition to the no-fly list

That's enough to get you thrown in jail without a right to trial under the NDAA which Congress passed by ~65% and Obama vetoed..... ooops, I mean signed. (I would have vetoed.)

Re:During the Cold War (4, Funny)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234767)

the NDAA which Congress passed by ~65% and Obama vetoed..... ooops, I mean signed.

Yeah, but he didn't WANT to sign it, see. Or, at least, that's what he says when he's running for reelection.

Re:During the Cold War (4, Funny)

nschubach (922175) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234875)

Those damn mind control pens!

Re:During the Cold War (3, Informative)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235351)

The House passed it 283-136, which is over 2/3 (though the President could have tried to flip four votes to 279-140). The Senate voted 86-13.

Re:During the Cold War (4, Insightful)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235599)

So? Veto it anyway. Make them declare themselves to be for the reasons that he vetoed the bill.

Re:During the Cold War (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40236031)

283 out of 435 is only 65%, not 66.7%. AND if the President vetoed the bill, I bet almost all the Democrats would have switched their "ayes" to "no" on the override vote, which would give approximately 200-219 and fail.

Then it would go back to committee, the jailtime-without-trial clauses removed, and the NDAA v.2 passed. (Of course the reason Obama didn't veto the vote is because he ASKED those two senteces to be added. He wanted them there.)

Re:During the Cold War (1, Troll)

Sqr(twg) (2126054) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235955)

I for one welcome overlord Obama's new right to throw anyone in jail that displeases him.

Re:During the Cold War (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234107)

yeh replace russia with middle east and nothing changed....

Re:During the Cold War (2, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234147)

The government wouldn't waste time doing a background check just because you flew to modern-day Democratic Russia.

Now they just do it whenever you buy an airplane ticket?

Re:During the Cold War (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40236017)

No they do it on pretty much everything now.

My sister-in-laws father bought her a new car, and while it was being put in her name, SHE had her 'profile' ran to make sure she wasn't a)terrorist , b) illegal, c) terrorist .. I assume it was for registration purposes. Essentially, any and all means with which your name has to go through a state registry, will get your name passed through the DHS database now.

And all of that was before they tried persuading her to fill out the 'credit app', though not for an actual credit application, since her dad was buying the car. She was just short of leaving the dealership in frustration, without a car, but the finance guy ripped the 'credit app' in half to make sure they couldn't run a credit check on her, which would essentially have been illegal at the time. Apparently the fine for the dealership for that, is only a couple grand... Kinda low, if you ask me.

Re:During the Cold War (2)

w.hamra1987 (1193987) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234447)

The government wouldn't waste time doing a background check just because you flew to modern-day Democratic Russia

no, they would now do it if you flew to yemen or china

Re:During the Cold War (0)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234739)

Everyone's a comedian these days.

Re:During the Cold War (0)

Shotgun (30919) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235601)

Kinda like that sig you're sporting.

-Libertarians think they're getting freedom by eliminating the government. They're just getting corporate slavery.

Since the government is OWNED by the corporations:

-Democrats think they're getting freedom by enhancing the power of government to redistribute wealth. They're just getting corporate slavery.
-Republicans think they're getting freedom by enhancing the police powers of government. They're just getting corporate slavery.

Re:During the Cold War (1)

ClintJCL (264898) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235949)

sick burn!

Re:During the Cold War (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40236001)

Fuck is there anything that you post that isn't completely fucking retarded? Just kill yourself already, please.

phirst posht? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234025)

or no?

surely they're joking (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234049)

surely they're joking

Re:surely they're joking (3, Funny)

blind monkey 3 (773904) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234251)

stop calling me Shirley

Re:surely they're joking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234475)

Can't remember the last time I saw a joke missed so badly.

Re:surely they're joking (1)

ldobehardcore (1738858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234553)

Taste the WHOOSH

Re:surely they're joking (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234919)

Does it come in grape?

Re:surely they're joking (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235947)

The woosh is on you, son. You never saw Police Squad?

Re:surely they're joking (1)

ldobehardcore (1738858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40236025)

While I do understand the Police Squad reference, I am absolutely sure original joke was in reference to the eponymous phrase of the book: "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman" the story of which I find funnier as a matter of opinion.

