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Nokia To Cut 10,000 Jobs and Close 3 Facilities

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the role-of-management-is-to-suck dept.

Businesses 350

parallel_prankster writes "NY Times reports that Nokia said on Thursday it would slash 10,000 jobs, or 19 percent of its work force, by the end of 2013 as part of an emergency overhaul that includes closing research centers and a factory in Germany, Canada and Finland, and the departures of three senior executives. The company also warned investors its loss was likely to be greater in the second quarter, which ends June 30, than it was in the first, and that the negative effects of its transition to a Windows-based smartphone business would continue into the third quarter. Nokia, based in Espoo, Finland, posted a loss of €929 million, or $1.2 billion, in the first quarter as sales plummeted 29 percent. Once the undisputed global leader in the mobile phone business, Nokia has been outcompeted by Apple, as well as by Samsung and other makers of handsets running Google's Android operating system." (Here's another source, if you're hit by the NYT paywall, and the company's own positive spin.)

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No good news in that (5, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321703)

A lot of Apple fans and MS haters may be tempted to cheer, but the loss of 10,000 jobs in this economy means 10,000 families whose lives will been up-ended and that sucks no matter what phone you're rooting for.

And what's more, according to the article, a third of these job losses will come from Finland, with more in Germany and Canada. Decent western factory jobs seem to be going the way of the Dodo bird. Are there any phones still actually being manufactured in the first world? Even if Nokia recovers, what are the odds that those jobs won't reappear in Finland, but in China?

Re:No good news in that (5, Insightful)

Nursie (632944) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321793)

Cheer?

I can hate on MS as much as the next guy, but this is sad whatever way you spin it. Nokia used to create great products and be a byword for quality, reliable, cutting edge phones.
Then they lost their way, management started all sorts of retarded internal competition games and the company just started chucking out hundreds of near identical handsets.

Even then they had a significant market lead, even in the smartphone sphere, but they were losing it. This is when Elop came along and really killed them, jumping straight into bed with his old bosses and sealing the fate of a once-great european tech powerhouse.

It's a shame to see such an icon driven into the ground.

Re:No good news in that (4, Informative)

Nursie (632944) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321825)

I should add that it's also entirely obvious that this would happen since the MS deal.

Re:No good news in that (5, Insightful)

plover (150551) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321997)

It may have been obvious, but it was obvious long before Microsoft had anything to do with it, and this certainly isn't Microsoft's fault. Remember the Burning Memo? Nokia has been faltering ever since the Chinese factories have been able to create their own lines because of the cell phone chipset availability.

Nokia took the Microsoft deal because it became evident to them that Nokia's own OS was no longer a selling point, so it didn't make sense to further invest in it. That saved them a few kroner in the short term, plus there was a longshot chance that Windows Phone 8 could have made a dent in the market. It obviously hasn't yet, nor did the tech community expect much different, but one never knows what the phone market will look like in five years.

Re:No good news in that - sounds familiar... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322169)

The fall of giants is tough. Nokias fall sounds like SGIs fall where project Fahrenheit sucked the last remaining useful IP out of the company before SGI went Jurrasic Park. Losing the R&D labs will mean that the next generation of phone-developers will not speak Finnish. Hey.. its that path they chose. What goes around comes around.

Re:No good news in that (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322213)

Finland has been using the euro for 10 years, and the 150 years before that they used the Finnish mark.

Re:No good news in that (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322253)

They could easily choose a different strategy and save the company. E.g. they could become OS-agnostic, just like Samsung: produce N9-like phone in both Maemo, Android and WP7 version, and see what sells best. I'm 100% sure lots of people would buy Android version of this phone because of the great looks and mature OS.
Killing Symbian too early, killing Maemo right after it was finally ready to sell and going to WP7 only was the most stupid decision ever.

I hope they eventually going to realize it and give that infiltrator from Microsoft the treatment he deserves.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322391)

plus there was a longshot chance that Windows Phone 8 could have made a dent in the market. It obviously hasn't yet,

Just a hypothetical, but that might be because it hasn't been released yet.

