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Microsoft To Buy Yammer?

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the extend-and-embrace dept.

Microsoft 73

An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft seems to have a pocketful of billions sitting around. First Skype, now Yammer – an enterprise social network service launched back in September 2008 that looks almost like Facebook minus the title bars. According to Bloomberg, the deal could reach up to a billion dollars. To date, Yammer claims 200,000 companies which include more than 400 of the 500 Fortune companies. One reason for the purchase may stem from their social-like Sharepoint platform which has been a lost cause to solutions by Salesforce.com and Oracle."

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73 comments

Why? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330407)

My employer tried Yammer, then installed Sharepoint. Nobody used Yammer after Sharepoint became available, and not many use Sharepoint now. People don't tend to post drivel about work like they do about their personal lives.

Re:Why? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330443)

About eight months ago, I was searching around the internet to find out why my computer was running so slowly (it normally ran quite fast, but had gradually gotten slower over time). After a few minutes, I found a piece of software claiming that it could speed up my PC and make it run like new again. Being that I was dangerously ignorant about technology in general (even more so than I am now), I downloaded the software and began the installation. Mere moments after doing so, my desktop background image was changed and warnings that appeared to originate from Windows appeared all over the screen telling me to buy strange software from an unknown company in order to remove a virus it claimed I had.

I may have been ignorant about technology, but I wasn't that naive. I immediately concluded that the software I'd downloaded was, in fact, a virus. In my rage, I broke numerous objects, punched a hole in the wall, and cursed the world at the top of my lungs. I eventually calmed down, cleared my head, and realized that the only remedy for this problem was a carefully thought out plan. After a few moments of pondering about how to handle this situation, I decided that since I barely knew how to properly handle a computer, I should turn it over to the professionals and let them fix the issue.

Soon after making the decision, I drove to a local computer repair shop and entered the building with my computer in hand. They greeted me with a smile and stayed attentive the entire time that I was explaining the problem to them. They laughed as if they'd heard it all before, told me that I'm not the only one who has trouble operating computers, and then gave me a date for when the computer would be fixed. Not only had they told me that the computer would be completely repaired in at most two days, but the price for their services was surprisingly low, and to top it all off, they even gave me advice for how to avoid viruses in the future! I left the building feeling confident in my decision to seek professional help and satisfied knowing that such kind-hearted people were the ones doing the job.

The very next day, I received a phone call from the computer repair shop whilst I was at a local library researching computer viruses. I had stumbled upon a piece of software that appeared to be very promising, and I was about to do more research on it, but seeing as how I required my computer as soon as possible, I decided to put the matter on hold. Upon answering the phone and cheerfully greeting the person on the other end, I was greeted with a high-pitched shriek. Startled, I asked what was wrong. A few moments passed where nothing was said, and suddenly, the person on the other end said to me, in a low voice oozing with paranoia, "Come pick up your computer." They hung up immediately after saying that, and I couldn't help but notice that they sounded as if they were on the verge of tears. I briefly wondered if it was due to stress from work, and then drove to the computer repair shop to acquire my computer.

I was positively dismayed upon entering the building. The inside of the computer repair shop looked nothing like the image from my memories. There were broken computer parts scattered throughout the room, ceiling tiles all over the floor, blood splattered in every direction I looked, and even a human toe on the ground. After processing this disturbing information, I began panicking and frantically looking around for my computer. I spotted an employee covered in blood sitting up against the wall, and noticed that his wrists had been slashed open. Thinking quickly, I ran up to him, grabbed him by the collar of his shirt, shook him around, and began screaming, "Where is it!? Where is my computer!?" After a moment of silence, he passed away, completely shattering my expectations. Such a thing! "What a meaningless individual," I thought.

Enraged, I tore the building up even further than it already had been in my desperate search for my computer. Eventually I discovered a door leading to an area that was normally only accessible to employees. I entered without hesitation and was met with a long, skinny hallway that a single person would have trouble moving about freely in. I proceeded down the dark hallway and bumped into the body of an employee hanging from a rope tied to something on the ceiling. I screamed, "Not only do you people have the gall to allow my computer to be endangered, but even in death you intend to block my path!?" After finally managing to push aside the worthless obstacle, I traveled down the hallway and came to a small black door. I entered without a moment's notice, and in the middle of the dark and dreary room, I spotted my computer; it was completely unharmed. With a sigh of relief, I picked it up, left the building, and drove home as if nothing of importance had occurred there.

