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Analyzing the New MacBook Pro

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the buy-a-few-spares dept.

Portables (Apple) 914

MrSeb writes "Late yesterday, Apple released a next-generation 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display. It has a 2880×1800 220 PPI display. The normal 13- and 15-inch MacBook Pros and MacBook Airs have also been updated, but the 17-inch MBP has been retired, in effect replaced by the new Retina display MBP. Without a doubt, this new laptop is an engineering marvel in the same league as the original iPhone or MacBook Air. ... The Retina display MBP really looks nothing we've ever seen before. Here, ExtremeTech dives into the engineering behind the laptop, paying close attention to that new and rather shiny display — and the fact that this thing has no user-replaceable parts at all." Fleshing things out a bit more, iFixit has a teardown of the internals. Their verdict: effectively unrepairable by the user.

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914 comments

has no user-replaceable parts at all (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40309419)

And it's made by Apple?
shocking.
Next I suppose you're going to tell me the battery in my iPod can't be replaced like my other MP3 player could.

Re:has no user-replaceable parts at all (4, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40309569)

It can be replaced it is just a huge pain to do so. I have done some ipod battery replacements and no the average non-slashdotter can't do it. The average slashdotter should be able to though, or should not be on slashdot.

Re:has no user-replaceable parts at all (5, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#40309753)

So have I, but we're not normal users. I'm actually not a user at all, except for a third generation ipod in my truck -- I got the special tools and a line on several parts suppliers because the disposable mentality of the Apple product line just annoys the hell out of me. I offer repair/refurbish services to family, friends, friends-of-friends because I get satisfaction out of spoiling Apple's throw-away stand-in-line-for-new-model paradigm. And that it's more environmentally moral to keep the older devices in play.

Re:has no user-replaceable parts at all (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309635)

You can't build a machine like that using off-the-shelf parts. I'm sure OWC will come to the rescue with an SSD upgrade, just like they did for the Air.

Re:has no user-replaceable parts at all (5, Informative)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 2 years ago | (#40309887)

You can't replace the battery in the Galaxy Tab, either, but nobody around here sharpened their pitchforks over it.

Oh, on an unrelated note: Battery life on the Tab is pretty good.

Christ... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309421)

"Without a doubt, this new laptop is an engineering marvel..."

Oh give me a fucking break. The LEM was an engineering marvel. The Roman aqueducts were an engineering marvel. Apple has done nothing of the sort, what bologna.

Re:Christ... (1, Insightful)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | about 2 years ago | (#40309467)

Yes, they did. It's called a "Mac Plus" -- the greatest Apple Macintosh ever built.

Re:Christ... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309609)

Which actually really serves to highlight the contrast between Apple Computers, the technology company, and Apple, Inc., the appliance and marketing company.

The only thing they've done lately is make new, chrome-y buttons whose highlights respond in time with the gyroscope in iOS 6. Wow, what progress.

Re:Christ... (4, Informative)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40309885)

>>>Mac plus -- the greatest Apple Macintosh ever built.

Really? A 68000 @ 8 MHz computer that cost $2600 in 1986. The best? No wonder I never bought one (though I used them in school). The Commodore Amiga cost about 1/3rd that price, at approximately the same speed, but with full 4000-color display and TV compatible resolution, so it could show full-sized video. In fact it was used to produce special effects for several sci-fi shows. Plus it had preemptive tasking.

The Mac+ was a boring black-and-white with teeny-tiny screen, that could only run one task at a time, and frequently crashed when I was using it.

Re:Christ... (5, Insightful)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#40309527)

"Without a doubt, this new laptop is an engineering marvel..."

Oh give me a fucking break. The LEM was an engineering marvel. The Roman aqueducts were an engineering marvel. Apple has done nothing of the sort, what bologna.

They engineered the battery to be right at the very edge of the unit, in a perfect spot to be easily replaced should they decide to put a thin layer of plastic around it and install a tiny seam on the outside (as many past owners found to be perfectly acceptable) but instead they decided that selling $150 replacement batteries wasn't enough, now they need to sell $150 replacement batteries AND $150 replacement battery services. That's a marvel.

