×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Coffee Consumption Strongly Linked To Preventing Alzheimer's

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the eight-cups-a-day-keeps-the-mind-sharp dept.

Medicine 205

An anonymous reader writes "Those cups of coffee that you drink every day to keep alert appear to have an extra perk — especially if you're an older adult. A recent study monitoring the memory and thinking processes of people older than 65 found that all those with higher blood caffeine levels avoided the onset of Alzheimer's disease in the two-to-four years of study follow-up. Moreover, coffee appeared to be the major or only source of caffeine for these individuals."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

205 comments

So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (2, Interesting)

Jerry (6400) | about 2 years ago | (#40234479)

will work just as well?

If so, why am I so forgetful? I drink two or three cups of tea a day.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234543)

Alzeheimer's disease is very different than being forgetful.

I would like to see studies on whether eating a lot of dark chocolate has the same effect. mmmmmm....

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234727)

If it is caffeine, then I guess you could conceivably get the same benefit from chocolate. However, given the amount of caffeine in even the darkest chocolate, you would need to eat so much of it that you would likely die from diabetes long before you had to worry about Alzeheimers. TFA talks about people who drink 3 cups of coffee per day, which would equate to around 300-350mg of caffeine, which would be around a 1/3 to 1/2 a pound of very dark chocolate.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235053)

However, given the amount of caffeine in even the darkest chocolate, you would need to eat so much of it that you would likely die from diabetes long before you had to worry about Alzeheimers. TFA talks about people who drink 3 cups of coffee per day, which would equate to around 300-350mg of caffeine, which would be around a 1/3 to 1/2 a pound of very dark chocolate.

You'd probably die of Theobromine poisoning [wikipedia.org] far before the onset of diabetes. The darker the chocolate, the more cacao, the less sugar.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

migloo (671559) | about 2 years ago | (#40235101)

You might get diabetes from american fattened sweetened "chocolate", not from swiss chocolate.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235277)

maybe it has less sugar, but it still has sugar. and saturated fat. "good sugar" can still give you the sugars.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#40235205)

On the plus side, if the caffeine is the causative agent, supplementation would be pretty easy.

The one positive side effect of the (otherwise dreadful) fad for leaching perfectly good caffeine out of wholesome caffeinated goods is that it creates a supply of the relatively pure stuff that can be added to things deprived by nature of their rightful share...

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235367)

The one positive side effect of the (otherwise dreadful) fad for leaching perfectly good caffeine out of wholesome caffeinated goods is that it creates a supply of the relatively pure stuff that can be added to things deprived by nature of their rightful share...

And now I have my new .sig for the next decade. Very eloquent sir.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (3, Informative)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40234579)

If I remember correctly, tea will only achieve half the concentration of caffeine that coffee will. Of course, tea has many other benefits, such as protection against cancer, and neuroprotective effects (even some protection against lead poisoning). You should, however, keep in mind that tea can be dangerous in too large a quantity; tea plants absorb quite a bit of Florine from the soil, and lower-quality, older tea leaves can have very high concentrations (these are what you get with Lipton etc.). Japanese teas tend to have less Florine because of the low Florine levels in Japanese soil, and white tea has lower concentrations because the leaves are so young.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (5, Funny)

NEDHead (1651195) | about 2 years ago | (#40234641)

And the Japanese tea has this cool glow-in-the-dark ambiance...

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (4, Interesting)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40234677)

You know, it is not all that hard to test for the presence of radioisotopes. Take a Geiger counter to your local tea shop and scan the Japanese teas if you are really concerned...

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (2)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | about 2 years ago | (#40235083)

Yeah, and while you are at it, scan the brazil nuts and bananas. (two foods with the most radioactivity where the radioactivity occurs naturally)

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (2)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 2 years ago | (#40234673)

I imagine tea plants absorb quite a bit of fluorine too.

Unless they loose it somewhere. :)

Yes, I am a spelling Nazi. Get over it.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40234729)

I had thought so, but my spellchecker actually insisted that "Florine" was the right spelling. I guess that's what I get for relying on a spellchecker :(

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#40235165)

"Florine", capitalized, is a given name. Fluorine, not normally capitalized except where appropriate, is the element (my spellchecker also suggests "Florine" if I spell it "flourine" instead of "fluorine", which I'm guessing is what happened.)