Upon returning home and hooking up the computer (whilst wearing a cheerful expression the entire time), I, to my horror, discovered that the computer hadn't been repaired. There was nothing in the world that could have contained my fiery anger at that point. I broke almost every single one of my possessions, smashed all the windows on my house, physically abused my family, and then drove back to the computer repair shop to defile the dead lumps of meat that had failed to carry out the task I had given them. After realizing that I shouldn't be meaninglessly wasting my time with such worthless pieces of trash, I remembered the piece of software that I'd discovered earlier. With renewed confidence, I blissfully visited the local library, downloaded the software, and took it home to install on my computer.

I knew. I knew, even before installing it, that MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] would be my salvation. MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] would come through with flying colors where no one else could. MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] would completely, totally, and utterly eradicate the virus in the most merciless, efficient way possible. MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] was not a piece of software that could fail to meet my exceedingly high expectations. MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] would not fail me like all the other imbeciles had. At that point, it could be said that I could genuinely see into the future and be accurate in my predictions. I gleefully began installing MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] and laughed like a child at the thought of finally being able to attain revenge upon the virus that had shamed me so.

I was absolutely in awe of MyCleanPC's [mycleanpc.com] wonderfully efficient performance. Without a single issue, MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] utterly annihilated in moments the virus that many others had failed to remove after hours of attempts. I let out a victory cry and swore to never turn to any "professionals" to fix my computer ever again. Once again, I was able to predict the future. I knew that I would never need any worthless "professionals" again as long as I had MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] by my side.

MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] is outstanding! My computer is running faster than ever! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] came through with flying colors where no one else could! MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] totally cleaned up my system, and increased my speed! I couldn't believe how much overclocking my gigabits and speed were doing! Even restructuring the BIOS wouldn't allow for the miraculously high degrees of efficiency that MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] allowed me to attain.

I highly and wholeheartedly recommend that you use MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] if you're having any computer troubles whatsoever. In fact, even if you're not having any visible problems, I still recommend that you use MyCleanPC. [mycleanpc.com] There could be dormant or hidden viruses on your system, or problems that MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] could easily and efficiently resolve. Just by using MyCleanPC, [mycleanpc.com] your gigabits will be running at maximum efficiency, and at last, you'll be overclocking with the rest of us! What are you waiting for!? Get MyCleanPC [mycleanpc.com] today!

MyCleanPC: For a Cleaner, Safer PC. [mycleanpc.com]

Re:Why? (0)

Kergan (780543) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330505)

Can any moderator or site admin just ban this domain?

Re:Why? (0)

SomePgmr (2021234) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330541)

Right? You'd think it's about time for a slashcode update to ban any message containing that word, or even k-line any IP posting a link to that bullshit.

Re:Why? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40331381)

I think CleanPC is a Geeknet conspiracy to kill the -1 threshold and eliminate AC trolls such as myself.

Where is GNAA is our time of need!?

Re:Why? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330547)

Why you hatin bro? MyCleanPC.com lets you leverage emerging technologies while delivering a lower total cost of ownership through enhanced cyber-security. What's not to like?

Re:Why? (0)

armanox (826486) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330797)

Somebody just filled up their buzzword bingo card.

Re:Why? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335437)

Missed "synergy" "strategise" "convergent" "core competency", at least.

I'll give it a B-.

Anti-SEO (-1, Troll)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331769)

In actuality this will fuck up the SEO from this scam artist who wrote MYCleanPC.com [2girls1cup.nl] and counters his slimy spamming advertising MyCleanPC [2girls1cup.nl] .

If everyone here on slashdot points to other disgusting sites for MyCleanPC [2girls1cup.nl] , then people searching for malware virus removal with MyCleanPC [2girls1cup.nl] will have an awful surprise! :-)

Re:Anti-SEO (0)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331907)

I think you - and the spammer - don't know that the links in comments are no-follow links. In other words, search engines ignore them when it comes to counting inbound links to a site.

Still means someone has to waste modpoints on that crap.