Re:Christ... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309695)

...they decided that selling $150 replacement batteries wasn't enough, now they need to sell $150 replacement batteries AND $150 replacement battery services...

Hmm ... seems to me that it costs $129 for a new battery and that includes installation. Apple MacBook Battery Replacement [apple.com]

Re:Christ... (2, Interesting)

BlackSnake112 (912158) | about 2 years ago | (#40309825)

Are they replacing your battery? Or giving you a refurb laptop? The last 5 people I know that had the battery replaced also needed to restore their data. Never knew that changing a battery required data to be restored in a laptop.

I know the apple store people also re-imaged the laptop. No need to, but that is part of their procedure. That was on 3 of them. The other 2 actually got a different laptops back.

Re:Christ... (2)

atisss (1661313) | about 2 years ago | (#40309953)

Probably because hardware serial number changed. Replacing battery would change serial and OS license numbers.

Re:Christ... (3, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#40309937)

Ah, the old "non-user replaceable battery" complaint. Didn't fly with the iPod 10 years ago. Still doesn't fly now.

Re:Christ... (4, Insightful)

Samalie (1016193) | about 2 years ago | (#40309541)

I like Apple.

"Engineering Marvel" is a fucking joke. I agree with the parent 100%.

Its just a fucking laptop.

Re:Christ... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309685)

fuck apple

Re:Christ... (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 years ago | (#40309715)

Its just a fucking laptop.

Well, in some circumstances, that would be considered a big plus, even if it doesn't quite rise (ahem) to the level of an engineering marvel.

Re:Christ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309931)

Slashdot may not have anyone left capable of contributing to a good tech discussion, but there's no shortage of this kind of hilarious zinger.

Re:Christ... (0, Offtopic)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#40309883)

Oh give me a fucking break. The LEM was an engineering marvel. The Roman aqueducts were an engineering marvel.

And the engineering in the new MBP is way better than either of those, so it MUST be an engineering marvel.

"effectively unrepairable by the user" (5, Insightful)

couchslug (175151) | about 2 years ago | (#40309429)

Appliance buyers don't tear down their toaster very often either.

That said, it's cool from my perspective since it will result in "dead lappies for cheap" which will motivate people who like to tinker and build machines from organ donors.

I won't be buying one. The ability to quickly repair Thinkpads is a key reason I buy them instead.

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309459)

And if your toaster was $3000, you'd have a point.

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (4, Insightful)

Tr3vin (1220548) | about 2 years ago | (#40309833)

If my toaster cost $3000, I think I'd have money to pay a toaster repairman.

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309461)

Appliance buyers don't tear down their toaster very often either.

Your childhood sucked didn't it?

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309683)

I won't be buying one of them either. A $200 price premium for 8GB ram is ridiculous. 16GB will feel cramped 2 or 3 years down the road. Last I checked, 16GB RAM costs $120 [newegg.com] meaning that you're paying $200 for an memory upgrade that should cost $60.

Bring back memory sockets.

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (5, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40309909)

Yes FOOL, but this is iRam.

Which is much shinier than regular RAM.

One could say it's an ENGINEERING MARVEL TO BEHOLD!

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (1)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#40309697)

So? for most people this will be powerful enough that they won't feel the need to upgrade it. Like most Acura/Lexus drivers they will buy this as a treat for themselves and not for any real need for all the computing power it has.

its also a pretty good gaming machine and will probably steal a lot of alienware and other silly computer case company customers

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309779)

its also a pretty good gaming machine and will probably steal a lot of alienware and other silly computer case company customers

Yes, because Apple is known for gaming.

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (1)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#40309719)

ditto for repairing

for most people they won't want to repair it. and the cost of paying someone plus the parts to repair it will be close enough to sell it for the parts and buy a new laptop

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309817)

Appliance buyers don't tear down their toaster very often either.

You would be surprised
Barring dangerous stuff (And expensive stuff that worked fine), I had opened up many appliances at home in the 10-18 age range

Re:"effectively unrepairable by the user" (5, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#40309875)

> Appliance buyers don't tear down their toaster very often either.

