×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Cognitive Software Identifies America's Brainiest Cities

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the ok-but-the-alaskans-are-just-bored dept.

Education 143

Hugh Pickens writes "We are often told that the smartest cities and nations do the best and economists typically measure smart cities by education level, calculating the cities or metros with the largest percentage of college grads or the largest shares of adults with advanced degrees. Now Richard Florida writes that a new metric developed by Lumos Labs based on their cognitive training and tracking software Lumosity seeks to track "brain performance" or cognitive capacity of cities in a more direct way by measuring the cognitive performance of more than one million users in the United States who use their games against their location using IP geolocation software. Lumosity's website offers forty games designed to sharpen a wide range of cognitive skills. Individual scores were recorded in five key cognitive areas: memory, processing speed, flexibility, attention, and problem solving.The data was normalized into a basic brain performance index controlling for age and gender. The results are shown on a map from Zara Matheson of the Martin Prosperity Institute that shows the brainy metro index across US metro areas with the top five brainy clusters in Charlottesville Virginia, Lafayette Indiana, Anchorage Alaska, Madison Wisconsin, and the San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose area. The result is not driven principally by college students, according to Daniel Sternberg, the Lumosity data scientist who developed the metro brain performance measure. 'Since our analysis controlled for age, the reason they score well is not simply that they have a lot of young people,' says Sternberg. 'Instead, our analysis seems to show that users living in university communities tend to perform better than users of the same age in other locations.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

143 comments

Self Selected groups (4, Insightful)

frnic (98517) | about 2 years ago | (#40245707)

'Since our analysis controlled for age, the reason they score well is not simply that they have a lot of young people,' says Sternberg. 'Instead, our analysis seems to show that users living in university communities tend to perform better than users of the same age in other locations.'"

Since the groups were self selected, ie. they decided to participate, maybe people living in college towns have more time or are more interested in playing.

Re:Self Selected groups (4, Interesting)

michaelmalak (91262) | about 2 years ago | (#40245823)

Not just self-selected, but those who have time to play videogames (and maybe have lots of prior experience playing videogames -- like maybe because there is no sunlight in Anchorage during the winter?)

Re:Self Selected groups (3, Insightful)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#40246235)

It kind of sounded like the author of this study dranks the same Kool-aid that Face Book Share Holders drink.

Re:Self Selected groups (4, Informative)

TheLink (130905) | about 2 years ago | (#40246283)

And those who bother to sign up. You don't have to sign up for some games but in my short time there I got a fair number of "sign up" prompts.

Whereas this site doesn't require you to sign up: http://cognitivefun.net/ [cognitivefun.net]

Re:Self Selected groups (1, Flamebait)

bored_engineer (951004) | about 2 years ago | (#40246539)

I'm not much interested in video games, but there's definite truth in what you say. Adoption of internet services was very high here, after Mr. Gore invented it.

There's a strong shift in activities between winter and summer, though some of us still insist on getting outdoors even when the weather turns cold. (I'm fortunate, in that I live 1/2 mile from a cross-country ski area.)

Re:Self Selected groups (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | about 2 years ago | (#40245869)

Yeah! That "International Studies" graduate at Starbucks is brilliant! (And he makes a mean Latte!)

Education does not mean intelligence, and intelligence does not mean useful. Often they do go together, but often they do not...

Re:Self Selected groups (1)

jhoegl (638955) | about 2 years ago | (#40245975)

TLDR ver of above poster: Sometimes you do... sometimes you dont...

Re:Self Selected groups (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#40246451)

To regionalize intelligence? I've been told constipation can be painful.

Maybe the author of the study could test its theroy? Maybe the author could transplant itself to some populated region of the planet like maybe Prairie Chapel Ranch? Afterwards, maybe a report presented on Fox News?

Re:Self Selected groups (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246605)

Yeah! That "International Studies" graduate at Starbucks is brilliant! (And he makes a mean Latte!)

He knows enough to realize that prompt, accurate, and courteous service retains customers. He has enough interest and capability to learn and understand basic brewing science. He knows enough to realize that in when he's having a shitty day, it's his job to hide that and put on a fake smile for the customer. Also, chances are good that he can take orders in a different language.