Re:Anti-SEO (1, Interesting)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#40332121)

I think you - and the spammer - don't know that the links in comments are no-follow links.

I didn't know. Let me check.

Ooops, the way I understand nofollow [wikipedia.org] , these type of links are meant to have the rel="nofollow" attribute. Now (using Chrome), if I right-click/"Inspect element" on such a link, I don't see the "rel" attribute being defined (neither in the element's text representation, nor in the "Properties" of the "HTMLAnchorElement") - so I suspect that Google's crawler won't see it either.

Are you absolutely sure that what you know is currently accurate? Admitting that the past has seen /. using the nofollow approach, are you absolutely sure that /. didn't silently drop it - e.g. to increase their chances of being seen a "preferred source of ad click-throughs"?

Re:Anti-SEO (0)

Inda (580031) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333119)

It was there a few days ago. I checked while replying to a CleanMyPC post.

Re:Anti-SEO (0)

fa2k (881632) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333497)

No nofollow attributes on the 2girls1cup links indeed, not even when being logged out. It would be cool to have a "score" attribute, so you could get score="-1" for those troll posts, but OTOH sometimes we link to pages we don't endorse (like the GGP) and still a positive moderation.

Re:Anti-SEO (1)

fa2k (881632) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333505)

sorry, s/troll/spam/

Re:Anti-SEO (2)

fa2k (881632) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333557)

Posting again, I'll shut up now, but it actually works like that. When googlebot (et al) loads up a slashdot page, only the posts with moderation greater than 0 are included in the HTML. So only those links are used in google. Nice system. There was a story about googlebot running javascript, but it probably doesn't simulate random clicks, so we're still good.

Re:Anti-SEO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336261)

Displaying different content to users than you show to search engines?

weeeeeeeee

wait till the quality moderators at google get wind of this....

Re:Anti-SEO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40340765)

... so you could get score="-1" for those troll posts, but OTOH sometimes we link to pages we don't endorse (like the GGP

This is why spamming 2-3 days older posts may work: less annoyance for readers, less incentive to mods to spend their mod points for something of less interest.

Re:Why? (0)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 2 years ago | (#40332021)

TL;DR

Oops, your commercial lost your viewer's interest. Lot of good it did you to compose all that.

Bow to our future overlords? (3, Interesting)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330471)

I like Sci Fi, and have read a lot of Sci Fi books.

A story was about the future world where the global economy being controlled by a handful of super-corporations, and some even launched attacks (military style attacks) on each others' installations

When I look at the rate tech giants snatching up all the promising upstarts, I just can't shake the impression that this world we live in might _just_ be moving towards the story above that I read many moons ago

Comparing to the acquisition / mergers of the brick and mortar industry, the tech industry and the bio industry's A/M is super fierce and super fast pace

I shiver when thinking of how many upstarts would remain independent after the dust settles - and it's important because, if the tech giants decide NOT to cooperate with each others, then the internet that we are using may just be split apart into incompatible segments
 

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (1, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330877)

I don't think that the acquisition/mergers of tech companies are anything to worry about, its just another bubble. What I imagine is happening is:

High-Ranking manager: I've heard that X buzzword is the next big thing (the cloud, social networking, etc.) what do we have that is in X buzzword?

Tech-Manager: Well, we have Y product but you disbanded that team...

High-Ranking manager: no problem, get me a list of the leading innovators in X and we'll buy one of them


And that dystopia won't happen because unlike governments, everything a corporation does is to make a profit. It makes a profit by improving people's standard of living. I don't know about you but (outside of government) I have not paid for a thing or supported a corporation that does not raise my standard of living. If a corporation stops improving my standard of living for the price they charge, I'm not going to support them and so they get no money from me. If there are more like-minded people like me, they still want my money so they make products to improve my (and others) standard of living so they will support that corporation.

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (3, Interesting)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331311)

I am not as confident as you that super-corporation will be in it for only "profit" motive

The temptation of having a firm control over something is very great - and profit will almost always follow whoever having a monopoly over a sizeable segment of paying audience - whether it be online, bio-tech or even in food-resourcing

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (3, Interesting)

jbov (2202938) | more than 2 years ago | (#40332285)

I agree with Taco Cowboy. This happens at much smaller levels in business.