Re:No good news in that (5, Funny)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322137)

The MS deal didn't really have anything to do with it. Nokia lost its way almost a decade ago. They flailed around trying a large number of incompatible things, with no overall direction. The Symbian kernel rewrite was probably the last good thing they did and they failed to couple it with a decent userland, so Symbian programmers were still stuck with APIs that were designed for systems with under 4MB of RAM. They made a few half-hearted attempts at moving to Linux (ignoring the fact that they already had a decent kernel, it was their userland that was the problem), and then seemed to completely lose the plot.

The MS deal was just another failure to fix the situation, in a long line of similar failures. It wasn't the cause, just another failed attempt at recovery.

Re:No good news in that (5, Informative)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322195)

Think again. Investors punished Nokia after the announcement of the Microsoft deal. Their stock took a massive hit. Then it took them ONE YEAR to bring a Windows phone to market and in the meantime they killed off their Symbian product.

All this was in direct relation to the Microsoft deal.

Re:No good news in that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322435)

It's also a taboo to mention, but burning platforms are still selling more than MS platform despite Elop declaring them dead publicly for no good reason except for sucking ms cock.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Jungle guy (567570) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321905)

Nokia has been taking a hard hit, mostly because of its management. But the bad economic climate in the world, specially in Europe, is not helping any european company.

Paging Mr. Belluzzo... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322441)

...Paging Mr. Rick Belluzzo...Mr. Elop on line one...

Re:No good news in that (0)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321801)

A lot of Apple fans and MS haters may be tempted to cheer, but the loss of 10,000 jobs in this economy means 10,000 families whose lives will been up-ended and that sucks no matter what phone you're rooting for.

It's a bit presumptuous to say people are rooting for Nokia employees to lose their jobs or for the company to close down. Yes, there are plenty of MS haters, and they aren't all Apple fans. Personally, I want Apple, Android & MS to succeed in the mobile market because it drives competition and development. Nokia slipping away doesn't do anything to force the others to continue to be innovative or creative.

Queue the replies from people wanting MS to suffer at the expense of Nokia employees and those who will declare that <insert name of company here> hasn't innovated in [year/ever].

Re:No good news in that (1)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322247)

I love how you don't include RIM.

What you actually meant to say is we need competition from more than two companies. Whether or not MS succeeds is irrelevant. The fact that Google could emerge as power player late in the mobile market is an example that other companies can compete.

So what is your utopian alternative? (0)

arcite (661011) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321805)

Nokia makes crap phones that no one wants to buy. They also make incredibly popular low cost phones that sell millions in the developing world. Unfortunately, none of these operations are profitable.

Re:So what is your utopian alternative? (0)

tiffany352 (2485630) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321981)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jf1fRu9YgfE [youtube.com] Not my idea of a crap phone. Have you been living under a rock all this time ignoring the "I dropped my nokia phone on the sidewalk and it shattered. Sorry about your sidewalk." image macros spammed everywhere?

Re:So what is your utopian alternative? (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322025)

They also make incredibly popular low cost phones that sell millions in the developing world.

Have sold. But the latest figures for 2011 is that there's now 6 billion cell phone subscribers, or 86.7% of the world's population, though some have more one subscription for home and one for work. That means there's not many more new people left to sell to, while in established markets people now buy smart phones and dump their dumb/feature phones for practically nothing. So that market is dying very shortly too.

Re:So what is your utopian alternative? (5, Insightful)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322041)

They're also getting rid of those popular low cost phones that have been selling in Africa and India. Elop is killing all possible ways to save Nokia and is actively ruining the company [blogs.com] . Other analysts don't see Nokia returning to profitability devices in the foreseeable future either this year or next [wraltechwire.com] . There's nothing left to save. The pre-Microsoft Nokia is already dead and gone. There's nothing to rejoice about, it's just a fact [blogs.com] .

Re:So what is your utopian alternative? (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322381)

Actually that's a smart move. Nokia's making very little on those tight margin devices. If Nokia wants to save money they'd stop trying to pursue those devices.