Not very often. On the other hand, toasters last longer, (ours is over 17 years old, my mother-in-law's still functional toaster is from a time when Bakelite was considered a valid construction material) and don't cost nearly as much. And they *are* fixable by anyone with a screwdriver and some aptitude.

> I won't be buying one. The ability to quickly repair Thinkpads is a key reason I buy them instead.

Agreed. Exactly. I just recently "repaired" my daughter's T30 -- open one door, replace battery, open a different door, replace hard drive, install OS, done.

no user-replaceable parts (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309431)

apple has perfected separating fools from their money.

No dvd drive is too soon for me (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309433)

I likes me optical media in a laptop still. The time to do without is coming very soon, but not quite yet.

Re:No dvd drive is too soon for me (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309871)

Besides the missing DVD drive and soldered RAM, the lack of ethernet proves the Retina book is nothing more than a Starbucks special.

Note the old fully-loaded MacBook Pro is still for sale. You know, for actual pros who need to pull big files off servers and shit.

More than 1080p (5, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | about 2 years ago | (#40309441)

At least Apple is recognising that there is a market for monitors with more than 1080p. Hopefully, the new display will be a success, and other manufactures will finally some out with truly high def monitors for less than a car payment again.

Re:More than 1080p (2)

bhcompy (1877290) | about 2 years ago | (#40309549)

Yet it's a measly 15 inches.. but it is 16:10, so I'll give them that. It's an improvement over this 16:9 shit standard nowadays

Re:More than 1080p (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40309593)

A measly 15"? I want this display in a 13" laptop.

Re:More than 1080p (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309797)

They do have that display in a 13" laptop. It's called the 15" laptop, which is what happens to 13" laptops when you put 15" displays in them.

Re:More than 1080p (2)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#40309907)

> Yet it's a measly 15 inches.. but it is 16:10, so I'll give them that. It's an improvement over this 16:9 shit standard nowadays

Yes yes yes! Not an Apple fan, but 16:9 is pants!

Re:More than 1080p (2)

Kjella (173770) | about 2 years ago | (#40309933)

Well apparently big and high PPI is more expensive and complicated than small and high PPI, but first the iPhone (3.5"), then the iPad (9.7") and now the MPB (15.4") it's pretty obvious to connect the dots on where this is going. I'd be very surprised if we did not have a high PPI iMac/Display within a year or so. Particularly since 4K TVs are finally starting to pop up in the market place, although still at outrageous prices.

no user-replaceable parts (4, Informative)

rvw (755107) | about 2 years ago | (#40309447)

This is quite annoying. When I bought my macbook three years ago, it had a 160GB harddrive. If I wanted to upgrade to 250GB I had to pay €130. I went to the nearest computershop and bought a 320GB drive for less then €100. That means I had a spare 160GB drive as well. The same goes for memory. I buy it via ebay in the US, for half the price. I hope there will be shops who will replace these parts for normal prices.

Re:no user-replaceable parts (3, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#40309553)

While a wholly proprietary pinout(and a different wholly proprietary pinout than the last model's wholly proprietary pinout) the storage card is at least socketed... Given that there are likely to be a reasonable number of these sold, and to deep pocketed buyers, 3rd-party options will likely exist sooner or later. RAM, though, may leave you with a case of buyer's remorse...

Re:no user-replaceable parts (1, Interesting)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#40309643)

While a wholly proprietary pinout(and a different wholly proprietary pinout than the last model's wholly proprietary pinout) the storage card is at least socketed... Given that there are likely to be a reasonable number of these sold, and to deep pocketed buyers, 3rd-party options will likely exist sooner or later. RAM, though, may leave you with a case of buyer's remorse...

Easy, just buy the largest option. Apple is doing one thing smart here, they are making a design that if produced by the tens of millions (which these will surely be) will prove to be VERY cheap. That means you can probably buy the upgraded ram for what the same version would have cost you with a modular ram socket but no upgrade in place. Comparing these notebooks to other similar competitors will probably put Apple on a footing closer than they were in the past. The question is, at what price does giving up choice come at? Clearly Apple is OK with removing choice (as seen in all other product lines) in favor of a cost-competitive set of options that "you want". Why should they not take their laptops to the same model?