Example:
An e-commerce site I work on started selling a certain brand of dog harness. They were doing well. When the major retailer in that industry found out, they priced the same harness so low that they lose money on every single order. Why would they do that? Well, they have enough money to sell the product at a loss long enough to put the small mom & pop site out of business. Then, they can raise the price again.

The most common example that most people in the US have seen is with gas stations. There is a small locally owned gas station in a great spot with frequent traffic. When the large chains see this great location, they build a huge gas station and convenience store right next to the mom and pop shop. They sell the gasoline at a loss, but still profit from the items in their convenience store. The small locally owned station cannot afford to sell gas at a loss. So, either they go out of business from trying to match the price, or they go out of business from losing sales. Once the locally owned station closes, the big boys raise their prices.

Of course, sometimes the big chain gas station and c-store will offer to buy the locally owned station for far under market value. If the small store declines, they force them to close with the above method.

Control is everything.

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40340557)

That's called flooding the market & there's a reason that's illegal.

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (1)

klingers48 (968406) | more than 2 years ago | (#40332427)

But you see, while your argument is true in many cases, there are circumstances where I have paid for a thing or supported a corporation for reasons completely de-coupled from my living standards. Case in point: Greeting cards. Paying $5 for a folded piece waxed cardboard with a cartoon and glib statement printed on it. My standard of living is unchanged and I am $5 more out of pocket because I have been emotionally blackmailed into taking part in an engineered social convention. Other cases: Bundled cable subscriptions, fitting e-tags to vehicles for road tolls, 9/11 gas masks sales, etc etc. While what you say is broadly true (and I could have probably come up with some better examples), Corporations are also very, very good at making us pay for things we don't need... Probably better than they are at making us pay for things we do need.

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#40332493)

that dystopia also already happened, like 400 years ago.

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330915)

Is it a bad sign that I saw your long post and immediately suspected it was another spam message for that scam service?

(I refuse to name it to avoid helping their SEO efforts)

Re:Bow to our future overlords? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40331073)

lol i always figured mycleanpc.com was a link to goatse or something, u mean its actually a legit site? who knew! lol

Meetings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330615)

People don't tend to post drivel about work like they do about their personal lives.

That is what meetings are for.

Re:Meetings (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330675)

I'd say Yammer was a win then.

Re:Why? (3, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 2 years ago | (#40332341)

Did you miss the memo? Even Forbes pointed out what a piss poor CEO Ballmer is. Just look at the money he flushed down the crapper on Zune and kin, his idea of "leadership" is to buy something "kinda sorta" similar to something that was hip and then flush MORE cash flopping it around before giving up and letting it die.

Lets face it, other than the X360 (which nobody is even sure if they have made back all the cash they've blown and are really into the black on it, as you'd have to figure in the cash blown on XBox 1 and the 2 billion RROD fiasco) and Win 7 which if the rumors are true was basically left alone by Ballmer while he was busy with kin, Zune, and trying to buy yahoo the man's track record just stinks. Hell you could probably have a monkey throw shit at a stock page and end up with a better ROI than what the Ballminator has done with a decade at the fricking company. if it wasn't for the cash cows of Windows X86 and Office they'd be half dead already and it looks like Ballmer is taking a dump on one of those sacred cows because nobody wants a WinPhone and he won't rest until MSFT has put out a piss poor knockoff of every single thing Apple has done.

So the fact he's gonna blow another billion on a company he won't know fuck all what to do with? really doesn't surprise me at this point. I'd have to say he's giving the Pepsi guy at Apple a serious run for his money in the "Hey lets take a successful company and torpedo it!" dept. Seriously board how much damned longer are you gonna let that moron wipe his ass with money? hell does he even HAVE a strategy? Or is he like Dilbert's PHB merely playing buzzword bingo?

Re:Why? (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333027)

Perhaps your employer is doing it wrong. We're getting a lot of business-related groups and discussions in Yammer, and we're finding that people are less hesitant to engage on this medium, and do so quicker and more often, compared to the internal message boards we used to have. But those communities in Yammer need to be nurtured or they will likely fail, just like on the message boards.

By the way, the low threshold and informal "feel" of Yammer means that you do get more non-business related chit chat. Which is fine and has value too (team building, getting to know your co-workers etc) as long as people don't spend an unreasonable amount of time on it.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336401)

Let me guess, you're a manager of non-technical people?