Re:No good news in that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321839)

Isn't that why there seems to be a huge focus on education in many first world countries? Because thats where the jobs are at, no?
Recently read that about 30% of the employers has troubles finding qualified people to fill in the functions. Thus I assume that the only thing it takes to get a job is getting qualified in the right thing.

Re:No good news in that (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321983)

Recently read that about 30% of the employers has troubles finding qualified people to fill in the functions.

Based on my experience, let me translate that for you:

30 percent of employers are posting jobs that they know can't possibly be filled, so they can run to Congress and cry "We can't find Americans to do it," and get more H1B visas--so they can pay foreign workers to come here and work for slave wages.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322081)

I am european, so H1B wouldn't work here. And we have pretty strict rules about most employment. This was something done across multiple countries, I believe. Including the US of course, but also many others.

Re:No good news in that (2)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321863)

Why would a fan wish for (fair) competition to go away in the first place? You may not want what they are offering, but its what keeps your side moving forward too.

Re:No good news in that (0)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321879)

Coffee, eggs, concern trolls...it's a Slashdot morning!

Re:No good news in that (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322011)

"Concern troll"? Haven't heard that one before. Does it have more HP than a Fire Troll?

Re:No good news in that (-1, Troll)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321915)

Yeah, these jobs and the Angry Birds jobs, [slashdot.org] and this will continue.

Too many people are arguing pro-Finish type of socialism, but that's why Finland is going to lose more and more jobs. All socialists do is drive investment capital out of their countries somewhere else. Good for 'somewhere else', bad for those socialist countries.

The good thing about this will be that eventually all socialism will end, which is great, because all of these countries will run out of other people's money to spend and nobody will loan to them also, because they don't produce anything.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321979)

If the corporate tax rate was 0, there wouldn't be any incentive for companies to leave, right? Put the entire tax burden on the public and you should be able to set the social program dials to wherever you want, right?

Re:No good news in that (1)

HolyLime (926158) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322293)

Actually that isn't such a bad thought. Set the Corporate tax rate to zero, or legislate that COMPANY profits can not be taxed, but levy taxes against the people that work for that company. I don't think this is a new or original idea, but I felt it should at least be voiced. If someone knows about any economic sources that comment on these type of policies I would love to look at them.

Re:No good news in that (1)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322319)

Local governments do this all the time with things like property tax abatements. Trade one kind of tax income for (hopefully more) of another, or for other less direct benefit (people with jobs put less strain on government resources, for example)

Re:No good news in that (5, Insightful)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321989)

The good thing about this will be that eventually all socialism will end....

No it wont. Because some socialism is good. Public schools are good. Public roads are good. Public health initiatives are good. You have some socialist countries now that are highly uncompetitive. And you have highly capitalist countries, such as China, which are highly competitive, but creating externalities that make their current path unsustainable. Somewhere in the middle, a resonably free enterprise system with some government sponsored investment and a public safety net is where you're going to get the best overal quality of life over the span of decades.

A brilliant mix of capitalism and socialism,... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322233)

In our quest for purity, we are asked to don a red or a blue cap which is supposed to align to socialist-leaning (blue) against capitalist-leaning (red) doctrines, but of late, not combine the two. Its time to realize that any successful society will need to embrace elements of both socialism and capitalism to be remain sovereign. Get that Mitt? Get that Barack?

Re:A brilliant mix of capitalism and socialism,... (5, Funny)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322261)

I find the subtlety of your argument confusing and upsetting. COMMUNIST!

Re:No good news in that (1)

micahraleigh (2600457) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322361)

How is China capitalist? It is certainly more capitalist than it was 10 years ago, but its level of central planning is comparable to European countries.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322451)

I dare you to name one european country that practices a central planning economy...

Re:No good news in that (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322365)

I really hate the whole capitalist / socialist debate because the whole thing is stupid like localman57 hinted at. The problem with any ideological system is that they try to reduce people to simple, consistent groups. But people are not simple and they are not consistent. Anyone who has ever mowed their neighbor's law because their mower was broke, or they were sick is a socialist. Anyone who has ever bought an overpriced candy bar to support some annoying kids program is a socialist. Anyone who has ever bought an oreo over value brand because they taste better and the cost is worth it is a capitalist. So is anyone who has ever bought the value brand because oreos are too damn expensive and not worth it.