Re:surely they're joking (3, Informative)

avandesande (143899) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234555)

I will help you along...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surely_You%27re_Joking,_Mr._Feynman!

Re:surely they're joking (2)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234769)

What do you care what other people think?

Re:surely they're joking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235715)

You should be getting more upmods for this. I wish I could give you one.

Re:surely they're joking (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235475)

Yeah, surely it was his failed attempt to get to Tuva that should have raised the real big red flag!

So who wrote that letter? (5, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234063)

The interesting question is, who wrote that letter? Not an FBI agent; an FBI agent wouldn't write to Hoover directly, outside of channels. That came from some outside source with a political agenda. But the source has been "redacted".

Jelious co-worker. (3, Insightful)

bussdriver (620565) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234185)

Envious people cause a lot of trouble; especially when you provide them outlets to express such emotions.

Modern day witch hunts are no better, people exploit the idiocy of the time to their own ends. We've not evolved any, we just like to think we are better than people thousands of years ago.

Re:Jelious co-worker. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235505)

No kidding.

These days it is pedo. You get even accused of being a pedo in the public eye, unless you are rich, your life is over even if you are innocent.
And then there is that malware just recent posted that locks computers and tells people to pay-up or they'll be reported.
Nobody even wants to be wrongly accused of being a pedo in the slightest.
So, for a person silly enough to get infected with viruses, you either pay up (if that even works, probably not), bin the computer and get a new one or grow the biggest set of balls on Earth and report it to the police and through some miracle not have yourself tagged as some child molester or some other nonsense.
And god knows how many cases we have seen come through here about people using actual child porn images to attempt to frame others.
Even though these people were proven innocent, their lives have essentially been ruined as far as anyone they have ever known cares, the place they live and possible employers in the future.

I think the only person I think I have seen stand up to any sort of questionable content was one of the guys in charge of Wikipedia standing up over the whole Virgin Killer Vs Internet Watch Foundation guidelines. (which are as prudish as it gets, nudity = porn, quite literally)

You could be claimed as a murderer, proven innocent without a shadow of doubt and nobody would give a damn.
Pedo and proven innocent in exactly the same way? They'll actually try to burn your house down with you in it. Probably.
It saddens me to exist in a society as awful as this where witch hunts like this still exist.
Say thanks to the nazi feminists and religious fruitcakes that regularly bring down society to its lowest levels.

Re:Jelious co-worker. (1)

catsRus (548036) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235755)

Exactly, the government was run by petty selfish morons then and still is now.

Re:So who wrote that letter? (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234193)

Sounds like a co-worker, doesn't it?

And indeed, the letter's author (whose name has been redacted) laid out an interesting case for Feynman-as-secret-agent, citing his analytical mind, film-developing prowess, code breaking techniques and his well-known fascination for lock picking. The latter was a skill he regularly showed off at Los Alamos, to the chagrin of more security-minded scientists.

Probably it was one of those "more security-minded" scientists.

I say, there's a grain of truth to it. You can never be a sure a free thinker will come to the conclusions you want.

Re:So who wrote that letter? (5, Insightful)

The Mister Purple (2525152) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234557)

I find it funny that the term "security-minded" is used when describing the scientists upset by Feynman's lock picking, when the impression I got from reading his memoirs and biography was that he was not concealing it and was indeed pointing out security vulnerabilities at Los Alamos. He was able to open a colonel's office safe using the default combination, if I recall correctly. After all, it's not like Feynman was letting the Germans or Japanese know about the weakness of the locks, let alone about the existence of the Manhattan Project. It's basically the same problem as seen in computer security today: people who point out vulnerabilities in a non-destructive way still get criticized (or worse, ignored).

Re:So who wrote that letter? (4, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234763)

I find it funny that the term "security-minded" is used when describing the scientists upset by Feynman's lock picking, when the impression I got from reading his memoirs and biography was that he was not concealing it and was indeed pointing out security vulnerabilities at Los Alamos.

"Security-minded" people always hate it when holes in their security systems are pointed out. It's practically a law of nature.

Re:So who wrote that letter? (1)

The Mister Purple (2525152) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235201)

Sad, but true.

Re:So who wrote that letter? (0)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234195)

My guess is someone who took his extremely famous introduction to physics course, the one he made textbooks out of, did not get the grade he felt he deserved...
And its redacted because he was somebody important's son, etc.