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (4, Funny)

Norwell Bob (982405) | about 2 years ago | (#40234873)

Then, as a spelling Nazi, I assume you didn't actually mean "Unless they lose it somewhere.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (3, Funny)

treeves (963993) | about 2 years ago | (#40235265)

Well, as a *spelling* Nazi, his expertise is limited to detecting misspelled words, not misused words. He apparently doesn't have the combined spelling/grammar or spelling/usage Nazi certification.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (2)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 2 years ago | (#40235365)

The :) after the sentence was supposed to alert you to the fact that the misspelling was an intentional joke. Sorry. I'll try and be less subtle next time.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | about 2 years ago | (#40235369)

His spelling of loose is correct, he didnt however say he was an english nazi :)

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235077)

Honestly, as long as the point comes across you shouldn't really care. There are some people that you have to guess a bit to get the point of their statement. Or worse people that use ambiguous language so it only makes sense to themselves. Notably a fair bit of people here probably don't have English as a first language and yet there are very few badly written comments.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40234865)

The article says other sources of caffeine had no effect. So it's probably not the caffeine but some other coffee component. (Or maybe just the hot water.) Personally I'd rather eat dark chocolate than drink coffee (ick).

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (2)

TheLink (130905) | about 2 years ago | (#40235113)

The article says other sources of caffeine had no effect.

I bet if people drink lots of Coca Cola everyday the odds of them getting Alzheimer's go way down. The higher the dose the stronger the effect.

Even reduces the odds of dying of cancer.

And many other things too. (1)

overshoot (39700) | about 2 years ago | (#40235695)

I bet if people drink lots of Coca Cola everyday the odds of them getting Alzheimer's go way down. The higher the dose the stronger the effect.

Even reduces the odds of dying of cancer.

Not to mention reducing the odds of death from auto collision, gunshot, malaria, HIV, ...

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235169)

The article says other sources of caffeine had no effect. So it's probably not the caffeine but some other coffee component. (Or maybe just the hot water.) Personally I'd rather eat dark chocolate than drink coffee (ick).

Yes, this is perhaps the important quote from the article:

Since 2006, USF’s Dr. Cao and Dr. Arendash have published several studies investigating the effects of caffeine/coffee administered to Alzheimer’s mice. Most recently, they reported that caffeine interacts with a yet unidentified component of coffee to boost blood levels of a critical growth factor that seems to fight off the Alzheimer’s disease process.

The interaction between the caffeine and the coffee component appears to produce something that is highly beneficial. Maybe it can be identified and synthesized and patented and sold in pill form. On the other hand, coffee is so cheap that it could be the generic version for those of us who don't mind drinking it.

Load up on SBUX stock! Doctors will be prescribing three cups a day and insurance will be paying for it!

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

Jahf (21968) | about 2 years ago | (#40234969)

That depends entirely on the tea. Some types of tea (not just black tea, either, some green teas have more caffeine than black) brewed to full strength are -equivalent- to a standard cup of coffee.

You are correct in that most teas are around 1/2 at the strength that is preferred by the U.S. palate. And some green teas are noticeably smaller than that.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235283)

Tea and coffee have different isomers of caffeine - in other words, they are different chemicals. You can't interchange them at the same measure, and they have different half-lives.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235309)

It's Fluorine not Florine. Too much bad tea for you?

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235613)

This is old news, and there have been other studies that show it's likely not the caffeine levels that provide the protective benefit but something else from the coffee altogether that hasn't been identified. The free radicals in your green tea may have some effect but it's quite a bit less than whatever is in coffee. Nicotine has a similar correlation with decreased incidence of alzheimers as well, and they are actually additive to some extent. Notice it's a correlation, not a causation, as well...

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235713)

More of a practical concern than fluorosis is the oxalate present in teas and chocolate, which binds to +2 ions like calcium and iron. If not bound at ingestion, oxalate can lower blood concentrations of necessary nutrients by precipitating them out, which can lead to goiter, kidney stones, and that weird feeling like your teeth are wearing sweaters. It seems there's good logic to taking your tea with milk, afterall.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (5, Interesting)

m00sh (2538182) | about 2 years ago | (#40234647)

No, tea won't work.