People are all socialists because we come from families, villages and towns that support each other. We are also capitalists because we're all selfish and want to get as much as we can for the work we do. Anyone who claims that one or the other is the only true way is either a fool, or lying in order to manipulate other fools,

Re:No good news in that (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322109)

Yeah, they're all fleeing socialist Finland for communist China.

Re:No good news in that (1)

icecoldkilla (1011085) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322193)

The good thing about this will be that eventually all socialism will end, which is great, because all of these countries will run out of other people's money to spend and nobody will loan to them also, because they don't produce anything.

If you think Finland is a socialist country then you have No Idea what Socialism is.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Nexus7 (2919) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322309)

Ah, but then you're assuming he doesn't live in Republico-Fox-News-world.

Re:No good news in that (3, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322321)

Too many people are arguing pro-Finish type of socialism, but that's why Finland is going to lose more and more jobs.

This argument would be a lot more convincing if the economies of more capitalist countries were booming. In case you hadn't noticed, they're not.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322323)

Too many people are arguing pro-Finish type of socialism, but that's why Finland is going to lose more and more jobs. All socialists do is drive investment capital out of their countries somewhere else. Good for 'somewhere else', bad for those socialist countries.

And investment capital doesn't flee the US for China and India because it's cheaper there? In capitalism, money goes where the slave labor is cheapest, the working conditions poorest and the regulations the weakest. You get fucked until you're the cheapest bidder for the job and by moving the jobs around workers are forced to underbid each other until they're all dirt poor. This whole "workers must stand up for themselves" and fight for social security and decent working conditions through laws and unions is just a communism. You hear that sound? It's the 1% laughing over you.

Re:No good news in that (4, Insightful)

IAmR007 (2539972) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321925)

Windows phones was definitely the wrong way to go. Getting Qt working well on Android and iOS and marketing it as a platform could have been a lot more successful. Being able to use the same core code on multiple platforms is a big advantage. Instead, they chose a dying mobile OS.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321943)

Decent western factory jobs seem to be going the way of the Dodo bird.

It's Finland, right? So more like going the way of the Angry Bird.

Re:No good news in that (1)

alen (225700) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321951)

assembling a phone is the equivalent of playing with Lego's. its simple tedious work. why would i want my kids to aspire to this kind of work?

the value is in owning and developing the OS, battery tech, screen tech, the communications standards as well as all the other IP and semiconductors that go into the phone. assembly is monkey work

Re:No good news in that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322085)

"assembling a phone is the equivalent of playing with Lego's. its simple tedious work. why would i want my kids to aspire to this kind of work?"

its difficult for kid's, your rite thair. playing with lego's, ball's, card's or bicycle's its more fun.

Re:No good news in that (2)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322087)

Because not everybody's kids have the ability do those kind of things. You need a complete economic scale of jobs to acheive resonably full employement. If everybody in the world developed battery tech and communication standards, there'd be nothing to eat, no roads to drive on, nowhere to buy stuff. As they say, "The World Needs Ditch Diggers, too..."

Re:No good news in that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322197)

Yes, but over the years they need less. 1 person with a crane will get that ditch dug pretty fast. Sooner or later we may not even need a person to man the crane, but we could need many people to design it.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Plammox (717738) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322099)

Assembly techology development is closely linked to the rest of the design, be it casing, antenna, battery and display. Make no mistake, assembly and assembly development (normally co-located on the same site) is no monkey work. And our far-eastern friends in China, Malaysia, Taiwan, etc. are excelling at this. At a low price, even.

Re:No good news in that (3, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322153)

why would i want my kids to aspire to this kind of work?

If you went to public school, remember all the "slow" kids, and all the others who clearly weren't cut out for college? Well, those kids are adults now and they need jobs just like you do.

Re:No good news in that (3, Insightful)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322243)

assembling a phone is the equivalent of playing with Lego's. its simple tedious work. why would i want my kids to aspire to this kind of work?