Re:So who wrote that letter? (4, Insightful)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234737)

Possibly someone like Klaus Fuchs [wikipedia.org] . Secrets are being leaked. Counter intelligence is certain to find out and come looking for an insider source. Better to divert attention towards a plausible suspect than have them spot you.

Law enforcement (in general) seems to develop a theory of a crime and then go looking for supporting evidence rather than keeping an open mind. So if you give them a plausible hypothesis, they'll stop their wider investigation. Its an old trick and still works quite well.

Re:So who wrote that letter? (4, Interesting)

tqk (413719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235287)

The interesting question is, who wrote that letter?

I doubt that really matters (but from a cursory read of the redacted FBI notes, I'd guess it was a woman). Everyone was encouraged to be suspicious of everybody else. I'd be surprised if no-one had bothered to point a finger at him.

Feynman was an oddball iconoclast and would have stood out as fairly strange at anytime. His wife divorced him because he was constantly solving calculus problems even while driving, and flew into violent rages (including choking her) when she interrupted him during it or while he was playing the drums. He made a habit of tweaking the noses of censors and the security people, for fun.

Back then, if you weren't a frothing at the mouth Commie hater like Curtis LeMay or Edward Teller, you looked suspicious, and the US' security apparatus at the time was encouraged to be nutbar paranoid. Look at what happened to Oppenheimer. This was the McCarthy era. Read Vasilli Mitrokhin's history of the KGB, and you'll see the Soviets were practically level-headed sensible in comparison. Besides, there was a large contingent of scientists who thought the whole thing should end once the Nazis were beaten. Feynman was just the village oddball (and a terrific physicist).

Tuva, or bust!

Re:So who wrote that letter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235481)

It wouldn't surprise me if the letter had, in fact, been written by Edward Teller.

Maybe it was a cuckolded colleague (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235333)

Feynman was known for sleeping with his friend's wives after his first wife died.

Sleeper agent? (4, Funny)

T.E.D. (34228) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234089)

Wouldn't a Theoretical Physicist (not under government contract) make a really crappy "sleeper agent"? When you activate him, what is he going to do, change Relativity?

Re:Sleeper agent? (1, Insightful)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234153)

Divulge nuclear secrets that would otherwise provide America an upper hand in the nuclear arms race. Essentially, something close to another Klaus Fuchs.

Re:Sleeper agent? (3, Insightful)

Dexter Herbivore (1322345) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234339)

Divulge nuclear secrets that would otherwise provide America an upper hand in the nuclear arms race. Essentially, something close to another Klaus Fuchs.

Alternatively, be in a position of trust to be able to recruit young and impressionable 'up and coming' physicists that might have better access to the current cutting edge military tech than he would have. The USSR already had most of the data from his generation, so using him to run a next generation network makes sense.

Re:Sleeper agent? (1)

T.E.D. (34228) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234421)

But if he's not working under Government contract, he's going to do that anyway. They call it "publishing".

Re:Sleeper agent? (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234515)

And the Government has a propensity for "publishing" bullets. It doesn't make it right, but it's been known to happen. And as they say "May you live in interesting times". Well, actually not. But you know what I mean.

Re:Sleeper agent? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234163)

The weird part of it is his life was much more classified when he was young. All his anecdotes about the Manhattan project, etc.
Once he got older, there's not much he can do ... directly.

On the other hand, numerous students of his probably went on to some interesting projects, and maybe he was politically advising them in addition to academically advising them...

Re:Sleeper agent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234313)

"Politically advising them"

Gee, like maybe saying something along the lines of, please consider the repercussions of putting the fruits of your research into the hands of sociopathic, self-aggrandizing politicians?

Re:Sleeper agent? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234203)

I imagine Dr. Breen thought similarly and we all know how that turned out...

Re:Sleeper agent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234211)

Worse, he would quickly make timetravel and parallel universe stuff work and change reality.
Secret methods used by previous administrations to flag rogue states... But don't tell anyone else or the FBI will have to keep a file on you as well. Good luck. This message will self destruct in 3-2-1-*poof*

Re:Sleeper agent? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234311)

He might have friends who are working for the government, and who might not suspect that a colleague would steal their papers.