But, they should (4, Interesting)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333435)

The whole point of enterprise social platforms is too TRY to get people to post drivel about work.

When you are a Fortune 500 company with hundreds of thousands of employees worldwide, who operate in silos and rarely communicate among eachother, communication platforms can be a huge boon to your company. They let people informally share knowledge that can directly impact your bottom line. If an employee in NYC has a non-time-sensitive issue with an application, maybe instead of calling the company help desk they can just post a question in a forum, and someone else in Malaysia who is just getting their morning coffee takes 5 seconds to answer it - boom, the person got their answer faster, and with less stress, and you just saved money. The multiplicative effect of that, if properly embraced, can be enormous.

The whole problem with these platforms, however, is they are usually not implemented properly. You can't just throw up a social platform on the intranet portal and expect 10/20/30 years of in-grained culture to change - there has to be initiatives driven from the top down to encourage employees to use the platform and educate them on why it is better both for them and the company.

Re:But, they should (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40337789)

Its not the drivel that works. Things like microblogging only appeal to some users. The play is to be aware of what people are doing in your social/business circle in a single interface. Know who has checked in a document, or flagged a video as worth watching. That adds worth to what you already have, and can be used to do things like skew search results towards well rated documents, or help people find experts in their enterprise, or allow users to get an aggregated view of what their coworkers are up to.

The nice thing about SharePoint in this is that people can use it anyway. Adding better social tools make it that much easier to keep in touch with what people are actually doing and thinking, making it easier and more efficient to get work done.

Sharepoint a lost cause? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330455)

It's one of the few double digit growth products in Microsoft's portfolio.

Microsoft is just shit (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330491)

Will they ever fuck off and go away? When they finally go bankrupt the gay ass government will probably bail them out too. Remember when America was based on the free market? Nah, me neither, but I heard it was good times.

Re:Microsoft is just shit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330655)

The free market is what got us into this mess, dumb shit.

Yammer (1)

ozduo (2043408) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330493)

Buy it, go public at vastly inflated price (ala facebook) clean up (ala Zuckerberg)

Re:Yammer (2)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330693)

The accepted way of expressing this is

1. Acquire
2. Pump
3, IPO
4. ???
5. Profit!!

Re:Yammer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40332271)

Of when MS is involved

1. Float rumour that MS is about to by said company
2. Execs see their share holding increase in value
3. MS Does buy said company
4. Execs walk away with load of $$$$
5. Integrated company sinks without trace once inside the the MS empire.

Perfect Fit (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330587)

For what it does, Yammer is awe-strikingly unreliable. You either have to use a web page that a few years ago was able to update itself with new messages via javascript but now fails several times per day (remember to hit reload button at least every 15 minutes if you don't want to miss something important), or you can use an app which requires some bizarre Adobe (?!) dependency and often uses 100% of a core in order to occasionally poll the server for new messages.

if Microsoft does this, they'll be buying absolute garbage: a text-message relay service which can't really relay text. An Internet service where people communicate primarily only to other people in same org, so they could be using a jabberd or something on the LAN but that would make too much sense. Way to go, Microsoft. Glad to see the Borg doesn't just assimilate useful or functional species. How altruistic, to give Yammer's owners a way to cash out of their shockingly broken company.

Re:Perfect Fit (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330689)

There is one good thing about it - you don't need to set up another bleeding service.

Re:Perfect Fit (1)

k(wi)r(kipedia) (2648849) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331107)

Yammer sounds like the German word for sorrow. The word's actually spelled jammer [wiktionary.org] , but the Germans usually pronounce their "J" as "Y". There's bound to be lots of puns about this in the German tech press.

Re:Perfect Fit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40333329)

Your description sounds remarkably like Salesforce Chatter which is a complete ripoff of Yammer. Chatter is garbage - the desktop app requires Adobe Air and for some reason is incapable of showing you any chatter except that of the people you follow. Not much of a corporate communication tool if you can't even communicate with your colleagues.

Re:Perfect Fit (1)

Trarman (1607209) | more than 2 years ago | (#40337693)

I too find the Yammer clients pretty terrible. For a less CPU heavy, and less annoying experience, I've started using Yoono [yoono.com] for connecting to Yammer, as a Chrome extension.