Re:no user-replaceable parts (5, Insightful)

cryptizard (2629853) | about 2 years ago | (#40309561)

I agree, it sucks pretty hard from a consumer standpoint but I can also see why it might have been (emphasis might) necessary in this case. That thing is crazy thin and if you look at the teardown they don't really have any room to mess around in there. Looks like they made it possible by taking all the things that used to be self contained (RAM, hard drive, etc.), pulling out their guts and soldering/plugging them directly onto the main board. Think about the space you save over having to include hard drive enclosures and sockets for the RAM. Again, not saying I like this, but I would sooner attribute it to a desire to make this thing as streamlined as possible rather than assuming they were trying to screw people over. In fact, the new non-retina Macbook Pros are still totally user replaceable.

Re:no user-replaceable parts (1, Insightful)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#40309659)

unless you're a digital hoarder who feels the need to keep more music and TV/movies than any reasonable person can watch in a lifetime hard drives are large enough. worst case i can buy an external drive to archive photos/videos of my kids.

most people don't have mental/OCD issues where they will have to see some photo from years ago right away

Re:no user-replaceable parts (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309905)

Hmm well as a Macbook Air user with a 128GB SSD, I agree that you can easily get by with that - and I have Windows 7 in VMWare just in case. You don't "need" *all* of your photos, videos, etc. with you all the time.

Still, my desktop has about 12TB of storage which is close to full. Mostly it is full of iTunes TV downloads and DVD rips. At 5-9GB each, normal DVD rips can fill up any hard disk pretty quickly. Even compressing them to AVC they still take 1-2GB each. 100 movies x 2 GB = 200GB. If you get a couple movies per week for a few years, your disk will be full before you know it. I don't compress all of them right away because it's a pain and I can just buy another disk. I also have many GB of photos and music (good quality CD rips, etc.). BlueRay would be another topic entirely.

Re:no user-replaceable parts (3, Insightful)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about 2 years ago | (#40309669)

Most laptops require a screwdriver to replace the hard drive. This one is no different. Except that in this case, the "hard drive" is a chip, third party versions of which will undoubtedly be available soon, just like the were for the Air [macsales.com].

RAM soldered to the motherboard is disappointing, although looking at how things are crammed in, I'm not really surprised. iFixit's point that it's "the first MacBook Pro that will be unable to adapt to future advances in memory and storage technology" is incorrect - Intel laptop motherboards have almost always been limited to memory that existed when they were sold, and you CAN upgrade the storage.

Storage may be replaceable (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#40309879)

In the comments someone noted that the built-in storage appeared to have the same connector as the Macbook Air, which would mean you could replace the storage.

The RAM seems soldiered in though.

Re:no user-replaceable parts (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309967)

Or, you could just follow the instructions on apple.com. They show you how to replace your battery, HD and RAM. It's actually very easy.

Did I miss something? (3, Insightful)

thogard (43403) | about 2 years ago | (#40309449)

Why is something made with the current generation of components considered "an engineering marvel "?

Re:Did I miss something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309559)

Sales engineering. They did what any other company could've done with a laptop at a 2300 dollar price point. The marvel is apple social engineering their way into people's wallets.

Re:Did I miss something? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309729)

Maybe not "marvel", but this laptop certainly is a very well-built, well-designed machine. This laptop is clearly more than "current generation of components". Many of them are custom designed to be as small and thin as possible. I'm not saying if that is good or bad, depending on what you are looking for, but this obviously is not just another case of throw together off the shelf components and call it a laptop.

Re:Did I miss something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309769)

It isn't made with the "current generation of components", you stupid cunt.

Most of them are custom-built and engineered.

Re:Did I miss something? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309785)

What other laptop on the market has a 220 DPI panel? Please, tell me, I hate buying Apple but that is one hell of a screen.

They will come (1)

Quick Reply (688867) | about 2 years ago | (#40309463)

The 17" model has always lagged behind.