Re:Sleeper agent? (3, Funny)

pseudofengshui (1432581) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235147)

Wouldn't a Theoretical Physicist (not under government contract) make a really crappy "sleeper agent"? When you activate him, what is he going to do, change Relativity?

Theoretically.

He was a sleeper agent. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234125)

But not of Communism, as you would expect, nor of Zionism, or Fascism, or even Americanism. He sought to advance the cause of alien entities in adjacent worlds, who, through their pushes upon the path-integral of probability, scheme to manipulate this world. Each Feynman diagram written, each step in the push to the smallest level of reality, adds to their influence. I'm not sure if the quantum encryption on my connection is en---CARRIER LOST

FREEDOM!!! (1)

narcberry (1328009) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234139)

More proof that if you have nothing to hide everything will be fine. Another success for team Freedom!imwatchingyou.

the lockpicking hobby was a bit more involved (5, Interesting)

Trepidity (597) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234191)

While the lockpicking hobby might've scared the FBI just in itself, more problematic to them was that he had used it in a "stole the atom bomb secrets" prank. He really did break into the safe that had the atom bomb secrets! But he didn't leak them. But: not everyone was sure of that.

Here's the story from an interview (from p. 51 in this book [amazon.com] ):

Interviewer: Is it true that you broke the Los Alamos security code and opened a safe containing top-secret documents? Then left behind a note that said "Guess Who?"

Feynman: When I was at Los Alamos one of my hobbies was to try to open safes and locks, a sort of locksmith-type hobby. Practicing opening locks, I at one point opened the lock of the safe that contained all the secrets of the atom bomb, and the whole business behind them. There were nine filing cabinets containing all the documents at Los Alamos. I opened three of them to check if they all had the same combination. I left notes in them to tell the guy that he shouldn't have locks with all the combinations the same, and stuff like that. And that I'd taken the documents out. And there were certain jokes in my notes. I was standing in the office there playing with the safes in the full light of day. The guy who was running the office was a friend of mine. And he was very upset when he found the safes had been opened. They probably changed the combinations after that.

Fortunately, FBI agents apparently were more reasonable even during the Cold War than they are in the War on Terrorism, because he'd probably be in jail for that prank today.

Re:the lockpicking hobby was a bit more involved (4, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234247)

Fortunately, FBI agents apparently were more reasonable even during the Cold War than they are in the War on Terrorism, because he'd probably be in jail for that prank today.

Its not so complicated as an individual's judgment call, its simpler; back then we were the good guys. Not so much now.

Re:the lockpicking hobby was a bit more involved (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234911)

More likely that prank probably caused more laws to be passed, and penal codes to be updated so that he *could* be jailed now.

Eventually everything will be illegal, we're close to that point already, so then it will be at the discretion of the police whether to arrest you for breaking a trivial law.

Re:the lockpicking hobby was a bit more involved (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235519)

Interesting that the govt. would be worried about Feynman obtaining nuclear secrets that he participated heavily in directly creating by his very own self, or by his own supervision.

Patriotism can be apparent or actual - this is a subtlety light-years beyond many government employees, to no surprise for anyone.

Re:the lockpicking hobby was a bit more involved (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235589)

Wait, didn't he already know all those secrets since he worked there?

Re:the lockpicking hobby was a bit more involved (5, Interesting)

History's Coming To (1059484) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235593)

He later revealed that they didn't change the combinations, instead they sent a memo out instructing that Prof. Feynman was not to be left alone with a safe. "Security by missing the point entirely" I believe it's called.

This Love (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234249)

You keep this love, thing, child, toy
You keep this love, fist, scar, break
You keep this love

Captcha: Nonzero

Old school (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234289)

Today, the Gove will just put you on the "google Glass" beta test list, as a ubergeenerd you will wear them everywher in hopes of people oogling at you. yet you are feeding a steady feed back to CIA headquarters....

"Anything new on subject 47?"

"no sir, he made it to Moscow, but is spending all his time in the hotel room looking at Russian porn and it seems that he is shaking a lot."

Re:Old school (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234643)

I really want a Google Glass (on my RX glasses) setup just so I can take pictures in places people say i cant. Sorry Mr. Tour Guide, its a medical device.