They are not just closing plants according to this [bloomberg.com] .

From the bloomberg article: "The biggest share of cuts will come in research and development, where Nokia is killing whole projects to preserve others that are more important, Chief Financial Officer Timo Ihamuotila said on a call. Sales is the second-biggest area affected and general overhead is third, he said."

So they are now at the stage where they have to stop developing tomorrow's products in order to pay today's bills.

Re:No good news in that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322141)

A lot of Apple fans and MS haters may be tempted to cheer...

Cheer, no; laugh, yes. It was monumentally stupid of Nokia to go all-in with Windows Phone 7 before that platform had demonstrated itself to be viable. Unfortunately, the managers who made that decision will be sheltered while the rank and file take the bullets.

Honestly, I think that a Google-Apple duopoly of the smartphone market is a bad thing, and wish Winphone posed stronger competition. Perhaps if Nokia had nursed Symbian, or come out with an Android handset line alongside its Winphone line, it could have held on long enough for Winphone to mature and become competitive. Perhaps it still will. (I give it a better shot than RIM at this point.)

Re:No good news in that (1)

Mr0bvious (968303) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322179)

Really? I'm no economist but I don't think these jobs are lost, the moved elsewhere surely?

I'd be willing to bet that the vast majority of those jobs were lost/moved to Samsung, and I'm pretty sure Samsung products are not primarily made in China. Though I could be wrong, but I thought Samsung manufacture a lot of their products in Vietnam and Taiwan. Not that this makes any difference.

Don't get me wrong, I really hope the rest of the world can regain some manufacturing capability from those who have the strong hold on it now - but we need to be smarter about it and our governments need to be smarter about it. If we don't make changes ourselves, it's going to be a long drawn out cycle until it comes back around to us (being the western world that's lost its manufacturing capability).

Personally I saw Nokia's demise as soon as they decided to go with Windows Mobile - I don't have any real hate of Windows Mobile, but it has never proven popular in the past and I couldn't see it catching on fast enough to dig Nokia out of its hole.

While the job 'losses' are never nice for the workers, their families or their local economies - this surely should not be a surprise to anyone and can only be blamed on Nokia's poor business decisions - and to the casual observer they seemed like obvious bad decisions at the time they were being made and shows that senior management at Nokia are out of touch with the market they are embedded in.

It's a shame, I always like Nokia phones, but they've offered nothing of interest for years now.

Re:No good news in that (1)

Bigby (659157) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322305)

There have already been 20k+ jobs gained by competitors at the expense of Nokia. So while 20k families have been helped. I say less than 10k, because there has to be husband/wife or parent/child employed there somewhere.

Net gain for society (but likely not Finland).

Re:No good news in that (1)

bug1 (96678) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322377)

Its pretty empty headed to show sympathy for the symptoms if you ignore the cause.

Every man and their dog told them that MS wasnt going to save them, but they took the money.

Re:No good news in that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322415)

Posting anon from Finland for obvious reasons. Economically speaking here in Finland another major IT (player) service provider has decided to cut about 20% of its staff as well by the end of this year. That's another couple thousand jobs plus now this news from Nokia. Future prognosis of the Finnish IT industry are not looking well.

N9 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321717)

If only they had built on the success of the N9 and its predecessors instead of selling their soul to M$...

Re:N9 (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322021)

It's kind of hard to do this when Apple and Google have hired away all your best people. RIM, MS, and Nokia are all in the same boat - lots of interesting ideas but not enough talented people to deliver.

RIM SUCKS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321725)

Another 10,000 jobs lost, they're going down!!! Oh wait that says Nokia up there. Oops.

"negative effects of its transition to a Windows-" (5, Funny)

White Flame (1074973) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321743)

Whaaaaat?!?! Really? This is a tremendously unexpected turn of events that nobody outside of your boardroom dealings would have EVER suspected!

Re:"negative effects of its transition to a Window (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321773)

That is just slashdots editorial spin. Typical strategy to incite anti-ms trolls.