Most recently, they reported that caffeine interacts with a yet unidentified component of coffee to boost blood levels of a critical growth factor that seems to fight off the Alzheimer’s disease process.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234671)

Only few teas contain coffein. AFAIK only green and black teas.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about 2 years ago | (#40235115)

Teas made with *tea plant* leaves have caffeine, and "herbal" teas without it don't. Duh.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234793)

A long time ago, way back in histo- ry,
When all there was to drink was nothin' but cups of tea,
A- long came a man by the name of Charlie Mopps,
And he invented the wonderful drink, and he made it out of hops.
Hey! He must have been an admiral, a sultan or a king,
And to his praises we shall always sing;
Look at what he's done for us, he's filled us up with cheer,
Lord, bless Charlie Mopps, the man who invented...
Beer, beer, beer, tiddley beer, beer, beer...

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1, Funny)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | about 2 years ago | (#40234829)

The article claims 3 cups of coffee a day. Tea has about half the caffeine so you'd be looking at 6 cups a day. No wonder the brits are always taking the piss.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40235013)

>>>No wonder the brits are always taking the piss.

They're drunk???

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

sdguero (1112795) | about 2 years ago | (#40235219)

FTFA...

Caffeinated coffee appeared to be the main, if not exclusive, source of caffeine in the memory-protected MCI patients, because they had the same profile of blood immune markers as Alzheimer’s mice given caffeinated coffee. Alzheimer’s mice given caffeine alone or decaffeinated coffee had a very different immune marker profile.

It sounds like there is something unique to coffee in this case. I.e. chocolate or tea won't cut it.

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (4, Interesting)

DaveAtFraud (460127) | about 2 years ago | (#40235275)

From TFA:

Since 2006, USF’s Dr. Cao and Dr. Arendash have published several studies investigating the effects of caffeine/coffee administered to Alzheimer’s mice. Most recently, they reported that caffeine interacts with a yet unidentified component of coffee to boost blood levels of a critical growth factor that seems to fight off the Alzheimer’s disease process.

Cheers,
Dave

Re:So, I suspect that a good strong cup of tea ... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#40235655)

No, this was in the news a few weeks ago. It isn't the caffiene, it's some other compound or mixture of compounds in coffee. Decaf works as well as caffeinated, and Coke, Pepsi, Red Bull and tea don't have the effect at all.

Green tea? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234507)

Apparently green tea might also be helpful against Alzheimer's.

Dang. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234509)

And I cain't drink caffeine laced drinks because I talk too fast and blur at the edges. All it takes is one coffee or glass of tea at the Chinese restaurant.

Yeah, yeah. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234511)

Apples have the same effect if I remember right, and without the giant list of negative effects coffee/caffeine have.

Re:Yeah, yeah. (2)

slimjim8094 (941042) | about 2 years ago | (#40235279)

What are the giant list of negative effects, exactly? The wiki [wikipedia.org] doesn't seem to show more than a few Aside from the high blood pressure stuff (which kicks in with more than the study's amount of coffee), everything else is either benign or a reason people drink it in the first place (it keeps you awake)

Re:Yeah, yeah. (1)

PCM2 (4486) | about 2 years ago | (#40235563)

I know what the negative effects on me are... about ten years ago I overdosed on caffeine by taking two No-Doz pills and washing them down with two pots of strong black coffee. That resulted in me feeling intensely nauseated and tweaked-out for 24 hours straight. I've never been the same since. Sometimes a little bit of coffee is just fine. But other times (probably depends on how much/what I've eaten) a single kitchen coffee cup worth of coffee will make me nauseated, I'll have hot and cold flashes, my limbs will tremble, I'll feel slightly confused and unable to concentrate, and on rare occasions it'll trigger a panic attack -- that is, I don't actually "panic," but my hands will shake violently and go numb, I'll have overall muscle weakness (I'll walk really slowly), and I'll probably throw up.

I know what you're thinking: Yeah, I kinda decided I wouldn't drink coffee anymore. Which sucks, because I really like coffee.

The interesting thing (relative to this article) is that I don't remember ever having a bad caffeine reaction from anything but coffee. I never drink more than the basic 8 oz Red Bull, but that's always fine. The same amount of coffee, though, could really set me off.

Anecdotal Evidence (0)

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) | about 2 years ago | (#40234549)

My Grandma suggests the opposite. She has drank coffee just about every day of her adult life. She is in her eighties and has Alzheimer's. So the headline is not necessarily true.

Re:Anecdotal Evidence (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234593)

was it decaf?

Re:Anecdotal Evidence (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40234619)

Nothing is guaranteed in life; if I tell you that drinking coffee reduces your chance of getting Alzheimer's by 90%, that does not mean that you will definitely not get Alzheimer's if you drink coffee. This is not math, where a single counterexample is sufficient.