When they can procure 17" 3840x2400 displays, the 17" will return.

I thought so too, but... (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#40309555)

The fact the current 17" model is no longer sold at all seems an indicator they might be dropping the model for a while.

The new display has enough pixels to fit a retina iPad display within... as much as I like the larger space of the 17" laptop I think with the new screen I could shrink fonts down a bit and be OK with it.

2880×1800? More like 1440x900. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309477)

I was reading about the display on AnandTech [anandtech.com], but one thing I don't get is what the actual resolution of the retina display is. From what I can tell, the images are rendered at 2880x1800, but can't actually be displayed at that size with pixel-perfect accuracy. Text cannot be read on higher resolutions without increasing the font size, which I thought was the whole point of having a higher resolution.

No, really 2880x1800 (3, Informative)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#40309619)

What you are confused by is the scaling for elements (like images) that are not built for a hi-res display. All system text, and all of the applications that come with the Macbook have everything at the full resolution.

Anything built for a high-res display can be displayed in pixel perfect accuracy.

No, really more like 1440x900 (2, Informative)

_xeno_ (155264) | about 2 years ago | (#40309865)

No, not really 2880x1800. Make no mistake, this is not a 2880x1800 display, at least in the sense that most people would think. It's effectively a 1440x900 display, where each pixel is actually four.

By which I mean that if you currently can fit 40 lines of code in a single editor window on your existing 1440x900 display, on this new 2880x1800 "retina" display, you will be able to fit those same 40 lines of code, just with extra clarity.

Now don't get me wrong, the increase in pixel density is a good thing, but calling it a "2880x1800" is incredibly misleading (albeit technically accurate). You won't fit any more actual data, the same data you can currently fit will just have a higher resolution.

Re:2880×1800? More like 1440x900. (5, Interesting)

LocalH (28506) | about 2 years ago | (#40309625)

That's how Apple does high DPI - it's basically a 2x mode. The idea is that programs not designed for a Retina display will still act like they're running on a 1440x900 display (and thus will be of a decent size on the screen) but programs with 2x assets will display with the increased sharpness. Non-Retina-aware programs still get some of the benefit in terms of font and UI rendering (as standard system widgets are always displayed at Retina resolution regardless of whether the app is Retina-aware). This is the same way that it works on the iPhone/iPod touch 4 and the iPad 3.

This is where the fact that Apple chose to use unhinted fonts is a big win. Windows can't easily do high DPI because many programs are not designed for it, font spacing will be way off in some programs because Microsoft chooses to hammer fonts to the pixel grid.

Re:2880×1800? More like 1440x900. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309759)

If you run with XP style scaling, yes (which is the default and what all sites I've seen actually demonstrate, they always forget to change the setting). But not with Vista style scaling, in which case non-DPI apps will also employ pixel doubling, if DPI is set to 200%.
W8 has a preset option for this (W7 this must be done manually).

Re:2880×1800? More like 1440x900. (2)

vux984 (928602) | about 2 years ago | (#40309761)

font spacing will be way off in some programs because Microsoft chooses to hammer fonts to the pixel grid.

I'd thought cleartype and the font system in Vista and later had gotten a lot better. I'd thought the reason Windows can't do high DPI well was more related to things like toolbar icon assets etc.

Re:2880×1800? More like 1440x900. (2)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#40309721)

I was reading about the display on AnandTech [anandtech.com], but one thing I don't get is what the actual resolution of the retina display is. From what I can tell, the images are rendered at 2880x1800, but can't actually be displayed at that size with pixel-perfect accuracy. Text cannot be read on higher resolutions without increasing the font size, which I thought was the whole point of having a higher resolution.

It seems to make sense, they will either have an option where you can get the display to act like it's 2880x1800 (and everything will be super fucking small like you are saying) or you can have the display scaled to a slighly more normal 1900x1200 aka 1080p-like but at the cost of having the GPU do some upscaling so that all the apps still pump out a lower number of pixels, but the screen gets all the pixels it needs thanks to what is probably a pretty well thought out smoothing algorithm. And as the screenshot suggests, this is probably what murders the performance and/or battery life on the unit since you basically need to have a high power GPU running all the time to keep up with that process.