Re:"negative effects of its transition to a Window (1)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322275)

No that was the assessment of Wall Street Investors after the announcement of Nokia's deal with Microsoft. Their assessment was correct. You're just an ass.

Re:"negative effects of its transition to a Window (2)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322429)

No it's not editorial spin. The NY Times appears to quote Nokia: "The company also warned investors that its loss was likely to be greater in the second quarter, which ends June 30, than it was in the first, and that the negative effects of its transition to a Windows-based smartphone business would continue into the third quarter."

Nokia always made the best hardware (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321769)

Nokia always made the best hardware. All they had to do was make an Android phone and they would have been set.

This ranks right up there with the other colossal commercial blunders (Netflix, GM/Chevy, Burger King's evil king, etc).

Re:Nokia always made the best hardware (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321963)

They'd have been a latecomer to a saturated market. Windows may have been a risk, but at this stage, delaying entry into the android market for another year isn't going to be a huge cost.

Re:Nokia always made the best hardware (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321995)

It may well be a huge temporary cost if they will have to repay Microsoft for the billions they already received.

Re:Nokia always made the best hardware (1)

segedunum (883035) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322329)

They'd have been a latecomer to a saturated market.

No, they wouldn't. This is about saving what they have (or had) that Android has largely taken off them, plus they would have had a platform with a lot of applications. As it stands now they've just pissed that away.

Windows may have been a risk, but at this stage, delaying entry into the android market for another year isn't going to be a huge cost.

They'll be bust by then.

Re:Nokia always made the best hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322343)

This is not about Nokia, but about the MS vulture picking out the last useful bits from Nokias failing corpse. Eyes go first!

Re:Nokia always made the best hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322023)

All they had to do was make an Android phone and they would have been set.

No they would still be going out of business.

http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/04/apple-samsung-99-percent-profits/

Competition is good? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321775)

With this kind of competition. We won't have no electronics manufacturers soon.

Idea (1)

arcite (661011) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321785)

Microsoft should do a 2 for 1 purchase of Nokia and Rim, then finally they'll be able to make a superior phone that is constructed tough as nails while also having a solid keyboard and touchscreen.

Re:Idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321887)

3 for 1.
Nokia
Rim
Free Vaccination

Re:Idea (3, Interesting)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321937)

Would not happen. Instead they would buy the companies fire all the workers and replace them with MS party line type folks. You would get a phone that RRoD would be a known issue for years, and would be worse than any the two previous companies made before. NIH is a huge issue for MS.

Re:Idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321945)

Microsoft doesn't have an employee plant/mole in the executive level at Rim, like they did with Nokia (Elop).

An award to Stephen Elop.. (5, Insightful)

GhostIdentity (2600469) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321789)

Stephen Elop - The Trojan Horse of modern era.

Re:An award to Stephen Elop.. (0)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322111)

I know it's very slashdotty to blame Microsoft for everything, but Nokia was in deep shit well before Elop. Moving to Microsoft Phone was a "If you're falling off a cliff, you might as well flap your arms and try to fly" move. He'll probably get the blame here as they hit rock bottom but Nokia threw themselves off the cliff.

Re:An award to Stephen Elop.. (5, Insightful)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322339)

I know Microsoft has alot of apologists but this is amazing.

Investors did not agree with the deal and the chickens are coming home to roost. EVERYONE knew the deal was bad.

1. No Windows phone for ONE YEAR. No product in one year is a lifetime in the smartphone market. 2. Killed off Symbian. Their existing lines of phones were selling. Their customer base starting jumping ship since those phones were being killed off for Windows phones that were yet to be seen.

Every analyst knew the timeline was extremely bad for Nokia. Nokia could have survived had they not made the deal and worked on their own products.

I tend to disagree here.. (5, Interesting)

GhostIdentity (2600469) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322397)

You may be right, but Nokia still had a fat chance of comeback with MeeGo, as already proved by Nokia N9 (I own one, and I easily claim it to be better than most, if not all, of the current smartphones due to its intuitive Swipe UI). Who was saying no to building Windows smartphones? But Elop apparently wasn't satisfied with only that. He had to kill the burning platform (Symbian) as well as the blooming platform (MeeGo). That is what has pushed Nokia off the cliff, IMO. I may seem to blame Microsoft (I actually do it inside my mind, though, having been a genuine Nokia fan since I became aware of phones), but the fact still stands that Elop cruelly slaughtered any remaining chances that Nokia had, with or without Microsoft behind him.