Re:Anecdotal Evidence (3, Insightful)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 2 years ago | (#40234625)

Or necessarily false either. Had she not been drinking coffee, the onset might have started a decade earlier.

Re:Anecdotal Evidence (1)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#40234693)

i think the study used real coffee. not the crap like Folgers which is 1/3 tree bark and full of crazy chemicals to hide the crappy taste

Re:Anecdotal Evidence (2)

avandesande (143899) | about 2 years ago | (#40234881)

She made it to her eighties? My grandfather died of Alzheimer at a much younger age which means I am at risk. If I can keep it at bay until I am eighty I will be quite pleased!

Spice (5, Funny)

Megane (129182) | about 2 years ago | (#40234561)

It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion. It is by the beans of Java the thoughts acquire speed, the hands acquire shaking, the shaking becomes a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

Re:Spice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234721)

I like this, i'll keep it for later use :)

Re:Spice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234731)

Dear Sir or Madame,

Thank you for making my day, and, if history is any teacher, a lot of other anonymous readers as well. We shall not forget your good attitude and ability to tell jokes which involve excellent science fiction.

[Any Anon reading -this- who hasn't read the urtext of the above: Check out Frank Herbert's Dune. It's fantastic. You won't be sorry you took some time to review it.]

-Anon

Re:Spice (2)

PCM2 (4486) | about 2 years ago | (#40235595)

Yeah, except as I recall, the quote his joke references doesn't come from Frank Herbert's Dune. Only the movie.

Re:Spice (1)

m00sh (2538182) | about 2 years ago | (#40234861)

And then you crash and you are fatigued, depressed, irritated, ravenous, edgy and anxious until you ride the caffeine train again.

Re:Spice (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235403)

And then you crash and you are fatigued, depressed, irritated, ravenous, edgy and anxious until you ride the caffeine train again.

And that's what the beer is for!

Re:Spice (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235319)

http://www.caffeineweb.com/

Probably 1% of the population is driven nuts by caffeine exposure. I had 25 years of hell till I discovered I was in that category.

To my wife..... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234565)

HA!

Re:To my wife..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234599)

You do know your Real Doll can't actually hear you, right?

Small Sample? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234587)

124 people in the study is pathetic. Why wouldn't they get a bigger sample size for a study like this? Not like it should be difficult. Apparently a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine included over 400,000 older adults in similar study.

Re:Small Sample? (2)

leuk_he (194174) | about 2 years ago | (#40235015)

Agreed, but it can be even worse. The study does not give a cause reason that this happens. It just show 2 factors that correspond. Some other factors might even cause this. e.g. some of the people with Alzheimer do not drink coffee because their health is too bad for if, or the medicins they use do not allow coffee. Or the shakes coffe gives them causes them not to drink coffee. I do not know.

Without a cause reason this makes great headlines, but is only a very tiny to do with resolving the disease.

AND EVEN besides this points, the science might by very valid. It describes very well how they came to the conclusions. But the major conclusions should be that there must be investigations with bigger test groups and that the root cause must be found in futher investigations. But that conclusions make bad headlines in the press.

Re:Small Sample? (4, Insightful)

jpate (1356395) | about 2 years ago | (#40235051)

Yeah! There's no way that trained scientists would be able to calculate reliable a difference is given a certain sample size with an observed variance! That's just wayyyy too hard. The only way to do real science is to get 400,000 data points for every comparison; it's the only way to be sure.

In all seriousness, huge sample sizes are only important if we are comparing several variables, where a large sample size can give us good estimates for rare combinations of events, and/or small effects, where a large sample size allows us to achieve small confidence intervals over the relevant comparisons. It's quite possible for a sample size of 124 to yield a significant difference for one effect if the effect is of at least moderate size.

Re:Small Sample? (1)

sdguero (1112795) | about 2 years ago | (#40235233)

There have been dozens of studies over the last 5 years confirming this finding. This one jsut had more information on the exact level of caffeine in people's systems.

So I wonder.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234595)

I wonder if Adderall has the same... oh look, a Thrive for under $200... 8 facebook messages!? Mmmmm... coffee sounds good about now....

Next week - coffee gives you cancer (0)

trevc (1471197) | about 2 years ago | (#40234617)

I am sure a study will come out next week saying 2 to 3 cups of coffee a day increases your risk of getting cancer (if that study has not already been published - I am too lazy to google).