Re:Old school (2)

The Mister Purple (2525152) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234755)

A bit off topic, but when I saw the number 47, I immediately thought of a bald assassin.

and with the internet .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234323)

In today's age, just think how this stuff can be. Everything you do ever say or do online, every word that you say on a telephone, everything you LOOK at on the internet, a record of the news stories you chose to read, everything you purchase, is recorded forever, and subject to government surveillance. Given enough random data about the most innocent person, insert Cardinal Richelieu quote here.

Different era (4, Insightful)

rbrander (73222) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234365)

That was a whole different era; government was different, indeed, human nature was entirely different.

There is NO chance of another generation looking back at all the surveillance of every Muslim community picnic and shake their heads in wonder at our paranoia. All of our investigations are justified and wise.

Re:Different era (3, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234449)

To quote from a previous generation's songwriter, Tom Paxton:

I learned our government must be strong.
It's always right and never wrong.
Our leaders are the finest men.
And we elect them again and again.
That's what I learned in school today.
That's what I learned in school.

Re:Different era (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235709)

It was? Probably the name Qian Xuesen wont ring a bell, but in the madness of McCartismthey did a lot of funny things, from wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qian_Xuesen):

"During the 1940s Qian was one of the founders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory[2] at the California Institute of Technology. During the Second Red Scare of the 1950s, the United States government accused Qian of having communist sympathies, and he was stripped of his security clearance[3] in 1950. Qian then decided to return to China, but instead was detained at Terminal Island[4] near Los Angeles. After spending 5 years under virtual house arrest,[5] Qian was released in 1955, in exchange for the repatriation of American pilots captured during the Korean War. Notified by U.S. authorities that he was free to go, Qian immediately arranged his departure, leaving for China in September 1955."

Of course, he was received in China with a ** big red carpet and sent straight to develop the Chinese program, no questions asked. And even afterwards, the evidence points that the guy never betrayed any secret (the Chinese rocket development started by a Russian model instead of cloning American design), so kudos for getting rid of a brilliant guy and export a missile program to a perceived enemy for free,

So, did anyone else... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234395)

Did anyone else substitute Feynman for Stallmam?
I think my head is broke.

But really, thinking of Stallman as some hacker sleeper agent locksmith god of the USSR is strangely kickass.

Government waste (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234399)

When people talk about government waste this is what they should be talking about; investigating people for no reason other than you don't like their politics. Likewise, when people talk about a big government taking away your freedom, this is what they should be talking about.

7 pages, typed... (1)

tomhath (637240) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234411)

... and very few typos or grammatical errors that I can spot. The author was obviously well educated and a good typist (albeit he had a crappy typewriter). Probably the Unibomber.

Re:7 pages, typed... (4, Interesting)

starless (60879) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234843)

Edward Teller testified against Oppenheimer's security clearance. Could he have been against Feynman as well?

Noted! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234431)

It must be noted that noted notes, noted by the fbi are usually noted on notepaper using note pen or note machine.

Re:Noted! (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234527)

Note way!

Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (2)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234439)

Just the right wing's way of saying- "thanks for saving us from Hitler, you crazy science guys!"

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (2)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234463)

Oh and I forgot about Turing.. that's right.. fuckin' faggot... the conservatives gave him just what he deserves, eh?

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234715)

Didn't that happen in the UK based on a law from the late 1800s? Was it really "conservatives" as the word is used today? Or is this just random hate spew?

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (2)

b0bby (201198) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235087)

Well, in 1952 there was a Conservative government in the UK (the first purely Conservative government since before the war); presumably they could have dropped his prosecution but didn't.

As a side note, Gordon Brown issued an apology in 2009, but David Cameron has ruled out a pardon.

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (1)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235257)

Who but a lib would even THINK of pardoning a man who lies with another man ?

"'If a man lies with a man as one lies with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They must be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads."
-The Holy Bible, the unerring Word of God, as asserted by conservatives.

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (1)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235123)

Uh let's see. Conservatives think homosexuality is, variously, a disease, a sin, a perversion and at any rate virtually all conservatives agree such people are unworthy of equal rights before the law.

As a matter of fact this being against gay marriage is one of the platform planks of the conservative movement, with a very few notable exceptions, Olsen and Krauthammer amongst them.

And yes, this is unchanged from the 1800s. Why do you THINK they call themselves "conservatives" while their opposition calls themselves "progressives"?

Just land here did ya? Have a nice trip from.. whatever planet it is you're from ?