The IP Vultures are Circling (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321797)

Meanwhile, Microsoft, Apple, Samsung, and Google IP lawyers are circling to fight over the carcass (Patent Portfolio) of Nokia.

If you cant adapt, you die (2)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321833)

Pretty simple math. No matter how big you are, if you cant keep up with changing times, you go away.

Re:If you cant adapt, you die (1)

DingerX (847589) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322097)

Ironically, this was the logic behind Elop's notorious Burning Platforms [engadget.com] memo that justified junking Symbian, MeeGo, and any homegrown smartphone work (which as profitable) in favor of Windows Phone. "Adapt or Die" sounds good, but in this case it was used to adapt the bathwater for Microsoft's baby.

A sad day... (4, Interesting)

christianT (604736) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321835)

It's a shame to see Nokia falling apart. It was not long ago that they had the very promising n900. I was all ready to buy one of those until I found out that it wasn't available on my carrier of choice, and in fact the only carriers it was available on in my area were the ones with the poorest coverage.

What a factory! (3, Funny)

fortfive (1582005) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321851)

a factory in Germany, Canada and Finland

That's some factory--Nokia must have invented some kind of trans-dimensional technology. Surely that's worth a few bucks to someone?

The end of Meltemi, Qt without Nokia (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321889)

Nokia was working on another Linux based operating system. This is now stopped [maemo.org] .

More insight into how the board of Nokia is being stacked with Microsoft cronies [blogs.com] .

Re:The end of Meltemi, Qt without Nokia (2)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322039)

I wonder if the endgame for Microsoft is to acquire rights to all the IP?

10,000 workers and 3 executives are going? (4, Funny)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321923)

Another round or two like this and the company will be all executives, no workers. That should help get them going in the right direction.

Re:10,000 workers and 3 executives are going? (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322053)

And just look how much money Microsoft has saved them... now they don't have to pay for those 10,000 workers!

Re:10,000 workers and 3 executives are going? (1)

game kid (805301) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322249)

Someday, when my soul and will are fully broken by the business world and I become an exec, I too shall use that "sharpen strategy" line from the press release...

Me
"Good news Jim-Bob, we're about to sharpen our strategy!"
Jim-Bob
"Yay! So, duhhhh, I'll be having a longer schedule in the project?"
Me
"No, Jim-Bob, you'll have no hours in the project. We'll just get some guys from China when we need help. Bwa hahaha hah!" *continues evil laugh for 4 minutes*

Typical (4, Insightful)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | more than 2 years ago | (#40321939)

CEO and board members make a bad decision, the workers at the bottom end up paying for it.
Best of luck to those being let go.

Re:Typical (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322077)

Or vagina?

heres another source... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40321953)

(Here's another source, if you're hit by the NYT paywall, and the company's own positive spin.)

what about slashdots spin effect?

CFIT (1)

bmo (77928) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322089)

This is what the aircraft safety people call "controlled flight into terrain" when one flies a plane into the ground.

Elop is one hell of a pilot.

--
BMO

3% of the smartphone market (1)

tekrat (242117) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322105)

When Apple first announced the iPhone, Jobs said in an interview that he would be happy if the iPhone captured 3% of the global smartphone market. Mind you, at the time, the Blackberry and the Treo were pretty much the only smartphones that existed.

Nokia was at the time, the biggest provider of any type phones and Apple believed that they had no chance to compete in that market, especially since Nokia was making phones that cost a mere $20 after being subsidized by the carrier.

So, how did Apple, which started with a very meager outlook for sales, completely destroy not one, but at least two major cell-phone makers (RIM and Nokia)? Both of these companies are mere shells of what they once were, and Apple is stronger than ever.