Did he need a 4 year degree for that? Probably not. Is there a difference between your "International Studies" grad slinging coffee and a high-school dropout slinging coffee? Yes. I get better service from the college grad, and the difference is enough to affect where I buy coffee.

Re:Self Selected groups (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | about 2 years ago | (#40246171)

While there are some interesting locations--like Anchorage--the results appear to track reasonably well with the old standby metrics that tend to make urban California and the south look bad, education, money and obesity.

Re:Self Selected groups (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246921)

It would be interesting to correlate the greens and blues of this map to the red and blue voting patterns of the country.

Re:Self Selected groups (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246995)

Anchorage: no nigger's - too cold.
Madison Wisconsin: see above.
Indiana: not many nigger's.
San Jose: lot's of wetbacks.

The only one where there might be significant number's appears to be Charlottesville.

Anyone care to comment?

Re:Self Selected groups (1)

HexaByte (817350) | about 2 years ago | (#40246199)

This is the group of "smart" people with too much time on their hands.

The smart, employed, people are too busy with their lives to play on-line games.

Re:Self Selected groups (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246351)

bollocks, I don't think it's very smart to never have any down time.

Re:Self Selected groups (4, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#40246389)

This is the group of "smart" people with too much time on their hands.

The smart, employed, people are too busy with their lives to play on-line games.

I'd think that one marker for being smart would be having spare time.

Re:Self Selected groups (2)

avandesande (143899) | about 2 years ago | (#40247631)

Not sure if you are being sarcastic- being busy might mean practicing piano or planting a garden. The kind of self selection mentioned here sounds something like Mensa stroking....

Re:Self Selected groups (1)

nine-times (778537) | about 2 years ago | (#40246633)

Since the groups were self selected, ie. they decided to participate, maybe people living in college towns have more time or are more interested in playing.

I'm assuming they took averages, so that explanation doesn't work. You'd have to explain why the sample of "people who had spare time to play" skewed smart.

If that's not clear enough, an average shouldn't be thrown off by the number of people playing, assuming that the sample size is large enough to begin with. If I have 1,000 people scoring an average score of 50 or 1,000,000 people scoring an average score of 50, the average score is the same. So if you wanted to draw out the fact that it was self-selecting, you'd have to say something more like, "The smart people in college towns have more free time than elsewhere. In other places, smart people work longer hours and wouldn't take the time to play the game."

Re:Self Selected groups (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40247357)

Too lazy to RTFA or TFS, who won?

Toronto?

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40245719)

What does cognitive mean?

Re:Huh? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40245795)

Cognitive means 'related to penis usage'. Eg "CmdrTaco relied on Hemos' cognitive therapy to help him out of his depression after ESR left."

Smarter - less conservative and religious (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40245757)

Because college towns tend to have larger concentrations of progressives and secularists, their cognitive abilities will be higher. Obvious conclusion is obvious.

Re:Smarter - less conservative and religious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246279)

Too lazy to create a troll account?

Re:Smarter - less conservative and religious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246517)

Conceit is the demise of self-ascribed "progressives"

Re:Smarter - less conservative and religious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40247625)

LOL at assumption being religious = dumb

Uni students tend to stick around (4, Insightful)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 2 years ago | (#40245803)

Even controlling for age, college towns and research institutions also have a lot of older, well-educated folks hanging around, living and working in the community. My husband finished his PhD at the local Research I, but liked the town so much he accepted a job at a smaller state university one town over so we could continue to live in our old college town. Big biotech companies are always around the big research institutes as well; they don't call it Research Triangle up in NC for nothing.

False Assumption (4, Insightful)

ibpooks (127372) | about 2 years ago | (#40245819)

And all of this based on the false assumption that Lumosity's pseudoscience click-on-the-shiny-colors games are any good at measuring "brain performance".

Re:False Assumption (2)

Dinghy (2233934) | about 2 years ago | (#40245915)

It's also based on the assumption that people who install and run these apps is a representitive distribution of the population. Cue debate on intelligence of people who let apps have full network communication permissions.