Re:2880×1800? More like 1440x900. (3, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about 2 years ago | (#40309793)

It's 2880x1800. Your confusion stems from Lion's text and OS UI element handling, which basically gives you choices about how big you want text and UI elements to appear. It looks like you can specify a kind of effective resolution, telling Lion to fool all the old software that doesn't know about high dpi screens into not rendering things too small to see.

OpenGL and the Cocoa drawing APIs have full access to high resolution screen.

Dead on arrival (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309501)

No matte option, only glossy. Useful for attractive Mac users that enjoy a good look in the mirror. Useless for anyone who writes code or uses computers to produce value.
It's sad that the mbp has finally died, I really love mine. Hopefully in a decade Dell or HP or someone will make something as good with a matte screen.

Wrong, semi-matte by default (4, Informative)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#40309709)

No matte option, only glossy

The new screen has a much different front, they said in the marketing materials 60-70% less reflective than the older glossy models. It's why there's no matte option this time around (I have a matte screen currently and wouldn't go for a glossy option again either).

Re:Wrong, semi-matte by default (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309795)

It's still glossy. The current MBP glossy screens are so reflective you can only see the lights in the room. a 70% reflectivity reduction means you can only see the lights in the room. I once tried to write an email on a borrowed MBP and all I could see was my own face, I had to touch type out the entire email. They simple are not usable computers.
They've totally ruined it. Maybe someone will come out with an aftermarket matte treatment.

Oooooohhh Retina Display (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309529)

I'll be able to see it with my retina.

(or vagina)

You aren't supposed to repair your Apple computer (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309533)

Just throw it away and buy a shiny, shiny new one! Or are you opposed to planned obsolescence? We have a few decades of resources left to consume before they run out, so don't worry!

The mac air was NOT an engineering marvel (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309575)

While all the fanbois ooohed and aaaahed over the mac air, Toshiba had a laptop that was thinner, lighter, had gigabit ethernet, and contained a DVD drive.

Toshiba had an engineering marvel. Apple just had a laptop with tapered edges so that it LOOKED thinner, even though it was actually thicker.

Who did it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309577)

Who engineered it? Americans, Chinese or Koreans?

The background picture (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309605)

I guess because of the load just the background picture of that article loaded on the first go. What the heck is it? It looks like a wooden table and a chair in some farm house in the third world with an oxygen tank sitting on the floor next to it. It looks like some place you could imagine "enhanced interrogation techniques" being used, but not on laptops. Funny.

Heat (3, Interesting)

NoZart (961808) | about 2 years ago | (#40309623)

I read a few articles on the new shiny, but there seems to be no information on how the thermal and related noise situation is. How does the smaller design and needed computing power to drive that screen impact the temperature (under stress)?
My old MBP already gets annoyingly hot and loud when i am doing stuff on it.

This is the problem I have.... (4, Insightful)

BigDaveyL (1548821) | about 2 years ago | (#40309641)

If I'm going to pay a premium for a laptop, I'd like to be able to upgrade the RAM and HDD. Or even replace the battery. Many users simply can't afford to buy the new model every year.

If this was an engineering marvel, Apple would have allowed users to do upgrades.

Re:This is the problem I have.... (4, Insightful)

DogDude (805747) | about 2 years ago | (#40309705)

Many users simply can't afford to buy the new model every year.

But many can, and those are Apple customers.

Re:This is the problem I have.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309857)

Upgrade it to what? The maximum capacity is 16GB RAM. Upgrade the SSD to more than 768GB? With what?

Re:This is the problem I have.... (2)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | about 2 years ago | (#40309929)

If I'm going to pay a premium for a laptop, I'd like to be able to upgrade the RAM and HDD. Or even replace the battery. Many users simply can't afford to buy the new model every year.

You want a T series Thinkpad (Maybe W and X is also similar)

Repairability Manufacturability (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309665)

Generally, there's a reason why many consumer devices today aren't repairable. Repairability is inherently at odds with manufacturability. The easier it is to repair, the more expensive it's gonna be. Though, those special proprietary screws contribute nothing to manufacturability and really are intended to keep you from messing with your hardware.