How is Apple one of the biggest companies on the planet, making what are essentially digital "toys"? Very few people actually *need* a smartphone, but apparently, and even Apple didn't forsee this, people *want* a single device that can really do it all.

Re:3% of the smartphone market (2)

MachineShedFred (621896) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322225)

How? By doing what they've done for 30 years - making hardware and software actually work together without massive end-user hassle. They don't invent ground breaking technologies (for the most part, there have been a few exceptions), but they make available technologies actually useable.

Turns out that there's a shedload of money in doing that.

Re:3% of the smartphone market (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322345)

I believe it's because they built a phone for consumers rather than for carriers.

Nokia's death spiral continues (5, Interesting)

tuffy (10202) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322129)

I've found Tomi's ongoing saga of Nokia's downfall [blogs.com] to be quite interesting. A choice quote about today's news:

The worse news is the guidance about Q2 profit warning and Q3 smartphone sales problems, that was hidden in the story about layoffs. So before, in Nokia's profit warning, Nokia said it will have problems with the handset unit profitability (producing a loss) in both Q1 and Q2. The losses for handsets in Q2 were supposed to be similar to Q1 ie -3%. Now we hear that Q2 losses will be bigger than 3%. This is VERY BAD NEWS. It really means that Nokia is falling into the hole and the rate of the fall is only increasing.

The gist of it being that Windows isn't working, and Elop is killing any possible "plan B" for the company.

Re:Nokia's death spiral continues (5, Informative)

tpheiska (1145505) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322263)

Mod parent up. The blog in question is awesome. For example this [blogs.com] :
  "Before the Burning Platforms memo, in 2010 Nokia towered over its rivals like very few companies have ever managed in a Fortune 500 size scale. Nokia's smartphones sold more than 2x those of the iPhone and more than 3x as many as Samsung. Today only 18 months later, Nokia is a third the size of the iPhone and one quarter the size of Samsung's smartphones. Never, ever, in any industry, has a global market leader collapsed this comprehensively. This is a world record in destruction of a market leader. Understand what that means. Elop has set a world record in management failure. He is a world record holder in the most incompetent CEO that has ever been. Not just the worst CEO now, but of all time - that is what 'world record' means - and this collapse of Nokia is BY A WIDE MARGIN the biggest collapse of a global Fortune 500 sized company, who was the market leader in its own industry. I have been asking my readers to come up with any example of such total collapse in 12 months in economic history - never been done. Never. This is the worst management failure of all time! And it was not caused by a tsunami or earthquake or national revolution or exploding factory. It was caused by Stephen Elop. He started the destruction on a February day in Espoo when he released his Burning Platforms memo. "

China is the culprit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40322211)

When Nokia made a deal with Microsoft, I didn't see any sense, except that:

1) Microsoft is well perceived in China,
2) Nokia is well perceived in China,

Nokia thought they would look good in the emerging market. However, they forgot that China makes only 1.3 billion people. Maybe they will win market in China, but they will lose market in the world. What is more 1.3 billion or 5.7 billion? Wrong decision.

Re:China is the culprit. (1)

Inyu (919458) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322357)

That's what happens when a company sells its soul for buck. Google didn't. As I see, there are 2 evils, which companies tend to sell their souls just to be there: Facebook and China.

Ballmer should buy them out (1)

gelfling (6534) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322387)

And then screw it up unto death, like everything else.

I can't have any sympathy for Nokia (1)

paladinsama (1831732) | more than 2 years ago | (#40322389)

Everybody here is always talking about the Microsoft deal or how good was the hardware Nokia made.
But something that is never mentioned is how Nokia closed a digital store that because of their DRM implementation, denied customers of their legitimate purchases.
These are the kind of things that usually causes boycotts, for example a few guys get the message that Rock Band will stop working on the iPhone, and everybody in the world is talking about it. Nokia cut access to 52 games, and nobody cared. Well, I lost 21 purchases that day so I care.
Obviously if nobody cared for what Nokia did, that only could mean that they didn't had a big following. I was a Nokia fan, but now I won't give them a cent.
For me Nokia didn't had a future no matter what choice of operating system they took.

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