Re:False Assumption (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246505)

You got that backward. It's very difficult to make a mental test that doesn't measure IQ to some degree, short of marking the wrong answer as the correct one or something like that. Then you'd still be measuring it, just in reverse. If something is actually intended to be tracking mental performance, you can be sure it has a pretty high IQ loading even if you had asked a random group of 10 year olds to design it. So you see, Luminosity would in fact need to hire someone with a good knowledge of what they were doing in order to design a test that did NOT measure brain performance.

The best and the brightest (2)

kryliss (72493) | about 2 years ago | (#40245847)

I love the fact that there is just one yellow area on the whole map. Care to guess where it's at?

Re:The best and the brightest (1)

magarity (164372) | about 2 years ago | (#40246093)

Hard to tell without even state border outlines. I'm not too bad at estimating from memory but what's with the bits down in the south east? Is that Mexico City or, like some maps of the USA, Hawaii or Alaska is munged into that map space??

Your actually killing bugs with spaceships. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40245857)

Now I have to check lumosity for a space based RTS!

The results disprove the study (1, Troll)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40245865)

"Charlottesville VA, Lafayette IN, Anchorage AK, Madison WI, and the San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose"??? Yes maybe SF/Oakland but not Charlottesville which is redneck territory. Or Anchorage.

The place with the highest concentration of iPhones and iPads is located between Baltimore and D.C. That's where I would expect to find the most intelligent people. Also Silicon Valley CA and Seattle WA.

Re:The results disprove the study (3, Insightful)

Stele (9443) | about 2 years ago | (#40245903)

The place with the highest concentration of iPhones and iPads is located between Baltimore and D.C. That's where I would expect to find the most intelligent people.

You mean douchiest right?

Re:The results disprove the study (5, Funny)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 2 years ago | (#40246321)

The place with the highest concentration of iPhones and iPads is located between Baltimore and D.C. That's where I would expect to find the most intelligent people.

You mean douchiest right?

Douche'

Re:The results disprove the study (1)

boristdog (133725) | about 2 years ago | (#40246091)

The place with the highest concentration of iPhones and iPads is located between Baltimore and D.C. That's where I would expect to find the most intelligent people.

Wow. Just wow. The leap it took to correlate Apple product ownership with intelligence was amazing. I congratulate you, that was awesome.

Re:The results disprove the study (2)

briniel (916290) | about 2 years ago | (#40247321)

The place with the highest concentration of iPhones and iPads is located between Baltimore and D.C. That's where I would expect to find the most intelligent people.

Wow. Just wow. The leap it took to correlate Apple product ownership with intelligence was amazing. I congratulate you, that was awesome.

Awesomely correct, here's proof [redapes.org].

Re:The results disprove the study (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40247745)

You sound like someone who doesn't wear glasses.

Re:The results disprove the study (1)

bored_engineer (951004) | about 2 years ago | (#40247137)

huh. Do location and lifestyle define intelligence? These factors may influence, but they are not deciding factors.

. . .And being a software or silicon center doesn't necessarily constitute a collection of brainpower. Madison, for example, is a major biotech center. . . .and your notion of "rednecks" being intellectually inferior surprises me, too. I probably, by your definition, qualify as a redneck: I drive a pickup, own several guns, live well out of town, collect firewood to heat my home during the winter, bla, bla, bla.

I lived in Beverly Hills for a (very long) decade, and the apparently institutional disdain that exists on the west side of Los Angeles for dwellers of less urban locales shocked me when I first moved there. Then I visited a few other places and found that several cities have the same disdain for those with a more rural lifestyle. These cities that you so casually dismiss aren't that different from wherever you live. There's a similar variety of losers, idiots, geniuses and winners.

Anchorage, by the way, has an unusual concentration of engineers, as well as a sizable university. There are also a hell of a lot of people there who stay indoors during the winter.

Re:The results disprove the study (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#40247453)

The results disprove the study ... not Charlottesville which is redneck territory. Or Anchorage.

No, the results disprove your stereotyped preconceptions of what people are like.

smartest people live in the north (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40245867)

just like in europe. why do smart people always decide to live in the cold north?

Re:smartest people live in the north (1)

skids (119237) | about 2 years ago | (#40246005)

Because the bugs all die once a year instead of growing to the size of avacados.

Re:smartest people live in the north (1)

Control-Z (321144) | about 2 years ago | (#40246133)

Charlottesville isn't North unless you're from Florida. It's firmly in the South. It is sometimes called the Mid-Atlantic region, but it's not North.