Re:Next week - coffee gives you cancer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235469)

That was studied long time ago. Just search for "mutagenic action of caffeine" or "DNA repair inhibition by caffeine".

Re:Next week - coffee gives you cancer (1)

treeves (963993) | about 2 years ago | (#40235507)

Another study will come out soon that says that observational studies sometimes produce erroneous and/or conflicting results.

Correction Factors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234699)

How do they correct for the social factors in this study? People who drink coffee might be doing it at work, which keeps you alert and prevents dementia. They might be going to coffee shops and reading, talking, or working puzzles which keeps you alert and prevents dementia. Coffee in general may attract people who have a desire to remain alert, which prevents dementia. etc...

Re:Correction Factors? (2)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#40234847)

People who drink coffee might be doing it at work, which keeps you alert and prevents dementia.

Depends on where one works. At some companies, dementia seems to be a prerequisite for employment.

Some issues (1)

brian0918 (638904) | about 2 years ago | (#40234711)

Besides correlation != causation, did they actually determine that those individuals with reduced Alzheimer's risk were actually consuming more caffeine? Higher blood caffeine levels does not necessarily indicate higher caffeine intake, any more than a person with high blood alcohol levels - who happens have to have slow alcohol metabolism - can be said to be drinking more alcohol than others.

Re:Some issues (2)

avandesande (143899) | about 2 years ago | (#40235017)

FTFA

"“We found that 100 percent of the MCI patients with plasma caffeine levels above the critical level experienced no conversion to Alzheimer’s disease during the two-to-four year follow-up period,” said study co-author Dr. Gary Arendash."

100% is a extremely strong correlation....

Re:Some issues (1)

canajin56 (660655) | about 2 years ago | (#40235555)

They drew a post hoc line. The line is DESIGNED so that nobody above it got Alzheimer's. So it's interesting that its possible to draw such a line, but the "100%" part isn't interesting at all. To talk about significance we have to know how many people total were above the line. According to TFA, 15% of people with MCI go on to develop Alzheimer's. If only 20 out of those 124 people were above the line, the expected number result is that 3 of the heavy drinkers would get Alzheimers, so 0 isn't as strong a correlation as you think. But maybe 60 of the 124 were heavy drinkers, in which case it is a pretty strong correlation.

Correlation or causation? (1)

m00sh (2538182) | about 2 years ago | (#40234745)

Maybe coffee drinkers are correlated with something else that prevents Alzheimer's. I see no mention in the article that this is more than statistical correlation they have found.

Doing a controlled experiment where the only dietetic difference is the coffee is near impossible due to the cost.

Most recently, they reported that caffeine interacts with a yet unidentified component of coffee to boost blood levels of a critical growth factor that seems to fight off the Alzheimer’s disease process.

Typical conclusion section speculation from a correlation study IMHO.

I think it would be dangerous for people to drinking coffee assuming they are warding off Alzheimer's. Coffee has know to have bad effects on the body. It is a diuretic and a stimulant.

Re:Correlation or causation? (3, Funny)

0123456 (636235) | about 2 years ago | (#40234889)

Maybe people with Alzheimer's forget where they left their coffee and never drink it.

Re:Correlation or causation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234979)

> Doing a controlled experiment where the only dietetic difference is the coffee is near impossible due to the cost.

Also, it's not necessarily a dietetic difference that's having the effect. If "older people who drink coffee" largely overlaps with "older people who are mentally active" then we should expect a correlation (hopefully, they controlled for this somehow, but speculating) if either 1) people with pre-detectable Alzheimers tend to find mental activity harder and start doing less of it, or 2) mental activity itself helps keep the brain healthy. Neither of these would be surprising.

Simple scientifically viable reason (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 years ago | (#40234801)

Sure caffeine possibly could, by itself, prevent Alzheimers.
But I would say a far more likely reason for the correlation is the correlation between drinking a good amount of coffee and being active and exercising your brain on a daily basis.

Bullshit. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40234859)

My mom drank coffee several times a day from the age of 16 or so until long after she was diagnosed with Alz at about 65. The disease finally killed her at age 77.

Bullshit study.

Coffee Miracle (1)

berlinerkindl (1124161) | about 2 years ago | (#40234897)

Recently I have seen all these reoccurring stories about how coffee prevents a slew of different forms of cancer, specifically prostate and colon, so I have taken to giving myself hot coffee enemas (3 cups per the articles recommendations) every morning. So now based on this speculative and partial study I am concerned if this is enough, should I continue on my current path or start a coffee IV drip instead?