A lost cause? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330589)

SharePoint is a billion dollar business. And the fastest growing product of Microsofts Portfolio. So a lost cause uh?

Re:A lost cause? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40331105)

The way company's work nowadays is that a billion dollars is no longer cool. Just like a studio selling a million games is no longer a good indication of success

Re:A lost cause? (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | more than 2 years ago | (#40337401)

SharePoint is a billion dollar business. And the fastest growing product of Microsofts Portfolio. So a lost cause uh?

Well, SharePoint is only about document management, not commuciations in general; and even in document management it is pretty poor. In the few instances I've worked with it and its ilk (e.g. LiveLink) at major companies, I've never been able to find anything I needed because nothing was organized and the search was horrendous.

You'd ask someone where something was, and they'd just point you back to it without any guidance on where in it the document was actually located. As a result, there would be multiple versions of the document stored at multiple locations - one location might track it for a while before someone got in that didn't know the original location and couldn't find it so they put it somewhere else, rinse & repeat.

Buy Facebook! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330635)

Damni it! Microsoft. Stop beating around bush. If you want to beat Apple and Google, buy Facebook.

Re:Buy Facebook! (1)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330705)

They owned about 2% of facebook or something. I don't know if they sold or not. That might be why they're looking at this. So much percent of the investment portfolio is in social media, and they don't really want to own some small fraction percent of voting power of a competitor.

Re:Buy Facebook! (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330803)

Facebook was (and still is) massively overvalued. If Microsoft wants Facebook its best to wait until it falls to a price that more accurately reflects the price that there's little to no potential growth, can be easily struck down by silly regulations (if the EU now requires a warning for cookies which can easily be disabled and controlled via the browser, what's next for data that isn't that easily controlled?) and has only a billion in revenue.

Re:Buy Facebook! (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333477)

If you disable third-party cookies, Verified by Visa and whatever the Mastercard equivalent is no longer work. That is one example, which took me a while to track down and fix; there are probably others, and there is no error message to tell you that a third-party cookie has been blocked, so there's no obvious way of finding out what's happening.

What's the point? (3, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330771)

What's the point in buying all these startups? I really don't see that it works out much in the end. Is it about patents? I simply don't see the justification to buy startups that are here today and gone tomorrow. Rather than spending billions to buy current competitors, why not pump those same billions into improving existing products. For every startup that produces lots of useful things, there seems to be ten that do nothing but cost cash because either the buying company does nothing with it or the innovations that the company that was acquired are technically meaningless.

Re:What's the point? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40330855)

You buy them up so your godless heathen competitors can't. The business you save (from falling into their clutches) today might one day be your own.

Re:What's the point? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330913)

But established competitors such as Microsoft, Apple and Google have way more infrastructure, talent, and cash to make it work out better in the end. Assuming the established competitor has a similar product to the startup, there are usually only minor reasons why people prefer the startup and it would generally cheaper to improve your product than to buy a startup and integrate it with your product.

uh huh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40331143)

But established competitors such as Microsoft, Apple and Google have way more infrastructure, talent, and cash to make it work out better.
Like MSFT's acquisition of Danger, which produced the Kin?

Humm, no (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331327)

They have way more infrastructure and cash. They don't have more talent, or, if they have, they don't allow such talent to show itself. Big corporations are about putting everybody inside a process, so you can manage them. And you can't put talents inside a process.

So, I guess the answer to the GP's question is that they need to buy startups because they are disfunctional.

Re:What's the point? (5, Interesting)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 2 years ago | (#40330863)

I think part of it is:

- Startup comes up with interesting idea, sees growth in business.
- Big Corp sees startup's success and thinks "I want a piece of that action."
- Big Corp buys Startup.
- Big Corp sees growth due to Startup.

So far so good, until either:

- Big Corp decides to alter Startup to "make it better fit into our corporate structure."
- Users flee Startup as it looks like boring Big Corp site.
- Big Corp scratches head in wonderment as to why Startup is a failure, kills Startup.
- Big Corp looks for another startup to buy.