Re:smartest people live in the north (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246249)

Cause the stupid people die more often in cold weather.

Re:smartest people live in the north (1)

Bengie (1121981) | about 2 years ago | (#40246925)

Warmer climates seem to have more lazy people. If it gets cold and you don't have a home, you're not going to hand around. /s

Re:smartest people live in the north (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#40247475)

just like in europe. why do smart people always decide to live in the cold north?

A powerful CPU requires good cooling, duh.

Holy crap look at the Southeast (-1, Troll)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#40245957)

I have heritage from the South and North.

I have ancestors who were soldiers in the Confederacy, and I have ancestors who were soldiers in the Union.

So I am speaking against my own blood here.

But I'm sorry, the Southern US has been a political and intellectual dead weight drag on this country since its founding.

Sometimes I wish the Confederacy won their independence, were allowed to descend to the impoverished nation status they so fervently desire. Go ahead, let them embrace economically and socially illiterate conservative policies they favor with religious (but not intellectual) fervor on their own. Enjoy your race to join Haiti on the development index.

These states suck up so much federal financial largesse from the West and East Coast (hypocrites) and in return we get nothing but backasswards social and political WHARGARBBBLE.

Canada, could you absorb some Northern US states please? I live in New York State. I feel more in common in terms of social and political values with Canadians than I do with Dixie. I know I am not alone.

Let's drop this dead weight Southern anchor and achieve greatness.

Can we build a wall?

Re:Holy crap look at the Southeast (1)

boristdog (133725) | about 2 years ago | (#40246113)

the Southern US has been a political and intellectual dead weight drag on this country since its founding

When was the Southern US "founded" anyway? Seems like many of those states were in the original 13.

Re:Holy crap look at the Southeast (2)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 2 years ago | (#40246209)

The sentence implies that the South has been a drag on the US since the US was founded, not since the "South" was founded. Aside from a few isolated bright spots in history, this is pretty much true.

Re:Holy crap look at the Southeast (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246357)

"since its founding" = "since the US's founding". He's saying the South has been a drag on the whole since then. Not that difficult to parse, dude.

Re:Holy crap look at the Southeast (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 2 years ago | (#40246541)

I'm looking at a map missing blobs for places I know to contain concentrations of highly educated populations in the south. I'm also looking at some blobs that, given local information you would expect to break the curve on the low end, doing relatively well. I'd be interested to know how the blobs were chosen, what the empty spots mean, and a filled map.

Re:Holy crap look at the Southeast (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246713)

If the Southern US is such a deadweight why are/have so many technology-based companies moving their IT operations out of northeastern cities like Boston to Southern cities like Raleigh, Atlanta and others. There are plenty of idiots (like you) living in both the North and the South -- many insecure Northerners just happen to pull the Deliverance card and say it represents the entire South whenever they feel a need to make themselves feel superior. Hope your rant made you feel better about yourself even though it exposes your narrow-mindedness and lack of exposure to the world outside of the tiny head you live in.

Re:Holy crap look at the Southeast (1)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#40247377)

Can we build a wall?

Yes. But we're going to have to hire Mexicans to do it.

Error in title (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40245965)

I found an error in the title, it should be

Cognitive Software Identifies America's Most Communist Cities

-- American Christians of Patriotism Association

Well duh, it's college. (2, Insightful)

HeckRuler (1369601) | about 2 years ago | (#40245987)

users living in university communities tend to perform better than users of the same age in other locations.

Ok, that makes sense. You know, COLLEGE.

The result is not driven principally by college students,

Uh...... wut?

'Since our analysis controlled for age, the reason they score well is not simply that they have a lot of young people,'

uh huh. So they discovered that smart people go to college?

I'm sorry, could someone explain to me how they come to the conclusion that their results aren't driven by college students?
"Controlled for age" doesn't mean much to me, but sure, ok, it takes into account the age discrepancy. But... you know, it doesn't take into account that THEY'RE GOING INTO HIGHER EDUCATION. I really don't see how this isn't driven by college students.