Oh I get it.....I get it... you think I that by me pointing out this well known material fact about conservatives I am somehow slandering them.

Well, I guess what they say is true. "Reality has a liberal bias "

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (1)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235347)

You get that all the calls on this thread to slaughter religious people and ban religion would effect nearly 100% of conservatives and anyway the anger is implicitly directed towards a distinctly conservative brand of proselytizing religion - both Islamic and Christian- and not, say the Zen Buddhist enthusiast down the road or even the peaceable Amish or Shaker Christian sects. I mean, you are capable of discerning the implicit cultural context in which we're all living... right?

I mean, if I was going to attack someone I would think to attack the people directly calling for my and my friends deaths before I attacked someone who was merely pointing out a truth known well to all.....

Oh... did I point out the identity relation between between Jihadis and their sworn enemies ? Jesus Fuck, I am sorry if I offended anyone.

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (1)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235433)

Oh oh oh I get it now. You think that i should sit back and not even mock, sneer at, deride, shame and parody that segment of the American population who is deconstrcuting the basis Western civilization - science, rationality and the Enlightenment and dragging us back into the Dark Ages WHILE AT THE SAME TIME actively working to ensure that the whole cultural debate becomes moot when civilization deconstructing climate change - which BTW conservatives also deny- not is fully realized, but only becomes only a guaranteed certainty, at which point all mayhem breaks out as "the market reacts to the bad news..."

Yeah, we're all going to just continue to be nice and respect the opinion of others under that set of exigencies.

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (1)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234807)

What did they do to Heisenberg? Looking over his bio it doesn't seem he suffered anything terrible after Germany's defeat, and had quite a decent career post-war.

Re:Then there's what they did to Heisenberg (1)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235133)

Fuck I was thinking Oppenheimer and I type Heisenberg . I blame this on reading material before me at the time of typing. .

If he was a sleeper agent for some enemy (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234495)

then the US certainly for the best end of that deal.

On the FBI files, Feynman would have asked . . . (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234613)

"What Do You Care What Other People Think?"

God? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234627)

...the fact that he was a godless scientist...

This is one of the problem with the USA right there. I know this document is from the cold war but the same kind of bullshit thinking is still happening in 2012.

Lockpicking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234703)

The guy showed off his lockpicking skills in Los Alamos at a time when people were getting sentenced to death for spying. He got some balls.

The pathetic twistiness of law enforcement minds (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234717)

...shows up in the heavily redacted original documents. It would be funny, if the writer wasn't so unintentionally creepy and didn't take himself so seriously. It has the hallmark of an individual totally incapable of self-reflection.

Redactions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40234927)

Wonder if it looked like this: http://infiltrated.net/redacted.jpg [infiltrated.net]

Tannu Tuva (5, Interesting)

fliptout (9217) | more than 2 years ago | (#40234977)

Feynman had a bit of an obsession with a small Asian nation called Tannu Tuva. He badly wanted to visit, and at the time Tannu Tuva was part of the USSR. As part of an arrangement with the USSR government, he would be allowed passage to travel there, but in exchange he would have to give some lectures in Moscow, I think.

Nova has a wonderful documentary about this, and it can be watched in its entirety on youtube.
The Last Journey of Genius: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mn4_40hAAr0/ [youtube.com]

Beautiful mind this is (4, Interesting)

pesho (843750) | more than 2 years ago | (#40235159)

You got to love the logic of the person who wrote the letter. The first thing that disqualifies Feynman as scientific adviser is:

Technical ability to review scientific data

And then there is:

Experience in formulating and laying out the groundwork for complex patterns of activity that extend well into the future

and

A practical aptitude for dealing with mechanical and electronic devices

The funny part is that this is exactly the kind of things that would send you to a camp if you were in the soviet block at that time. And people on the other side of the iron curtain were writing exactly the same letters but substituting 'communist' for 'imperialist'.

Surely you're joking Mr FBI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40235659)

I could'nt resist it.
Seriously, that book of his was instrumental in my decision to stay in engineering and not go into management. I went back to University and did a Masters.
On the day that Ray Bradbry died, I salute you Mr Fenyman.
 

Any bongo playing genius will do (1)

cvtan (752695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40236011)

If you're a bongo-playing genius, you are either a famous communist spy physicist or Maynard G. Krebs.
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