Obligatory... (4, Funny)

tool462 (677306) | about 2 years ago | (#40234945)

... SMBC [smbc-comics.com] ;)
Had you for a second there, didn't I?

It's not that caffeine prevents Alzheimer's, caffeine dilates time itself. We live a lifetime of productive bliss in only a few moments. Why else do non-coffee drinkers never appear to age? In what feels like 60 years for us, only a short time passes for them. They look younger because they are younger. But, they also live long enough to get Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, cancer. In a twist of irony our lives are shorter but our years are longer. We looked to the internet for the Singularity, but we should have looked inside. The Singularity is us.

I doubt this is a good study (1)

Khyber (864651) | about 2 years ago | (#40234951)

My grandfather, major coffee drinker, died from Alzheimers.

And despite the coffee I consume, I'm already noticing my memory slipping and fading. Of course it doesn't help I was already dead twice back in 2007.

Re:I doubt this is a good study (2)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 2 years ago | (#40235071)

And my grandfather recently died at the age of 103, after a lifetime of smoking, drinking, getting hardly any exercise, and eating crappy food. None of which means that these are recommended practices for extending your lifespan. The plural of "anecdote" is not "data."

Diclofenac-Phenol or Ibuprofen (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235031)

or the true "wundermittel" against Alzheimer!!

Against current "scientific belief" Alzheimer has nothing - absolute nothing - do to with those "dark" spots within the brain.
Truth is, that Alzheimer disease does statistically effect people less which use one of the named medicines. This is because Alzheimer is a chronic inflammation of the brain. and both "wundermittel" are repressing inflammation (in any part of the human body).

Pharmaceutics won't tell you as Ibuprofen is really cheap, and Diclofenac-Phenol is - even if a bit more expensive than Ibuprofen - still much cheaper then those medicines they are touting against Alzheimer...

I also found some texts that suggest the opposite (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235139)

With these studies, it's very important to know WHO finances them, because this fact has an overwhelming influence onto the results. I was looking here:
http://www.patrickholford.com/index.php/blog/blogarticle/1184/
and found this text:
Coffee and Alzheimer’s

There’s no doubt that coffee raises homocysteine levels, which are strongly associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

A group of doctors from the University Hospital Nijmegen tested the effects of coffee by assigning volunteers to drink a litre of unfiltered coffee a day – that’s about four cups – for two weeks. At the start of the two weeks their average H score was 12.8 M, slightly above the national average of 10 to 11. At the end of the two weeks their H score was 14.

A study by Dr Verhoef and co. at the Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences in the Netherlands showed that two cups of regular coffee increased homocysteine by 11% after only four hours, while caffeine tablets without coffee increased it by 5%.

However, whether coffee drinking actually increases Alzheimer’s risk is not yet clear. There are study pointing both ways.

In summary, the research does suggest that, if you are going to drink coffee it is best to do it on its own, without either a sweetener or carb snack, then wait at least 30 minutes before eating. Also, it is best to not overdo it having perhaps one or two coffees at most. More than this is likely to make your more stressed and agitated Almost all the benefits of coffee are also reported for decaf, which eliminates a fair amount of the downsides. So, a decaf a day may actually help rather than hinder your health as far as diabetes and blood sugar control is concerned.

Now, who can prove me which one is right? :-).

Lies, damned lies, and statistics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235185)

Everything I needed to know I learned from Mark Twain...

Not sure about validity... (1)

ilikenwf (1139495) | about 2 years ago | (#40235243)

My beloved granddad drank at the peak probably 1-2 carafes of coffee a day single handed. He was a trucker in his younger years and after that built fence for 10 years or so, and he loved his coffee. (In fact, he started me out drinking it at age 7 - great memories). Anyway, I can't be sure what caused his mind to go there 3-4 years before he passed, but it was one of two things - low blood oxygen levels and low bloodflow to the brain because of his past heart issues, or it could've been Alzheimer's.

If this turns out to be true it'd affirm that his heart, not Alzheimer's caused his dementia.

caffeine the cause or a symptom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40235355)

I find myself wondering if the cause is the caffeine or is that a symptom... If you are elderly, retired, don't do much and sleep in everyday, perhaps you don't drink as much coffee as the active elderly person who gets up early to go snow skiing when he's 85 years old - and I seem to remember studies saying that staying active has many health benefits.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...