Re:Well duh, it's college. (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | about 2 years ago | (#40246339)

If they are controlling for age and colleges are principally made up of students, and those students aren't senior citizens then it isn't a reach to conclude that the universities are providing an indirect influence that raises the bar. Maybe some students are sticking around, maybe the university is pulling in "intelligence required" companies to the area, maybe college students are engaging non-students in the coffee houses, etc..

Re:Well duh, it's college. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246677)

Or perhaps the college professors are pulling up the curve?

Stop the presses! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246081)

Wait, you're telling me that a study designed to measure "braininess" using Internet games shows that affluent areas with readily available broadband fare better than those that don't? What a brilliant insight!

Seriously though, researchers (of all types) need to revisit entry level statistics where "sample bias" and related basic concepts are introduced. Show me a study like this that overlays availability of Internet services, population density, and median salary, instead of one that only compensates for gender and age. Then we can all be impressed by the cognitive abilities of the researchers.

IP Geolocation is horribly wrong at times (3, Insightful)

locketine (1101453) | about 2 years ago | (#40246189)

If people are playing these games at work then the geolocation might be where the company's datacenter is, not where the people are.

Re:IP Geolocation is horribly wrong at times (1)

Beorytis (1014777) | about 2 years ago | (#40246559)

Yes, that. I constantly get web advertising targeted to my employer's corporate HQ, not my office location. Did the study use anything better?

Re:IP Geolocation is horribly wrong at times (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246769)

My geolocation info shows me in Anchorage. I live 400 miles away.

Re:IP Geolocation is horribly wrong at times (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40247539)

Not to mention that if these were smartphone geolocations, unless they were directly querying the phone and not relying on their ip-geolocation, the results were further skewed as a phones ip address is a horrible representation of their actual location. Disregarding the fact that a phone can expose a different IP address to the server within a few minutes, phones suffer from the same problems you described, where their true location is obscured because of how they are assigned their ip addresses.

I Think This Study Lacked Just One Thing (2)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 2 years ago | (#40246207)

Reality. Any time a person combines three separate communities together has no idea of the reality they are describing.

Re:I Think This Study Lacked Just One Thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40247057)

There is something telling in the scores in general. There is a clear North/South divide that may be a remnant of the Civil War.

"The womb" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246253)

I have always been partial to Madison, and one of the nick-names that I heard while living there could explain its presence on the list (assuming that the measurements are valid): it is sometimes called "the womb". The idea is that students, especially grad students, at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) get so used to the environement around the university there (it is a really nice place to live if you are not in the nightlife crowd) that they just hang around after graduation, even working at jobs that you would not think a grad student normally would do. I swear that half of the taxi drivers in Madison seem to have taken the "African Storytelling"[1] grad course at the UW.

Now living in silicon valley I can tell you it is not the same thing that keeps people in this side of that metro area, but that could apply to the San Francisco side. Maybe even the northern side of silicon valey (near Stanford).

[1] I am actually serious about that course, it is really highly rated and not because it is easy but because the prfessor who teaches it is amazing (I have heard).

Re:"The womb" (1)

Ryanrule (1657199) | about 2 years ago | (#40247977)

Madison wanted to put in a streetcar. I imagine walker shit all over that though. That city must be brutally hostile to him.

I wouldnt be surprised if he thought about moving the capital or something.

And the dumbest (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246273)

And the least brainiest are those in like Alabama or Texas or the local redneck trailer court.

Re:And the dumbest (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 2 years ago | (#40246753)

FYI, the Birmingham blob contains quite a lot of rural area. The Opelika/Auburn, Tuscaloosa, and Huntsville areas are entirely unrepresented. In the 2000 census, Opelika ranked #32 in the country for percentage of local population with graduate degrees, Huntsville ranked #66, Tuscaloosa #79. It also appears as if the Mobile area is only partially represented. If you cut out those areas, then Alabama does indeed look incredibly dumb.

Where? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246387)

There seems to be a larger concentration around Cedar Rapids IA, than the concentration in Indiana. How is that explained, or is it?

By-the-by, Cedar Rapids is the home of the University of Iowa, which sort of falls into a lot of the other comments posted so far.