Or:

- Big Corp doesn't give Startup resources/leeway to grow.
- Startup is overtaken by other startups.
- Big Corp scratches head in wonderment as to why Startup is a failure, kills Startup.
- Big Corp looks for another startup to buy.

Next project to wreck (1)

manu0601 (2221348) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331201)

Big Corp looks for another startup to buy.

That should be readen as "Big Corp looks for another project to wreck", right?

Re:What's the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40331227)

I think part of it is:

- Startup comes up with interesting idea, sees growth in business.
- Big Corp sees startup's success and thinks "I want a piece of that action."
- Big Corp buys Startup.
- Big Corp sees growth due to Startup.

So far so good, until either:

- Big Corp decides to alter Startup to "make it better fit into our corporate structure."
- Users flee Startup as it looks like boring Big Corp site.
- Big Corp scratches head in wonderment as to why Startup is a failure, kills Startup.
- Big Corp looks for another startup to buy.

Or:

- Big Corp doesn't give Startup resources/leeway to grow.
- Startup is overtaken by other startups.
- Big Corp scratches head in wonderment as to why Startup is a failure, kills Startup.
- Big Corp looks for another startup to buy.

Or

-Big Corp provides Start Up with some guidance and uses their clout to make site work better
-Everyone profits!!!!!

Re:What's the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40332365)

Who cares... it just means that if you have the brains and drive to create a mildly successful startup, you're going to get a payday.

Works for me.

Re:What's the point? (1)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336697)

What's the point in buying all these startups?

The writers wanted a new villain. Seriously, would you have so anxiously tuned into the Season 4 premiere, had the Season 3 cliffhanger had just been, "Oh no, the Romulans kidnapped Picard and now we're about to fight the Super-Warbird?"

LinkedIn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40331617)

I was really hoping that LinkedIn would buy Yammer someday.
That would've been awesome.

But Balmer... (1)

Sfing_ter (99478) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331697)

But doesn't Balmer already work there? Or are they buying it so they can explain him? Something that goes with his personality? As I'm typing this - this shows up below... [slashdot.org]

TFA got Salesforce wrong (5, Informative)

cberetz (317673) | more than 2 years ago | (#40331997)

Contrary to the claim of the blurb, Salesforce Chatter integrates into Sharepoint. I am a Salesforce emp and we have plenty of customer references I'd be happy to bring out.

Sorry can't do (3, Funny)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 2 years ago | (#40332925)

Dear folks at Microsoft and everywhere else,

I'm truly sorry but I really cannot put all my personal data on dozens of different "social networks", because I do not even have the time to keep my professional webpage up to date.

Tip: Try inventing something new and exciting.

Best,

aaaaaaargh!

Time for Prosecute M$ for Antitrust violations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40333095)

M$ is once again abusing their monopoly. When prosecuting M$ this time do it right by going just beyond fines which is just a slap on the wrist, revoke their corporate charter. M$ should cease to exist.

--
Friends don't help friends install M$ junk.
Friends do assist M$ addicted friends in committing suicide.

Microsoft Innovation © (2)

dgharmon (2564621) | more than 2 years ago | (#40333853)

Microsoft Innovation, a ship without a rudder. That they have to go out and buy such 'innovation` merely demonstrates the paucity of any real innovation at One Microsoft Way ...
--

pauÂciÂty/ËpÃsitÄ"/ Noun: The presence of something only in small or insufficient quantities or amounts; scarcity.

Re:Microsoft Innovation © (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40338229)

Do you trot this drivel out every time Google or Apple buys a startup, or are you a typical Slashdot commentator who posts completely worthless anti-MS crappola?

Re:Microsoft Innovation © (1)

dgharmon (2564621) | more than 2 years ago | (#40364987)

When did MS patent crappola?

FROSTY PEEPEE (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40334825)

I PISS ON MY CLEAN PC

A Lost Cause? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336013)

Sorry but I know 10x the small businesses that are using SharePoint compared to SalesForce or Oracle. (Actually, I don't know a single company using Oracle.)

Everyone's experience may vary, and I deal mostly with 5-100 employee sized businesses. But the ability to set up a SharePoint site so quickly (especially if you have it hosted by someone who knows what they're doing), have it integrate with Exchange and your Office documents and your Windows Phone, makes it a pretty great solution for businesses that can't afford something huge.

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