Re:Repairability Manufacturability (1)

RobertLTux (260313) | about 2 years ago | (#40309939)

needing a "magic screwdriver" to open X just means that in a couple months your local electronics Shoppe will have some thing new to sell you.

Has anyone else noticed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309691)

...a crop of macbook pros and airs suddenly popping up for sale in your classifieds, for only a few hundred less than they are new? Mind you, these are last years models... I'd like to say I'm shocked at *just* how soon it is before the apple crowd can't resist that shiny new macbook any longer, but a matter of hours? Really?

SSD storage? (3, Interesting)

Geeky (90998) | about 2 years ago | (#40309711)

I think the big turnoff for me is that they only have flash storage

The limited writes are likely to be a factor for some uses, surely? I certainly wouldn't want to be using one as a development machine, or for serious photography (my other main computer use).

Not what I was looking for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309725)

I already have a new iPad 3, and desperately need a new MacBook Pro -- with 1080-capable display, "normal" connectors, and Bluetooth 4 -- I do NOT need a new "MacPad Pro" which this thing basically is -- its a large-screen iPad 3 with a permanently-attached keyboard, not a workhorse laptop.

you mean social-engineering marvel... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309731)

Where you can call something like this an "engineering marvel", and convince a significant % of the population that it is so.

It's beautiful. (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40309743)

I wonder why the fans are enclosed in plastic shrouds? http://www.extremetech.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/macbook-pro-retina-display-innards-labelled.jpg [extremetech.com]

"The battery has a capacity of 95 watt-hours, some 20% larger than 77.5 watt-hour battery in the non-Retina MacBook Pro. As far as I know, this is the largest built-in laptop battery ever produced â" and yet the new MBP "only" has a battery life of seven hours."

It's amazing how many hours laptop makers can squeeze out of batteries. This may be the largest battery ever produced, but would still only power my reading light (40 watt bulb) for 2 and 1/3 hours...... they ought to put some of that technology into a desktop to make it low-power (and green).

"If you run out of flash storage (and 256GB isnâ(TM)t a whole lot), your only option is expensive external storage. "

Only? Sounds like a lot to me. And external storage isn't expensive... $70 for a 500GB and $90 for a 1000GB drive.

Re:It's beautiful. (2)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#40309821)

And external storage isn't expensive... $70 for a 500GB and $90 for a 1000GB drive.

The only measure of a laptop is its thinness, and you're not going to find a 1/16th inch thick 1 TB drive anywhere soon. So you've gotta make a flash card RAID array out of about forty 32 gig SD cards and a zillion USB hubs and cables and adapters. The price is gonna add up.

thin? why does anyone care? (1, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#40309751)

Why should the only measure of a laptop be its thinness?

I want a laptop that's light, cool (thermally), powerful, reliable, cheap, good A/V and silent. Thinness is at least 8th on my priority list. Make it 4 inches thick as long as it maxes out the 7 higher priority goals first.

Why is there is fixation on thin laptops? What do you "get" out of a laptop being 1/2 inch thinner than another laptop?

I have Realistic Consumer specifications (0, Troll)

netsavior (627338) | about 2 years ago | (#40309863)

Your new notwindows is shiny and stylish! When you go to starbucks to check your facebooks people will totally think you are an artistic writer!

Didn't ViewSonic have a 22" 200ppi display... (2)

El Puerco Loco (31491) | about 2 years ago | (#40309869)

... like 10 years ago? Well, hopefully since apple stuck their logo on it, high ppi displays will be the next big thing. It managed to convince people that tablets aren't the totally useless toys they are. Maybe it will do the same for something that's actually useful.

ITT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309915)

Apple fanboi has the most intense orgasm of his life.

Could Linux on there skip the "retina" part? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40309949)

Could Linux on there actually use the whole 2880x1800 without doubling everything? Basically, does OS X double the size of everything or does the hardware do that. If it's a software "feature", I could theoretically put Linux on there and use it with that insanely high screen resolution, right?

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