That's silly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246411)

So you're... tracking physical location by IP address on a network with so many dynamically allocated IPs, that may wildly vary in how large an area they represent (like this one is anywhere in the neighborhood, this one is anywhere in the city, this one is anywhere in the state, etc), or even if they represent individual users, households, businesses, campuses, agencies, or companies (which may actually be scattered across the entire nation in reality, but all show the same public IP address). And using all that to try to figure out where the smart people are?

How is that accurate at all?

Don't get excited (1)

Bob-taro (996889) | about 2 years ago | (#40246493)

Before anyone gets to too proud or offended, notice that the whole scale only ranges from 98 to 102. That's not much of a difference, is it? Even if we ignore all the problems with method, the results point to a surprising degree of uniformity, don't they?

geolocation...really? (1)

proslack (797189) | about 2 years ago | (#40246551)

The mere fact that these lab rats are allowing themselves to be continuously geolocated doesn't say much about their brains. I suspect the smarter people are busy working in the lab and don't need games to improve their "brain performance."

Hey, I've see this map before! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246693)

The colors are different but it looks just like the red/blue political maps they show during elections

Not my definition of smart, but whatever! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40246881)

Whether certain activities are smart or dumb is a cultural and personal matter. Plus the self-selecting nature of the survey is likely very biased.
In my mind, playing video or on-line games is not smart--not a wise use of one's time. But cultural differences will probably attract more-capable minds in some geographic areas. That doesn't mean the population on the whole for these areas is more intelligent. It might simply mean the culture for these areas is one of waste and sloth, with more intelligent individuals "buying into" the regressive ideas.
That's my opinion.

Off the charts! (1)

tippe (1136385) | about 2 years ago | (#40247105)

My area is completely white. That means I'm off the chart, right guys? Guys?

I guess the next thing to figure out is which way off the chart I am...

What is Smart? (1)

sycodon (149926) | about 2 years ago | (#40247447)

If not for all the "dumb" people, most of the "smart" people would be standing in their own shit because they couldn't fix the plumbing and would be scratching for nuts and berries in the fields because they have no clue how to raise and harvest crops or raise and slaughter livestock, let alone hunt for food. They'd be walking because they have no ability to work on their vehicles, or run a refinery, or operate a drilling rig. And even if they did, they probably can't weld for shit...all jobs that are done by people that most here on Slashdot would not consider to be "smart".

So the next time you think to yourself how smart you are, consider all the essentials of civilization that rely on the "dumb" people to make happen and what situation you would be in if not for them.

Certainly not here. (1)

kurt555gs (309278) | about 2 years ago | (#40247481)

Joliet Illinois would never be on this list. The demographic indicator I use is the ( tooth / tattoo ) ratio. Normally Joliet has an embarrassingly low value, except where there is a NASCAR race in town. Then, the ( tooth / tattoo ) ratio slides down into the extreme low single digits.

   

Scoring (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | about 2 years ago | (#40247593)

How is the scoring done? A 6 point spread between least and most intelligent doesn't seem all that interesting to me....

Vanishing Effect (1)

pubwvj (1045960) | about 2 years ago | (#40247653)

"our analysis seems to show that users living in university communities tend to perform better than users of the same age in other locations.'"

I'll bet that effect will vanish in the future. People used to gravitate to the university towns for resources that are now available no matter where you live. We live way the heck out in the countryside and can get the same intellectual resources via the Internet that we used to have to go to the university towns to get.

New Mexico? (1)

clovis (4684) | about 2 years ago | (#40247819)

Their study is a cool idea, but it looks to me like they made a hash of it. It's simply a way of locating college towns.
How did the southern half of New Mexico/Arizona get designated a single area? That segment appears to contain Phoenix. OK, I can see 500 people there playing games, but how did they expand the metro area to include half of New Mexico? I wonder if it's just the IP space of a single ISP.

BTW, that yellow area in Georgia is probably Fort Benning - an area filled with people who have free time which may be filled with interruptions.

failure of parametric statistics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40247943)

So, Madison WI scored well? Makes me wonder if the parametric statistics used in the analysis are actually reasonable to apply in this case.

Turn the study up to 11 (2)

paiute (550198) | about 2 years ago | (#40248067)

"...users living in university communities tend to perform better than users of the same age in other locations....."

That explains why Boston isn't on the list. It's not much of a college town.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...